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Jumping To Ubuntu At Work For Non-Linux Geeks

timothy posted more than 5 years ago | from the there's-no-ubuntu-topic dept.

Linux Business 181

twigles writes "I'm a network engineer, meaning I spend my days dealing with things like selective route advertisements, peering, and traffic engineering; I'm not a Linux admin or developer. About 6 months ago I finally got fed up enough with my experience on Windows XP to jump ship to Ubuntu 8.04, despite not having much Linux experience, particularly on the desktop. Read my ramblings for an engineer's take on taking what can be a pretty intimidating plunge for us Linux noobcakes."

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181 comments

Yawn (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26597301)

No offense but this isn't very enlightening or insightful.

Re:Yawn (2, Funny)

pnevin (168332) | more than 5 years ago | (#26597397)

Speak for yourself. I just learned that someone's apparently still listening to The Prodigy.

If you don't like a story, please don't post. (-1, Troll)

Futurepower(R) (558542) | more than 5 years ago | (#26597441)

If you don't like a story, please don't post comments.

Re:If you don't like a story, please don't post. (1)

JickL (1398643) | more than 5 years ago | (#26597691)

Great attitude you got there! At least the AC seems to have bothered to RTFA.

Re:If you don't like a story, please don't post. (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26598087)

if you don't like the comments, shut the fuck up, you whining
little bitch.

Traffic Engineer? (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26597303)

Repeat after me, you are not an engineer.

Until you go through the same hell in college that degreed mechanical/electrical/aero/civil engineers go through in college and have a chance to obtain a PE, you are not an engineer.

Re:Traffic Engineer? (2, Insightful)

CarpetShark (865376) | more than 5 years ago | (#26597457)

He's also quite madly irresponsible, if he's advocating non-techie people switching to Linux in work without the support of a sympathetic admin. Sounds like a sure way to lose that promotion.

Re:Traffic Engineer? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26599707)

Way to subvert the university system for your job training program and rent seeking credentialism bullshit. Just like the lawyers did. Shameful.

Noobcakes (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26597309)

I hereby nominate noobcakes for "word of the year"

A Flock Of Seagulls? (3, Informative)

auric_dude (610172) | more than 5 years ago | (#26597331)

Submit an article. Get people to view your hair style. Profit ??

Re:A Flock Of Seagulls? (1)

Yvan256 (722131) | more than 5 years ago | (#26597779)

"Service Temporarily Unavailable" doesn't look like a hair style to me.

Re:A Flock Of Seagulls? (2, Informative)

Squeeonline (1323439) | more than 5 years ago | (#26599867)

...Learning how to use the br tags?

Priceless.

for everything else, there's Mastercard.

WTF? (1)

mangu (126918) | more than 5 years ago | (#26597341)

FTFA:

my company had installed so many things on my laptop that it crashed or locked often, and booting took more than 20 minutes. There was no way around this while still on the domain, and if you run Windows here, you have to be on the domain

One of my goals was to have everything be as easy as Windows.

So, what he's looking for is how to make a boot in Ubuntu take more than 20 minutes?

Re:WTF? (1)

PrescriptionWarning (932687) | more than 5 years ago | (#26597427)

he said "as easy as windows", not "as fast as windows". 20 minute boot time isn't easy nor difficult, just slow and frustrating.

Re:WTF? (1)

azgard (461476) | more than 5 years ago | (#26598165)

Maybe he thought that Windows took booting "easy".

Re:WTF? (0, Flamebait)

kerashi (917149) | more than 5 years ago | (#26597431)

My Windows box only takes 15 minutes, with all the crap that runs at startup! Still, a PC with an Intel Core 2 Extreme QX9650 may boot faster than most.

Re:WTF? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26598583)

You are doing something very, very wrong. Perhaps you need to run a registry cleaner and stop installing unneeded crap on your machine. My work laptop has had the same install of XP on it for about 2 years. It boots in about 2.5 minutes. Not a speed demon by any stretch, but 15 minutes? WTF?

Humor in Slashdot (2, Informative)

troll8901 (1397145) | more than 5 years ago | (#26598765)

You didn't hear the Whooooooosh!! flying past you?

I suggest buying these two products:

  • Humor for Humans 3.1
  • Common Sense for Humans 1.4

The open source equivalences require you to build our own databases (by reading lots and lots of Slashdot), which takes too long. These two proprietary products allows you to gain Humor and Common Sense capabilities instantly.

Re:WTF? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26598761)

My Windows box only takes 15 minutes

What is it with so many Slashdot readers being so completely inept at administering Windows?

No SFTP? (3, Informative)

dvice_null (981029) | more than 5 years ago | (#26597347)

From TFA: "Also, there's no SCP or SFTP feature that I can find comparable to SecureCRT."

