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Happy 25th, Macintosh!

ScuttleMonkey posted more than 4 years ago | from the fanbois-of-the-world-unite dept.

Apple 296

bradgoodman writes to tell us that tomorrow will mark the 25th anniversary of the first Macintosh, debuting just 2 days after the famous Super Bowl XVIII commercial. "'The Macintosh demonstrated that it was possible and profitable to create a machine to be used by millions and millions of people,' said Alex Soojung-Kim Pang, research director for the Institute for the Future, a Palo Alto, California, think tank, and chief force behind 'Making the Macintosh: Technology and Culture in Silicon Valley,' an online historical exhibit. 'The gold standard now for personal electronics is, "Is it easy enough for my grandmother to use it?" People on the Macintosh project were the first people to talk about a product in that way.'"

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fp (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#26582047)

eat my asshole, you linux loving fags.

Re:fp (-1, Offtopic)

PopeRatzo (965947) | more than 4 years ago | (#26582253)

eat my asshole, you linux loving fags.

eat my asshole, you linux loving fags.

Why is a sincere offer like this considered flamebait?

Who wants to bet he got more than a few takers?

Re:fp (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#26582269)

No, apparently you're busy using it to spew your shit on our site. I'll wait until you've finished (just to be polite, of course).

Not the first... (1)

houstonbofh (602064) | more than 4 years ago | (#26582087)

'The gold standard now for personal electronics is, "Is it easy enough for my grandmother to use it?" People on the Macintosh project were the first people to talk about a product in that way.'"

And those slogan stealing bastards are Sears. Always trying to piggyback on Apple innovation...

Re:Not the first... (3, Informative)

dimeglio (456244) | more than 4 years ago | (#26582821)

Yep, I was one of those who bought one during the first 100 days. All I remember was how painful it was swapping 3.5" floppies in and out of that computer. It was easy but painful. The Apple Lisa was much better and had a hard disk (that amazing 5mb Apple Profile). Sadly it was 3-4 times the price.

OT: Sig (4, Funny)

Hatta (162192) | more than 4 years ago | (#26583175)

[ My car's odometer reads in pentaparsecs. My speedometer in parsecs/hour. ]

Does your car appear blue from the front, and red from behind?

Re:Not the first... (2, Interesting)

lymond01 (314120) | more than 5 years ago | (#26583373)

Clearly you never had to wait for your dad to shell out $400 for a 5.25" floppy drive upgrade on your Commodore 64 because your cassette drive would just take FOREVER to load Temple of Apshai (which, until this very post some 25 years later -- Christ... -- I thought was spelled Aphsai).

Re:Not the first... (4, Insightful)

goombah99 (560566) | more than 4 years ago | (#26582839)

Pioneers get the arrows, settlers get the land, is the operating phrase of most major technology companies. Apple did not invent the mp3 player, but they most definitely settled it. They did not invent postscript, but they definitely established it. And they did not invent the GUI but they settled it.

But taken as a whole, the mac was really a pioneering achievement, When you consider what was available at the time. Sure Xerox had their star systems, people used floppies and so on. But to put it all together in (relatively) cheap system that did not have a command line at all and sell it to consumers was a huge risk. And one that took a lot of innovations to make all work together. It had an original OS. It used software driven instruments to do everything (apple desktop bus. disk timing, character generators, etc...)

a huge leap and worthy of the boldness of that ad.

Re:Not the first... (1)

mdwh2 (535323) | more than 4 years ago | (#26583021)

Pioneers get the arrows, settlers get the land, is the operating phrase of most major technology companies. ... And they did not invent the GUI but they settled it.

As did many other companies. Like it or not though, 95% or so of that land is "settled" by one particular other company... I'm not sure this is a good analogy :)

Yeah but... (1)

Skyppey (196275) | more than 4 years ago | (#26582089)

Yeah but, is it easy enough for Windows users to use it?

Re:Yeah but... (-1, Troll)

PopeRatzo (965947) | more than 4 years ago | (#26582325)

This love poem to Apple comes only two stories after the "Why Linux is responsible for Microsoft's demise" headline.

It's why I loves my Slashdot: reasoned discussion of technology.

And yet, those that dare speak goatse's name are shunned. For shame... I wonder if things will change when it's revealed that the guy in the goatse photo is one Steve Jobs?

Hmmm?

