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Google Unofficially Announces GDrive By Leaked Code

ScuttleMonkey posted more than 5 years ago | from the more-than-speculation dept.

Google 342

An anonymous reader writes "Google has unofficially announced the GDrive by source code. In an in-direct way, Google has publicly advertised the new, much-anticipated online storage drive called the GDrive. If you take a look at the source code of some javascript within the Google Pack, you will clearly see the GDrive referenced. The code categorizes the GDrive as an 'Online file backup and storage' device. It also provides the following descriptions; 'GDrive provides reliable storage for all of your files, including photos, music and documents' and 'GDrive allows you to access your files from anywhere, anytime, and from any device — be it from your desktop, web browser or cellular phone.'"

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Like xdrive and idrive before it (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26674001)

Finally, somewhere to back up all of my important porn!

Re:Like xdrive and idrive before it (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26674143)

As opposed to unimportant...?

Re:Like xdrive and idrive before it (5, Insightful)

relguj9 (1313593) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674159)

Exactly. I'll be curious to see the google analytic stats on what these drives are actually used for. Taking bets on the percentage that is porn, my guess is 80%.

Anyone else at least on notice that Google is looking to know not only all of the sites we visit with google analytics and chrome, all of the videos we watch on google video and correlate this with our gmail/video logins, but also get statistics on data that we store.

Not that they are necessarily going to do anything nefarious with it. But it's a lot of data that, if someone had access to and was inclined to mine, could yield an unnerving amount of information about an individual who heavily uses Google products.

I think I'm gonna change the drop box on my browser to Yahoo! for a while. Need to spread the love.

Re:Like xdrive and idrive before it (4, Funny)

Malevolyn (776946) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674235)

Is this just Google's front for collecting porn for themselves? Taking all bets!

Re:Like xdrive and idrive before it (5, Funny)

Winckle (870180) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674545)

Eric Schimdt likes porn just like every other guy.

He just happens to archive it in the petabytes instead of gigabytes.

Re:Like xdrive and idrive before it (4, Funny)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674243)

Hey! Who told you about Google Perv? That hasn't been released yet!

Re:Like xdrive and idrive before it (4, Funny)

Vectronic (1221470) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674323)

Pfft, that was the last codeword, it's now referred to as GSpot.

Re:Like xdrive and idrive before it (5, Funny)

RCourtney (973307) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674425)

Pfft, that was the last codeword, it's now referred to as GSpot (BETA).

There, fixed that for ya. And don't feel bad if you can't find it - submitter had to dig deep in the code to even know it existed, too.

Re:Like xdrive and idrive before it (1)

Arthur Grumbine (1086397) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674583)

We've been hearing about the coming(sp?) of this GSpot for decades [wikipedia.org] . It's actual existence is more questionable than Duke Nukem Forever. Pure vaporware.

Re:Like xdrive and idrive before it (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26674453)

Pfft, that was the last codeword, it's now referred to as GSpot.

GSpot is in Haajinen.

(If you understand that then you were in fleet and heard Macker's hilarious pronunciation of Haajinen.)

Re:Like xdrive and idrive before it (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26674495)

That is a myth. There is no Gspot!

Re:Like xdrive and idrive before it (3, Funny)

SleepyHappyDoc (813919) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674539)

It would probably cross the line, but I'd love to see them do a Zeitgeist report on the porn people have in there.

Perhaps a bit like skydrive as well (1)

dhavleak (912889) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674217)

Re:Perhaps a bit like skydrive as well (1)

Apathist (741707) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674471)

Oh, yeah, skydrive...
but isn't that a bit like Office Live [officelive.com]
but isn't that a bit like Live Mesh [mesh.com]

Can anyone say "Confused Product Strategy" three time backwards?

Gmailfs (2)

iYk6 (1425255) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674247)

I wonder if this will be as good as gmailfs.

Re:Gmailfs (4, Informative)

John Hasler (414242) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674333)

Description: Use your GMail account as a filesystem
  GmailFS provides a mountable Linux filesystem which uses your Gmail
  account as its storage medium. GmailFS is a Python application and
  uses the FUSE userland filesystem infrastructure to help provide the
  filesystem, and libgmail to communicate with Gmail.

