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Dutch Study Says Filesharing Has Positive Economic Effects

CmdrTaco posted more than 5 years ago | from the like-helping-kids-save-money-for-college dept.

Media 336

An anonymous reader writes "In a study conducted by TNO for the Dutch government the economic effects of filesharing are found to be positive. According to the 146 page report (available for download, but in Dutch) filesharing is good for the prosperity of the Dutch: with filesharing more media are available, even though this costs the media industry some profit. One of the most noticeable conclusions is that downloading and buying are not mutually exclusive: downloaders on average buy just as much music as non-downloaders, but they buy more DVDs and games then people who don't download. They also tend to visit more concerts and buy more merchandise."

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report available for download (5, Funny)

alxkit (941262) | more than 5 years ago | (#26516697)

...but where's the torrent?

Re: report available for download (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26516751)

In my ass, you cunt.

Re: report available for download (5, Insightful)

gravos (912628) | more than 5 years ago | (#26516915)

We should also point out the frequently cited possibility that downloaders' propensity to purchase is positively correlated with downloading (the so-called sampling effect). Google around for this and you will find at least 10 papers that discuss it.

Example: http://www.rufuspollock.org/economics/p2p_summary.html [rufuspollock.org]

Re: report available for download (4, Insightful)

aurispector (530273) | more than 5 years ago | (#26517765)

Music downloads are just a form of free advertising. Hell, people are falling all over themselves to write software to do it, set up websites to promote it and use them to get the music. The music industry doesn't have to do a thing. There's still a ton of money to be made on merchandising, touring, advertising, etc.. If only the music industry could just grasp this very basic point...

Re: report available for download (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26517159)

Maybe the editor could use P2P to download that missing "than". Oh... I see. I used "editor" when I should have said "!editor".

Steve Jobs plans "most unique" death ever (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26516705)

ANUS News
January 15, 2009

Steve Jobs plans "most unique" death ever
AIDS demise to have innovative interface

CUPERTINO, California (NNN) - Steve Jobs, the polymath CEO and star evangelist of Apple Computer, Inc., publically announced a medical leave of absence from the company, but in private promised "the best AIDS death ever" from the affliction no one will publically recognize he has.

As HIV-positive test results leaked onto the web from the last five years of Jobs' fight for health and secrecy, former lovers raced to the clinics on Segways looking for solace. Unflappable as always, Jobs vowed to make the best of the situation.

"There's AIDS deaths, and then there's AIDS deaths," Jobs said in his strident baritone with a slightly ironic lisp. "As with all Apple products, my demise from pneumonia brought on by full-blown AIDS will be poignant, witty, ironic, aesthetically pleasing and have an interface that breaks new ground for the industry."

Turning to a reporter he said, "That's off the record. Officially, my hormones are unbalanced because I did not care enough about Darfur." On the news of Jobs' leave, Apple stock plunged $7.38 as people feared the cool had left their Macs, but then rebounded by almost four points once rumors of HIV-death leaked.

"If Christ were to die today, he'd die of AIDS," said Jared Hvitles, who has owned four Macs, three iPods, an iPhone and a Steve Jobs Picking Up a Quarter blow-up doll. "He's going out like he's lived, as a Christ for the new millenium -- with a better interface."

About ANUS:

The American Nihilist Underground Society advocates nihilism, or a removal of interpretive layers from our perception of physical reality, as a means of transcending illusion. Nihilism denies value and purpose, which are byproducts of the human desire to judge reality and make a consensual "social reality" that by seizing on a single material factor misses the intelligible, or design-based, knowledge we need to adapt to reality. ANUS has been promoting nihilism since 1987.

http://www.anus.com/ [anus.com]

About Nihilism:

Nihilism is the belief that nothing we perceive has Absolute value; reality exists, but beyond its inherent meaning to us as the physical container of our existence, it has no significance outside of what we perceive. "The world is my representation," indeed. When we strip away all of the values projected onto physical reality and its outcomes, we are left only with personal ideal and natural ideal, and bringing the former into adaptation with the latter is the lifetime task to which nihilism is a gateway.

http://www.nihil.org/ [nihil.org]

Copyright © 1988-2009 mock Him productions [anus.com]

Re:Steve Jobs plans "most unique" death ever (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26516847)

So you gave Jobs AIDS?

Always the dutch .... (5, Interesting)

unity100 (970058) | more than 5 years ago | (#26516717)

since 15th century, dutch speaking countries (low countries) have led the world in modern and visionary concepts, in areas ranging from humanism to trade. erasmus, spinoza and more. and now this ....

a little big nation. kudos.

Re:Always the dutch .... (2, Informative)

3.5 stripes (578410) | more than 5 years ago | (#26516857)

They also were the worst colonizers (have a look at the dutch east indies corporation).

So, as I'm sure most dutch will tell you, they're far from perfect.

Re:Always the dutch .... (3, Informative)

daniorerio (1070048) | more than 5 years ago | (#26517141)

I'm not sure what you are referring at, but I'm quite sure the Dutch East Indies corporation was (largely) responsible for making the Netherlands one of the richest countries on earth (at that time) and initiating the Dutch "golden century". So define "worst" colonizers?

Honouring my Dutch blood, I couldn't agree more with the second part of your post :-)

Re:Always the dutch .... (2, Insightful)

Kokuyo (549451) | more than 5 years ago | (#26517207)

I believe he refers to what this colonizing has done to the colonies.

Re:Always the dutch .... (1)

Nerdfest (867930) | more than 5 years ago | (#26517221)

So define "worst" colonizers?

France?

Re:Always the dutch .... (1)

Gorshkov (932507) | more than 5 years ago | (#26517291)

So define "worst" colonizers?

The Belgians.

Re:Always the dutch .... (1)

Klaus_1250 (987230) | more than 5 years ago | (#26517361)

I'm not sure what you are referring at

We had a tendency to slaughter men, women and children to secure our overseas "possessions". You should have been taught that during history classes, I'm pretty sure it is (or was) mentioned in Dutch history books about that period.

Re:Always the dutch .... (1)

Ghost Hedgehog (814914) | more than 5 years ago | (#26517727)

It is probably mentioned in the same history books that other European countries did the same. So what is it that makes the Dutch the worst colonizers?
Except for the fact that we were expanding while the rest already stopped expanding and didn't grant independence after WO II. But in the earlier years we weren't worse then the rest of Europe.
The other European countries probably do not have clean reputations regarding the colonies.

