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Methane On Mars May Indicate Living Planet

timothy posted more than 5 years ago | from the or-a-big-bean-dinner dept.

Mars 200

Riding with Robots writes "NASA is announcing today that the definitive detection of methane in the Martian atmosphere means the planet is still alive, at least geologically, and perhaps even biologically. 'Methane is quickly destroyed in the Martian atmosphere in a variety of ways, so our discovery of substantial plumes of methane in the northern hemisphere of Mars indicates some ongoing process is releasing the gas,' said one agency scientist. The gas was detected with observations made over over several Martian years with NASA telescopes at Mauna Kea, Hawaii. Both biological and geological processes could explain the methane."

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Ninnle Linux used on the probe! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26472343)

This detection of possible, or at least strong evidence for, life on Mars could not have been possible if not for the intricate work on the probe software by none other than Ninnle Labs.

Re:Ninnle Linux used on the probe! (-1, Troll)

pandrijeczko (588093) | more than 5 years ago | (#26472559)

Based on the fact that "ninnie" is a Spanish word for "girl", so how did they ever decide what colour the Linux kernel should be, let alone cram it into a space probe?

Your mother thinks Bush is just dandy! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26472611)

Yer one o' them "transgender" jobbies, ain't you?

Apple Computers, The Homosexual's Favorite (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26472349)

It's funny that I had only recently been thinking and praying about these queerest of computers. It certainly is true that Apple computers are very popular amongst the homosexual communities, the fact that these computers are so popular indicates the depths to which our great nation has sunk to.

The Apple corporation logo is naturally an apple with a bite taken out of it. Is it not a coincidence that Eve tempted Adam with an Apple? The apple is a symbol of defiance against God, and was an obvious choice for a company whose primary objectives include the liberalisation of all media, and which activly finances the political party that hates God.

When I first saw an apple computer (called a Mac, after the popular fast food product) with it's "fruity" design, I had assumed that it was some kind of obsolete product aimed at latte sipping east-coast homosexual designers. This initial observation turned out to be only half true:

The apple computers are not as obsolete as their gaudy designs suggest - the Apple computer company, based in that Sodomite Central, Cupertino CA, have invested a great deal of money in keeping up with more mainstream American PC brands like Dell or IBM, however rather than compete on computing power, practicality or ease of use the Apple company prefer to emphasize "eye-candy". If you are the sort of person who loves nothing more than gazing for hours at an aquarium full of brightly colored fish, then the feeling of using an Apple desktop will be most familiar.

Note the oddly-shaped apple-mouse. Unike modern computer mice, the Apple product has only one button. This is because historically Apple computer failed to license the patent for including buttons on mice. Since most apple computers are used as children's toys, their homosexual owners have barely noticed this deficiency, they are too busy thinking about sodomy worry about their computer's obvious deficiencies.

Windows appear to swim around, distorting and melding into the "dock", with almost psychedellic fluidity. Parts of the desktop become inexplicably transparant, and then return to normal or else swirl into oblivion. Control over windows is achived not through familiar buttons (like Window's "X"), but candy colored blobs, which are designed to remind the user of "Extasy" tablets. I suspect that the Apple design team must have been doing more drugs than the average touring funk-band.

The Apple OSX platform is missing a large number of common and esential productivity tools commonly used on the Windows platform. For example the endearing BonziBuddy can only be found on Windows, and therefore will only run on a Mac that has been upgraded to Boot-Camp and Windows. I suspect that this is exactly what most Mac-owners will feel forced to do.

Naturally, the big question is, does the "alternative lifestyle" approach to computer design really pay-off for the people who count: The Users?

I think the answer is no. Having used computers all my life, I consider myself an expert in the day to day tasks of computing. The Microsoft Windows operating system makes installing, uninstalling, defragmenting, and removal of viruses and spyware trivially easy. It's a shame that the Apple company (who unbelievably are much praised for their interface design) had not thought to make these everyday tasks simpler.

As I have pointed out on a number of occasions both Linux and AppleMac fail to unclude a disk-defragmentor, a personal firewall, a standard method for installing or removing software or even a system repair utility. Microsoft introduced all of this in their epoch-making "Windows Me" edition. Linux users have had to get used to the lack of these essential productivity tools, however Linux is universally acknowledged as a cheap immitation of Windows. Mac on the other-hand is marketed as a full-price premium product.