Re:Gmailfs (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26674397)

Karma WHORE! No Informative for you! Don't mod him up!

what happens if google folds (1, Informative)

timmarhy (659436) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674015)

don't think big trusted names can't fold. and if it happens, how will you get this data? i would advise extreme caution on what you use this for.

Re:what happens if google folds (4, Insightful)

Directrix1 (157787) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674175)

Have a backup. Just like with any storage.

Re:what happens if google folds (1)

timmarhy (659436) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674189)

agreed, but this will most likely be connected to some *cough cloud* form on online computing. will it have backup abilities ?

Re:what happens if google folds (5, Insightful)

Chyeld (713439) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674301)

agreed, but this will most likely be connected to some *cough cloud* form on online computing. will it have backup abilities ?

No, at no time whatsoever will you ever have access to the files you store on gdrive. In fact, gdrive is really just a counter attached to /dev/null

Will it have backup abilities? WTF? You either uploaded a file to it, thus implying you had access to it, enabling you to back it up. Or you can download the file from it, thus implying you have access to it, enabling you to back it up.

Re:what happens if google folds (4, Insightful)

dissy (172727) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674381)

agreed, but this will most likely be connected to some *cough cloud* form on online computing. will it have backup abilities ?

No, backups are your job.

Just don't delete the stuff you upload.

You need to have the files on your computer First before you can store them on gdrive anyway. They are already there.
The act of spending no energy, and doing nothing, in that case gives you your backup.
The act of spending energy, time, resources, and thought on deleting your copies afterwards, is not just a waste but will put you in a bad situation when something happens to gdrive (or where ever you stored the copy at)

And if you DON'T have the files already on your computer, then you dont need to be worrying about uploading them to anywhere :}

Re:what happens if google folds (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26674183)

You can say that with any online backup who's server you don't own. That being said, I don't think it will be marketed towards that but a more personal backup that you can access anywhere. Loosing a few gb of music won't kill you for example. Also, stuff like documents which aren't critical where you forgot your thump drive can be uploaded to it. All in all, it's beats not having the options in the first place. How useful it is depends on the user, I know I would love to upload my documents or whatever that I prefer not to delete but it wouldn't kill me if it was gone.

That being said, if it was so important, having more than one backup is always good idea wherever you backup to. (It's up to you whether google's track record is good enough for gdrive as your 2nd/3rd/etc... backup choice)

Re:what happens if google folds (1)

The MAZZTer (911996) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674345)

Depending on how it's implemented on the Windows/Linux desktop, you might be able to create and mount a TrueCrypt volume on it.

How do they make money from this? (4, Interesting)

elucido (870205) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674347)

Sure this is very useful, but whats in it for Google?

Re:How do they make money from this? (4, Insightful)

Korin43 (881732) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674437)

More information about you? Plus, they can.

Re:How do they make money from this? (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26674493)

Yes they can!

Re:what happens if google folds (1)

dissy (172727) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674351)

don't think big trusted names can't fold. and if it happens, how will you get this data?

You get that data by opening the files on one of your PCs or backup media.

Why is it a lot of people seem to have the mindset of "once you move data from place A to place B, you should get rid of the data in place A" ???

If it is important to you, encrypt it up, and store it EVERYWHERE. All your home PCs, offsite HDs, friends houses, USB keys, as well as Gdrive, and every other online storage service you can get (or can afford.)

Sounds Good. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26674021)

Just give google all your data. Do no harm right?

Re:Sounds Good. (4, Informative)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674049)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dm_crypt [wikipedia.org]

Give them my data? Not bloody likely. Poke around with some free storage for non-critical applications? Sure, sounds fun.

Re:Sounds Good. (4, Insightful)

Enderandrew (866215) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674289)

My MP3 collection and some digital photos I don't wnat to lose isn't like some secret, private data I'm terrified they will analyze.

Re:Sounds Good. (1)

The MAZZTer (911996) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674353)

Even if the RIAA somehow gains access to your directory listings?

Re:Sounds Good. (2, Interesting)

Enderandrew (866215) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674463)

Do you have any reason to suggest that Google is handing over data to the RIAA when Google has historically fought to protect the privacy of its users?

