×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Apple's Terms No Longer Allow ITMS Purchases Outside of US

timothy posted more than 5 years ago | from the just-a-test-to-see-if-you're-reading-the-terms dept.

Media (Apple) 319

JasonDT writes "I just accepted the new terms of service for iTunes and found that I will no longer be allowed to access US iTunes outside of the United States. This may seem like no big deal but, I am a US citizen living abroad and I regularly purchase and view TV and movies from AppleTV. Not to mention US citizens just traveling abroad. Does anyone know if this has been enforced or have themselves been affected by this?"

cancel ×
This is a preview of your comment

No Comment Title Entered

Anonymous Coward 1 minute ago

No Comment Entered

319 comments

Quick someone register itunesproxy.com (4, Interesting)

Foofoobar (318279) | more than 5 years ago | (#26710651)

Register itunesproxy.com before apple does!!!

Re:Quick someone register itunesproxy.com (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26710871)

OT, but your sig is slightly wrong. It should read:

"I agree with 90% of the world which are all idiots, you don't, therefore you're biased!"

7th grade English, sentence diagramming... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26711511)

OT, but your sig is slightly wrong. It should read: "I agree with 90% of the world which are all idiots, you don't, therefore you're biased!"

That is better, but you should take it one step further and translate it into something humans can understand.

Seriously, it needs a diagram accompanying it.

Re:Quick someone register itunesproxy.com (3, Funny)

Yvan256 (722131) | more than 5 years ago | (#26710895)

Even better, someone register itunes.apple.com, quick!

Re:Quick someone register itunesproxy.com (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26711775)

If it's a joke, I don't get it.

Re:Quick someone register itunesproxy.com (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26711855)

Got it :D

It directs u to 1.3.3.7 for now lol.

Re:Quick someone register itunesproxy.com (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26712455)

Domain Name:ITUNESPROXY.COM
Created On:01-Jan-1970 00:00:00 UTC
Last Updated On:03-Feb-2009 16:51:38 UTC
Expiration Date:03-Feb-2010 16:51:37 UTC
Sponsoring Registrar:Vitalwerks Internet Solutions, LLC / No-IP.com
Registrant Name:Austin, Chad
Registrant Organization:
Registrant Street1:ATTN: itunesproxy.com, c/o No-IP.com Registration Privacy
Registrant Street2:P.O. Box 18797
Registrant City:Reno
Registrant State/Province:NV
Registrant Postal Code:89511
Registrant Country:US
Registrant Phone:+1.7758531883
Registrant FAX:
Registrant Email:6646d708928830e1-312134@privacy.no-ip.com
Admin Name:Austin, Chad
Admin Street1:ATTN: itunesproxy.com, c/o No-IP.com Registration Privacy
Admin Street2:P.O. Box 18797
Admin City:Reno
Admin State/Province:NV
Admin Postal Code:89511
Admin Country:US
Admin Phone:+1.7758531883
Admin FAX:
Admin Email:6646d708928830e1-312134@privacy.no-ip.com

US and Canada? (0)

geek2k5 (882748) | more than 5 years ago | (#26710687)

Is Canada included in that?

Re:US and Canada? (5, Funny)

geekoid (135745) | more than 5 years ago | (#26710805)

Yes, Canada is still outside the US...for now~

Re:US and Canada? (1)

rock56501 (1301287) | more than 5 years ago | (#26710839)

Last time I checked, Canada is outside of the US. Although, I haven't read the ToS (who does) so I couldn't tell you if there is an exception for Canada.

Re:US and Canada? (3, Funny)

MightyYar (622222) | more than 5 years ago | (#26711179)

The TOS specifically mentions the annexation of Canada.

It's official people.

Re:US and Canada? (5, Funny)

ColdWetDog (752185) | more than 5 years ago | (#26711447)

The TOS specifically mentions the annexation of Canada.

Apple annexed Canada? Just wow. I didn't know that had that much cash on hand.

Well, congrats Steve.

Re:US and Canada? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26711859)

As long as China doesn't annex Alaska in response, we should be fine.

Re:US and Canada? (5, Funny)

denarii (1174883) | more than 5 years ago | (#26712465)

No, no, it's Russia that wants to annex Alaska.

