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Power In Scotland From Tides and Whiskey

timothy posted more than 5 years ago | from the plus-the-spinning-corpse-of-william-wallace dept.

Earth 170

tsamsoniw writes "Singapore-based Atlantis Resources Corporation, which brings to the table tidal-turbine technology, is partnering with Scotland-based datacenter developer Internet Villages International) to construct a tidal-powered 150MW 'Blue Datacenter,' InfoWorld reports. If all goes to plan, the facility will eventually be powered entirely by clean energy produced by tidal-current turbines in the Pentland Firth, the stretch of water between the far north Scottish mainland and Orkney. The firth's currents could generate 700 megawatts of electricity by 2020." And reader Mike writes "Here's something to raise a glass to: recently the Rothes consortium of whiskey and scotch distillers announced that they have partnered with Helius Energy to install a power plant fueled entirely by whiskey by-products. The completed plant will use biomass cogeneration to convert draff and pot ale from the distillery into 7.2 MW of electricity — enough to power 9,000 homes."

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170 comments

Reclassification needed! (5, Funny)

Bud (1705) | more than 5 years ago | (#26664469)

It seems that in some cases, whiskey can now be called an energy drink.

--Bud

Re:Reclassification needed! (1, Offtopic)

MindKata (957167) | more than 5 years ago | (#26664951)

"energy drink"

It'll be fun watching them trying to tell the Scottish they plan to burn their "energy drink"!

For example, William Wallace: "tell our enemies that they may take our lives, but they'll never take our Whiskey!"

Pelosi the Partisan (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26665109)

Why the hell do you people in San Fran keep sending this insufferable witch to torment the rest of the country? Is it any wonder that the House has basically stopped functioning since she took charge? Get her incompetent ass out of there!!! So much for restoring bipartisanship and civility, huh Nancy?

Whisky (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26664479)

Of course in Scotland we call it Whisky...

Re:Whisky (5, Informative)

FTWinston (1332785) | more than 5 years ago | (#26664517)

Yeah, Whiskey is Irish, Whisky is Scottish.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whisky [wikipedia.org]

They're very different drinks. Although speaking as a Scot, the only Whisk(e)y i actually like is Jack Daniels, and being american, thats Whiskey too. Meh.

Re:Whisky (2, Informative)

beelsebob (529313) | more than 5 years ago | (#26664691)

and being american, thats Whiskey too
No it's not, it's bourbon.

Re:Whisky (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26664775)

No it's not, it's bourbon.

Jack Daniels is definitely not bourbon.
It is a Tennesee Whiskey.

Re:Whisky (0, Flamebait)

overlordofmu (1422163) | more than 5 years ago | (#26666297)

No it's not, it's bourbon.

Jack Daniels is definitely not bourbon. It is a Tennesee Whiskey.

Bourbon is made is barley, corn and water and Jack Daniels is indeed made with corn. Jack Daniels is Bourbon Whiskey. Whiskey is barley and water (note, no corn). Corn is for Americans. I live in Iowa. We have plenty of corn. Now, Jack Daniels is good but nothing, IMHO, beats a good Irish Whiskey. FLAMEBAIT: Scotch Whisky is inherently inferior to Irish Whiskey. Scotch is for stuck up Americans that don't know what good whiskey is supposed to taste like. DOUBLE FLAMEBAIT: Whiskey should be consumed in a glass at room temperature. No ice. No water. Sipped or gulped as you prefer.

Re:Whisky (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26666467)

DOUBLE FLAMEBAIT: Whiskey should be consumed in a glass at room temperature. No ice. No water. Sipped or gulped as you prefer.

You are indeed correct. Ice cubes just serve to remove the taste and water out the Whiskey.

Re:Whisky (1)

auldnic (1185365) | more than 5 years ago | (#26666679)

FLAMEBITTEN: Good Scotch is also for us Scottish people who know what good whisky is like. Americans are not the only people who drink.

Re:Whisky (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26665449)

Actually Bourbon is a type of whiskey. It was named bourbon, because it was originally made in Bourbon county, Kentucky

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bourbon_whiskey

Sincerely,

Anonymous Alcoholic

Jack Daniels is not bourbon (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26665451)

Jack Daniels absolutely IS NOT bourbon, it's Tennessee Whiskey.

Re:Whisky (1)

Ngwenya (147097) | more than 5 years ago | (#26665029)

Although, Maker's Mark, another American product is spelled "Whisky". Something to do with the founder being Scots, IIRC.