Apple computers come preloaded with iTunes which only works with Apple's oddly-coloured iPod. The Apple Mac cannot run the more popular "Windows Media Player", and is therefore incompatible with Microsoft DRM or the wildly popular Microsoft Zune. This seems quite unfair to me, and is most probably an illegal monopoly.

Finally, we should also ask ourselves - is the Apple Mac good value for money? Superficially this may seem to be the case - Apple try to match price-points with Dell on a range of products, however the clues are in the small-print. All Dell products include the industry standard Windows Vista as standard. Dell ensure that each computer comes with an operating system, without which the computer could not function. Apple computers are still bundled with OSX, an attractive but aging operating system based on the very old UNIX, a technology developed by SCO group in the early 70s. This is the the same technology which Linux developers were recently accused of stealing.

Are apple aware of thier obvious limitations? We think they must be - A couple of years ago they released a product that most shrill-voiced liberal Apple pundits believed was impossible: It's called "Boot Camp" - a utility that upgrades any recent Apple computer to be compatible with the industry standard Microsoft Windows. Industry insiders now believe that this release heralds Apple Computer Corporation's exit from the software business. For once, I'd have to agree with Apple - this would be a sensible way to preserve shareholder value.

Apple computer make a big deal out of the claim that their absurdly lurid products are "Designed in California", however a close inspection reveals that just like Linux, they are made in the Republic of China. Christians and Patriots should rather invest in an IBM ThinkPad, which is both designed and made in the USA.

Customers should also consider the moral aspects of buying an Apple computer. One reason for the queerness of Apple's products is that the company's board of directors includes Albert Gore - yes, the same Al Gore whose doom and gloom environmental cassandra-complex is intended to distract America from it's real foes (the Islamofascists and Homosexuals). Apple has historically been a major backer of the Democratic party, and both Bill and Hillary Clinton, not to mention Osama Bin Laden are avid Apple Mac users.

The simple and sad fact is that if you buy a Mac or an iPod you are funding immorality. You are helping to finance the secularists who are ruining America.

It wasn't Me! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26472351)

The dog did it.

Re:It wasn't Me! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26472409)

He who smelt it ...

fart jokes anyone? (0)

u4ya (1248548) | more than 5 years ago | (#26472371)

maybe something about a space burrito would do well with this crowd

Re:fart jokes anyone? (4, Funny)

PsyciatricHelp (951182) | more than 5 years ago | (#26473323)

I bet Uranus has tons of Methane emmisions.

SBD (5, Funny)

Mud_Monster (715829) | more than 5 years ago | (#26472381)

Mars is farting, hehe.

Re:SBD (0, Troll)

Walt Dismal (534799) | more than 5 years ago | (#26472687)

President-Elect Obama's science advisor notes that this is strong evidence of Martian cows. "This is why we must launch a Mars mission soon. Because if even one Martian lights a match, the entire planet will blow up. It is our duty to stop this potential disaster, and also import Martian cheese made from Martian cow's milk. " Obama will ask Congress for $700 trillion dollars for this vital mission. NASA officials objected, saying "We cannot risk contamination of Earth cows' genetics from six-legged Martian cows."

Re:SBD (3, Funny)

smooth wombat (796938) | more than 5 years ago | (#26472879)

"We cannot risk contamination of Earth cows' genetics from six-legged Martian cows."

Oh come on! Everyone knows there are no cows are Mars. Mars has buggalo [polov8.co.uk] !

Re:SBD (1)

Hordeking (1237940) | more than 5 years ago | (#26473067)

President-Elect Obama's science advisor notes that this is strong evidence of Martian cows. "This is why we must launch a Mars mission soon. Because if even one Martian lights a match, the entire planet will blow up. It is our duty to stop this potential disaster, and also import Martian cheese made from Martian cow's milk. " Obama will ask Congress for $700 trillion dollars for this vital mission. NASA officials objected, saying "We cannot risk contamination of Earth cows' genetics from six-legged Martian cows."

Obama's administration also pointed out that we have to do something to prevent global warming on Mars as a result of their cows. The proposed solution is to tax them per-head of cattle.

Re:SBD (2, Funny)

AragornSonOfArathorn (454526) | more than 5 years ago | (#26474133)

"We cannot risk contamination of Earth cows' genetics from six-legged Martian cows."

What about six-legged turkeys? They'd be great for Thanksgiving and John Madden would no longer have a monopoly on them.