Fortunately, we have Palin standing on the coast up there keeping a close eye on them.

Re:US and Canada? (4, Informative)

Yvan256 (722131) | more than 5 years ago | (#26710915)

No idea, but it's something you don't have to worry about if you get your media from other sources that don't keep on putting up artificial barriers...

HA HA HA HA (5, Interesting)

jhfry (829244) | more than 5 years ago | (#26710815)

I bet that the poster of this article is exploring his options, after all, he's not allow to purchase his media legally, so perhaps he would be better served by a free alternative?

I am sure Apple did it only to make someone else happy (labels, investors, foreign governments, us government, etc...) however, it's ridiculous to suggest that this will do anything but increase piracy.

Re:HA HA HA HA (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26711031)

I bet that the poster of this article is exploring his options, after all, he's not allow to purchase his media legally, so perhaps he would be better served by a free alternative?

Personally, I'd suggest looking to see if Spotify is available in his country by now.
Think of it as Pandora/Oldschool Napster/iTunes combined.

Free, ad supported (optional subscription to get rid of the ads) streaming music.
Current library of roughly 2M songs, with the big labels already in on it, independents being added "all the time", and a library that grows by roughly 10k songs per day.

Re:HA HA HA HA (4, Informative)

repvik (96666) | more than 5 years ago | (#26711077)

You know Spotify has done the same? A fair bit of music is unavailable in several countries due to licensing issues.
This isn't Apple, Spotify or any stores fault. It's the music business.
Yay for making it easy for consumers to buy music.

Re:HA HA HA HA (2, Insightful)

conares (1045290) | more than 5 years ago | (#26711497)

I am sure Apple did it only to make someone else happy (labels, investors, foreign governments, us government, etc...) however, it's ridiculous to suggest that this will do anything but increase piracy.

Wow do you think pirates are that sensitive? That they would hijack more boats and kill more ppl? And just because Apple doesnt want to sell them music? They must get really lonely at sea... those poor pirates.

Let's be sensible about this... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26711617)

Just get mp3's from the internet for free.

It's the *sensible* thing to do when faced with ridiculous obstacles to what is a simple problem.

Re:HA HA HA HA (4, Funny)

linhares (1241614) | more than 5 years ago | (#26712767)

YES I AM BRAZILIAN INFERIOR HUMAN BEING and I had one account with a US address and an itunes card. Shit, I fucking said yes to the EULA or SLA when prompted. GOD DAMN YOU, APPLE! Now I can get no new apps for my iPhone. Oh well, just one more thing: GOD DAMN YOU APPLE! I'm just switching to Android as soon as it's available here in Banana Republics.

You are subject to laws of where you live (5, Insightful)

ducomputergeek (595742) | more than 5 years ago | (#26710879)

not where you were born. When I was an American living and working in Germany, I was subject to the laws of Germany. I couldn't download a browser with more than 40-bit encryption at the time due to export regulations. Yes I was an American citizen, but I wasn't in the united states.
Now, if you are working on behalf of the US government at a diplomatic consulate/mission or in the military, then you may have a gripe, and I believe Apple should do something to work with you. Especially if your billing is to an APO address.

Just because I'm american and we are allowed the freedom of speech inside the US doesn't mean I can have a copy of Mein Kampf in Germany.

Re:You are subject to laws of where you live (4, Funny)

MightyYar (622222) | more than 5 years ago | (#26711085)

Just because I'm american and we are allowed the freedom of speech inside the US doesn't mean I can have a copy of Mein Kampf in Germany.

LOL, I think this might be the most sensible post to invoke Godwin's Law ever!

Re:You are subject to laws of where you live (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26712109)

It also is quite wrong. It is legal to own "Mein Kampf" in Germany. It is not legal to sell, give or even show it to somebody else. It is also illegal to purchase it as far as I know.
Possession however is fine.

Re:You are subject to laws of where you live (2, Interesting)

neuromanc3r (1119631) | more than 5 years ago | (#26711113)

Just because I'm american and we are allowed the freedom of speech inside the US doesn't mean I can have a copy of Mein Kampf in Germany.

Bad example. It is a common misconception that Mein Kampf is illegal in Germany. You are allowed to have a copy (even though it you will probably not find a new one anywhere).