Re:Yeah but... (0)

turgid (580780) | more than 4 years ago | (#26582437)

You Microsoft shills are always looking for the next conspiracy. Go to Sheffield.

Steve? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#26582113)

And where's Steve Jobs when you need him, dammit!

Mac World (2, Funny)

MindlessAutomata (1282944) | more than 4 years ago | (#26582121)

I'm a PC. I've always been a PC at heart.

Not like the rest, the others. Everyone around me. I was at odds with my society and knew it early since birth. Unlike them, I did not "Think Different!"--the mantra of the Macs around me, the phrase on all the billboards in the city that served as a reminder to its citizenry. Sameness pervaded the essence of my being and no amount of self-conditioning I did could change that. Eventually, I gave up and isolated myself emotionally from society.

I gaze at the faces going by, the white earphones contrasting their black turtlenecks, connecting their ears to their pockets, their blank faces engrossed in hip Indie rock music and various garage bands. I envied them for their perfection against my flaws and my compulsive nature to expand, to burden my life with troubles instead of remaining, like them, simple and easy to deal with. The grandest of virtues, simplicity... the philosophy by our loyal benefactor Steve Jobs, who descended from the heavens, creating the Earth, the iron, the wind and the rain. Steve Jobs, who defined the parameters of existence, the one who set about the patterns of reality, the constants, the variables. He who made gravity, electromagnetic energy, and shaped atomic structures and brought forth motion. From these things, he crafted the elements, processed them, refined them, and from these things engineered Apple products through the purity of his mind. Each Apple product was individually crafted by his own hands with the programming code used to run each device having being compiled in his brain and uploaded to each device telepathically, breathing life and perfection into each and every unit.

Except, it seems, for me, for I was not among the many. I was a PC. They were Macs. I've always been a cold, stiff person. I got by, disguising myself by keeping my non-Ipod music player safely out of sight, which I use because of my depraved nature demanding more functionality than the simple and easy-to-use Ipods have to offer... In the safety of my own home, behind locked doors, I ran a Forbidden, a contraband computer from more depraved, earlier days that was not given the love and blessing of being birthed by Steve Jobs. I dual booted, out of the great sin of curiosity. Curiosity, a shameful value of a PC, as curiosity has no place where simplicity matters most. I used two of the great unutterable blasphemies--something called "Windows Vista" and something else called "Linux." Although, as I mentioned before, although my tendency to be a PC and towards conformity has always been inherent to me, I was truly transformed when I found these old things in a hidden cache of computer parts predating The Purging. Perhaps the greatest sin of all, the single evil that, if discovered, would damn me forever, was the fact that my mouse had more than one button.

As I walked on among the Macs on the streets, passing the Starbuckses as I went along, I wondered how it all came to this. I glanced at The Holy Marks on the foreheads as the people wandered down the streets, the Bitten Apple tattooed on all our of us at birth, and wondered if, perhaps, there could be something more to life. But again, this was a PC's thought, and not, like everyone elses', a Mac's. We were to hold ourselves to the philosophy of Steve Jobs--so as his products were designed for idiots, so too were we to be idiots. But I was not a Mac--I was not an idiot. I was simply too complicated to be a worthwhile person.

Nature called. I found a nearby public iPoo--squeaky clean and sparkly white, things weren't all bad--and let myself go, expelling the waste that had accumulated inside me. After relieving myself and committing the overly-complicated and thus illegal act of wiping my ass (I did not flush as iPoos, designed to be idiot-proof, did not flush) I left and once again wandered the streets aimlessly, hoping to find some meaning in a world where I simply did not belong, a world where if my true nature was discovered, I would be endlessly persecuted by smug, self-righteous sons of bitches.

Re:Mac World (0, Troll)

Daniel Dvorkin (106857) | more than 4 years ago | (#26582315)

a world where if my true nature was discovered, I would be endlessly persecuted by smug, self-righteous sons of bitches

Your post is one of the most smug, self-righteous things I've ever read on Slashdot. And that's saying something.

Re:Mac World (1)

LoadWB (592248) | more than 4 years ago | (#26582473)

You think so? Wait until us Amiga users start littering this place!

Re:Mac World (1)

Tokerat (150341) | more than 4 years ago | (#26583061)

How can you mod this as Troll? The only reason most Mac users ever act smug is because we're sick and tired of Windows people telling us that we're idiots who need to buy "real" computers.