Zero-Bama (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26474905)

You can't make fun of President-Elect Zero-Bama! He is The One! The One We've Been Waiting For! Yes We Can!!!

ha (4, Funny)

liquidpele (663430) | more than 5 years ago | (#26472389)

Sounds like what we think is the Northern end is really the southern end.

Re:ha (1)

F3V0H1B (1313103) | more than 5 years ago | (#26475119)

I hope Martians don't take up smoking.

*insert martian fart joke here* (0)

Slutticus (1237534) | more than 5 years ago | (#26472413)

:D

Re:*insert martian fart joke here* (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26472751)

OK, but I don't really care about Methane on Mars. I'm REALLY worried about Methane from Uranus.
There... is that the joke you were expecting?

Martian Global Warming (1, Funny)

stevedmc (1065590) | more than 5 years ago | (#26472481)

I think I heard somewhere that methane gas contributes to Global Warming. If Mars is going through Global Warming shouldn't it be renamed to Solar, or even Universal, Warming?

Re:Martian Global Warming (2, Funny)

alta (1263) | more than 5 years ago | (#26472621)

:) Obviously we caused Marsian warming. Or at least us conservatives did it. Do you know how much fossil fuels it takes to get from here to there.

Re:Martian Global Warming (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26473343)

Nah, it's the wrath of God. Punishment against us liberals and our secular science. :)

Re:Martian Global Warming (1, Redundant)

mhall119 (1035984) | more than 5 years ago | (#26472729)

Mars isn't going through Global Warming, it just has methane in it's atmosphere.

Re:Martian Global Warming (1)

mhall119 (1035984) | more than 5 years ago | (#26472759)

As an aside, though, global warming on Mars would actually be a good thing for human habitation. Now if only we could figure out to to create and contain an atmosphere.

Re:Martian Global Warming (1)

morgan_greywolf (835522) | more than 5 years ago | (#26473061)

So what you're saying is we need to genetically engineer an "Anti-Al Gore" and send him to Mars?

Say, it's January 15, right? So what's W doing in 5 days?

Re:Martian Global Warming (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26473219)

Say, it's January 15, right? So what's W doing in 5 days?

Getting indicted I hope.

Re:Martian Global Warming (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26474419)

Actually, it has been news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2007/02/070228-mars-warming.html
. It is one of the counter arguments to human caused global warming...that it is solar and not the result of green house gases.

Re:Martian Global Warming (1)

mhall119 (1035984) | more than 5 years ago | (#26474895)

Mar has experienced regional warming, but is not experiencing a global warming trend.

Re:Martian Global Warming (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26473113)

There is no global warming you DOLT, it's global COOLING.
yeah, no @#%X! shit. The has nothing to do with it.

 

Re:Martian Global Warming (2, Interesting)

Hordeking (1237940) | more than 5 years ago | (#26473115)

I think I heard somewhere that methane gas contributes to Global Warming. If Mars is going through Global Warming shouldn't it be renamed to Solar, or even Universal, Warming?

No. Global refers to the local planet in context. As for universal warming, fat chance of that. Given the universe's expansion and the laws of thermodynamics, the universe will eventually cool to somewhere around 0K (but probably not exactly at 0K, due to quantum vaccuum energy) See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heat_death_of_the_universe [wikipedia.org]

Any Space Probes Nearby (1)

warewolfsmith (196722) | more than 5 years ago | (#26472497)

Hmmm, I wonder if there are any space probes nearby, lets spend a trillion dollars to find the bug only to discover its one of ours we seeded there. Oh dear the technician had oral thrush.

Greenhouse gas! That stuff is worse than CO2 ... (5, Funny)

NotBornYesterday (1093817) | more than 5 years ago | (#26472549)

They'll destroy their environment! If they don't slap some limits on those gas emissions, or come up with a workable credit-trading plan, they'll end up with a dry, dusty, desert planet in no time!

Re:Greenhouse gas! That stuff is worse than CO2 .. (2, Informative)

mhall119 (1035984) | more than 5 years ago | (#26472789)

It's not worse than CO2, because it decays relatively quickly in the atmosphere. That's why this find is significant, it means the methane hasn't been in the atmosphere that long, which means there's still an active process on Mars that's putting it there.

Re:Greenhouse gas! That stuff is worse than CO2 .. (3, Funny)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 5 years ago | (#26472867)

there's still an active process on Mars that's putting it there

Oh, that's just James. He had beans for lunch again.