Re:You are subject to laws of where you live (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26712211)

Wrong. In Germany as well as in Austria 'Mein Kampf' is an illegal book prohibited under laws against glorifying and identifying with the National Socialist German Workers Party.
Only heavily commented versions are available and legal.

Re:You are subject to laws of where you live (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26711207)

You are certainly under the law of the country you live and work in. The important thing is that there is no law, at least in Germany, that forbids Apple to sell music and TV shows online.

So whatever the reason behind this, I am quite annoyed. My girlfriend is from the US and currently working here and we watch quite a few TV shows through Itunes, that are not available here otherwise. Just guessing about the reason, it might be that they want to establish different regional prices. So instead of paying and watching we can now wait for an equivalent offer or circumvent this somehow, both options just reduce the content producers and Apple's revenue...

Re:You are subject to laws of where you live (2, Informative)

Corbets (169101) | more than 5 years ago | (#26711275)

For the record, you can be subject to both the laws of the country where you live and where you were born simultaneously, even if the two are not the same. ;P

American paedophilia and tax laws come to mind...

Re:You are subject to laws of where you live (5, Insightful)

JustinOpinion (1246824) | more than 5 years ago | (#26711309)

I don't think the submitter is complaining that what iTunes is doing is illegal (or that he should be subject to US law while abroad). I think he is complaining that what iTunes is doing is stupid.

He wants to be a customer. He wants to give them money. But they (iTunes, or whichever content providers require this rule) want to restrict things regionally. These regional restrictions are inconvenient, arbitrary, and illogical in an age of ubiquitous global network connectivity, and easy trans-national travel. Someone abroad can circumvent the restrictions easily with a proxy. Conversely a US citizen on a trip abroad is denied access (whereas it would have been fine if they had downloaded it while in the US and carried it on their computer on the plane). Thus it doesn't seem that the rule accomplishes its nominal goal. Actually for the most part the nominal goal isn't even clear. In short, the restrictions are silly.

Of course it is within iTune's ability (technical and legal) to impose such restrictions. But it just seems illogical, since anywhere that the content is not available through a legitimate source (or available but only after a substantial delay) will simply increase the amount of circumvention (proxy, file sharing, etc.). So why don't these companies want the money being offered to them?

Re:You are subject to laws of where you live (1)

peragrin (659227) | more than 5 years ago | (#26711633)

Is it itunes fault is country laws(USA Germany, France,etc) forbid such things ? Just because you Are an American doesn't give you the right to playmusic, videos, even newspapers that are banned in the country your currenrtly in.

Re:You are subject to laws of where you live (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26711915)

Welcome to the state of copyright law around the world. You (and the submitter) may think that Apple is being stupid, but they're complying with the legal framework in which they operate. Whether these laws should change is another story. And even if they do change to better reflect the networked world we live in, it won't happen overnight.

Re:You are subject to laws of where you live (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26711985)

So why don't these companies want the money being offered to them?

Because regionalizing of content allows you to extract the maximum price at the market will bear in each region. At least that's what the bean counters and lawyers that come up with these schemes tell themselves.

If a company regionalizes any service or product for any reason other than language or obvious logistics concerns, you can be pretty sure they're just trying to extract more money from the places that will pay it. Yes, they're assholes. No, I don't like it. No, it won't work that well in the long run. As we've seen time and time again though, a lot of upper management in most companies just doesn't "get" the Information Age yet.

Re:You are subject to laws of where you live (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26712959)

This is solely to adhere to the fact that different parties (i.e. record labels, film studios, distributors, etc) regularly secure distribution rights based on a specific territory. For example, the Sci Fi Channel/NBC Universal has distribution rights for Battlestar Galactica in the USA, but not in Canada. If BSG isn't in the Canadian iTunes Store, don't blame Sci Fi, blame Space, who has the Canadian distribution rights. End of story.

Perhaps all of this will go away one day but for now, the selling of distribution rights remains a major part of film/TV studio's and record label's businesses.

Re:You are subject to laws of where you live (2, Interesting)

mikael_j (106439) | more than 5 years ago | (#26711613)

I couldn't download a browser with more than 40-bit encryption at the time due to export regulations. Yes I was an American citizen, but I wasn't in the united states.