I don't know what SecureCRT is like, but you can use the file manager as SFTP client and bookmark pages if you want to. Or you can install Filezilla (the new version can handle SFTP also). Not sure what version comes with Ubuntu 8.04.

Re:No SFTP? (1)

kerashi (917149) | more than 5 years ago | (#26597483)

From my reading, it's not a matter of having no options that can handle it, but a matter of having them all in one single easy to use client with a large feature set.

Unfortunately, SecureCRT is proprietary. So no go on a Linux version, and just a quick search doesn't turn up much in the way of alternatives. One thing it DID turn up was SecPanel, which is a GUI for SSH and SCP. I doubt it has quite the feature set, and I haven't tried it, but it might be worth looking into.

Sshfs is your friend. (4, Informative)

Kjellander (163404) | more than 5 years ago | (#26598915)

It's so much easier to just mount the remote dir with fuse, that to use any client.

sudo apt-get install sshfs
sshfs user@host:dir/ dest/

And you're done. Use the normal file handler after that.

Don't want to type in passwords? Use ssh-keygen and ssh-add. Don't wanna type in the mount line? Just put them all in a bash script and mount them all first time you log in. Or get the old ones with 'history | grep sshfs' and tun it by typing in the number in front of the command after an exclamation mark, like so: '!679'

Re:No SFTP? (1)

dna_(c)(tm)(r) (618003) | more than 5 years ago | (#26597679)

I think both scp and sftp are installed with the openssh package. Command line tools of course.

And in the menu 'Places' there is an item 'Connect to Server...' that launches Nautilus using the sftp, ftp, webDav, smb protocols. You might have to install openssh for that too, I'm not sure.

Re:No SFTP? (1)

cr_nucleus (518205) | more than 5 years ago | (#26597899)

From TFA: "Also, there's no SCP or SFTP feature that I can find comparable to SecureCRT."

WTF ?? Nautilus does handle mounting file system over ssh. It's just as simple as connecting to a samba share.
It's event better than secureCRT since it's completely integrated.

Re:No SFTP? (1)

quippe (767072) | more than 5 years ago | (#26598595)

I think it's not nautilus itself; should be a new interesting library, gvfs, which replaced the infamous gnome-vfs and provides nice features as managing mounts via dbus, give a new solid base to the file dialog and provide an unified way to configure mime handlers

Re:No SFTP? (1)

bartonlp (1241662) | more than 5 years ago | (#26598659)

There is a sshfs module that lets you mount a remote file system just like you mount anything else. It is secure and fast. Google sshfs for more information.

Re:No SFTP? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26598697)

From TFA: "Also, there's no SCP or SFTP feature that I can find comparable to SecureCRT."

I don't know what SecureCRT is like, but you can use the file manager as SFTP client and bookmark pages if you want to. Or you can install Filezilla (the new version can handle SFTP also). Not sure what version comes with Ubuntu 8.04.

We use SecureCRT, all this is Putty in a Non-free package with some bells.

I choose to use putty instead.

Since I find the extras in SecureCRT get in my way.

All the functions of putty can be done from the command line in linux anyway.

Re:No SFTP? (1)

ucblockhead (63650) | more than 5 years ago | (#26598795)

Or you can be a real programmer, and use the command line.

Re:No SFTP? (2, Informative)

Matt Perry (793115) | more than 5 years ago | (#26598937)

SecureCRT uses tabs in a window for each session you have open. You can open a new tab with a "sftp>" prompt and enter sftp commands, although I think that using filezilla or a file manager like you mention is much easier.

The best part about SecureCRT is that you can install the lrzsz package on your Linux boxes and then use sz and rz commands in the remote session to send and receive files to/from your local computer. No need to mess around with scp, sftp, or opening other windows or tabs. It's very nice, and far easier and faster to use than other methods.

zmodem (1)

coryking (104614) | more than 5 years ago | (#26599275)

zModem support is the *best* feature of SecureCRT. Much easier then the alternatives. While I've switched to PuTTY, I sure miss it.

Re:No SFTP? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26599111)

I think this is a wider problem in Linux with some things like SSH and Package management. They are so well integrated that users dont find them. Coming from Windows users think that they need a separate application for everything, and search it from the internet or something.

Not again (-1, Offtopic)

El Lobo (994537) | more than 5 years ago | (#26597357)

Just another "wishful thinking" article. I'm very glad that you enjoy (or think you enjoy) your Linux. But excuse me, news for nerds this is not.

Now, back to enjoy my Windows, knowing that an article about is not interesting or enlightening either, Let everyone use whatever tool they want.

Re:Not again (3, Interesting)

PrescriptionWarning (932687) | more than 5 years ago | (#26597443)

I think the guy's main point was "give it a try, you might just like it". It didn't sound in any way like he was trying to make you a convert, it was more for someone like him who as come to not exactly enjoy their windows experience due to all the bloat of modern day security apps business tend to require.