Furthermore, even if the RIAA saw my massive MP3 collection, I do have CDs to justify most of it, and I'm not distributing copies to other people. They don't have anything on me.

Re:Sounds Good. (5, Insightful)

osu-neko (2604) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674517)

Do you have any reason to suggest that Google is handing over data to the RIAA when Google has historically fought to protect the privacy of its users?

I have no reason to suspect Google would not do precisely that, if ordered to by the courts (after the inevitable, expensive appeals are finally exhausted). Much as I like cyberpunk sci-fi, I don't see Google declaring itself an extraterritorial sovereign entity no longer subject to national laws any time soon...

Re:Sounds Good. (1)

Enderandrew (866215) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674581)

Unreasonable search and seizure. It is in the Constitution. Given that I don't distribute, and haven't even broken the law, and that Google hasn't shown any willingness to work with the RIAA, even if the RIAA wanted to go after me for no apparent reason, they'd need probable cause with sufficient evidence that I broke the law, which I didn't.

Again, I'm not worried.

If you used your Gdrive and gave the entire world access, and used that to distribute, and the RIAA got wind of it, and have evidence to subpeona ip logs, well that is a different story.

So don't be stupid and use Gdrive to distribute pirated content to the known world.

Re:Sounds Good. (1)

argux (568146) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674551)

Furthermore, even if the RIAA saw my massive MP3 collection, I do have CDs to justify most of it, and I'm not distributing copies to other people. They don't have anything on me.

Shyeah!, like that's ever been an impediment.

Re:Sounds Good. (1)

InlawBiker (1124825) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674589)

They should be watched, that's for sure.

Q: Why is GDrive any different from any other online storage service?

A: It's pretty much the same, but integrated with Google's other services too!

Q: Hey, isn't that Microsoft's line?

A: Nothing to see here! Move along!

where do you store your data (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26674023)

in the clowns.

Re:where do you store your data (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26674279)

There's clowns in the tubes now?

Security (4, Informative)

nz17 (601809) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674027)

I know that Google is all about introducing new (usually useful) services which tie into its already existing sites and services, and for that I applaud it. However I hope that it takes privacy, security, and encryption into account for this new online storage service. It's one thing to do a search with Google's engine - trusting Google with personal files is another issue entirely.

Also, here's hoping for a rich desktop client instead of just a Web interface.

Re:Security (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26674117)

Just send encrypted files.

Re:Security (1)

SanityInAnarchy (655584) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674215)

Let's hope it's implemented as FUSE, for portability...

If it's actually exposed as a local filesystem, then it should be trivial to encrypt the files using something like encfs [arg0.net] .

Re:Security (0, Troll)

elucido (870205) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674419)

Exactly, if you encrypt the files its perfectly secure. Of course you don't want to encrypt it in Windows with that buggy random number generator.

Re:Security (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26674227)

However I hope that it takes privacy, security, and encryption into account for this new online storage service.

They never have so far so what makes you think they'll change things now?

However I hope that it takes privacy, security, and encryption into account for this new online storage service.

No, its a beta service so it'll come with no guarantees or assurances.

However I hope that it takes privacy, security, and encryption into account for this new online storage service.

Sure it will but they'll need the keys for data mining, general nosiness & national security letters.

Also, here's hoping for a rich desktop client instead of just a Web interface.

Just as long as it has a way to write files encrypted by the user. A nice API that lets you download user-encrypted data without google knowing what it is.

It might even become a huge hit for music/movie sharing, without the need for seeding.
I can see a few lawsuits on the way, much like with youtube.

Obvious (3, Insightful)

bhsx (458600) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674033)

Seriously, who didn't see this coming at least four years ago? I'm glad it's finally closer to "official" but really, not a surprise in the slightest.

Re:Obvious (3, Interesting)

dmomo (256005) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674135)

If by "closer to official" you mean "closer to Beta" which for Google means "yeah, it's official, we just cannot claim it's 100% without flaw"

See also: GMail... still in BETA!

Re:Obvious (1, Insightful)

mikek2 (562884) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674147)

Yes, but other major player is forging ahead with goodies like this?

I, for one, welcome our new Googly overlords.

Until, of course, they fuck it all up.