Actually, the law you would've broken was a US law, there's a reason lots of software that contained encryption was written in a way that allowed it to ship without the encryption, so that europeans and others could use the encryption module/plugin/component coded outside the US.

Also, I think this move is partly to stop non-americans from getting US iTunes accounts so that they can buy movies and TV shows (yeah, are you listening Apple? We're still waiting!).

/Mikael

Re:You are subject to laws of where you live (1)

0xdeadbeef (28836) | more than 5 years ago | (#26712647)

Just because I'm american and we are allowed the freedom of speech inside the US doesn't mean I can have a copy of Mein Kampf in Germany.

By that logic, we should all STFU whenever these companies assist foreign governments in tracking down dissidents.

Either natural rights exist or they don't. If they exist, then it doesn't matter what country a person is in when they are infringed.

Re:You are subject to laws of where you live (2, Informative)

kwerle (39371) | more than 5 years ago | (#26712849)

not where you were born. When I was an American living and working in Germany, I was subject to the laws of Germany. I couldn't download a browser with more than 40-bit encryption at the time due to export regulations...

Couldn't download it *from the US*.

Don't feel special (4, Informative)

chrism238 (657741) | more than 5 years ago | (#26710901)

Similarly, Australians traveling overseas cannot access (their money in) the Australian iTunes store. Don't feel special.

Re:Don't feel special (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26712057)

As someone who has visited Australia several times over the past few years, I'm wondering why the Aussies would want to travel overseas.

Bored with the moderate weather in NSW? Move to QLD.
Bored with the stoner culture around southern coastal QLD? Move to SA.
Want better wines? Move to WA.
Want to get away from civilization? Move to the NT.
Want to get away from the oppressive heat? Move to Victoria.

Feeling REALLY interested and want to travel to strange and exotic lands?
Well, there's always Tazmania.

Compartmentalizing the Internet (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26710941)

Welcome to the dismantling of the internet. If you have the slightest knowledge of how media cartels work, not just American ones but World wide, then you know it was just a matter of time before market segmentation reared its ugly head onto the web. Google is not exempt either, they've been IP filtering their early days.

First a moon base, now this (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26711155)

Google is not exempt either, they've been IP filtering their early days.

That's amazing! Are they using some kind of time-traveling firewall?

Re:Compartmentalizing the Internet (1)

poot_rootbeer (188613) | more than 5 years ago | (#26712707)

If you have the slightest knowledge of how media cartels work, not just American ones but World wide, then you know it was just a matter of time before market segmentation reared its ugly head onto the web.

And that time was right around when RFC 1591 was adopted, fifteen years ago. What other reason for ccTLDs could there be -- for television shows to contribute to the Tuvan economy by reserving a vanity *.tv domain?

The Internet may be the same all over, but the laws its users are compelled to abide by are not. Segmentation can and will exist on the network as long as any locality is capable of determining its own laws.

Deployed (4, Insightful)

donaggie03 (769758) | more than 5 years ago | (#26710949)

As a deployed American soldier (Afghanistan) who has downloaded many songs from Itunes over the last year, I just have to say this change is ridiculous! That is all.

Re:Deployed (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26711143)

arent US installations considered US soil? a wouldnt think you would be affected as you likely are using DoD servers.

Re:Deployed (2, Interesting)

donaggie03 (769758) | more than 5 years ago | (#26711285)

No, we have a local Afghan internet service provider. Of course there are military computers all over base, but we cannot use them for personal use . . especially not to install software and dl music.

Re:Deployed (2, Interesting)

Dravik (699631) | more than 5 years ago | (#26711353)

A lot of the internet access is contracted out. Often deployed personnel get the Italian or Germain versions of google and will have a problem with itunes thinking they are in the country where the sat downlink(and thus ip address range) is located.

You could always just SSH (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26710961)

SSH to a friends machine, and tunnel all of your traffic.Then you'd technically be purchasing in the US, right?

Re:You could always just SSH (1)

Estanislao Martnez (203477) | more than 5 years ago | (#26712387)

SSH to a friends machine, and tunnel all of your traffic.Then you'd technically be purchasing in the US, right?