Re:Always the dutch .... (1)

Culture20 (968837) | more than 5 years ago | (#26517705)

define "worst" colonizers

Doesn't Afrikaans derive from Dutch?

Re:Always the dutch .... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26517855)

Yes, though the grammer and pronunciation are way different. The most well known Dutch/Afrikaans word used to be Apartheid.

Re:Always the dutch .... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26517301)

They also were the worst colonizers

We were incredibly cruel and violent indeed. But whether or not we were the worst colonizers, is something I would leave open.

Re:Always the dutch .... (4, Funny)

Hognoxious (631665) | more than 5 years ago | (#26516925)

If only they'd learn to cook, they'd be perfect.

Re:Always the dutch .... (4, Funny)

jonaskoelker (922170) | more than 5 years ago | (#26517285)

If only they'd learn to cook

What are you talking about?

I once ordered coffee and cookies at some cafe or coffee shop or something. Man, those were some great cookies!

Re:Always the dutch .... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26517693)

Next time, you should check out the brownies; AWESOME!!

Translation (5, Informative)

mrvan (973822) | more than 5 years ago | (#26516997)

And to do something in return I'll give you my attempt at translating the interesting parts of the article (which is quite interesting). Note that the net effect on the content industry is still negative, and the net gain for Dutch prosperity is positive, this might be because quite a bit of the losses are outside the country. It can also be seen as a proof of the failure of the normal free market model to give an optimal allocation of resources in the case of near-zero marginal costs.

----

File sharing has positive net effect on economy

The economyic effects of file sharing on Dutch prosperity on long and short term are positive. Consumers obtain access to a wide range of cultural products due to file sharing. On the other hand it is likely that there is a decrease of turnover in the sales.

This was shown by a joint study of TNO, SEO Economic Research, and the Institute for Information Rights (IViR) into the economic and social consequences of file sharing for music, films, and games ordered by the Ministries of Education & Culture, Economic Affairs, and Justice. This analysis is conducted based on a study of statistics and recent scientific literatur, interviews with frequent downloaders, a representative survey of the Dutch population and a number of informative workshops with the [media] sector.

Estimates of the volume of global unauthorised downloading are widely divergent. The global count is at least several billion files per year, a substantial part of the international Internet traffic. Around 4.7 million Dutch Internet users of 15 years and older have downloaded something without authorisation in the past year. Citizens view downloading and sharing of music, films, and games as socially accepted, but know little of the technique and regulation involved.

[...]
Net prosperity gain

For the music industry the downloaded recordings cannot be translated 1-on-1 into lost sales. Many downloading consumers would not have bought the same amount of music [that they downloaded] against current prices if downloaded would not be possible. Additionally, there are people who download music in order to get to know it and buy it if they like it.

Although there are also positive effects of downloading music on sales, a negative effect on the turnover of the involved sectors is likely. This is especially the case for music because downloading music has become the most normal. There is a differentiated effect based on the artist: well-known artist are most impacted negatively, while relatively unknown artists can even profit when file sharing increases their reknown. For society at large the lost turnover of the [media] sector is opposed to the gains by the large group of downloaders that would otherwise not have made a purchase. The net effect on prosperity is substantial.

Rise of new business models

The music and film industry are faced by the challenge of matching their supply with the changed consumer demand. New business models are on the rise. The music industry is moving to use new sources of revenue (concerts, merchanise, sponsoring). There is a place for music recordings, but in the future it will probably become impossible to run a company on music recordings alone. Within the movie industry the markets of cinema and DVD sales are still growing. DVD rentals are down strongly. In the longer term this might change as faster internet becomes available. Here also new business models are important. The gaming industry is growing in spurts, especially console games and their combination of hardware and software. Especially here file sharing is less prevalent than in e.g. PC games, where turnover is stagnating. A platform bound official game has so many advantages that it is not inconceivable that this branch will be able to aboid file sharing to a larger degree than the music industry.

Re:Always the dutch .... (2, Interesting)

Thiez (1281866) | more than 5 years ago | (#26517101)

We're morons about the whole magic mushroom thing though. Current government is being a bitch about drugs.

Re:Always the dutch .... (1)

pete-classic (75983) | more than 5 years ago | (#26517191)

I've heard the Amsterdam canals were dug by slave labor. I can't find a reference, but this jives with the fact that the Dutch were the "leading" traders of slaves at the time they were dug.

I love the Dutch, but let's not pretend they're perfect.

-Peter

Re:Always the dutch .... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26517491)

As far as I know the canals in Amsterdam (and other Dutch cities) weren't dug by slaves. The Dutch only transported slaves from Africa to the Americas, not to The Netherlands.

Canals we're dug by hand, by paid workers.

Re:Always the dutch .... (1)

berend botje (1401731) | more than 5 years ago | (#26517859)

Yes, we were (and still are) largely dependent on transport. These days it's containers from Rotterdam to the rest of Europe. In them days it was spices (and everything else that wasn't nailed down) from the colonies and slaves from Africa to the States.

As for worst colonizers, I'm not sure that is quite right regarding to violence. The Spanish and the English where brutal, but the Dutch always tried to keep trade flowing. Damaging the merchandise (slaves directly, or crop harvest indirectly) was bad for business.

The Dutch were masters in using the local rulers to keep the population under control, however. Better to have the head of state (or tribe, whatever) on their side than to replace him with a Dutch ruler that could count on severe opposition. Again, that would be bad for business.

Now, the current government of The Netherlands are a bunch of religious nutjobs that are actively turning back the clock about fifty years. Not to worry, next election they will get their asses handed to them, big time.

Re:Always the dutch .... (1)

PinkyDead (862370) | more than 5 years ago | (#26517283)

Ok, apart from the humanism, trade, Erasmus and Spinoza - what have the Dutch ever done for us?!

Re:Always the dutch .... (1)

boombaard (1001577) | more than 5 years ago | (#26517609)

"We" also invented the stock market (and the still-used model for government bonds)? ;-)

Re:Always the dutch .... (1)

Alinabi (464689) | more than 5 years ago | (#26517661)

They also gave us Ruud Gullit and Marco van Basten?