Re:Not again (0, Offtopic)

El Lobo (994537) | more than 5 years ago | (#26597451)

Sure, but that is an OPINION, (a politically correct one in this place), but... an ARTICLE??? An article should be informative, interesting, or fun... not a biased or anecdotal opinion. That are what the comments are for.

Re:Not again (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26597487)

You must be new here. In a few days you will be posting your 1337 H4x0R adventures in 00B00NT00 and showing the world your ugliness.
You might want to install a so called CYGWIN(Yes, like all free software it is named after a swearword/mental/physical disability) to get you started on the UNIX gulag mentality.

Re:Not again (1)

RedK (112790) | more than 5 years ago | (#26598033)

I thought nerds were usually open minded and wanted to try new stuff ?

Re:Not again (1)

In hydraulis (1318473) | more than 5 years ago | (#26598391)

Let everyone use whatever tool they want.

Your sig:

It's time to realise that Abble's products are the biggest abomination these days. Just say NO to the dumb iAbble way!

You, sir, are a hypocrite.

For password management try using KeePassX (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26597387)

For password management try using KeePassX http://www.keepassx.org/
It's free and cross platform.

Linux will not "get there" until this happens (1, Interesting)

bogaboga (793279) | more than 5 years ago | (#26597407)

From the submission:

My experience in switching from Windows XP to Ubuntu 8.04 has not been all positive, but overall I'm incredibly glad I did it. I used to hate my entire computing experience, now I just hate my email client. My coworkers say things like, "wow, it took Notepad over 10 seconds to load," and I chuckle. It's tempting to interpret this to mean Windows would be a better choice in an environment not bogged down by constant security scanning and filtering, and to some degree that's accurate. However I've found that most of the pain in switching comes from having to tinker a little to get the Linux equivalent of your Windows program working.

Remember the author had time to try to make things work. How many folks have time to tinker with text config files or a system help mechanism that is incomplete at best? I wish Linux fan boys can put their bigotry aside and listen for once.

For Linux to become main stream the following must happen.

Support for relevant applications, out of the box - not via a separate repository that must be enabled. (Key word, - relevant)

A single API for applications so that "Linux" is one platform, not many that must be supported for many versions. Without this, all efforts to make Linux the mainstream are thinned, customers get confused which leads to less adoption.

A single desktop, so that Linux is one desktop, not several. Otherwise the other efforts, such as the help desk, marketing and research all multiply their efforts making everything impractical.

I am sure those waiting for this to happen will love KDE 4.2 which will be released in 2 days. Trust me, it's a different animal all together. Things actually work and work well in the coming release. The earlier releases were a total disaster.

Re:Linux will not "get there" until this happens (2, Interesting)

kerashi (917149) | more than 5 years ago | (#26597539)

There are a few reasons I don't use Linux on my main box right now, and this hits the biggest of them.

Anyone who has ever tried to install a program not in the repository will know what a pain it can be. Getting stuck in dependency hell is still a very real problem, and while repositories help they are no substitute to fixing the problem.

In Windows, if you get an installer you have a reasonable expectation of being able to run it. Sometimes you hit dependencies, but not often, and they're generally the same for most programs.

Another big thing is having different package managers. What to do when a developer distributes a .rpm but not a .deb, or the other way around?

And I won't even start bitching about the 3D Graphics support...

Still, Windows isn't perfect, and Linux is far better in many ways. Having a software repository is awesome, and saves a lot of time searching for programs. However, until these problems are addressed, many developers will continue to develop only for Windows.

(I do use Linux on a regular basis, and find it does an awesome job for many things. Just not everything)

Re:Linux will not "get there" until this happens (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26597701)

Please remember one thing, Linux is not trying to be Windows.

I wish people would stop trying to lead and or label it that way.

Re:Linux will not "get there" until this happens (1)

karnal (22275) | more than 5 years ago | (#26598021)

Why wouldn't people think Linux is trying to be Windows? They're both Operating Systems for PCs; they both give you access to web browsing, creating documents, enjoying multimedia files and generally getting work done.

They may not be targeting the same mindshare for the desktop, but they're both capable of doing the same thing. In that regard, I'd bet most people would compare the two as similar if they had the chance.

Re:Linux will not "get there" until this happens (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26597901)

Anyone who has ever tried to install a program not in the repository will know what a pain it can be. Getting stuck in dependency hell is still a very real problem, and while repositories help they are no substitute to fixing the problem.

So how often do you install windows applications that aren't compiled, linked and packaged for that OS distribution? See how moronic the argument is?

Usually on a linux/bsd distro, you at least have the option of compiling / linking yourself.