Re:Greenhouse gas! That stuff is worse than CO2 .. (3, Interesting)

MBGMorden (803437) | more than 5 years ago | (#26473201)

I think we need a qualifier for "relatively quickly" and "that long" when talking about geologic timescales. When dealing with this sort of thing "relatively quickly" could mean anything from a few months to several million years.

Re:Greenhouse gas! That stuff is worse than CO2 .. (1)

mhall119 (1035984) | more than 5 years ago | (#26474819)

And here I thought that "relatively" was a qualifier.

Yes there could be Life on Mars or... (1)

SupremoMan (912191) | more than 5 years ago | (#26472561)

we don't know all the ways in which methane can be produced. Now which is more likely?

Re:Yes there could be Life on Mars or... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26472721)

RTFSummary - "Both biological and geological processes could explain the methane."

By not reading the summary, you've made a false dichotomy. I hope you're ashamed of yourself.

Re:Yes there could be Life on Mars or... (1)

moderatorrater (1095745) | more than 5 years ago | (#26473367)

Geological, but they would be remiss not to mention all the possibilities they know about.

Let's take that seriously for a moment (5, Insightful)

Kupfernigk (1190345) | more than 5 years ago | (#26473433)

We've only explored one planet seriously, and looked at a tiny bit of a moon with extreme temperature variation. Almost everywhere we look on the planet - water, air, surface, crevices in rocks - we find lots of living things and the remains of even more. We find things like thiobacter concretivorans chewing up nuclear reactors. We find complex features that arise through different biological routes - image forming eyes evolve separately at least twice. We find a variety of body plans. We find two different data storage systems, DNA and RNA. The evidence so far is that life appears all over the place and can inhabit moderately sever environments so long as it has a source of energy, an electrolyte, and some stuff around the place suitable for building molecules based on carbon backbones.

Putting aside some books written by people who thought the Earth was flat, the evidence to date is that where life is possible, there you find it. If you even half accept Popper's falsificationism, it is up to the people who believe that life doesn't appear wherever it is possible to prove that there is no life on Mars. People who believe that life on Mars is probable are actually just accepting that the cumulative evidence of experience is likely to be correct.

Re:Let's take that seriously for a moment (4, Insightful)

PapayaSF (721268) | more than 5 years ago | (#26474243)

I generally agree, but the Gaia hypothesis [wikipedia.org] says a trace amount of methane probably isn't evidence of life. Lovelock's argument regarding Mars was that if there was any life there, it would be easy to tell. The fact that extremophile life exists in niches on Earth doesn't really show that a small amount of extremophile life exists on Mars: over the eons it would have evolved, spread, and altered the Martian environment in ways easy to see. The theory doesn't rule out the possibility that there was once life on Mars that died out, though.

Re:Let's take that seriously for a moment (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26474413)

We've only explored one planet seriously, and looked at a tiny bit of a moon with extreme temperature variation. Almost everywhere we look on the planet - water, air, surface, crevices in rocks - we find lots of living things and the remains of even more. We find things like thiobacter concretivorans chewing up nuclear reactors. We find complex features that arise through different biological routes - image forming eyes evolve separately at least twice. We find a variety of body plans. We find two different data storage systems, DNA and RNA. The evidence so far is that life appears all over the place and can inhabit moderately sever environments so long as it has a source of energy, an electrolyte, and some stuff around the place suitable for building molecules based on carbon backbones.

Putting aside some books written by people who thought the Earth was flat, the evidence to date is that where life is possible, there you find it. If you even half accept Popper's falsificationism, it is up to the people who believe that life doesn't appear wherever it is possible to prove that there is no life on Mars. People who believe that life on Mars is probable are actually just accepting that the cumulative evidence of experience is likely to be correct.

Yes but I think it is the formation of life that is the issue, not where it is capable of living.

Re:Let's take that seriously for a moment (3, Informative)

Shimmer (3036) | more than 5 years ago | (#26475129)

You are confusing two different concepts. This should be an argument about the prevalence of abiogenesis (i.e. the creation of life from non-life), not the ability of life to adapt to harsh environments.

On the other hand, it could turn out that there is life on Mars that was carried there from Earth (e.g. via a chunk of rock that was ejected from Earth and landed on Mars). In that case, we're back to marveling at the resilience of our single tree of life.