Re:Always the dutch .... (2, Funny)

BrentH (1154987) | more than 5 years ago | (#26517587)

Just a reminder: Dutch is spelled with a capital D, just like how american is spelled with a lowercase a. Thanks,

The Dutch.

Re:Always the dutch .... (1)

Beyond_GoodandEvil (769135) | more than 5 years ago | (#26517615)

in areas ranging from humanism to trade. erasmus, spinoza and more. and now this ....
Particularly in the trading of humans, and getting chicks to pay for half. Hooray Dutch. And having a football team whose name is spelled like a household cleaner but pronounced eye-ax.

Re:Always the dutch .... (1)

donstenk (74880) | more than 5 years ago | (#26517825)

we also invented slavery and futures apparently.

Uncle Sam wants YOU to use P2P!!! (4, Funny)

Drakkenmensch (1255800) | more than 5 years ago | (#26516731)

This is the evidence to wwhat I've suspected all along - file sharing is patriotic and the RIAA is trying to destroy the economy by undermining media sales with their spamigation method!

Re:Uncle Sam wants YOU to use P2P!!! (5, Interesting)

jedidiah (1196) | more than 5 years ago | (#26516841)

Well... discouraging consumption is discouraging consumption.

Piracy can contribute to a perception of plenty. Many people
tend to spend more freely on many things when they percieve
that things are "going well". Push people to "do without"
and they might do just that. They may also become entirely
too good at it in the process.

That's not even getting into the psychological implications
of "doing without". Most people associate this with dire
economic misfortune.

Re:Uncle Sam wants YOU to use P2P!!! (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26517147)

Is your screen 40-columns wide or what?

Re:Uncle Sam wants YOU to use P2P!!! (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26517331)

O
n
e
.

Re:Uncle Sam wants YOU to use P2P!!! (2, Funny)

CannonballHead (842625) | more than 5 years ago | (#26517369)

He posts via telnet. :)

Re:Uncle Sam wants YOU to use P2P!!! (4, Insightful)

Thanshin (1188877) | more than 5 years ago | (#26516881)

I think the first response by american institutions will be:

"It has a positive benefit for the dutch because they are stealing from us. Which clearly proves it has a negative benefit for us".

Re:Uncle Sam wants YOU to use P2P!!! (2, Funny)

Kokuyo (549451) | more than 5 years ago | (#26517225)

And thus grows the axis of evil ;).

Re:Uncle Sam wants YOU to use P2P!!! (1)

Thanshin (1188877) | more than 5 years ago | (#26517333)

Maybe it's all a marketing ploy to promote Empire: Total War.

Dutch Pirates are stealig your mojo*!

*: That's how intellectual property was called in empireal** times.

**: The times of The Empire. Not to be mistaken with empirical times, i.e.: Time which has been derived from experiment and observation rather than theory.

***: There's no "***" call; why the hell are you reading this?

Re:Uncle Sam wants YOU to use P2P!!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26517799)

The Americans can start stealing music from Dutch artists to get even. To give a hint, start with Monique Smit.

Re:Uncle Sam wants YOU to use P2P!!! (0, Redundant)

jonaskoelker (922170) | more than 5 years ago | (#26517481)

This is the evidence to what I've suspected all along - file sharing is [good]

Stated in a somewhat less politician-mocking way, I can definitely get behind this---

It's one thing to have an opinion based on an ideology. It's something very much different to have an opinion based on evidence and reasoning [or science, if you will]. It means you have a good argument for why Your Way should be public policy.

I assume that if politicians listen to science rather than money*, they'd give the general notion of allowing file sharing in some form more thought than otherwise. In fact, one danish politician has done so. She's in a minority party, far out on the left wing, and we have a right-wing government right now...

* My inner pessimist thinks that US politicians listen to US corporate money, and non-US politicians listen to US politicians. He may or may not see reality for what it is, and there are always shades of gray.

Re:Uncle Sam wants YOU to use P2P!!! (4, Funny)

artg (24127) | more than 5 years ago | (#26517781)

I know it's not the same thing, but I wonder what the result would be if a similar study were done on burglary ? It might show it's good for the economy (growth in replacement sales, higher turnover for insurance companies etc.) even though some group (householders) suffer a little. Given that politicians currently want us to spend our savings, maybe they'd even see it as a good thing and give burglars a tax break or something ? After all, they're happy to help the thieves in the stock market.

Filesharing (5, Interesting)

Xaemyl (88001) | more than 5 years ago | (#26516739)

This is definitely the case for me. I'll download an mp3 or two, and if I like them, I'll go out and buy their album (normally directly from the band if Im able to), and go to their shows if they play locally, buy their merchandise, etc.

I've discovered a lot of great music from filesharing, that I wouldn't have been exposed to otherwise, and went on to buy their stuff.

Re:Filesharing (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26516833)

Information wants to be $17.99

Re:Filesharing (5, Insightful)

tverbeek (457094) | more than 5 years ago | (#26517255)

So what they've discovered here is that people who are really interested in music (i.e. they download a lot of it) tend to buy more music than people who are not that into it (i.e. they download very little). This is not surprising ("obvious" would be a better word), nor does it say anything definitive about the effect of downloading on sales, because (all together now) correlation does not equal causation.

Re:Filesharing (1)

CannonballHead (842625) | more than 5 years ago | (#26517385)

The article isn't talking about it having a positive effect on media sales. Even the summary said this:

even though this costs the media industry some profit.

I knew it! (4, Funny)

Thanshin (1188877) | more than 5 years ago | (#26516743)

This is the final proof that pirates are destroying the economy!

Pirates are like terrorists!

And they pervert children to pirate more!

Pirates steal music and musicians everywhere are suiciding because they're so poor.

Did you already forget the article? Or do I have to blabber about children and wars for a while until I totally misdirect your atten... Until we really concentrate on the pirate comunist music thieves.

5...4...3...2...1... (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26516747)

RIAA/MPAA spin to debunk this report will begin in 5..4..3..2..1..

Re:5...4...3...2...1... (1)

Amazing Quantum Man (458715) | more than 5 years ago | (#26517703)

Sample spin...

"Why do you hate America?"

or...

[NIGEL-POWERS]
Damn Dutch!
[/NIGEL-POWERS]

Two incomprehensible links. (3, Funny)

knutkracker (1089397) | more than 5 years ago | (#26516771)

Double Dutch?