Jack Daniels. Pfft. A drink for schoolgirls. Talisker FTW. :-)

--Ng

Re:Whisky (2, Insightful)

Dupple (1016592) | more than 5 years ago | (#26665051)

I'm not a big fan of Talisker at all, a nice 18 year old famous grouse or 12 year old Oban - lovely

Re:Whisky (2, Interesting)

cthulu_mt (1124113) | more than 5 years ago | (#26665435)

Ardbeg 10 year. It'll take the enamel off your teeth.

Re:Whisky (2, Informative)

Ngwenya (147097) | more than 5 years ago | (#26666197)

Ardbeg 10 year. It'll take the enamel off your teeth.

Not bad. Although the 25 year old Laphroaig is smoother than the other Islay malts I've tried (most of them - never tried Port Askaig). And now the Yanks know why British teeth are so awful - no enamel!

If you can find Ledaig, that's nice too - made in Mull, but the good stuff is rarer than rocking horse shit (the Whisky Shop in Edinburgh's Victoria Street is where I got mine).

--Ng

Re:Whisky (0, Flamebait)

Ngwenya (147097) | more than 5 years ago | (#26666135)

Famous Grouse? That blended shite? Barely good enough for alkies and Englishmen. ;-)

Oban? Nah, bit weedy for me.

--Ng

Re:Whisky (1)

Funk_dat69 (215898) | more than 5 years ago | (#26666117)

Maker's is actually a Jim Beam brand. The spelling is probably just a marketing thing, but who knows.

I love Whiskey/Whisky/Bourbon debates, though!

I lot of people I know prefer American Whiskey/Bourbon (I'm American), because they're not used to the smokey/peaty taste, but I like all kinds.

I agree about Talisker - very good. It's *really* smokey/peaty. I got to visit the Talisker Distillery last year. The tour guide lady was very interesting - we asked her what her preference was and she said that after Talisker, she liked some American Bourbons. She also said that any Scotch aged more the 12 years is too woody - which I agree with.

Drink on!

Re:Whisky (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26666629)

You should try some Canadian rye whisky.
e.g. Alberta Springs (10 yr), Alberta Premium (5 yr)

Re:Whisky (3, Funny)

shawb (16347) | more than 5 years ago | (#26664877)

That's actually not an error. Whiskey is perfectly good stuff... for turning into power to make real Whisky with.

Re:Whisky (1)

BobisOnlyBob (1438553) | more than 5 years ago | (#26665097)

Yes, and you're also the only country in the world that would look at an egg and go "Y'know wha' tha' needs? Meat, an' batter."

Only the Scots would Scotch an egg. Bloody jocks.

Re:Whisky (1)

Gordonjcp (186804) | more than 5 years ago | (#26665387)

Yes, and you're also the only country in the world that would look at an egg and go "Y'know wha' tha' needs? Meat, an' batter."

Yes, and your point is? We were right, weren't we?

If they keep doing this, the Moon will be affected (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26664483)

They will stop the moon, because everyone knoes that the Moon pushes the tides, and against these contraptions the moon will have to push harder, so it will lose speed and this giant Italian spy-satellite that we call the "moon" will crash into America and contaminate our base-ball parks and churches with its nefarious blasphemy. Obama has pledged to wage war against the terrorists, but "Barack" (his middle name is actually Giuseppe!) could be an agent of the sinister Italian infiltrators! Alert America! Alert!

Re:If they keep doing this, the Moon will be affec (1)

32771 (906153) | more than 5 years ago | (#26665073)

The moon will move outward slightly faster than it already does. As a result the total eclipses we are able to watch now will become a ring at some point. I know you were trying to be funny but I just had to ... .

Re:If they keep doing this, the Moon will be affec (1, Redundant)

kerohazel (913211) | more than 5 years ago | (#26665605)

So what you're telling me is... that's no moon?

(couldn't resist)

Re:If they keep doing this, the Moon will be affec (1)

Funk_dat69 (215898) | more than 5 years ago | (#26666149)

Isn't it a bit early to be hitting the Scotch? I guess it's 5 o'clock somewhere...

Re:If they keep doing this, the Moon will be affec (1)

xaxa (988988) | more than 5 years ago | (#26666355)

Isn't it a bit early to be hitting the Scotch? I guess it's 5 o'clock somewhere...