Re:Obvious (1)

morgan_greywolf (835522) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674153)

Apparently not C|Net, ZDNet and Wired, who all have been writing articles and posturing about this for like three or four days now. They'd all written it off.

But if you've been paying attention to Google's strategy, then it's an obvious next step.

Slowly by surely Google is taking its best shot at making the operating system irrelevant. Microsoft sees that and that is why they've been preoccupied with Google. (So "duh" to all you people going "Why is Microsoft so preoccupied with Google?")

Re:Obvious (1)

Ethanol-fueled (1125189) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674401)

Nobody will make the OS irrelevant. All this "cloud" hype is just another buzzword. Sure, Google is jumping on it, but it's only another service. Google are agile and humble enough to call it quits if it dosen't work. From a Wired interview:

Wired: Will the success of Google Apps mean market share erosion for Microsoft Office?
Schmidt: It may. Or it may be that consumers will push us to solve completely new problems.

In another recent Wired interview with some high-ranking Microsoft guy, said guy acknowledged with a straight face that the cloud was the future and laid out Microsoft's plans for it. Does Microsoft really believe in their own planned obsolescence?

Not as surprise (4, Informative)

inKubus (199753) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674059)

Duplicity [nongnu.org] , a clever backup tool, has let you use Gmail [nongnu.org] boxes for a storage engine for a while now. I'm sure they are just taking the next logical step. Of course, you can assume that they will probably index your files in some way, even if it isn't made public.

Misplaced priorities? (3, Informative)

bogaboga (793279) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674067)

I know this is not officially released by Google but I would rather have Google get Gmail out of beta. My school would like to move to Gmail but the "beta" label is a show stopper on this front. What do you think?

Re:Misplaced priorities? (5, Informative)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674203)

If you pay for Gmail ("Google Apps for business") it isn't beta, and it has an SLA and whatnot. Gmail's interpretation of "beta" seems roughly the same as all the other free webmail services' interpretation of their default release states, so it isn't as though Google is really behind in that area. If "beta" is just a scary word, ignore it. If you are waiting to get enterprise SLAs for no money, forget it.

Re:Misplaced priorities? (2, Informative)

Creepy Crawler (680178) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674261)

My water-damaged discarded 333MHz file server has a better uptime than Google SLA provides.

They only offer at most 95% per month, MINUS pre-scheduled downtimes, and non-scheduled downtimes that are "exempt". Honestly, 90% uptime per month real. The key is that these numbers are not real, because of the possible exemptions and everything, so a real SLA is unknown.

Re:Misplaced priorities? (1)

Chyeld (713439) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674315)

K'. And how does that negate GP's point?

Re:Misplaced priorities? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26674579)

You should be measuring:

a) the measured availability of the servers needed to support the users that you plan to support. If your dinky little server does that, good for you.
b) the measured availability of Gmail, not the SLA.

If you have no clue how to do (a) or (b), you are not qualified to hold an opinion on this topic.

Gmail has downtime, but never for all of its users at once. I am not aware of Gmail ever having scheduled downtime. These factors are why (b), actually *measuring* Gmail's availability for your users, is far more important and useful than looking at the SLA. Call around to some local IT firms and ask them what kind of SLA they offer.

Re:Misplaced priorities? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26674277)

Well your school is really superficial about things if a simple word is to deter them from it.

The service works, it's had faint downtime or in the least an up time that overpowers that, but gmail is continually being developed into a better and better service.

Once they retire the "beta" label your school is likely to have an uproar if they do accept it have gmail not remain static for long intervals.

Maybe it's not "getting out of beta" but learning to accept risk, hell, most the time a "professional" will have a larger downtime rate or higher instability than gmail.

I also might be speaking out my ass so read my words with a pinch of salt.

Storage Poll (1)

pieterh (196118) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674069)

You would save your work on:

* 8" floppy drives
* Removable Winchesters
* Good old spinning rust
* SSD, like my MBA
* GDrive: slow, but cosmic
* Cowboy Neal's Sneakers

Re:Storage Poll (2, Funny)

morgan_greywolf (835522) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674169)

Where's the "post to an FTP site and let the world mirror it" option? Linus will feel left out!

making up new words (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26674071)

"in-direct"?

that word is im-possible.

hold on, i have to tie my shoe-lace, be-cause i keep tripping over all the hy-phens.