Google translation (4, Informative)

I cant believe its n (1103137) | more than 5 years ago | (#26516843)

File sharing net positive economic impact

The economic effects of file sharing on the Dutch welfare in the short and long term net positive. Consumers will benefit as a result of file sharing access to a wide range of cultural products. On the other hand, a fall in turnover from the sale of sound recordings, DVDs and games as a result is plausible.

This is reflected in joint research by TNO, SEO Economic Research and the Institute for Information Law (IViR) to the economic and cultural consequences of file sharing for music, movies and games on behalf of the Ministries of Education, Ministry of Economic Affairs and Justice. The analysis was conducted on the basis of a study of statistics and scientific literature, interviews with fervent downloaders, a representative survey of the population and a number of informational workshops in the sector.

Estimates of the volume of the global download unauthorized movement vary widely. The world is in any case, many billions of files per year, a substantial part of international Internet traffic. Some 4.7 million Dutch Internet users aged 15 and older in the last 12 months unpaid ever downloaded. Citizens see the download and share music, movies and games as a general social acceptance, but know little of the technology and regulations that it faces. Regulatory unclear

It appears that there are many unclear about the admissibility of download. The download for personal use of copyrighted music and movies may. Downloading games is prohibited. In the case of p2p networks is often not only downloaded, but material, often automatically, again made available to others. This upload files without the permission of the owner, as such not allowed.

The effects of unpaid downloading the purchase of paid content are difficult to determine. Download and buy are not mutually exclusive: an average music downloaders buy more DVDs and more games than people who never download. Even more downloaders go to concerts and buy more merchandise. Net profit prosperity

For the music industry is that downloaded pictures of 1-to-1 can be translated into lost sales. Many consumers who download music would not be in the same amount at current prices to buy and download unpaid not feasible. There are people who download music and get to know where to buy if they like. Although there are also positive effects on the purchasing behavior of downloading, is a negative impact on the turnover of the sectors likely. This is particularly true for the sale of recordings, especially as downloading music has become the most established. In addition, there are differences between artists known artists seem to have more damage, while relatively unknown artists may even benefit when exchanging files increased their awareness .. For society as a whole is against this turnover of the sector the benefits of the large group of downloaders who would otherwise never have to purchase. On balance, there is a significant welfare gains.

New business models emerging The music and film industries face the challenge to match their offerings with the changing consumer demand. New business models are emerging. The music is made for new movements to tap revenubronnen (concerts, merchandise and sponsorship). There is a place for music recordings, but in future it does not seem possible only on the basis of recorded music to run a profitable business. Within the film industry to grow the markets visit cinema and DVD sales still. DVD rental has fallen. Over time this can change quickly if the Internet is available. Again, there are important new business models. The game industry is growing boisterous, especially the console games and their hardware-software combination content. Here is file sharing on the watch less than eg PC games, where turnover is now stagnating. A related official platform game has so many advantages that it is not inconceivable that this industry is the file-sharing practice the music industry now faces a far greater extent could avert or circumvent.

Re:somewhat corrected translation (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26517453)

File sharing net positive economic impact

The economic effects of file sharing on the Dutch welfare are in the short and long term net positive. As a result of file sharing, consumers will get access to a wide range of cultural products. On the other hand, a fall in turnover from the sale of sound recordings, DVDs and games as a result is plausible.

This is reflected in joint research by TNO, SEO Economic Research and the Institute for Information Law (IViR) about the economic and cultural consequences of file sharing for music, movies and games on behalf of the Ministries of Education, Ministry of Economic Affairs and Justice. The analysis was conducted on the basis of a study of statistics and scientific literature, interviews with fervent downloaders, a representative survey of the population and a number of informational workshops in the sector.

Estimates of the volume of the global unauthorized downloadtraffic varies widely. Worldwide it is many billions of files per year, a substantial part of international Internet traffic. Some 4.7 million Dutch Internet users aged 15 and older have downloaded unpaid in the past 12 months. Citizens see downloading and sharing of music, movies and games as socially accepted on a broad base, but know little of the technology and regulations that it faces.

Regulations unclear

It appears that there are many unclearities about the admissibility of download. Downloading for personal use of copyrighted music and movies is allowed. Downloading games is prohibited. In the case of p2p networks files are often not only downloaded, but also automatically made available to others. This uploading of files without the permission of the owner, is as such not allowed.

The effects of unpaid downloading on the purchase of paid content are difficult to determine. Downloading and buying are not mutually exclusive: average music downloaders buy more DVDs and more games than people who never download. Also downloaders go more often to concerts and buy more merchandise.

Net welfareprofit

In the case of the music industry, downloaded recordings can not be translated directly into lost sales. Many consumers who download music would not buy the same amount of music at current prices if unpaid downloading would no longer be feasible. There are people who download music to get to know it and eventually buy it if they like. Although there are also positive effects of downloading on the purchasing behavior, presumably there is also a negative impact on the turnover of the sectors. This is particularly true for the sale of recordings, especially as downloading music has become the most established. In addition, there are differences between artists, known artists seem to suffer more damage, while relatively unknown artists may even benefit when exchanging files increases awareness about them .. For society as a whole opposed to this loss of turnover of the sector there are the benefits of the large group of downloaders who would otherwise never have purchased. On balance, there is a significant welfare gain.

New business models emerging

The music and film industries face the challenge of matching their offerings to the changing consumer demand. New business models are emerging. By the music industry movements are made to tap into new revenue sources (concerts, merchandise and sponsorship). There is a place for music recordings, but in future it does not seem possible to run a profitable business only on the basis of recorded music. Within the film industry the markets of cinema visits and DVD sales are still growing. DVD rental has fallen dramatically. Over time this can change if the faster internet is available. Also in this case new business models are important. The game industry is growing boisterous, especially the console games and their hardware-software content combination. In this case file sharing is less likely then e.g. PC games, where turnover is now stagnating. A relation of the official platform with a game has so many advantages that it is not inconceivable that this industry could avert or circumvent the file-sharing practices the music industry are now facing to a far greater extent .

Study Conclusions (3, Insightful)

yotto (590067) | more than 5 years ago | (#26516873)

So, assuming this study is accurate, there are two conclusions one could come to:

1) Downloading opens people to things they would not know about, causing them to buy more. So, downloading should be allowed as advertisement.
2) The people who download are the most fervent fans. So, downloading should be allowed as a means to not drive them away.