Re:Linux will not "get there" until this happens (3, Insightful)

ozmanjusri (601766) | more than 5 years ago | (#26598407)

What to do when a developer distributes a .rpm but not a .deb, or the other way around?

Use Alien [softpedia.com] .

Re:Linux will not "get there" until this happens (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26597543)

A single desktop, so that Linux is one desktop, not several. Otherwise the other efforts, such as the help desk, marketing and research all multiply their efforts making everything impractical.

Many GNU/Linux users like the possibility to choose your own desktop (window manager). The possibility to choose is a feature and advantage of FOSS and who doesn't like it, simply shouldn't use it :-)

If KDE or Gnome was the only window manager in GNU/Linux, how would be possible to make a lightweight distribution for older computers?

I don't think GNU/Linux will become main stream neither it's users really want it. //Dan KrÃtký

You got it wrong (1)

bogaboga (793279) | more than 5 years ago | (#26598349)

Let me put it this way. Linux should put [all] resources on one desktop environment which should result into a wonderful desktop while leaving the possibility of using another should there be need. What's wrong with that?

Re:You got it wrong (1)

skeeto (1138903) | more than 5 years ago | (#26598379)

I think you completely misunderstand how all this software gets developed. There isn't some big company that makes all the software you find in a single distribution.

Re:You got it wrong (0, Redundant)

bogaboga (793279) | more than 5 years ago | (#26598421)

Now, if that is the problem, then why do we spend resources on all there desktop environments which have given us lots of choice but at the same time, robbed us of "hands" to make an impact where it matters most?

It that is the problem, then let's solve it. Fixing the API or making it at least predictable would be a good first step. This approach appears to work for Apple...that is a software is made to work for OSX and indeed it does. But for Linux, more questions about the distro have to be answered.

In addition, different library versions within the "Linux" (read distro) ecosystem make it difficult to create software that will run across the board. I don't know why this concept is so difficult to understand. Why?

Re:You got it wrong (2, Insightful)

Daengbo (523424) | more than 5 years ago | (#26599005)

Statically link your binaries or create a startup script to include the necessary (and included) libraries. It's done all the time. Lots of proprietary software that's distributed on Linux is packaged this way. It's no different, really, than OS X's disk image method.

Do you even understand the system you denigrate?

Re:You got it wrong (1)

Daengbo (523424) | more than 5 years ago | (#26598971)

If everyone puts all resources towards one desktop, how can there be another one to use "should there be a need."

Really, when we follow that reasoning, you should just choose the desktop every person on the Earth will use. All Hail Emperor Bogaboga!!!!

BTW, you're a complete idiot.

Re:You got it wrong (1)

bogaboga (793279) | more than 5 years ago | (#26599247)

Did you see "[all]" ? If I were to mark your script, I would call you a complete idiot.

Re:You got it wrong (1)

Daengbo (523424) | more than 5 years ago | (#26599393)

Quoting from your original post:

A single desktop, so that Linux is one desktop, not several. Otherwise the other efforts, such as the help desk, marketing and research all multiply their efforts making everything impractical.

You then go on to say in a later post:

Let me put it this way. Linux should put [all] resources on one desktop environment which should result into a wonderful desktop while leaving the possibility of using another should there be need.

You want a single desktop. How, then, can one leave "the possibility of using another should there be need?" People see a need now, so they use different ones now and they help develop these.

p.s. You're writing in English, not pseudo-code. Use brackets correctly [wikihow.com] .

Re:You got it wrong (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26599773)

before calling people idiots i would rethink what you wrote.
it is a strength of linux that the desktop
is modularized, configurable and replaceable.

it is also a strength that multiple 'desktops' are being developed.

Re:You got it wrong (1)

Draek (916851) | more than 5 years ago | (#26599785)

Let me put it this way. Linux should put [all] resources on one desktop environment which should result into a wonderful desktop while leaving the possibility of using another should there be need. What's wrong with that?

"The mythical man-month", for starters, the issue of the philosophy underlying The One And Only DE (simplicity, flexibility, aesthetics, which one takes priority over the other two?) for another, and then there's the fact that if another desktop enviroment is at all developed, then it's not "all" resources and we're back where we originally were.

Re:Linux will not "get there" until this happens (1)

downix (84795) | more than 5 years ago | (#26597999)

Let us analyze the following:

>Support for relevant applications, out of the box - not via a separate repository that must be enabled. (Key word, - relevant)

Then you become dependent on a single source for what applications are available. By allowing, and enabling multiple repositories means that you can offer more choice, and choice is good. Imagine a world with only Coke products. No Coffee, no Tea, no 12 year aged Scotch Whisky, just Coke. Do you complain that you need to go to a seperate grocery store to some products?