Re:making up new words (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26674191)

Fuck-you and fuck-all other grammar-nazi's.

Re:making up new words (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26674209)

grammar-nazi's

Well played, sir!

Re:making up new words (1)

morgan_greywolf (835522) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674239)

Hey, that would be gram-mar na-zi's to YOU, pal!

Re:making up new words (1, Offtopic)

DigitalReverend (901909) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674219)

I am glad I am not the only one who noticed.

Saturated (3, Insightful)

fireteller2 (712795) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674083)

This market place is already saturated with companies like box.net, dropbox, mozy, amazon s3, xdrive, pocketque and many others. What is interesting about GDrive, other then it'll search through my data to mine advertising opportunities?

Better be a massive amount of free online storage. What is the online storage to privacy exchange rate anyway?

Re:Saturated (1)

Rakishi (759894) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674259)

Not to mention that some of those are set up so they can't access your data themselves, period. Unless it's encrypted and the encryption key never leaves my computer I wouldn't trust any such service.

Re:Saturated (3, Interesting)

Enderandrew (866215) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674317)

From what I've read, you'll be able to map it like another drive on your computer, just drag and drop files. Unlike a slow web interface with other products, you can very quickly access your files. There will be tons of storage, and it will be completely free with no nags to upgrade to a premium service.

Otherwise, exactly like this should have been handled by everyone else from day 1.

Yeah, Right. (1, Informative)

Kid Zero (4866) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674109)

...and it's all online, so that when the government decides to datamine your life, Google will just send it over without bothering you.

Re:Yeah, Right. (3, Insightful)

fluffernutter (1411889) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674285)

What do you mean 'when'? Google has already openly stated that mining is part of their business model for GMail.. Why would GDrive be any different. If I was to use it, I think I would take ten minutes to write a script that encrypts the files first. I'd even go so far as to mangle the filenames and keep track of the original names locally. With that in mind, what the heck, GDrive could be good for small uses here and there if it's free.

Re:Yeah, Right. (-1, Troll)

TheGratefulNet (143330) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674335)

'send' it over?

they have direct wires to all the google datacenters. whatchamean 'send it over'? come on. this is the US gov we're talking about.

btw, anyone using google can be tapped by the US (or any local) gov. google replicates data all over the world and so any local DC can be 'tapped' by the gov in that region and google will be happy to roll over.

giving data to google is not something you do when you need privacy, we should know THAT much by now. google has already tipped their hand more times than needed to see the true 'rollover to the gov' colors they have.

unless you locally encrypt your data, expect no privacy from google based storage, that much has to be clear!

Re:Yeah, Right. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26674541)

btw, anyone using google can be tapped by the US (or any local) gov. google replicates data all over the world and so any local DC can be 'tapped' by the gov in that region and google will be happy to roll over.

You do not know what you are talking about.

Re:Yeah, Right. (5, Informative)

rossifer (581396) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674591)

btw, anyone using google can be tapped by the US (or any local) gov. google replicates data all over the world and so any local DC can be 'tapped' by the gov in that region and google will be happy to roll over. giving data to google is not something you do when you need privacy, we should know THAT much by now. google has already tipped their hand more times than needed to see the true 'rollover to the gov' colors they have.

I work for Google. In a project closely related to "GDrive". And I know for an absolute fact that you, sir, are full of shit. Google is the one company that has stood up to our government's "requests for information" and said, "Show me the subpoena." Hell, that's one of the big reasons I work at Google. As for your privacy, the only entities that can see the actual content of your files are 1) you, 2) the ads analysis program, 2) Google developers/system maintenance staff who sign a blood oath that they will not violate user trust, and 3) government agencies that provide a lawful warrant or subpoena for the data. The moment that list fails to be complete, a significant fraction of all Google employees will leave in disgust.

Enough with the evil Google routine (5, Informative)

Enderandrew (866215) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674341)

How did you get modded informative?

When Bush was talking about wanting search data for all US citizens, Microsoft, Yahoo and AOL handed it over without even really being asked. Google refused, and said they would not hand over any search data unless they were forced to do so by a court of law. Google has also since decided to anonymize their logs sooner and increase their privacy policies.