Think about how you act when a Microsoft fanboy tries telling you something foolish like "Linux doesn't even have any games, and that's the REAL test of an OS!"...

Re:Mac World (1)

gnasher719 (869701) | more than 4 years ago | (#26582403)

I'm a PC. I've always been a PC at heart.

And it was funny, in a rather pointless way, when you posted it the first time. Now the joke is getting old.

Re:Mac World (2, Insightful)

Idiomatick (976696) | more than 4 years ago | (#26583023)

Man your karma is going to take a massive hit ... getting dozens of +1funny from humans and -1troll from the macs. Kudos

Re:Mac World (1)

dangitman (862676) | more than 4 years ago | (#26583157)

Aside from being copypasta, the pasted text has everything backwards. It's Windows which was designed for narrow-minded idiots. The Mac was always about expanding possibilities, doing new and different things.

Re:Mac World (1)

idontgno (624372) | more than 5 years ago | (#26583333)

And that's what makes it a marvelously effective troll. Only the bigots can detect the substitution*. (As a notable corollary, only the bigots care.) The rest of us lol a bit, mostly at the joke, but juuuust a little at the bigots slapfighting each other. ("No, you're a tard, Mac!" "No, you're a tard, PC!")

*"substitution" == pretending the joke is supposed to be on the other guys. In truth, it's on both of you.

Best. Dept. Name. Ever. (0, Troll)

damn_registrars (1103043) | more than 4 years ago | (#26582123)

fanbois-of-the-world-unite

'nuff said

I remember it well... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#26582127)

It was the last day I showered or left the basement.

Re:I remember it well... (3, Funny)

Scottar (969033) | more than 5 years ago | (#26583301)

Its not a basement, its a command center

Commemorative model? (1)

HTH NE1 (675604) | more than 4 years ago | (#26582141)

Will this include a commemorative model Macintosh like the 20th Anniversary [wikipedia.org] did? (I own two, one dead by lightning strike.)

Re:Commemorative model? (1)

StreetStealth (980200) | more than 4 years ago | (#26582717)

While the TAM was incredibly forward-looking and foreshadowed Apple's coming priority of cutting-edge industrial design, I think its status as a "commemorative" model was very much a product of the Gil Amelio era at Apple. Somehow that sort of status for a product doesn't seem to fit in with Apple's present-day, minimalist offering strategy.

Re:Commemorative model? (3, Interesting)

HTH NE1 (675604) | more than 4 years ago | (#26583037)

Yeah, but I can still hope for some kind of a Mac Mini-level revision with a bump in speed and a built-in iPod dock to come out tomorrow at a price point of $666.66 (between the prices of the two current configurations), perhaps merging in features of the Apple TV platform.

Or even better, how about a pocket-sized Mac Micro? That would be a shocker!

Re:Commemorative model? (1)

glwillia (31211) | more than 5 years ago | (#26583315)

$666.66 is also, coincidentally, the price for the very first Apple I computer, in 1976.

Re:Commemorative model? (1)

dangitman (862676) | more than 4 years ago | (#26583195)

No. Steve has publicly said that Apple today is about looking to the future, not being nostalgic about the past. He really seems to hate fetishes and nostalgia. I can see where he's coming from, because Apple could very easily get caught up in repeating the past and reminiscing about the good old days.

Kinda Telling (3, Insightful)

QuantumRiff (120817) | more than 4 years ago | (#26582149)

That you mention "Apples Superbowl Commercial" and people know it. My dad knows, and is a real estate manager! That commercial really sticks in peoples mind. I would love to see apple come out with another commercial of that caliber. The Hal9000 commercial wasn't nearly as cool...

Not my Grandmother (3, Informative)

aardwolf64 (160070) | more than 4 years ago | (#26582153)

I have two Macs at home, but I don't think my Grandmother could handle it. How do you explain the difference between quitting an application and simply closing the window? My wife has the same issue...

Re:Not my Grandmother (1)

Hatta (162192) | more than 4 years ago | (#26582601)

If you read this article [slashdot.org] from yesterday, it seems that even slashdotters have some trouble with the distinction.

Re:Not my Grandmother (5, Insightful)

dingen (958134) | more than 4 years ago | (#26582633)

Why should your grandmother care? If she wants to surf the web, she clicks on Safari in the dock. If it's already running, she'll get a window to browse the web with. If it's not running, it will load and she'll get a window to browse the web with.