>A single API for applications so that "Linux" is one platform, not many that must be supported for many versions. Without this, >all efforts to make Linux the mainstream are thinned, customers get confused which leads to less adoption.

A single API is a security exploit waiting to happen. And how would customers get confused, as they don't, in general, program.

>A single desktop, so that Linux is one desktop, not several. Otherwise the other efforts, such as the help desk, marketing and >research all multiply their efforts making everything impractical.

Absolutely incorrect. I work for a very large, public company, which does sell Linux based products. We manage to handle the differences between the various desktops quickly and easily, even those among us in the support department that do not use Linux.

Re:Linux will not "get there" until this happens (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26598049)

Meh, while I'm an experienced Linux user I have not done any tweaking using text files or anything like that on my Ubuntu system. That is part of the reason why I use Ubuntu. I want to get stuff done, not tweak crap. In fact, I have to do less tweaking to an Ubuntu install than Windows so I don't really get where you're coming from.

As for packages, well out of the box Ubuntu has a frickin crap-ton of packages compared to Windows. On Ubuntu I pull up the package manager GUI and click install while on Windows I would have to go out searching to find it, then hope it installs, etc. Sure, if you need something not in the stock repositories it's going to take more work but not any more than it would be for the same program in Windows. Usually when you do have to do more work to get something you're working with something that isn't even available on Windows so now you're talking about something completely different.

I see you're a KDE user, maybe that's why you think you need to tweak a whole bunch of crap on Linux to make it nice.

Jesus Christ... (-1, Flamebait)

Computershack (1143409) | more than 5 years ago | (#26597411)

I ain't a fan of Linux but even I can do more than this dufus. FFS, he spent most of his time in XP via Virtualbox. It'd been better if the article had been titled "What you can do on XP running in virtualbox on Ubuntu." Did he actually do anything other than run a standard Ubuntu install and then shove XP on a VM?

I hate to think how shit a Windows admin he is if this is the sum total of his abilities in Linux. As I said, I'm not a fan of Linux by any shot but even with the amount of dabbling I've done, I can do tenfold what this moron can merely by using the brain God gave me accompanied with help from Google search and Ubuntu Forums. Hell, if you're going to do as much in XP as he was when he ran Ubuntu, you might as well stick with XP.

At least I did the fucking job properly and didn't even use WINE.

How would you replace Visio? (2, Informative)

tepples (727027) | more than 5 years ago | (#26597489)

I ain't a fan of Linux but even I can do more than this dufus.

The only things he told us that he ran on virtualized Windows were Microsoft Visio and the password manager. With a viable alternative to Visio, he might not have been tempted to set up virtualized Windows in the first place. What would you have used to replace Visio?

Re:How would you replace Visio? (1)

kerashi (917149) | more than 5 years ago | (#26597567)

A quick search on OSAlt.com turns up kivio, Dia, OOo Draw, and ArgoUML. While they probably don't have the feature set of Visio, there are alternatives.

Re:How would you replace Visio? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26597649)

Did you read the bit where it's a "de facto" industry standard?

From another comms person's view, without visio you will struggle

Re:How would you replace Visio? (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26597845)

OOo Draw is like creating stick figures, its not even remotely a replacement for visio, any more than MS Paint is a replacement for visio.

When a network engineer is asking for a replacement for visio they are looking for a program that will use visio templates provided by hardware vendors for the specific devices. Those templates are not just a picture of the device but include some amount of manipulation; such as a cisco 12000 chassis and seperate blade templates to load up the chassis EXACTLY the way its setup in your network.

I hate MS with a purple passion and hate the windows community equally. But I do concurr that a template compatible replacement for visio does not exist.

Re:How would you replace Visio? (2, Informative)

markdavis (642305) | more than 5 years ago | (#26597945)

>OOo Draw is like creating stick figures, its not even remotely a replacement for visio, any more than MS Paint is a replacement for visio.

Obviously you have not *really* USED OOo Draw's flowcart and diagramming features before; it is certainly no "Visio" but:

1) It is object oriented, and vector based
2) Objects can be labeled, grouped, scaled, etc
3) Objects can be connected with various connector types
4) Objects can be moved while retaining connections to other objects
5) Template objects can be created and used
6) Controlling styles can be used across objects

So comparing OOo Draw to MS-Paint is *far* more insulting than comparing MS-Visio to OOo Draw.

Re:How would you replace Visio? (0)

tepples (727027) | more than 5 years ago | (#26598195)

[In OpenOffice.org Draw,] Template objects can be created and used

But can OOo Draw use template objects created for Visio by hardware vendors? Or do you expect hardware vendors to re-create all template objects for OOo Draw (not bloody likely at this point)?