Any others? /I was a a 1) when I stopped downloading, and consuming, all RIAA media.

Re:Study Conclusions (4, Insightful)

nedlohs (1335013) | more than 5 years ago | (#26517133)

3) People have a fixed amount of money to spend on entertainment, by downloading shitty music on the internet they spend that money on other entertainment products/services.

For the Netherlands that's a win because the loser is the music companies and they are mostly overseas corporations and the winners are live performances which provide local employment and so on.

Of course I haven't read the article, not knowing Dutch and not bothering with a translate this page thing, and I know nothing of the music industry - for all I know the Dutch produce 99% of the world's music, though I doubt it.

Re:Study Conclusions (1)

Kokuyo (549451) | more than 5 years ago | (#26517393)

I think this needs to be clarified.

I personally believe, that every human has a fixed amount of money he or she is willing to spend on music. Those who are unable or unwilling to spend a single buck won't do so no matter if or if not downloads are available.

Those who will spend, say 50 bucks a month on music would still do so if, and only if, they had found something worthwhile to spend the money on. I believe the possibility of downloads does indeed have a negative impact on the music industry insofar as people now have the alternative of trying the music before they buy it. For me the fact that sales are in decline simply means that there is not enough 'good' music from big labels out there to buy.

Same goes for DVDs, obviously. Just yesterday I downloaded Idiocracy which I am now going to purchase on disc after having seen it. I would not have done so had I not had the chance to experience its greatness beforehand ;).

After buying Saint Anger and a few Hammerfall albums, which have been crappy, I now download just about everything before I buy it. And it's already saved me money: I now know that I will not have to buy Death Magnetic as that album sucks almost as much as St. Anger. This is just my opinion, of course.

Artists should just open their own websites, offer high quality samples and sell their stuff through amazon or whatever. It's not like I've discovered any (really, I'm serious: ANY) band or single artist, ever, because of the big labels' so called marketing (unless their name was Britney Spears or Justin Timberlake or... well you get the idea...). Not even once. So I really don't see what artists expect from these labels... most of them have to cough up the money for producing their stuff beforehand anyway.

Re:Study Conclusions (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26517811)

I actually find most of my music from the radio. I listen to the radio in the car and when I hear something I like, I download more music from them to see if I like the rest of their music. If they have good music then I will usually buy the album.

Re:Study Conclusions (1)

Kokuyo (549451) | more than 5 years ago | (#26517829)

In Switzerland, most radio stations only play the top ten and some oldies.

minor nitpick (1)

botik32 (90185) | more than 5 years ago | (#26517709)

[quote]Of course I haven't read the article, not knowing Dutch and not bothering with a translate this page thing, and I know nothing of the music industry - for all I know the Dutch distribute 99% of the world's music, though I doubt it.[/quote]

Fixed that for you.

But let me see what's in my playlist as a european at this moment:
De-Phazz - New Format Recordings, HQ Germany
Gotan Project - Beggars Group, London, UK
Buena Vista Social Club - Wold Circuit, London, UK
Cheb I Sabbah - Six Degrees Recordings, NY, US

While none of them are from the Netherlands, most of them are not from the "overseas" either, but more like next door.

Re:Study Conclusions (1)

fastest fascist (1086001) | more than 5 years ago | (#26517139)

3) Copyright for most media downloaded without authorization in the Netherlands is held by parties outside the NL. Not paying for foreign products leaves the Dutch consumer with more money to spend locally.

Re:Study Conclusions (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26517143)

Extrapolating wildly, I'd like to say the following:
The value of reaching millions across the globe is greater than the value of lost sales. Not least because those millions would never know of your product if it were not for file sharing.

Therefor, I can easily see a future where advertisers learn to tap into this by making music that people want to download, and then follow it with association driven marketing. (Like pepsi's, the choice of a new generation, only now the associated music is free).

So I am not in the least afraid for the music business as such. It's just the the current companies seem completely unable to make this leap.
Probably, some big advertising company, or maybe even proctor and gamble, will step in and make this shift happen, to the great chagrin of the RIAA.

(like Hey, this german post industrial body electronica band is good.. oh sponsored by Zilog semiconductors, I wonder what that is?)

TV and Film producers have even greater possibilities with product placement and whatnot.

Re:Study Conclusions (2, Interesting)

leomekenkamp (566309) | more than 5 years ago | (#26517229)

I would say that the most important conclusion is that the *IA*'s of this world are actively reducing the welfare/wellbeing of the people in order to make more profit.

Communism/socialism without bounds has been failing for some time now; I get the feeling that we can see more and more that capitalism without boundaries is also failing.

corrolation != causation (0)

wjaxmann (1407929) | more than 5 years ago | (#26516907)

See title. And good grief!

Re:corrolation != causation (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26517041)

The article was trying to point out that p2p downloads and a higher rate of media purchases were statistically related.

Statistical relation != (assumption of corrolation = causation)

Re:corrolation != causation (1)

owlstead (636356) | more than 5 years ago | (#26517095)

Does it matter? There seem to be enough people buying for the entertainment economy to prosper. For the music industry you'd better perform live, or you are going to have tough times. Well, that should nicely take care of the freeloaders in the industry. Even if there is no causation, it does show that there is still plenty of money to be made in the industry.

If there is correlation (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26517149)

then there CAN be causation.

Hell, look at the "piracy is killing us" bollocks. Not even correlation to back that up. If anything, a correlation stating the reverse.

So, if there is no causal link between P2P and increasing sales, how did sales of CDs increase with Old Napster and drop sharply when Old Napster stopped? If there were a causal link between P2P and dropping sales, the sales would have gone UP EVEN MORE when napster shut down.

And since sales went down, there must then be an even BIGGER cause for a sales drop that meant that with napster gone, the sales figures would have been EVEN WORSE.

AND that item has to kick in about the right time.

Got anything?

No???

"...prosperity of the Dutch" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26516917)

filesharing is good for the prosperity of the Dutch

Without reading the 146page (in Dutch) report, I'm curious to know which copyrighted works they included in their study.

If the Dutch only download US works then of course it would be good for their economy.

I'm curious to know what's good for the "prosperity of the GLOBE".

IMHO, increased exchange of ideas and culture would help make the world a smaller place, but I'm not qualified to determine the long-term impact.