11 o'clock UK time is late enough to hit the Scotch -- but only on a Friday.

Monday-Thursday it's best to wait until lunchtime.

Hoots mon! (1)

Canazza (1428553) | more than 5 years ago | (#26664495)

I can see the Moray firth becoming more popular for the traditional New Year skinny dip, mainly to drink the run-off from the Power plant.

Re:Hoots mon! (1)

FTWinston (1332785) | more than 5 years ago | (#26664523)

And if Virgin Galactic build their proposed spaceport there, could we have booze-powered spaceships? Please?

Re:Hoots mon! (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26664903)

Acould we have booze-powered spaceships? Please?

The Russians have had those for years, now.

Re:Hoots mon! (1)

Canazza (1428553) | more than 5 years ago | (#26664961)

no no no... the astronauts were perfectly sober...
it was the ground control team that were sozzled.

7.2MW for 9000 homes? (4, Informative)

AceJohnny (253840) | more than 5 years ago | (#26664503)

That's 800W per home. That's very little. A fridge, a microwave, and you're quickly over it.

What is, actually, the average power draw of a home in Scotland?

Re:7.2MW for 9000 homes? (2, Insightful)

stranger_to_himself (1132241) | more than 5 years ago | (#26664521)

That's 800W per home. That's very little. A fridge, a microwave, and you're quickly over it.

What is, actually, the average power draw of a home in Scotland?

I was thinking that 9000 homes sounds like it should cover the whole of the Highlands.

Re:7.2MW for 9000 homes? (2, Informative)

Canazza (1428553) | more than 5 years ago | (#26664565)

The higlands need energy for three things:
Lighting, Milking and if they're lucky, Cooking
that is, if they're near the national grid. If not then they'll be using Diesel generators and will only get their milking and cooking done in darkness. Unless they have a Gas stove.

Re:7.2MW for 9000 homes? (4, Insightful)

borizz (1023175) | more than 5 years ago | (#26664545)

I bet 800W is the average power draw of a Scottish home. I bet it's also about the average power draw of a Dutch home. I think they also use natural gas for heating and (mostly?) for cooking, like we do. Your microwave might use 1100 Watts, but you're not running it 24/7. Your fridge only uses a lot of power when it runs its compressor. You're not running your washing machine constantly.

The trick with these calculations is is that they're on average. Yes, during the day the plant will probably not be able to supply them all. But you should look at it this way: The plant generates x terajoules per year, and 9000 homes use x terajoules per year. In reality, sometimes the plant will only feed 1000 homes, sometimes it'll feed 18000 homes.

Re:7.2MW for 9000 homes? (1)

Planar (126167) | more than 5 years ago | (#26664773)

The trick with these calculations is is that they're on average. Yes, during the day the plant will probably not be able to supply them all. But you should look at it this way: The plant generates x terajoules per year, and 9000 homes use x terajoules per year. In reality, sometimes the plant will only feed 1000 homes, sometimes it'll feed 18000 homes.

Counting only the average is a recipe for disaster. You have to build your plant to deal with the maximum, not the average. Or you have to come up with a way to store massive amounts of electricity.

Re:7.2MW for 9000 homes? (2, Informative)

DocDJ (530740) | more than 5 years ago | (#26664923)

You don't need to store massive amounts of electricity, just massive amounts of energy, in whatever form. That's what pumped-storage hydroelectric power stations do - they pump water uphill overnight using the cheap electricity produced by the coal and nuclear power stations that can't be turned off, and then let it fall during the day, driving the turbines.

Re:7.2MW for 9000 homes? (1)

xaxa (988988) | more than 5 years ago | (#26664985)

Counting only the average is a recipe for disaster. You have to build your plant to deal with the maximum, not the average. Or you have to come up with a way to store massive amounts of electricity.

Or just transmit the required power from elsewhere in the UK: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Grid_(UK) [wikipedia.org]

Re:7.2MW for 9000 homes? (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26665009)

Or you have to come up with a way to store massive amounts of electricity.

We already have that. Thanks to our extensive hydro-electric infrastructure, we're able to use surplus production at times of low demand to pump water into elevated reservoirs which feed the hydro plants at peak demand. We've done it with surplus coal power for many years now.

Re:7.2MW for 9000 homes? (2, Insightful)

borizz (1023175) | more than 5 years ago | (#26665213)

Don't worry, they have that covered.