Re:How would you replace Visio? (3, Informative)

markdavis (642305) | more than 5 years ago | (#26598469)

As far as I am aware, no, you cannot directly use Visio objects in OpenOffice. However, there are lots of objects available if you don't want to draw them yourself. For example:

http://openoffice.blogs.com/openoffice/2006/10/custom_openoffi.html [blogs.com]
http://lautman.net/mark/coo/index.html [lautman.net]

Or, you can convert many Visio VSS files into objects that *can* be read by other programs, such as OpenOffice. For example:

http://www.gnome.ru/fileformats/stencils.html [gnome.ru]

Will hardware vendors release their objects/stencils in something non-proprietary? As you said- not likely for now. But that doesn't mean OpenOffice Draw isn't perfectly capable of creating nice diagrams. In fact, people tend to grossly underestimate what can be done in OpenOffice Draw; mostly because many of the powerful features aren't immediately obvious and/or it is positioned more as a vector drawing program and not a diagramming program.

Re:How would you replace Visio? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26599407)

Inkscape can do all the common Visio things and can be made to work with it if the Visio output is saved in .wmf or .emf instead of the proprietary .vsd format.

Password Program: KeepPassX (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26597413)

Hello sir,

I think i read that KeepPassX can be used in Linux and Windows,
using the same repository.

Check it out!

Cheers

Re:Password Program: KeepPassX, Password Gorilla (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26598395)

Password Gorilla is compatible with Password Safe databases and works on both Windows and Linux.

Who is this guy? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26597517)

I'm a network engineer, meaning I configure routers, switches, firewalls, and the occasional Unix/Linux box. I don't write code or script, though I have a little experience in both of those areas.

Not only is he a nobody he offers little unique insight, this guy is suffering from "newbs enlightment fever". Why is this blogosphere pollution here?

Re:Who is this guy? (3, Funny)

Spy der Mann (805235) | more than 5 years ago | (#26597599)

Not only is he a nobody he offers little unique insight

GASP! Wow, I never thought about it. You're ABSOLUTELY RIGHT, Mr. Anonymous Coward!

Re:Who is this guy? (1)

quadrox (1174915) | more than 5 years ago | (#26599259)

Just because someone is a hypocrite doesn't mean they aren't right. Just thought I'd throw that out there...

For printable documents... (1)

Spy der Mann (805235) | more than 5 years ago | (#26597583)

Just export as PDF.

This is something that I still don't get: Why do businesses require all printable documents to be written in a WRITABLE format? Oh, right. Word doesn't have one by default. Why Innovate when you got 100% of the market?

Re:For printable documents... (1)

Richard_at_work (517087) | more than 5 years ago | (#26599283)

MS was going to include PDF save capability in Office 2007, but Adobe threatened antitrust action so MS made the PDF and XPS save capability a separate installation.

http://my-tech-tips.blogspot.com/2006/11/adobe-threatens-microsoft-over-office.html [blogspot.com]

http://www.computerweekly.com/Articles/2006/06/05/216271/microsoft-drops-pdf-option-after-adobe-threat.htm [computerweekly.com]

So blame Adobe for this lack of ability, its certainly not Microsofts fault...

What the hell? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26597683)

A network engineer running IM software, music players and Amazons MP3 whatever on his admin box?

Sounds to me like switching to linux is but a minor problem here.

What's wrong with Dia (1)

xeoron (639412) | more than 5 years ago | (#26597743)

Why did he not replace Visio with Dia?

Re:What's wrong with Dia (4, Funny)

Jantastic (196238) | more than 5 years ago | (#26597873)

Why did he not replace Visio with Dia?

Because he was running late for his appointment at the hairdresser

Re:What's wrong with Dia (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26597913)

Dia is fine if he is creating a non-shared, vanilla, block diagram illustration. If he needs to work with existing Visio diagrams already on the main file server, or use templates provided by vendors like HP and Cisco, he doesn't have a recourse.

required Linux tools .. (1)

viralMeme (1461143) | more than 5 years ago | (#26597793)

A pretty impressive set of tools, now you only left out this one [elitecarcare.co.uk]

--

click on reply, nothing happens, fire up textpad and type in what you were going to say, before you forget, back to slashdot as the page has finally loaded .. :)

Linux not Ubuntu (0, Flamebait)

markdavis (642305) | more than 5 years ago | (#26597797)

Here we go again with another example of the word "Ubuntu" being used in the title instead of "Linux", which would be more appropriate. In general, the subject of the article (more of a blog) is about using Linux instead of MS-Windows. It is not specifically about using Ubuntu.

http://hardware.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=344745&cid=21176921 [slashdot.org]
http://slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=1095787&cid=26502007 [slashdot.org]

If MS-Windows were (generically) a car, and Linux were a motorcycle, it would be like titling an article "Jumping from driving a car to a Kawasaki". This trend can be extremely annoying to fellow Linux users that don't use Ubuntu, and somewhat of an insult to the thousands of people who contribute time and money to non-Ubuntu distros and even Linux and Linux-related FOSS projects in general. There is nothing wrong with using, liking, or even promoting Ubuntu; but give credit where credit is due. Distros are all about 99% the same, the real difference that matters is MS-Windows vs. Linux vs. MacOS....