More money for everyone! (2, Interesting)

Mishotaki (957104) | more than 5 years ago | (#26516943)

Not spending money on music = Spending money on something else

If people don't spend a thousand "dollars" on music, they might buy a new TV... TVs are probably bringing more money to the Dutch economy than buying songs online where not even a penny is going back to the country's economy...

Music Industry Doesn't Care (4, Insightful)

whisper_jeff (680366) | more than 5 years ago | (#26516953)

The music industry doesn't care if the end result of file sharing is good for the economy (which I can easily agree it probably is) because they don't make money from the economy as a whole. They don't care if fans of music (including file sharers) are more inclined to pay outrageous prices to see a concert - most music companies don't make money from concert proceeds. For me, however, POLITICIANS should be paying attention to this information. Sure, they may have some lobbyist chewing their ear out about how bad file sharing is and that it must be stopped before the end of the world comes as a result but they need to be shown the bigger picture so that they can make the best decision for the people.

I know. I know. I can hope that there are still some politicians who are actually interested in doing the right thing for the people they represent...

Politicans dont care either (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26517251)

That's all good in theory, but it's the music company that's putting money in these politicians pockets, not the general public at large... so I wonder who they'll really listen to...

And where are they getting their data from? (1)

Lorens (597774) | more than 5 years ago | (#26517011)

Consumer studies? In which people admit to file-sharing? Wouldn't studies like that be skewed by the file-sharer's perception of themselves?

Re:And where are they getting their data from? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26517563)

Downloading music and movies is legal here and no-one has an issue to talk about it. Regardless, people still tend to buy music, movies and games.

What are the odd? (3, Funny)

smchris (464899) | more than 5 years ago | (#26517025)

That American corporate/government policy would have it backwards?

Correlation is not Causation (1, Insightful)

A. B3ttik (1344591) | more than 5 years ago | (#26517027)

It applies here. The article claims that people who download music and movies tend to buy more music and movies than those who do not download.

Perhaps the link is simply that the people who download music and movies are the ones who _like_ music and movies. The real question is "How much would these same people be buying if piracy were not an option?"

The article is also full of the same generalities and excuses that pirates love to make, from "Lots of people are just trying it" to "People who pirate music probably go to more concerts and probably buy more merchandise."

Some people think that the only way to truly determine the effects of filesharing on media purchase would be to perform a significant number of intrusive case studies to see how filesharing availability has affected individual spending over time... but that's not really true. All you need to do is analyze the overall market and look at the filesharing trends vs. the market economy.

We -know- that file sharing is bad for big record labels, but is it bad for the economy as a whole? I don't think we know, yet. I hoped this article would present some kind of study with a definitive answer, but all I see is a rehashing of the same tired, fallacy-ridden arguments... except this time in Dutch.

They aren't talking about causation (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26517167)

They are talking about results.

And the result is that P2P is good for the economy.

HOW it does that would be causality. But the correlation is there. After all, the number of breasts correlates well with being female as opposed to male. But "being male" isn't the cause. Hormones are the cause.

Re:Correlation is not Causation (2, Insightful)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | more than 5 years ago | (#26517169)

We -know- that file sharing is bad for big record labels...

No, we don't.

Re:Correlation is not Causation (1)

Zironic (1112127) | more than 5 years ago | (#26517671)

It's not an article, it's a 146 page report that you obviously have not read.

Pareto Improvement (1)

srussia (884021) | more than 5 years ago | (#26517061)

Initial situation: 100 people have the file. Music company has x dollars.

Process: I get copy of file.

Final situation: 101 people have file. Music company still has x dollars.

Q.E.D.

Re:Pareto Improvement (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26517323)

Initial situation: 100 people spend 0 bucks on something doubtfull. Music company gets $0.70 for each Ubuntu CD burned.

Process: Most people still don't give a shit, but some actually buy the album because they like it.

Final situation: Music company has money from albums otherwise not sold and gets to steal loads from linux fans.

Re:Pareto Improvement (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26517413)

Initial situation: 100 people go to the live concert.

Final situation: 101 people go to the live concert.

Where I live, tickets are way more expensive than a CD.
From the Band point of view... which scenario is more profitable?

I think we are moving towards free music and expensive live concerts (I believe fans will always be willing to pay for a live presentation)

Unfortunately... (1)

brian0918 (638904) | more than 5 years ago | (#26517109)

If this study was meant to persuade the RIAA to change their policies, then so be it. But until those policies are changed, it remains true that rights are being violated. The ends do not justify the means.

Re:Unfortunately... (3, Insightful)

Maxo-Texas (864189) | more than 5 years ago | (#26517437)

What you say is true.

Those rights were created so that society would benefit, not so the individuals would benefit.

The point of those rights was to encourage the creation of new works.

The rights have been expanded to the point that they now frequently prevent the creation of new works.

I think we should respect those rights as far as they promote new works and not any further.

I am particularly against paying money to encourage artists who are dead to make new works.

A counter argument (3, Interesting)

MikeRT (947531) | more than 5 years ago | (#26517113)

This works because the Dutch still generally care about private property rights, and have a sense of the need to reward people for hard work. The "entitlement mentality" has not fully set in because most of Dutch society is still working from the older mindset, but slowly we are seeing this falling away across the Western world. Give it another 100 years, and it's doubtful that this will be true.

The fundamental problem with this issue is that the business model is forced to work based on the good will of the buyers. In every other area of the economy, you don't get access to the goods and services until you pay for them or come to an understanding that allows you to get them for free. Why should this be any different?

One of the things we need to face up to here is that in another century or two, manufacturing technology will be advanced enough to allow people to fabricate complex physical goods from raw materials. What will happen when any good on the store can be replicated at the cost of materials? I suspect that a pirate culture would end up meeting with utter disaster here.

So really, we need to face up to the fact that we need a culture that says "you don't deserve it just because you can't pay for it or don't want to pay for it." That sort of thing would pay dividends in other areas, since such a culture would also tend to promote an attitude that you have no right to tell others what to do on most things.

Re:A counter argument (2, Insightful)

pm_rat_poison (1295589) | more than 5 years ago | (#26517373)

And that's why capitalism sucks. Business model is based on maximizing profits instead of the good of the public. I'd much rather have an economic model that depends on the good will of the public than the good will of private corporations.