The only time Google has handed data over to a government agency was one case in Brazil, when they were forced to do so by a court, and even then, they didn't do it immediately when they were first ordered to do so. And that case was when Google had evidence on a child porn ring who distributed child porn via Orkut.

So please, explain to me how can you justify statements with no basis on fact?

Re:Enough with the evil Google routine (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674459)

If your business is information, wouldn't you resist being asked to hand over valuable merchandise for free?

I don't know if that is google's motive or not; but it should be remembered that protecting user privacy and reserving data for paying customers look pretty similar; but differ in important respects.

Re:Enough with the evil Google routine (4, Insightful)

cperciva (102828) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674515)

The only time Google has handed data over to a government agency...

I think you mean "the only time we know about...". Under the PATRIOT act it's entirely possible that Google has handed over lots of data to the US government but has been instructed that they're not allowed to tell anyone about it.

Re:Yeah, Right. (1)

icepick72 (834363) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674377)

They can datamine me through GDrive as much as they want because I'm not stupid enough to put important, sensitive or incriminating data online. However I might put up other kinds of information so I can access it from anywhere. If I do see the need to store something sensitive online be rest-assured it will be well encrypted and the private key will not be stored alongside it.

Just use truecrypt or some other encryption. (1)

elucido (870205) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674389)

The feds aren't going to be able to decrypt all that stuff. And they certainly don't care to.
It's simple, encrypt all your files BEFORE you back them up on GDrive. Encrypt all your porn with AES256 or Serpent.

Use the longest most random passphrase you possibly can come up with, or better yet don't use a passphrase at all.
By the time the feds crack your encryption scheme, you'll be dead anyway. And unless you are a terrorist, they aren't going to torture you to get you to hand over the keys.

Re:Just use truecrypt or some other encryption. (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674429)

And unless they think you are a terrorist, they aren't going to torture you to get you to hand over the keys.

FTFY.

Re:Yeah, Right. (1)

dissy (172727) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674435)

...and it's all online, so that when the government decides to datamine your life, Google will just send it over without bothering you.

I hate to be the one to point this out, but shame on you for sending data you don't want the govt to see unencrypted over the internet! It's time for you to retake your geek test to see if you should keep your geek card :P

I could see that as a valid complaint for 'regular joe six-pack' types who don't know about encryption, or realize that when you put data out in front of the public, that *gasp* the public can see it!
(Ok, a bit bitter there, but I just had an unsecured WiFi argument with someone who had sniffed chat transcripts used against her, yet wont even turn on wep/wga because she hates remembering passwords...)
But in my experience, those same users don't seem to care when the dangers are explained to them and alternatives offered, so can it really be too big of a concern?

Either way, this is slashdot, and you should just know better :}

Borgle? (1)

Toe, The (545098) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674149)

Show of hands... how many slashdotters use Google for multiple services?

Next question; why do you trust them so much? What makes them so radically different from Microsoft or Apple?

Once they become the Borgle, do you really think they'll do no evil with the vast amount of data you are giving them? Remember, this means not just your actual data, but also all the implications they can draw from your data habits.

Re:Borgle? (1)

pieterh (196118) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674197)

About 10 years

Re:Borgle? (2, Insightful)

Enderandrew (866215) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674357)

Google isn't a new company. They've been around a while and have a positive track record. They're fairly transparent. Microsoft and Apple have had fairly negative track records for ages.

Please explain to me your assumption that Google will change against all reason their company strategy to emulate their competitors that they constantly try to differentiate themselves from?

Never debug comments (3, Insightful)

Weaselmancer (533834) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674201)

Only debug code.

I'd guess the code must be commented out since the service in question doesn't exist. So if this code were to try to connect to it, it would hang. Right?

So it's non-executing code. Which means that maybe it's a leftover from some meeting where they thought they would offer this service but changed their minds since then.

How many times have you been fooled by reading outdated comments?

Believe it when it launches. Inferring Google's direction from reading code comments is clever, but perhaps a bit too clever.