Re:Linux not Ubuntu (1)

jerep (794296) | more than 5 years ago | (#26597929)

It's Linux/GNU you insensitive clod!

But seriously, I think he meant Ubuntu as in the general name for the entire system; linux is only the kernel, GNU are only a core set of the tools, and Ubuntu is the glue that holds it together.

As for all distros being 99% the same: try using both Slackware and Ubuntu and we'll talk about it again. That would be like saying winME, XP and Vista are all 99% the same.

And don't even get me started on LFS (linux from scratch) :)

Re:Linux not Ubuntu (1)

jerep (794296) | more than 5 years ago | (#26597935)

Apparently my morning coffee didn't kick in yet, it's GNU/Linux, not the other way around !

Re:Linux not Ubuntu (1)

VampireByte (447578) | more than 5 years ago | (#26597991)

Good save, RMS was about to post a comment correcting your error.

Re:Linux not Ubuntu (1)

markdavis (642305) | more than 5 years ago | (#26597987)

OK, I probably shouldn't have said "all distros", perhaps "most distros" or "the major distros". Having used Fedora, SuSe, Mandriva, Debian, and Ubuntu; I can pretty confidently say all THOSE are nearly 99% the same, especially after installation.

Re:Linux not Ubuntu (1)

quadrox (1174915) | more than 5 years ago | (#26599309)

As someone who has been switching distros like their underwear (i.e. regularly) because they each sucked, I beg to differ. Even now, SUSE Linux remains unusable to me due to their arcane menu and configuration systems. I far prefer ubuntus simplicitly - even though it is lacking in configurability in some areas, but that is nothing I can't do myself in the command line. (It sounds like a contradiction, I know. But this is how it appears to me)

For sheer "get-stuff-done" I still think ubuntu is King. But I must admit that I have not checked any other distro for more than a year, simply because I am satisfied with ubuntu.

Re:Linux not Ubuntu (1)

quadrox (1174915) | more than 5 years ago | (#26599377)

Ok, so I reply to myself, but I am ill right now and find it hard to think properly.

Anyway, what I mean is that the last time I compared distros, ubuntu was the only one that tried not to get in the way. Ubuntu does not provide you a path to ALL the things you might want to do or configure, but instead it focuses on the most important core tasks and makes it straight-forward to do them.

SUSE/KDE try to give the user EVERYTHING they might ever want in the name of configurability, but they don't do it well. The 5 features I do want to configure drown in the sea of other useless junk that is also enabled or has some obscure default setting.

I find it far easier to start with an almost clean slate and add-in those five things myself instead of filtering out all the junk I don't need. Even if that means I have to install gnome-do myself, it ensures that I get exactly what I want.

Re:Linux not Ubuntu (1)

weazzle (1084967) | more than 5 years ago | (#26598425)

It sounds like the comparison you would prefer is: "Jumping from driving a Ford to a vehicle with a Kawasaki engine".

Re:Linux not Ubuntu (1)

markdavis (642305) | more than 5 years ago | (#26598503)

Not really. Although I thought about that before posting. Don't you hate car analogies? :) We always seem to revert to them, since it is something people can relate to... they just don't always fit quite right.

Dump the VM (1)

gbr (31010) | more than 5 years ago | (#26597989)

Visio runs just fine under Codeweavers CrossOver Office. I run Visio 2003 that way, and it just works.

GO BACK TO COLLEGE (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26598359)

Network Admins are like Dental Assistants and other occupations advertised by Sally Struthers.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7RKQRVn4NAs

My troubles switching to Ubuntu at Work (2, Insightful)

DanWS6 (1248650) | more than 5 years ago | (#26598509)

Two main problems that I'm trying to overcome:

Exchange support. Evolution just doesn't cut it. It won't load my global address list and it doesn't seem to handle the "location" field for meeting invites. That means when I get an invite or try to send one I have no clue where our meeting will be.

CVS. I really like TortoiseCVS and can't find an equivalent that is as easy to use. I guess it's not a big deal, I could go back to using the cli, but what can I say, I am lazy. :)

Everything else has been good so far.

Re:My troubles switching to Ubuntu at Work (1)

Janek Kozicki (722688) | more than 5 years ago | (#26599019)

I never tried invitations, but you can try http://www.claws-mail.org/faq/index.php/Connecting_to_MS_Exchange [claws-mail.org]

Re:My troubles switching to Ubuntu at Work (1)

DanWS6 (1248650) | more than 5 years ago | (#26599071)

Thanks I'll check it out. My latest attempts were install outlook 2007 through the latest version of wine. That's been an effort in futility as well. I can get it installed, but then when I run the account setup wizard the pages are all blank. I managed to snag one of those free serial numbers for Codeweavers CrossOver when they were giving them out back in October, maybe I'll give that a shot.