Re:Yes there could be Life on Mars or... (2, Insightful)

pclminion (145572) | more than 5 years ago | (#26474981)

Science doesn't investigate only those things which seem "likely." If we operated that way we'd be nowhere by now.

Coming from a background of ignorance, how "likely" would you think it was that a lump of some rare metal could be made to explode with the force of thousands of tons of TNT?

Martian planetary defence system (4, Funny)

chebucto (992517) | more than 5 years ago | (#26472583)

So the martians weren't knocking out our probes because they thought we were attacking - they were just embarrassed about the smell. And to be honest, this revelation does lower my opinion of martians. I think a few eons of evolution might help to teach them some manners.

Re:Martian planetary defence system (5, Insightful)

Daniel Dvorkin (106857) | more than 5 years ago | (#26472779)

This joke and others like it would be a lot funnier if not for the fact that methane is odorless. It's not the methane you smell in farts, it's all the other stuff the gas picks up on its passage through, well, a tube full of shit.

Re:Martian planetary defence system (1)

Shakrai (717556) | more than 5 years ago | (#26472921)

a tube full of shit.

Is that why Ted Stevens never got those internets his staff sent to him?

Re:Martian planetary defence system (1)

Daniel Dvorkin (106857) | more than 5 years ago | (#26473039)

Exactly!

Re:Martian planetary defence system (1)

ColdZero (668801) | more than 5 years ago | (#26473815)

t-butyl mercaptan is added to methane so that you get the bad smell. That way you can smell it before an explosion happens. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Natural_gas [wikipedia.org]

Re:Martian planetary defence system (4, Informative)

domatic (1128127) | more than 5 years ago | (#26474077)

In particular, mercaptans, hydrogen sulfide, and other sulfur compounds are responsible for most the disagreeable oder of flatus.

Re:Martian planetary defence system (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26474291)

OMG! A slashdotter that doesn't get fart jokes!

Canals (1)

CarpetShark (865376) | more than 5 years ago | (#26475049)

What? You never suspected that the Martian canals were in fact open sewers?

Lovelock - Gaia hypothesis strong evidence against (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26472615)

over 40 years ago Lovelock pointed out that you can tell there is life on earth because the atmosphere is HUGELY out of chemical equilibrium.
And it is maintained that way due to life on earth.

He also argued that by the same reasoning, there ain't life on Mars.

I suspect this bit of disequilibrium is not enough
to indicate life.

Re:Lovelock - Gaia hypothesis strong evidence agai (2, Insightful)

moderatorrater (1095745) | more than 5 years ago | (#26473417)

I suspect that we don't know enough about how planets with atmospheres but no life behave to be able to determine if there were a chemical equilibrium or not. I also suspect that the people at NASA and most credible scientists believe that the chance of other life in our solar system is very small, but should be investigated anyway.

Lovelock - Gaia hypothesis strong evidence against (2, Insightful)

Locke2005 (849178) | more than 5 years ago | (#26473653)

I also suspect that the people at NASA and most credible scientists believe that the chance of other life in our solar system is very small, but should be investigated anyway.

Or perhaps it is just that the people at NASA have figured out that holding up the _possibility_ of other life in our solar system is their surest bet for justifying their continued employment? It is obviously a geologic process, but planetary science is boring... "little green men", on the other hand, is a subject that really gets the ignorant taxpayers excited.

Anyone care to explain? (1)

TubeSteak (669689) | more than 5 years ago | (#26472635)

"Methane is quickly destroyed in the Martian atmosphere in a variety of ways,

Like...? /talk to me nerdy

Re:Anyone care to explain? (1)

Sen.NullProcPntr (855073) | more than 5 years ago | (#26472787)

According to Wikipedia [wikipedia.org] (if you are prone to believe such things;-);

Methane in the atmosphere is eventually oxidized, producing carbon dioxide and water. As a result, methane in the atmosphere has a half life of seven years (if no methane were added, then every seven years, the amount of methane would halve).

Re:Anyone care to explain? (1)

bohemian72 (898284) | more than 5 years ago | (#26472881)

Ah! So as soon as all that new Martian methane hits all that Martian oxygen in the atmosphere . . . hang on a minute. Mars has cows AND plant life? :-)

Re:Anyone care to explain? (1)

Sen.NullProcPntr (855073) | more than 5 years ago | (#26473269)

Garrrrr! Good point;-)
So, what _is_ happening to all the methane?