Keeping track of which applications are currently running is something for techies who are concerned with memory usage and such because they actually know how their computer works. Your grandmother doesn't so neither does she needs to know the difference between closing a window and closing an application.

Re:Not my Grandmother (4, Interesting)

GaryPatterson (852699) | more than 4 years ago | (#26583001)

On top of that, a good OS will page out the unused application after a while, so it's taking up neither RAM nor CPU cycles.

It doesn't matter if the app is left open, it doesn't have any noticeable impact on the system for users.

Re:Not my Grandmother (0, Offtopic)

mdwh2 (535323) | more than 5 years ago | (#26583321)

Talking about a "good OS" is all very well, but did classic MacOS on the Macintosh 128k do these things?

(And indeed, although I know that modern OSs do do this, I'd be curious to see them tested in practice - how well does OS X, or any other OS come to that, run if you never ever close anything down?)

Re:Not my Grandmother (3, Insightful)

mdwh2 (535323) | more than 4 years ago | (#26583063)

She'll care when it's "Why does my computer keep running slow?" or even that she doesn't have enough memory to open applications. Especially 25 years ago, when OSs didn't swap out RAM, and RAM was very limited.

Are you actually saying that users never closing applications was intended behaviour?

Re:Not my Grandmother (0, Flamebait)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 4 years ago | (#26583003)

Just buy more ram. Don't worry about quitting. It's a mac, it'll beachball itself eventually and have to be rebooted anyway.

Re:Not my Grandmother (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#26583081)

I have two Macs at home, but I don't think my Grandmother could handle it. How do you explain the difference between quitting an application and simply closing the window? My wife has the same issue...

Why bother explaining it? Get 4 GB and let it run. If there's memory contention it will be swapped out. Perhaps have them reboot the system every week or three.

Re:Not my Grandmother (1)

dangitman (862676) | more than 4 years ago | (#26583263)

Just explain the difference between an application and a window. Grandmothers typically aren't stupid. Grandmothers of the original Mac era easily understood it. The only reason people today don't understand it is that they've gotten used to the Windows way, where a window is perceived as the application.

Re:Not my Grandmother (1)

mdwh2 (535323) | more than 5 years ago | (#26583353)

The only reason people today don't understand it is that they've gotten used to the Windows way, where a window is perceived as the application.

I've used a variety of OSs, so I don't think this is the issue. It's fundamental UI problem - there's no visual indication that the application is still running, so one assumes it isn't. This doesn't have to be a window - e.g., on AmigaOS you could close windows, but still leave a screen open for it.

Arrrgh. And many more too... (2, Interesting)

jedidiah (1196) | more than 4 years ago | (#26582171)

May you continue to be the true innovators in the industry and give the rest of us good stuff to copy from.

Re:Arrrgh. And many more too... (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 4 years ago | (#26583203)

Apple is mostly responsible for true innovation in marketing. Actually, there is another case where they did something great for everyone: firewire. (memory security issues notwithstanding...) But everything that the mac is known for was done by someone else first. What they did was make it marketable. Unfortunately they also did it very poorly. The Macintosh was a graphic-only machine with zero graphics acceleration until the release of the 8*24 GC. A moment later, the Amiga cost little more than a games console and would run rings around it with the same processor at about the same clock rate. And later Amigas were even better at being macs than macs were; an Amiga 2500 would run Mac programs and MacOS programs faster than a Macintosh IIci with the same processor (68030@25MHz.) NeXTStep was pretty usable on a Turbo Slab with a 68040@25MHz. Apple turned it into OSX, chunky and unresponsive on a dual PowerPC G5@2GHz. But wow, it sure is pretty. Apple is about marketing first.

1984 was not like 1984 (1)

fm6 (162816) | more than 4 years ago | (#26582185)

But get real people, the Mac had nothing to do with it.

Re:1984 was not like 1984 (2, Funny)

TheKidWho (705796) | more than 4 years ago | (#26582271)

Are you kidding? 1984 was exactly like 1984, the personal computer was just a ploy by the government to gain access to our very thoughts. What you don't know is that MAC OS and WINDOWS and even LINUX are all running rootkits that grant access to the NWO. Everything you type is monitored. Why do you think new computers come with video cameras standard??? So they can monitor you...