Re:My troubles switching to Ubuntu at Work (1)

Daengbo (523424) | more than 5 years ago | (#26599091)

Instead of finding a good CVS client, you should focus on finding a good VCS instead of CVS.

What a loser (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26598687)

This guy probably makes less money than the guy who cleans the toilets.

Who cares what this loser's silly "problem" is. I don't hear the toilet cleaner guy in a state of angst over switching to Formula 409 after relying on Fantastik for all these years.

Suck it up, bucko. And get a life.

What about Linux users moving to Windows? (5, Interesting)

Jim Hall (2985) | more than 5 years ago | (#26598707)

I've been a Linux user since 1993, when I was a student at university. Until 1998, I ran Linux as my primary OS, but kept a Windows partition on my home system to run some games. And since 2002 I've been fortunate enough to run Linux full-time at work. It has been a great experience so far. I didn't have any issues exchanging documents with others at work, and certainly my previous bosses didn't mind. But times change, I suppose.

I've been asked to move back to Windows, at least for work. The difference between Windows (XP) and Linux (Fedora 9) has been shocking, to say the least. Since you often see blogs or tech articles (like the parent post) when long-time Windows users experiment with Linux for the first time, I thought it might be equally interesting for this long-time Linux user to blog about my first experience running Windows in over 6 or 7 years:

Linux in Exile [umn.edu]

The short list of things I have run into in my first week of running Windows:

  • hardware support is definitely not plug-and-play (had troubles getting a simple laptop mini-dock to get recognized, same with the external display.)
  • programs look and act differently from each other (no common themes, inconsistent behavior, etc.)
  • MS Office (2007) makes it hard for me to write the documents I need to create for work.
  • Font rendering is poor.

I haven't written yet about program look-and-feel; I'll do that soon. But I have noticed that MS Office acts differently from Notepad, from Media Player, and from the Windows local file browser.

Also, ctrl-backspace is implemented differently just about everywhere - in some cases, it backspaces to the start of the word or field (what I expect) and elsewhere it only backspaces once, and in other cases it inserts a ctrl-backspace character!

Re:What about Linux users moving to Windows? (1)

cj1127 (1077329) | more than 5 years ago | (#26599431)

But I have noticed that MS Office acts differently from Notepad

DEAR GOD!

Re:What about Linux users moving to Windows? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26599575)

I haven't written yet about program look-and-feel; I'll do that soon. But I have noticed that MS Office acts differently from Notepad, from Media Player, and from the Windows local file browser.

Ars Technica mentioned this a while ago, about every windows application looks different from one another. There's an excellent screenshot here:

Windows Theme Confusion [arstechnica.com]

Showing about 10 different applications from Windows Explorer and IE through Visual Studio, Word, and Notepad and their inconsistant themes.

How about web-based apps? (1)

f1vlad (1253784) | more than 5 years ago | (#26598781)

Microsoft Outlook Web Access (if recent built on server side) works actually very well on IE7+. It has some resemblance to hotmail.com, or maybe hotmail resembles OWA. Unfortunately it scks deluxe on any other browser :(

When it comes to other things you mentioned, why not use some of the web-based alternatives?

  1. PDF Reader -- Google docs/gmail offers a fantastic PDF reader [downloadsquad.com] .
  2. Visio could very likely be completely replaced by one of the following -- glinkr.net, bubbl.us, gliffy.com.
  3. MS Office/OpenOffice probably too can be replaced by either thinkfree.com [thinkfree.com] or docs.google.com [google.com]

I think he forgot about wine ... (1)

RoCKeTKaT (1456287) | more than 5 years ago | (#26599135)

He seems to know know about the existence of wine, or at least he didn't mention it. Too bad.

I switched in Decemeber (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26599671)

Had a position change at my current job which results in a lot less .Net programming and more infrastructure management and planning.

First thing I did was dump XP for Ubuntu 8.10. I love it. Everything on my Dell Latitude D620 just worked. I have dual monitor support from nVidia with just a driver download. I've got OpenVPN and wireless and sound and all working with almost no hacking.

The only times I use Windows are when I need to manipulate Active Directory or SQL Server, then I use an XP instance in Virtual Box. Oh, and the stupid Exchange calendaring.

Otherwise, I have no issues using Ubuntu daily. The update mechanism works well, it's secure, and I've had zero issues. I've tried Linux several times in the last 10 years, and I can finally say it is ready for 'mom' use.

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