This is just a Discovery Channel unit. How much is 7.2MW? About enough to power 9000 homes. How heavy is the space shuttle? About 400 Volkswagen Beetles. It's only done to give someone without a feel for how much a Watt is (there's loads of those people) an example of how much power this will generate.

Re:7.2MW for 9000 homes? (1)

dunkelfalke (91624) | more than 5 years ago | (#26665269)

base load powerplants are for average, peak load powerplants are for delta between average und maximum.

Re:7.2MW for 9000 homes? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26665445)

Thank you for reminding me why I hardly ever come to /. anymore. The sheer stupidity and arrogance you show in this post is astounding.

Clearly you can do the job of designing the electrical grid better than the professionals who have been doing it for decades.
You're forgetting about the existence of the local and national grid.
You're forgetting they have nearly a century of data on electrical load trends.
You really don't know what you're talking about and should shut up.

Re:7.2MW for 9000 homes? (1)

sjames (1099) | more than 5 years ago | (#26666121)

Actually, you build a base load plant to handle the continuous need and you use other plants to handle the peak load. It's been a long time since a house received power from THE power plant. It's all interconnected now.

When 'home' is used as a unit of measure for a power plant, it's just an effort to put things in a scale that average readers will understand, kind of like libraries of congress per second.

Re:7.2MW for 9000 homes? (1)

Mr. Slippery (47854) | more than 5 years ago | (#26666309)

You have to build your plant to deal with the maximum, not the average.

Only if it's the only power plant around. There's this idea of a "grid", you see.

Re:7.2MW for 9000 homes? (1)

Gordonjcp (186804) | more than 5 years ago | (#26665583)

I think they also use natural gas for heating and (mostly?) for cooking

Up north we use gas, although oil and solid-fuel boilers are pretty common too. Quite often houses will have a big oil tank for heating and a couple of propane bottles for cooking. Mains gas would be uneconomic, given the runs of pipes involved. An ever-growing number of modern homes use solid-fuel heating (either an oldskool Rayburn, or a modern pellet- or chip-fed boiler) in conjunction with ground-source heat pumps.

Tight? Just careful! (4, Funny)

Hognoxious (631665) | more than 5 years ago | (#26664551)

What is, actually, the average power draw of a home in Scotland?

Not much.

What do Scots use for heating when it's cold? A 40 watt lightbulb.

What do they do when it's very cold? Switch it on.

Re:Tight? Just careful! (3, Funny)

bigpistol (1311191) | more than 5 years ago | (#26664633)

Its only English that say Scots are tight - thats coz we dont give them the time of day :p

Re:Tight? Just careful! (1)

RotateLeftByte (797477) | more than 5 years ago | (#26665121)

Funny that. My ex (who hails from Old Reekie) used to say that about people from Dundee (where her Father came from) especially around the time of her Birthday...

Re:7.2MW for 9000 homes? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26664555)

That's 800W per home. That's very little. A fridge, a microwave, and you're quickly over it.

What is, actually, the average power draw of a home in Scotland?

you keep your microwave running all day?

Re:7.2MW for 9000 homes? (4, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26664613)

The average Uk home uses 4700kWh of electricity per year.
http://www.renew-reuse-recycle.com/showarticle.pl?id=311

4700/(365*24)=0.536

So only 536W average load

Re:7.2MW for 9000 homes? (1)

MadMidnightBomber (894759) | more than 5 years ago | (#26664647)

Winter or summer?

Never mind, summer doesn't really happen north of Berwick.

Re:7.2MW for 9000 homes? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26664711)

summer doesn't really happen north of Berwick.

Yes it does! Thats when the snow turns to rain. :P

Re:7.2MW for 9000 homes? (2, Informative)

Canazza (1428553) | more than 5 years ago | (#26664727)

the funny thing is, Winter in Glasgow, atleast, is generally drier than summer (in which the rain is usually torrential) - no idea why that is, but it's rained about 3 times in the last month here.

Re:7.2MW for 9000 homes? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26664709)

Don't forget that it won't be the only power station on the grid. Because you have such a massive number of total houses, you can just use the average to calculate these numbers.

Of course, the 800W per home is probably not based on the 8am or 6pm peaks, those are quite a bit higher.

Re:7.2MW for 9000 homes? (1)

owlnation (858981) | more than 5 years ago | (#26664813)

What is, actually, the average power draw of a home in Scotland?