</TinFoil>

Re:1984 was not like 1984 (2, Funny)

fm6 (162816) | more than 4 years ago | (#26582431)

That's simply not true. I'm sending the Thought Police over to your house to explain to you how mistaken you are.

Re:1984 was not like 1984 (4, Funny)

Sans_A_Cause (446229) | more than 4 years ago | (#26582513)

There was no 1984. We have always lived in 2009.

Re:1984 was not like 1984 (1)

LoadWB (592248) | more than 4 years ago | (#26582567)

Which is why I use my Amiga for personal pursuits. Although, I am sure that once Obamamerica finds out that I have a non-approved device connected to the Internet, and I have thoughts of my own which are not directed by video streams of passing the buck and exceptional exceptions to hard and fast rules, and countless advertisements about non-consensual consensus, I will have to go into hiding.

Re:1984 was not like 1984 (1)

Idiomatick (976696) | more than 4 years ago | (#26583057)

Re:1984 was not like 1984 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#26583139)

I like that service. I especially like the name: Let Me Go Ogle That For You.

Has it been that long? (1)

Jonah Bomber (535788) | more than 4 years ago | (#26582213)

I love my iMac! My first computer was an Apple IIe.

Re:Has it been that long? (1)

Threni (635302) | more than 4 years ago | (#26582285)

I used an Apple iie years ago. I enjoyed sneakers, epoch, super taxman. The Macs just seemed like expensive but well marketed bollocks to me, but I was comparing them to the Amiga and the Early PC, both of which had their pros (and cons, admittedly). I'm sure if you had loads of money but struggled with 2 mouse buttons they were great. Thank heavens for Xerox's R&D, eh?

It was a ridiculous failure (4, Funny)

Bemopolis (698691) | more than 4 years ago | (#26582231)

No wireless. Less space than a nomad. Lame.

funny, it booted faster (4, Insightful)

Ancient_Hacker (751168) | more than 4 years ago | (#26582281)

25 years and computers still don't boot any faster. A 8MHz 128k Mac would boot in about 20 seconds. Now computers are clocked about 500 times faster and it takes 10 times longer. What's a factor of 5000 among friends?

Re:funny, it booted faster (1)

CannonballHead (842625) | more than 4 years ago | (#26582545)

This is especially insightful, considering recent MS hate regarding boot speeds and increasing OS requirements. It's not MS specific. It's a general OS thing...

Macs boot quickly (1)

ciaohound (118419) | more than 4 years ago | (#26582801)

Have you tried a Mac? It powers on and boots in less time than it takes to post on /.

Re:Macs boot quickly (1, Funny)

Tokerat (150341) | more than 4 years ago | (#26582883)

That's because it takes 15 minutes for the "Preview" button script to complete in Firefox for some damn reason...

Re:funny, it booted faster (1)

jaavaaguru (261551) | more than 4 years ago | (#26582929)

It's really not a general OS thing. I have new OSes on hardware that I got 4 or 5 years ago and it runs just as quick as the OSes I was running back then, if not faster. There is no reason why all OSes shouldn't be getting faster rather than slower as hardware speed increases.

Re:funny, it booted faster (4, Informative)

MouseR (3264) | more than 4 years ago | (#26582613)

EFI OpenBoot firmware has more code than the original Mac OS boot floppy, wich cheated by having 4 megs already in ROM.

So, what's your point, really?

My Apple //c and multitude of other antique hardware (including a Lisa 2) might boot faster, but they sure dont do as much.

Quit complaining and head back to your compiler!

Re:funny, it booted faster (1)

Microlith (54737) | more than 4 years ago | (#26582635)

And considering what my computer can do, compared to an 8MHz 128k Mac, I'm not surprised that it takes longer. I'm sure if you reimplemented that Mac today, you could make it boot in less than 20 seconds. It'd still be just as incapable of today's applications.

Re:funny, it booted faster (1)

Yvan256 (722131) | more than 4 years ago | (#26582701)

Even more so, I bet an emulated 8MHz 512KB Mac would boot under 1 second on today's computers.

Re:funny, it booted faster (1)

ogdenk (712300) | more than 4 years ago | (#26582907)

You don't have to bet.... I just tested it with Mini vMac and turned throttling off.

It takes less than 1/2 a second to boot System 7.01 on an emulated Mac Plus even when loaded up with lots of extensions. This is on a 1.42Ghz eMac G4 w/ 768MB of RAM.