Re:Anyone care to explain? (1)

SBacks (1286786) | more than 5 years ago | (#26474829)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atmosphere_of_Mars [wikipedia.org]

Mars does have an atmosphere, it's just very very thin (0.005 atm or 0.6kPa)

It is made up of about 0.13% Oxygen and 10.5 ppb Methane.

I think the Methane has plenty of Oxygen to interact with.

Pull my finger (1)

conureman (748753) | more than 5 years ago | (#26472713)

Next we'll hear about extracting this for fuel to propel our next-generation inter-galactic probes.

Re:Pull my finger (1)

flyingfsck (986395) | more than 5 years ago | (#26475189)

Methan and ethane is everywhere in our solar system. You can send a rocket ship to Titan, refuel and come back. The only problem is finding oxygen. If there was any free oxygen, Titan, Jupiter, Saturn and Uranus would have been burning fiercely.

It's comeing form the under grround citys there (2, Funny)

Joe The Dragon (967727) | more than 5 years ago | (#26472717)

It's coming form the under ground city's there.

Re:It's comeing form the under grround citys there (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26473071)

It's coming form the under ground city's there.

Um, no, that would be cities.

In this case, "city's" just demonstrates that you're illiterate.

Re:It's comeing form the under grround citys there (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26473429)

It's coming form the under ground city's there.

Um, no, that would be cities.

In this case, "city's" just demonstrates that you're illiterate.

Actually, no. He just left off the style information that would have let you know that "there" was a euphemism for... um... posterior.

"It's coming from the underground city's 'there'."

Of course, the fact he misspelled "from" (as "form") along with the fact that he apparently did not realize that "underground" is one word may somewhat weaken my position that he's not illiterate. Sorry, Joe.

Re:It's comeing form the under grround citys there (4, Funny)

Jeppe Salvesen (101622) | more than 5 years ago | (#26473301)

Bravo, you misspelt "cities" in two different ways! A good day for humankind indeed.

Re:It's comeing form the under grround citys there (2, Insightful)

Hillgiant (916436) | more than 5 years ago | (#26474331)

Yet he misspelled "from" consistently.

Re:It's comeing form the under grround citys there (1)

Fragasaurus (1432365) | more than 5 years ago | (#26475203)

You misspelled "misspelled." Or you just come from an inferior country!

Re:It's comeing form the under grround citys there (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26473727)

Well, maybe underground dorm rooms.

Re:It's comeing form the under grround citys there (1)

hendrix2k (1099161) | more than 5 years ago | (#26473773)

It's coming form the under ground city's there.

Hey, that's actually pretty good English for an underground-martian-city dweller!

Re:It's comeing form the under grround citys there (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26473879)

Its coming form OURS under ground city's there.

fixed it for you.

Re:It's comeing form the under grround citys there (1)

MBGMorden (803437) | more than 5 years ago | (#26474011)

And I just had a vision of Master-Blaster beneath to surface keeping the martians hard at work . . .

Re:It's comeing form the under grround citys there (0)

crabboy.com (771982) | more than 5 years ago | (#26475209)

Why would anyone mod parent up? It's one thing to be a Grammar Nazi, but quite another to post something that looks like your cat typed it...

Methane On Mars May Indicate Living Planet (2, Funny)

wallywam1 (715057) | more than 5 years ago | (#26472731)

Meth on Mars may indicate Martians who need to go to rehab.

Or another possibility (1)

No2Gates (239823) | more than 5 years ago | (#26472743)

There was at one time a LOT of cows on Mars.

Send in the drill (1)

kilodelta (843627) | more than 5 years ago | (#26472747)

Next mission to Mars should focus on that and should take along a drilling platform. May as well answer the question.

Re:Send in the drill (4, Funny)

lwsimon (724555) | more than 5 years ago | (#26474095)

Is the question "Is there oil on Mars?"

Methan On Mars INDICATES +1, Helpful (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26472753)

the WAR ON MARS for oil by BP, Chevron, Royal Dutch Shell, and so on and so forth.

Yours In Socialism,
Kilgore Trout

Mass Spec (2, Interesting)

jfp51 (64421) | more than 5 years ago | (#26472797)

Has any probe carried a mass spectrometer? If not that should be a high priority to find out which isotopes are being produced as well, would help answer the organic vs. volcanic question.

Methane on Mars, 2004 (5, Informative)

mbone (558574) | more than 5 years ago | (#26472803)

This was reported by Mars Express [esa.int] in 2004 [bbc.co.uk] .