No. You'd be purchasing wherever you are physically located.

Re:You could always just SSH (1)

gandhi_2 (1108023) | more than 5 years ago | (#26712693)

No. You'd be purchasing wherever you are physically located.

It's not what you do, it's what they can prove. If the "proof" is an IP address on iTunes' logfiles, then where you "are" is wherever the SSH tunnel end was visible.

Re:You could always just SSH (1)

noc007 (633443) | more than 5 years ago | (#26713001)

I don't think you understand how SSH tunneling works. One can essentially setup a VPN with SSH tunneling. SSH to the US located system and with tunneling all of your traffic is routed through it thus presenting a source IP that's in the US to iTunes.

works in Vietnam (2, Informative)

wisebabo (638845) | more than 5 years ago | (#26710969)

I live in Vietnam and regularly purchase apps for my iPhone which, uh, has gained the ability to work here ;).

I saw the warning too but short of setting up some sort of proxy I have no other options but to try and use it here. Fortunately it works (for now).

Geography - not nationality (4, Informative)

Midnight Thunder (17205) | more than 5 years ago | (#26710973)

This has nothing to do with being an USA citizen and all about where you are geographically located. If you have a credit card registered to a USA address, then you can buy quite happily from the US store (Apple isn't going to know the real story), but not if you have a non-USA address. This policy has been in place since day 1 of the iTunes store, and is in place because of the distribution rights set in place by the record companies, so in reality this is a non-story.

Re:Geography - not nationality (3, Interesting)

davecb (6526) | more than 5 years ago | (#26711647)

Odd, I have a Canadian credit card and itunes still takes my money (;-))

--dave

Re:Geography - not nationality (1)

ceoyoyo (59147) | more than 5 years ago | (#26712837)

US iTunes store, or Canadian iTunes store? The US store certainly doesn't like my Canadian credit card, but the Canadian version takes it no problem.

Re:Geography - not nationality (1)

Aladrin (926209) | more than 5 years ago | (#26712313)

That's the way it's always been before, yes. The submitter is panicking because the new ToS says he won't be allowed to access it, even with his US credit card.

Is he right? Who knows. If they were already blocking based on IP, I'm sure we'd have heard that story instead.

This is probably a complete non-issue.

Re:Geography - not nationality (1)

NonUniqueNickname (1459477) | more than 5 years ago | (#26712367)

If you have a credit card registered to a USA address, then you can buy quite happily from the US store

The store looks at your IP address. The account you opened and used in the US, with a US billing address, and a US credit card, will be declined when you travel abroad. Tested. Then circumvented using a proxy.

Re:Geography - not nationality (1)

Duradin (1261418) | more than 5 years ago | (#26712979)

I'm guessing this means getting a foreign region's gift card to use with the appropriate store will no longer work without going through a proxy either then.

Re:Geography - not nationality (2, Informative)

Linnen (735667) | more than 5 years ago | (#26712401)

yup.

Same thing hits when US card holder tries purchasing electronica from the European iTunes store or Anime Soundtracks from the Japanese store.

If it were not for this aspect of region locking, I would have been a customer.

Re:Geography - not nationality (2, Insightful)

Duradin (1261418) | more than 5 years ago | (#26712911)

Gotta love it when the recording industries refuse to let you give them money for their product.

Ya, those regional restrictions are really helping to promote piracy, err, I mean combat piracy. 'Cause if someone can't legally get access to something they want for non-exorbitant prices (or if at all) they'll just totally stop wanting it...

So, Fanboys... (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26710989)

What do you have to say about Apple's warm and fuzzy user-friendly DRM now?

"Well, at least you can always burn it to CD then re-rip it..."

Anyone have a pool going for how long Apple will stay afloat after the rapidly
deteriorating Jobs shuffles off this mortal coil?

Re:So, Fanboys... (2, Interesting)

argent (18001) | more than 5 years ago | (#26711159)

What do you have to say about Apple's warm and fuzzy user-friendly DRM now?

I say "I just upgraded three tracks from Joe Hisaishi's soundtrack to "Kikujiro" to iTunes Plus", what do you expect me to say? I should refuse to take advantage of the fact that Apple finally got the labels to agree to let them finish removing the cold and prickly DRM from the trackes they're licensing?