I need to mod my eMac with an LCD though, the analog board for the CRT is slowly dying. While I'm in there I'll move a couple resistors so it runs at 1.67GHz. I'll take an eMac over a G4 iMac or mini any day.

Re:funny, it booted faster (1)

ogdenk (712300) | more than 4 years ago | (#26582825)

I don't know though.... a Mac 128 really was a joke but I can't think of much I do now that I wasn't doing with my old Mac IIci I had w/ 128MB RAM. It just took a little more patience for things like 3D rendering in Strata3D. I had Adobe premiere and a VideoSpigot card after a while as well.

I had MacOS 7.5, A/UX 3 and NetBSD/mac68k on separate SCSI drives and 2 extra NuBus video cards (for 3 monitors total).

Running a modern browser on it today would kinda suck but running software from the same time period, it was quite an effective machine. It was a bit slower than the monster IIfx I replaced it with though.

For basic computing tasks, the old Mac Plus (my first real 16-bit machine) w/ 4MB RAM was an OK machine for word processing, BBS'ing, light database work and playing with HyperCard. The 128 was obsolete before it left the production line.

Re:funny, it booted faster (4, Informative)

StreetStealth (980200) | more than 4 years ago | (#26582759)

Honestly, I think the evolution of suspend states has more than made up for it. Granted, you're still drawing a bit of power while in sleep, but modern Macs use next to nothing in that state and wake near-instantaneously.

Coupled with an OS that can run for weeks without a reboot, I've no complaints.

Re:funny, it booted faster (1)

jrothwell97 (968062) | more than 4 years ago | (#26583209)

In the first Macs, the system software was stored in the ROM, and didn't have to be read from slow, clunky, rewriteable disks. There's also the minor fact that the Mac 128 didn't have to start the window compositor, the wi-fi extensions, the journaled file systems, quickly check the directory structure and file system integrity, and load several gigabytes of data from the disk, whilst also activating the swap and pre-emptively buffering data during boot.

And in other news... Happy 40th PDP-10 (4, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#26582317)

Many of the original processing concepts of the Macintosh 68000 CPU came from Digital Equipment Corporation's PDP-10 which celebrated its 40th birthday last year. The data/address separation as well as the instruction set sequencing via a two-step clock. The PDP-10 "DDT" debugging tool also had an equivalent that could be invoked by using the "programmers switch" (which was a cheap little plastic doohicky which slid into place on the side of the original Macs and, when pressed, would directly activate a switch on the motherboard and drop you into a debugger)

Re:And in other news... Happy 40th PDP-10 (1)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 4 years ago | (#26582589)

Its interesting to speculate where DEC might have gone if they had not had such a bad case of the IBMs.

Re:And in other news... Happy 40th PDP-10 (1)

ogdenk (712300) | more than 4 years ago | (#26582953)

I literally shed a tear when DEC got bought by Compaq. They were one of the early pioneers in cost effective computing and had some of the coolest machines I've ever laid hands on. We still have an old AlphaServer 4000 in production use at work.

Re:And in other news... Happy 40th PDP-10 (4, Informative)

Guy Harris (3803) | more than 4 years ago | (#26582969)

The data/address separation

Are you referring to the memory buses here? The only data/address separation in the 68K instruction set was the separation between data and address registers, which the PDP-10 didn't have (it just had 16 GPRs).

The "PDP" that the 68K more closely resembles from a programming point of view is the PDP-11, with more complex addressing modes and an operand/operand orientation rather than the register/memory orientation of the PDP-10.

Computer with a mouse AT HOME?! (5, Interesting)

Tom Arneberg (93330) | more than 4 years ago | (#26582323)

I got one of the first Macs. It wasn't my first computer with a mouse; we had those at work for chip design. But those cost over $100K each. My fellow engineers couldn't believe that I got a computer at home with a mouse and windows/menus for only $2500!

It even made it into our family Christmas card photo that year:


http://arneberg.com/family/xmas/xmas1984.jpg

(This is my first-ever slashdot post...how do I get a web link to work?)
   

Re:Computer with a mouse AT HOME?! (1)

LoadWB (592248) | more than 4 years ago | (#26582507)

And if you read here often enough you would know that you have now opened yourself up to an onslaught of jokes about passing or giving birth to that thing.