Re:A counter argument (1)

leomekenkamp (566309) | more than 5 years ago | (#26517417)

The fundamental problem with this issue is that the business model is forced to work based on the good will of the buyers. In every other area of the economy, you don't get access to the goods and services until you pay for them or come to an understanding that allows you to get them for free. Why should this be any different?

Well...

One of the things we need to face up to here is that in another century or two, manufacturing technology will be advanced enough to allow people to fabricate complex physical goods from raw materials. What will happen when any good on the store can be replicated at the cost of materials?

You answer your own question. Why pay when the 'reproduction costs' are almost zero and one can make infinite identical copies?

I suspect that a pirate culture would end up meeting with utter disaster here.

I disagree. Copyright and patents did not exist until fairly recently, and yet world empires have been build by humans, and alongside them works of art and literature.

Money is not the only incentive for human beings. The drive to create things has given us Lascaux, the Iliad, numerous legends and folk tales, etc., etc., etc. Copyright has given us Brittney Spears. ;-)

Flawed study is flawed... (1)

Jonas Buyl (1425319) | more than 5 years ago | (#26517117)

People who don't download music or films aren't interested in them and they're obviously not going to buy tickets or merchandise.

Re:Flawed study is flawed... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26517599)

...so?

Would people that aren't interested in music or films become more interested in them when the people that download them stop to download them? I guess not.

What do you mean by economy? (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26517161)

Whose economy? We need to distinguish between the wealth of nations/society and the profits of the corporations. Built on a primary source of raw materials a manufacturing "economy" relies on a scarcity of manufactured resources. Commodity products will destroy it, but the society is greatly enriched by the cheap improvements in living. It leads to freedom from labour and poor health and to a (secondary) service economy. A service "economy" relies on a scarcity of services. Free services destroy it but everone is fullfilled, employed, occupied, which is half the challenge of attaining a peaceful society. It provides security and opens up a society to pure "thinking", to permit a knowledge economy. Likewise, a consequent "knowledge economy" or "information economy" relies on a scarcity of knowledge and information. If the benefactors of that scenario had their way they would destroy the internet and burn all the books. That's where we are now in the USA and most of Europe. Look at the RIAA and other anti-progressive agendas. Controlling the channels of knowledge is no different from the ancient battles between pirates and thugs who used to fight over the spice routes. So, the next step of human development, free information and comodity media resources like art, music, literature and scientific knowledge greatly enriches the society at large. But where does that lead? What is the next level of social enlightenment and progress? What does free knowledge, built on free service, built on free manufacturing, built on automated primary industry facilitate?

The answer is something that frightens the shit out of the corporations. Some people believe it is a "lesiure economy". It's that utopian future where people just live their lives, because in fact as every truly intelligent person knows, there is no scarcity, only a manufactured illusion of scarcity. Energy is the single most abundant thing/concept in the universe. Money is a fiction. There is no need for banks, or corporations, or any kind of "economy".

It's scary shit, because many people cannot see beyond the current model, and to many it;s just too much to contemplate. Yet we arrive there by simple logical steps. Therefore, you cannot conflate the two uses of the word "economy", they mean different things depending on whether you are talking about. It is a self evident truth that sharing and bringing the cost of knowledge down to a social commodity is vastly enabling and increases everyones wealth. But what it enables isn't a continuation of the ruling class model for "economic activity" to simply move up another level. There is nowhere left to move up to, We have arrived. It'll probably sound like Bill Hicks to say but, you know, the corporate cock is burried so deep in our asses, and the lies, denial, and illusion needed to keep it there is piled on so think we can't even see the fucking obvious in front of our noses any longer.

Actually, if I try to imagine beyond a "knowledge economy" I do not see a "lesiure economy" where we all play around on jet skis like dolphins frolic in the ocean. I think humans are naturally industrious. We will get one of the following:

1) A care ecomomy. Wehere we turn our attentions to poverty, medicine, extending and improving human life. Peoples status and "worth" will be measured in how much they contribute to the welfare of others. It will be a complete reversal of capitalism.

2) A colonial ecomony. We decide to explore space. Human industry aligns behind the expansion of the species into the solar system.

3) A permenant war economy. A new dark age where we spend the next 100 years thinning out the population in a state of endless global conflict. Peoples status will be determined by how many others they have killed or whether they can build a more lethal bomb.

At the moment (1) is the only viable option, and the danger of (3) is so awful that we may as well continue with the market capitalism illusion and burn the books in order to perpetuate a contrived knowledge economy long enough to keep us out of trouble.

Every time... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26517173)

...I see an article that correlates two phenomena, someone tags the story correlationisnotcausation. It's probably just a coincidence, though.

Larger corp loose, and small businesses win (2, Interesting)

salarelv (1314017) | more than 5 years ago | (#26517195)

Small (niche) content producers benefit from file sharing. Because more and more people encounter content that isn't advertised or played in the mass media. When there wasn't no Internet people had rely on the radio/tv/newspapers for bringing them the newest cultural content but now people can find suitable content for them self. Therefor I think that it's fair to share files. Look how much the big corps. earn and how much the musician/actor/director etc earn. The revenues are too large to complain.

Downloading is... (1)

Nicolay77 (258497) | more than 5 years ago | (#26517295)

Downloading is really self-inflicted advertising.

When more companies understand this, information will flow more efficiently.

(And we will be billed for services and other stuff instead of just the data.)

When Napster(I) was in its height (3, Interesting)

kimvette (919543) | more than 5 years ago | (#26517305)

I've posted this before but when Napster was in its height, I bought more CDs in the year I used Napster than in the 13 previous years I owned CD players. I downloaded a LOT of music (I'd search for the letter A, download, listen to bits of tracks, then go out and purchase new CDs with the tracks I liked, etc.) and discovered a lot of new and old acts I would never have been otherwise exposed to, in genres ranging from rap to country; jazz to pop, and everything in between. I also tracked down tracks I remembered listening to on 8-track when I was a toddler but couldn't remember anything other than most of the tracks had names of foods in them - it turned out the album I was looking for was Herb Alpert and the Tijuana Brass' Whipped Cream and other Delights -- and the specific track I was trying to find was Taste of Honey. Well, the next day I actually went into work late because I had to run out and find and buy that CD. I felt like I was in heaven - I had tracked[sic] down a childhood favorite! I played that 8-track so much I wore my parents' copy out. It took me a long, long time using Napster to find that song. Then, I'd export the list to a spreadsheet, delete everything and download more to try. The vast majority of tracks I'd play I'd think "crap" but there were many, many downloaded tracks that would prompt me to go out and buy the CD. On the way to work, I would usually listen to top 40 radio, too - and buying what I liked.