Re:Methane on Mars, 2004 (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26472989)

Yeah, but that's the ESA and the BBC. This time it's an AMERICAN agency reporting on it, so it's newsworthy goddammit!

Re:Methane on Mars, 2004 (1)

usul294 (1163169) | more than 5 years ago | (#26474227)

There was a streaming video of a NASA panel talking to the media, and the thing here is that they have been able to see local concentrations. The ESA mission basically looked at the atmosphere on a full couple of orbits and integrated the results to be able to detect that somewhere there was methane. Now we have some concentrated areas, coincidentally where we think there might have been water...

Re:Methane on Mars, 2004 (5, Informative)

sighted (851500) | more than 5 years ago | (#26474281)

IANAS, but it appears that since these findings were obtained by a completely different process, they provide important confirmation of the Mars Express data--and extend that knowledge in an important way by adding location-specific information. From TFA: "According to the team, the plumes were seen over areas that show evidence of ancient ground ice or flowing water. For example, plumes appeared over northern hemisphere regions such as east of Arabia Terra, the Nili Fossae region, and the south-east quadrant of Syrtis Major, an ancient volcano 1,200 kilometers (about 745 miles) across."

Re:Methane on Mars, 2004 (1)

mbone (558574) | more than 5 years ago | (#26474893)

IANAS, but it appears that since these findings were obtained by a completely different process, they provide important confirmation of the Mars Express data-

Yes, more data is good, and seeing it from here is cool. I have no doubt whatsoever that the principal investigators understand all of this. The thing I don't like is how the actual details always seem to get ground up by the PR machinery and come out the other end as "discovers."

I believe that I have seen 4 or 5 "X discovers water on Mars," press releases in the last 10 years, for example.

Re:Methane on Mars, 2004 (1)

sighted (851500) | more than 5 years ago | (#26474969)

Yeah, no arguments. I knew about the Mars Express discovery, and I wish I had included it in the summary. Finding those location-specific 'plumes' also seems pretty important, though.

I've got a... (1)

quonsar (61695) | more than 5 years ago | (#26473011)

...geological process for ya!

Re:I've got a... (1)

gEvil (beta) (945888) | more than 5 years ago | (#26473609)

...geological process for ya!

Mmmm. Thrust and cleavage never went so well together.

Well, obviously (0, Offtopic)

techstar25 (556988) | more than 5 years ago | (#26473053)

Well, obviously whoever smelt' it dealt it.

Underground inhabitants (1)

TheDarkener (198348) | more than 5 years ago | (#26473139)

Who's to rule that possibility out?

On our own planet, even?

Both are good (4, Interesting)

WindBourne (631190) | more than 5 years ago | (#26473227)

If Mars is geologically active, then it may make geo-thermal power a very real possibility. At the same time, it gives heat for a station as well as greenhouse. If it is biological in nature, all the more interesting.

Not Mars! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26473283)

Hey, why are you loosing time with Mars? Venus is full of naked women!

Oblig. Futurama ref. (4, Funny)

slashdotmsiriv (922939) | more than 5 years ago | (#26473443)

"The gas was detected with observations made over several Martian years with NASA smeloscopes at Mauna Kea, Hawaii."

YOU FAIL IT... (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26474165)

numbers. The loss anD Its long term

Mars Rovers? (3, Interesting)

TheSync (5291) | more than 5 years ago | (#26474455)

Are any of the Mars Rovers near the methane plume sites?

Re:Mars Rovers? (1)

sighted (851500) | more than 5 years ago | (#26474735)

Doesn't look like it, no. But the Mars Science Laboratory [nasa.gov] rover mission, slated for launch in 2011, has not been assigned a final landing target yet.

Martians have telescopes? (1)

Eric Elliott (736554) | more than 5 years ago | (#26474861)

Martians with telescopes could smell my farts? Would I be famous Mars wide?

Methane is everywhere in the solar system (2, Informative)

flyingfsck (986395) | more than 5 years ago | (#26475131)

Our sun and solar system is a second generation system, made from the rubble of a previous star that went nova billions of years ago.

Jupiter, and Uranus have red spots that indicate Methane in their lower atmosphere. Some moons of Saturn have lakes and rivers of methane (Titan and Europa). That indicates that methane is older than the solar system and was created in the previous solar system that this one is made from.

Consequently, the presence of Methane doesn't say anything about the presence of life.

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