Nerd. heheheh

Re:Computer with a mouse AT HOME?! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#26582575)

NERD! [arneberg.com] .

Oh wait.

Re: first-ever slashdot post...how do I get a link (1)

MRe_nl (306212) | more than 4 years ago | (#26582587)

Instructions for auto-linking are at the bottom of the "Post Comment" page under "URLs".

cheers.

Re:Computer with a mouse AT HOME?! (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#26582599)

You have a 5 digit ID and this is your first post? You've really been lurking for a decade?

Re:Computer with a mouse AT HOME?! (1)

CannonballHead (842625) | more than 4 years ago | (#26582611)

HTML anchor tag. <a href="http://arneberg.com/family/xmas/xmas1984.jpg">family picture</a>

Re:Computer with a mouse AT HOME?! (1)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 4 years ago | (#26582661)

When a friend of my dads got one of the first macs we went around to his place to remonstrate with him. We pointed out that there was no software to buy for it. You couldn't see much on the tiny screen and the way you used it it looked like a toy.

But I noticed that they keyboard was small. It only had the buttons you needed, you could select with the mouse, and the whole system left a lot of space on a cluttered desk.

I wondered where the computer was. In the keyboard or behind the screen? I couldn't figure it out.

Re:Computer with a mouse AT HOME?! (1)

bored_engineer (951004) | more than 4 years ago | (#26582799)

html [w3schools.com] is how I've always done it. I'm sure that someone fellow who looks down on mere mortals with disdain will explain that I'm doing it all wrong, though.

Re:Computer with a mouse AT HOME?! (5, Insightful)

funky49 (182835) | more than 4 years ago | (#26583147)

Sir,

You are so awesome and I'm so glad the mother of your child was willing to go along with the picture.

Re:Computer with a mouse AT HOME?! (2, Informative)

Locke2005 (849178) | more than 4 years ago | (#26583163)

Xerox made computers with a GUI and mouse before Apple, but they cost a fortune, and were pieces of feces. The disk drive on the Interlisp D machine I used was powered by a rubber belt (like a vacuum cleaner). And just like a vacuum cleaner, it occasionally popped off or broke. Also, the entire file system was stored in Lisp nodes, so when you deleted a large directory, it stopped doing anything for over a minute while it garbage collected all the deleted files.

Alternatively (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#26582347)

This month, I prefer to celebrate the 26th anniversary of the Compaq Portable, the machine that kicked off the process of market competition that resulted in the affordable and open-standards-based systems that the majority of users enjoy today.

Re:Alternatively (1)

multisync (218450) | more than 5 years ago | (#26583377)

Yes, thank you IBM for using off-the-shelf parts to save money. It made it possible for a lot of us to do the same thing and assemble our own systems.

Presents (2, Funny)

hendrix2k (1099161) | more than 4 years ago | (#26582381)

Xerox wanted to send a present, but they decided the GUI they sent for the baby shower is the gift that keeps on giving.

Institute for the Future? (1)

microbee (682094) | more than 4 years ago | (#26582389)

And "think tank"?

I want nothing to do with that.

mac w128K of RAM - so little power, but powerfull (3, Interesting)

acomj (20611) | more than 4 years ago | (#26582435)

It amazes me now, how we computed with so little RAM and no Hard Disk. I don't know how much ram Cell phones have but its probably more..

Those old macs 8 mhz processor 128 Kbytes (512 soon after.)

full specs
http://lowendmac.com/compact/original-macintosh-128k.html [lowendmac.com]

Of course there were times when those old macs would spit out the disk you were using and ask you to put in the system disks... The Mac SE with harddrive couldn't come soon enough.

Re:mac w128K of RAM - so little power, but powerfu (1)

Sans_A_Cause (446229) | more than 4 years ago | (#26582737)

That was probably the decendent of AppleWorks for the Apple II. That suite of programs was a spreadsheet, database manager, AND word processor and ran on a computer with a whopping 64k of RAM.

Re:mac w128K of RAM - so little power, but powerfu (1)

Amazing Quantum Man (458715) | more than 4 years ago | (#26582827)

Obviously, you didn't have a Mac Plus with a (25-pin) SCSI port.