Fairly low compared to most of Northern Europe and North America. Scotland gets the Gulf stream in the winter, it's rarely below 0 degree Celsius, and it's never hot enough in Summer (that's a Tuesday in July) to warrant air conditioning. It has a very mild climate compared with most of the Northern Latitudes (though this doesn't stop Scots moaning about the weather, but most never live anywhere else to realize how tame the climate really is.)

Large numbers of homes in Glasgow also get their electricity by stealing it from street lighting, and are usually too drunk to notice the temperature. But that's another story...

So, I guess Whisky has always provided energy to many Scots!

Re:7.2MW for 9000 homes? (1)

Canazza (1428553) | more than 5 years ago | (#26664945)

I resent that, we in the West end are perfectly civilised. We recycle and everything. Our energy comes from turbines built into catflaps.

Re:7.2MW for 9000 homes? (1)

a_fuzzyduck (979684) | more than 5 years ago | (#26664947)

Also, loads of areas in Glasgow have life expectancies that you'd maybe expect in a war torn Third World country, so that's a load of old folk not needing to be kept warm and cosy...

800 should be enough for everyone (1)

spectrokid (660550) | more than 5 years ago | (#26664943)

You leave your microwave on constantly, do you? When averaged out over a large population, 800 W is not bad. A fridge will use about 40 Watt, add another 40 for clocks, standby crap and other always-on stuff. This means that in the 8 hours you are at work, your house only uses 10% of that average value.

Re:7.2MW for 9000 homes? (1)

necro81 (917438) | more than 5 years ago | (#26665799)

Look at it another way. 800 Watts times 24 hours is 19.2 kWh of energy consumption in a day. The typical home in the US uses about 30 kWh/day, my own uses less than 8 (and, yes, I have a fridge, and a microwave, and everything else you'd expect). So, 19.2 kWh/day for a Scottish home is probably not all that out of line.

Re:7.2MW for 9000 homes? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26665919)

About 1 pint/day, lad.

Three pints if you mean bitters.

whisky vs whiskey (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26664593)

fyi- if it's made in Scotland, you spell it "whisky" (no 'e'), if it's anywhere else, it's "whiskey" (with an 'e').

a couple of charlatans in other countries do spell it without an 'e', but we've sent our finest drunken brawlers to deal with them asap.

Anonymous Coward (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26664609)

If you are a Scottish distiller, then itâ(TM)s whisky - no E in the word at all.

the Scots are leading (2, Interesting)

gEvil (beta) (945888) | more than 5 years ago | (#26664655)

Scotland's First Minister came and gave a speech at National Geographic Headquarters a few months ago in which he announced a $15M prize for whomever could come up with a way to harness the sea's energy around Scotland. [nationalgeographic.com] I'm wondering if this will be one of the entries. Either way, Scotland seems to be located in a prime spot to be leading the charge with this type of renewable energy.

Know your drinks! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26664697)

There's no 'e' in whisky in Scotland!

What's a hiskey by-product? (1)

InsaneCreator (209742) | more than 5 years ago | (#26664829)

Helius Energy to install a power plant fueled entirely by whiskey by-products.

That's an excellent idea. Raging drunks do have a lot of energy.

Waves and Whiskey (1)

MightyDrunken (1171335) | more than 5 years ago | (#26664879)

This gives me a great idea!
Fix small wave powered generators to Whiskey drinkers and the resulting swaying motion from the inebriated could power Scotland.

Go To Scotland In January (1)

aquatone282 (905179) | more than 5 years ago | (#26664883)

. . . and you'll understand why they invented wool AND whiskey.

Re:Go To Scotland In January (1)

mrbene (1380531) | more than 5 years ago | (#26664941)

Gosh, glad the Scots invented wool - the sheep must have been cold before that.

Re:Go To Scotland In January (1)

Canazza (1428553) | more than 5 years ago | (#26664953)

actually, last night i was walking round in just jeans and a t-shirt... considering the forcast was a snowstorm heading in from Siberia it was rather mild

Re:Go To Scotland In January (2, Informative)

hoover (3292) | more than 5 years ago | (#26665227)

No wonder if you're a Scot. We travelled Edinburgh a few years ago in early May and as soon as the sun came out, the locals were donning shorts, T-shirts, Kilts and the lassies in short skirts... all at around 5 degs Celsius, brrr ;-)

It's actually TWO huge data centers (3, Informative)

1sockchuck (826398) | more than 5 years ago | (#26664911)

The Scottish tidal power project actually involves two huge data center projects [datacenterknowledge.com] . Atlantis is working with Morgan Stanley on a large data center [datacenterknowledge.com] near its planned tidal power generation site in the Pentland Firth. Internet Villages is planning a large data center campus near Dumfries that could eventually include 3 million SF of data center facilities. The alliance will split the responsibiltiies, with Atlantis handling power generation at its own site and a second location nearer the Dumfires project, while IVI will handles the marketing and be responsible for finding customers for both facilities.