There were many, many others and I was buying up to 15 CDs a week at one point. I would literally go to Best Buy, Strawberries (now defunct) or drive down to RI to Luke's Records every single day and I'd buy 3 to 5 CDs. That was every work day, on the way home from work, or if I found something I really "had" to have, shift my schedule and work a later day and buy it on the way to work. Granted, I had a lot more "disposable" income then, but were it not for the RIAA turning against its biggest "fan base"/"consumer base" I'd still be buying at least 3 to 5 CDs a week.

As soon as the RIAA started making noise about filing suits I quit not only using Napster, but I also quit listening to top 40 radio. In fact for quite a few years I listened to only Christian talk radio and the local big classical station (then WCRB 102.5 and 99.5, now it's just on 99.5).

I only recently started purchasing CDs but my purchases are very few and far between, and it is usually based on recommendations of my favorite artists (for example: Dave Gilmour recommended Radiohead for folks who like Pink Floyd, since fans are clamoring for more), or on what I find on Pandora or what friends in bands or who are composers expose me to. :) I also check out Youtube a bit, but the RIAA labels are trying to alienate me even further by demanding that obvious Fair Use projects are being removed at their demand.

The RIAA has lost me as a big-spending customer. I track down USED CDs now, on the rare occasions I do buy.

They need to embrace models such as the original Napster; I am NOT happy with the rip quality of downloads - I used it to sample music at random, and would discover whole new worlds of music that appeal to me in genres you normally couldn't PAY me to listen to (e/g. rap, country) because I could try it for free and then go out and buy the perfect-quality product on CD. I'd always shop around though - I nearly always refused to pay more than $15 per CD.

That's a lot of revenue the RIAA has "lost" - and because I don't expose myself to top 40 radio, I'm not even tempted to buy new material. I have most of the old material I want. RIAA members, are you reading this? That's up to $225 per week I'm not spending on music now, and the temptation truly is not there because I don't expose myself to stations where payola drives the play lists.

Now, I spend my entertainment dollars on DVDs and cable TV.

I might consider iTunes when I upgrade to an iPhone - I hate Windows (it's installed on my desktop ONLY for games) but might put Tiger on my Macbook so I can use iTunes. What I will be buying is tracks that haven't been released on CD here in the States, but I've discovered in movies.

RIAA Members: P2P pays. The folks who wouldn't buy anyway, won't buy regardless of the existence of P2P. The folks who care about audio fidelity will buy even with unrestricted P2P - in fact they will probably buy a LOT more if they can freely download at random.

I've considered Rhapsody, but unfortunately they provide only very limited browser support on Linux and OS X and don't support the iPhone/iPod/iTouch - plus I prefer CD anyhow, then I can rip to whatever bit rate and format I want.

Re:When Napster(I) was in its height (1)

SanityInAnarchy (655584) | more than 5 years ago | (#26517809)

Worth mentioning -- while it depends on the album, you can find plenty on BitTorrent now in FLAC format, which means you're getting exactly the same quality you'd get from buying a CD.

Is sound fidelity the only reason you were buying CDs?

For my part, I don't buy CDs, because I can no longer trust physical media. There's always the (good) chance an optical drive will crap out on me, or the disc will be scratched. More worrisome is the chance that it will come with some form of DRM.

However, I find things like iTunes and Amazon MP3 a bit insulting -- there is plenty of bandwidth, and they want to sell me an album for the same price I'd pay for a CD, but already encoded in a lossy format.

Instead, I find places which will sell me lossless music, most often in FLAC, and most often without requiring any special software other than a web browser.

If I can't do that, I really don't see the point.

"Downloaders" buy more stuff. (1)

Culture20 (968837) | more than 5 years ago | (#26517583)

Ignoring that "downloader" is being used in a derogatory way, I believe it. I'm the music companies' worst nightmare; I don't listen to their music. Since I don't know what the latest band/song/blond-bimbo is, I am far less likely to buy a CD or MP3 of the music.

Of course it does! (1)

billcopc (196330) | more than 5 years ago | (#26517613)

The Dutch get a positive economic effect because that's where all the gray-area seedboxes are leased! And since there is likely far more U.S. content being shared than Dutch content, the net result for the Dutch is a positive.

Re:Of course it does! (1)

ral8158 (947954) | more than 5 years ago | (#26517805)

And the slashdot tradition of not reading an article continues.

Duh! Obvious (1)

mlwmohawk (801821) | more than 5 years ago | (#26517687)

While I don't have any verified tests or studies to support this claim, I do have my personal experiences to draw my own conclusions.

(1) Electronic file sharing has not affected music/movie purchases. Some percentage of people will always share. There were a lot of dubbing cassette decks in the 70s and 80s designed specifically to copy cassettes. In the 90s and this decade, we use MP3s.

Similarly, we recorded TV and movies on our VCRs. There were pulse amplifiers to eliminate the effects of copy protection.

(2) People who copy and download are INTERESTED in the media. They are consumers and they buy what they like but they like to try before they buy. The emergent fact is that they DON'T buy everything the download and that is because it, to them, not all of it is worth it.

(3) The very people who download and share are their best customers.

Then /= than (1)

torgosan (141603) | more than 5 years ago | (#26517713)

NT

fuck a Bitch (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26517741)

battled in court, Be any fucking OS i do, because

Warning... TNO... (2, Informative)

thrill12 (711899) | more than 5 years ago | (#26517813)

...big grain of salt needed.
While TNO has been in the far past a research *company* with a respected name, nowadays they are more and more on the hand of whoever it is that pays them to do a study.
When I saw this headline in Dutch papers, it clearly was that "more and more people are downloading without paying". Maybe somewhere in the appendix, it read that they would buy songs when downloading.

TNO was the same agency that approved our voting computers multiple times [wijvertrou...ersniet.nl] in a row - the same ones that are forbidden right now.
TNO also researched the chip used for the public transport system in The Netherlands, and approved its security multiple times. [heise-online.co.uk]
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