Re:Never debug comments (1)

nextekcarl (1402899) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674363)

If you read the pdf (and assuming it is legit) they do say they want to offer it to google users, but that it isn't quite ready yet. And I can't think of any reason they wouldn't want to offer it (and since people are already using Gmail that way through things like gmailfs, etc). It gives them even more information on people, which they do want (they are primarily in advertising after all). I think you'd need to be careful with what you put on it, but I don't see it as an automatically bad thing. Of course most users I know won't be able to understand what that means, but I've given up on teaching most of them about computers and safety already.

Re:Never debug comments (1)

Enderandrew (866215) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674371)

Several people have been reporting on GDrive rumors, fairly specific ones, for months.

It just so happens that Google code also references a product whose name and description match those rumors.

The title of this article says the announcement is "Unofficial" not "Officially Confirmed".

That seems like a fair assessment to me.

gdrive.com (3, Interesting)

dmomo (256005) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674267)

Taken right now by a web design firm. Curious how long they stay there for.

Re:gdrive.com (-1)

Enderandrew (866215) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674379)

Gmail doesn't use Gmail.com.

Gdrive can easily use gdrive.google.com, and even better, the first Google search result for Gdrive can easily point to gdrive.google.com

Re:gdrive.com (4, Informative)

LiENUS (207736) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674491)

Gmail doesn't use Gmail.com.

It doesnt?

Domain Name: GMAIL.COM
Registrar: MARKMONITOR INC.
Whois Server: whois.markmonitor.com
Referral URL: http://www.markmonitor.com/ [markmonitor.com]
Name Server: NS1.GOOGLE.COM

Weird. Did you perhaps mean gmail doesn't exclusively use gmail.com?

Re:gdrive.com (4, Insightful)

verbatim_verbose (411803) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674523)

Then how do you suppose that email sent to user@gmail.com gets to the Google account? Someone just kindly forwards it?

Re:gdrive.com (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26674553)

Actually, gmail.com redirects to http://mail.google.com

Re:gdrive.com (1)

skroops (1237422) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674559)

What do you mean gmail doesn't use gmail.com?

Re:gdrive.com (1)

erikdotla (609033) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674465)

So, someone has chrome.com too, no guarantee Google will even be interested.

Whoever owns gdrive.com would be wise to offer a backup service though :)

Hmm (2, Insightful)

lunartik (94926) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674291)

Well that sucks for Google [gdrive.com] .

MySpace started out as a storage site (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26674297)

I remember when myspace.com was a storage site before it became the social network, I signed up multiple accounts and got some nice picks on common words.
My accounts transferred over when I tried to log back into it when the myspace hype was at prime, but I wonder what ever happened with all my files?

Moral of story is; you can never trust that a free online storage company will go under and take your files with them. Microsoft(SkyDrive) and Google are really the only places I could trust to drop my files in and come back to in 15 years hopefully, just hopefully they will not pull the crap where you don't login for 90 days and they delete everything.

GMail File Shell extension (2, Informative)

flogger (524072) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674327)

I've been using the GMail Drive Shell Extansion [viksoe.dk] for quite a while now. Google must have liked it as well.

Re:GMail File Shell extension (1)

The MAZZTer (911996) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674395)

Have you used it recently? That hasn't worked for me in months. I assume some change to GMail broke it a while ago and it hasn't been fixed.

Re:GMail File Shell extension (2, Informative)

flogger (524072) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674537)

Recently? Sure have. I use it twice a day at least. Used it just now. Every couple of months, google changes something. Just check http://www.viksoe.dk/code/gmail.htm [viksoe.dk] and an update is usually there the next day. I have a drive mapped to it on work machines. Nice stuff.

GDrive slogan! (2, Funny)

Korbeau (913903) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674361)

GDrive! A hard-disk governments and corporate businesses can finally google on!

Ads and Encryption (2, Interesting)

Adrian Lopez (2615) | more than 5 years ago | (#26674407)

How will they make money with this service? Will they charge a subscription fee or will it be supported via ads like most of their services? If it's going to be ad-supported, that probably means encrypted files will not be permitted [Ever try to send a fully encrypted RAR file through GMail? You can't.], which doesn't sit too well with me.

Re:Ads and Encryption (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26674519)

I email encrypted files through gmail almost every day.

not announced - CANCELLED (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26674543)

there is no announcement of any kind because this is a project from 2007 [slashdot.org] that has been cancelled. Whatever code you found in Google Pack is also from that time.

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