Firth (1)

haggisbrain (945030) | more than 5 years ago | (#26665003)

For those of you not familiar with the term Firth [wikipedia.org] :

"usually a large sea bay, which may be part of an estuary, or just an inlet, or even a strait"

Hmmm... Numbers??? (1)

BazilBBrush (1259370) | more than 5 years ago | (#26665135)

150MW Data Center...

If a 7.2MW plant can power 9,000 homes, then a 150MW data center would use the equivalent of nearly 200,000 homes...

Didn't seem right so a bit of research found...

"5MW - the power consumption of a large data center today, according to Subodh Bapat, who runs Sun's energy efforts. 50MW - that's the average large datacenter in 2020, he said."

from some greentech mob [greentechmedia.com]

So we either have typical media numbers spin, or that's one mother of a data center they plan to build.

Getting Lit (1)

whisper_jeff (680366) | more than 5 years ago | (#26665363)

This takes the phrase "getting lit" to a whole new level.

Seriously speaking though, this is very cool. I hope lots of other companies/industries that churn out biomass take a lesson from this.

Re:Getting Lit (1)

Pictish Prince (988570) | more than 5 years ago | (#26665809)

This takes the phrase "getting lit" to a whole new level. Seriously speaking though, this is very cool. I hope lots of other companies/industries that churn out biomass take a lesson from this.

"Biomass"? Just remember, if it's nae Scottish it's "crap"!

This is good news considering UK energy strikes... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26665393)

which are.... just starting [bbc.co.uk] , so 3 day week anyone? [wikipedia.org]

So long Slashdot and thanks for all the fish!

I don't get it (1)

Dunbal (464142) | more than 5 years ago | (#26665607)

a power plant fueled entirely by whiskey by-products.

How they're planning on fueling a plant with drunkards without breaking the law is beyond me...

PS: It's a JOKE (for the humor impaired).

Burning food... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26665745)

...in this case animal food, which is what usually happens to the solids left over from whisky making. But it's good publicity - who cares if it makes sense or not...

Obligatory (1)

PeeAitchPee (712652) | more than 5 years ago | (#26665989)

"Now, here's a fellow attempting to ride a bicycle. But he's having some trouble, isn't he? And do you know why? Because he's a Scot!!" -- Buzz Killington

Wont someone think of the cows? (1)

MadMcMan (190196) | more than 5 years ago | (#26666057)

And reader Mike writes "Here's something to raise a glass to: recently the Rothes consortium of whiskey and scotch distillers announced that they have partnered with Helius Energy to install a power plant fueled entirely by whiskey by-products. The completed plant will use biomass cogeneration to convert draff and pot ale from the distillery into 7.2 MW of electricity -- enough to power 9,000 homes."

but they generally use the draff for cattle feed! poor cows wont be getting any lovely whisky food!

One small problems with this.. (1)

LingNoi (1066278) | more than 5 years ago | (#26666219)

The completed plant will use biomass cogeneration to convert draff and pot ale from the distillery into 7.2 MW of electricity â" enough to power 9,000 homes

and how much electricity does it take to power the distillery in the first place? Sounds like they're focusing on the benefits without realising that it's not actually helpful at all, side from the fact that the distillery would be running anyway.

not to rain on the parade (2, Insightful)

circletimessquare (444983) | more than 5 years ago | (#26666301)

but we have these in new york city in the east river, and one effect of tidal turbines is they increase silting because they slow the tides, possibly requiring the city to dredge at some point

not that the pentland firth is as shallow or has as many ships as the east river, but what it does have that the east river doesn't (because we killed it) is an ecosystem. slower water speeds changes the balance of natural flora and fauna that depend upon the tides to work at a speed they have worked for eons (filtration, transport, reproductive timing, etc.)

point being: there is no such thing as truly green energy. any energy source has a negative impact on the environment in one way or another

there is no such thing as a free lunch

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