Re:mac w128K of RAM - so little power, but powerfu (2)

HTH NE1 (675604) | more than 5 years ago | (#26583349)

I have a Mac Plus. I got it specifically to run a particular version of AppleShare that allowed you to boot an Apple IIgs over an AppleTalk connection. And I never got around to actually doing it. Hmm, now there's something I can look into doing once I get that desk rebuilt. I know I've got an old 40 MB SCSI drive lying around somewhere....

Re:mac w128K of RAM - so little power, but powerfu (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#26582945)

My old TI-99/4A had a 16-bit 3 Mhz processor and 16K. yeah baby. It's amazing how clean your code gets when you only have 16k to play with....

Re:mac w128K of RAM - so little power, but powerfu (3, Informative)

ogdenk (712300) | more than 4 years ago | (#26583025)

Ummm.... the Mac plus had SCSI and the 512 supported a hard drive they made for the floppy port. I think that drive worked with the 128 as well. The floppy port HDD's were pretty slow but they worked.

When the Plus was a new machine, I had an Atari ST at home though. The ST was cheaper, just as fast, had built-in MIDI, an awesome audio chipset, color graphics, an ugly GUI and much cooler games. I got a Mac Plus later.

Apple is dying (0, Troll)

Sans_A_Cause (446229) | more than 4 years ago | (#26582451)

Dying a long, slow death. Oh god, when will it ever end?

Re:Apple is dying (1)

Tokerat (150341) | more than 4 years ago | (#26582935)

Dying a long, slow death. Oh god, when will it ever end?

It's not. Get over it.

Re:Apple is dying (5, Funny)

ogdenk (712300) | more than 4 years ago | (#26583039)

Heh. They've been dying since 1977 according to most industry analysts.

"Is it easy enough for my grandmother to use it?" (0, Flamebait)

bugs2squash (1132591) | more than 4 years ago | (#26582487)

"... People on the Macintosh project were the first people to talk about a product in that way."

Bullshit, I bet that distinction goes to the makers of false teeth or a similar product with geriatric fangirls.

Hat Tip (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#26582491)

Thanks, Doug!

Slashdot Tue Dec 09, 2008: The Mouse Turns 40
http://hardware.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=08/12/09/163205 [slashdot.org]

Wikipedia: Douglas Engelbart
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Douglas_Engelbart [wikipedia.org]

Wikipedia: The Mother of All Demos
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Mother_of_All_Demos [wikipedia.org]

and of course,

Folklore.org: 118 stories about the development of Apple's original Macintosh computer, and the people who created it.
http://www.folklore.org/index.py [folklore.org]

I have a Mac 128 (2, Interesting)

elmerfud2000 (1349717) | more than 4 years ago | (#26582593)

I have a Mac 128 with an Apple Imagewriter, one of the first ones where they used a regular DB25 cable instead of the Appletalk cable. I can't believe its 25 years old. I bought it in 1990 for the printer. I think the lady said she paid $4500 for it. At the time I told her that could buy her a very nice '386

Memory Lane... (1)

CrazyTalk (662055) | more than 4 years ago | (#26582797)

Macs I have owned (or used):

512K Fat Mac in Grad School - our lab bought a couple of these when they came out

Mac LC - my first Mac. Cashed in my 401k and bought it, a color monitor, and printer for about $6,000

Mac Centris 660 AV - Two processors, and speech recognition! Sort of.

iBook G4 - needed something to sync with my iTunes, and my PC just wasn't cutting it.

And now....Shiny new iMac used mostly to run World of Warcraft

I still have mine... and it still works. (1)

phallstrom (69697) | more than 4 years ago | (#26583033)

My dad bought one when it came out... passed it onto me, and it's now sitting in my kids room where they either pretend to work or play some basic games on it. Only problem I've had is the video went out and had to reinforce the connection a bit, but that did give me a chance to look at the engraved signatures on the inside.

Not a bad investment all things considered... wish other computers would last that long...

It's not easy enough for my grandmother to use (3, Funny)

Locke2005 (849178) | more than 4 years ago | (#26583093)

My grandmother's dead, you insensitive clod!

oh just roll over and die already (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#26583159)

apple was a great company when it first started, but sadly their products have gone down hill since, so much so that they're now almost a PC. some fans still want the glory days to come back and believe apple makes nothing but gold but the fact is they never had an original idea that really mattered, and simply steal from others, then claim ownership, and still find a way to mess up a good idea. i've had all kinds of apple products break on me time and time again, and apple will never see a single penny of my money.

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