And whoever modded you "funny" must be similarly out of touch.

Re:So, Fanboys... (1)

jcr (53032) | more than 5 years ago | (#26711345)

What do you have to say about Apple's warm and fuzzy user-friendly DRM now?

Two things: 1) Apple never wanted it in the first place, and 2) Apple is dumping DRM [apple.com].

-jcr

Re:So, Fanboys... (1)

PPH (736903) | more than 5 years ago | (#26712605)

Apple probably has no interest in forcing such restrictions on its customers (US or foreign). What they do have to do is to survive an audit by the various record companies that have demanded them.

So, charge to a US credit card and tunnel through a US proxy and Apple will be happy. (Nod, nod. Wink, wink.)

Re:So, Fanboys... (1)

ceoyoyo (59147) | more than 5 years ago | (#26712893)

Uh, I hate to tell you, but Amazon doesn't offer ANY mp3 store in most places in the world. In fact, many of the products available in their US store are off limits to most of the world.

It has nothing to do with DRM.

it hasn't been enforced (3, Interesting)

stress_weenie (1002697) | more than 5 years ago | (#26711135)

This policy is not new. It has been around for at least a year. But I live outside the US (and I am a US citizen... not that it matters in this case) and I still regularly purchase and download and watch TV shows and movies on iTunes. In fact, it is the only software that lets me do this. Amazon and other alternatives disable their service outside the US.

Re:it hasn't been enforced (3, Interesting)

Ertman (29767) | more than 5 years ago | (#26712223)

Amazon even disables their service within the US if you don't use a US credit card. (I can walk into any record store in the US while on vacation and buy a CD or DVD using my credit card, but I can't buy songs or videos from Amazon because I don't have a US billing address. How silly.)

Amazon MP3 (3, Informative)

Rinisari (521266) | more than 5 years ago | (#26711141)

Try out Amazon MP3 [tinyurl.com].

It's cheap, DRM-less, and easy. Plus, it runs on Linux just fine (32-bit has packages, force it on 64-bit, use getlibs, and it works fine).

YEARwithoutDRM [yearwithoutdrm.com]

iTunes Plus (5, Interesting)

argent (18001) | more than 5 years ago | (#26711305)

It's cheap, DRM-less, and easy. And it doesn't install a helper application into your browser, just waiting for someone to figure out how to slide an exploit into a ".amz" file.

For Safari under Leopard, to remove that erroneous tagging of ".amz" as "safe" (there's no such thing as a "safe" file), remove the entry from ~/Library/Preferences/com.apple.DownloadAssessment.plist .

Re:iTunes Plus (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26711469)

Out of curiosity, how are you posting to slashdot?
Any connection to slashdot involves transferring many files, all in formats repeatedly shown to be exploitable in the past, in virtually any application you could be using.

Re:iTunes Plus (1)

commodoresloat (172735) | more than 5 years ago | (#26712051)

It's cheap, DRM-less, and easy. And it doesn't install a helper application into your browser, just waiting for someone to figure out how to slide an exploit into a ".amz" file.

What are you talking about? Amazon doesn't install anything in my browser; you download a separate application. And what makes an amz file less safe than any other file? It's a document, not an application. And it's being served by amazon.com -- or does your scenario involve malicious hackers taking over amazon.com too?

Re:iTunes Plus (1)

krzy123 (1201507) | more than 5 years ago | (#26712251)

Um .. don't you need iTunes to download iTunes Plus tracks? iTunes is pretty much bloated crap and way worse than the Amazon downloader.

Re:Amazon MP3 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26711697)

Try the Pirate Bay. It's cheaper, DRM-less, and works with any platform.

Re:Amazon MP3 (2, Informative)

steve9001 (1468303) | more than 5 years ago | (#26711819)

I agree with this post. After getting "shuffled" by songs my wife bought on itunes, I searched for months for a easy/legal/open/fair music solution. I don't want to be a Amazon fanboy, but they have a "fair" system that doesn't lock out any competing OS's. The amazon mp3 let you download a single song without installing anything on your PC. Here's my music solution: OS: Debian GNU Linux - i'm running Lenny Music Manager: Rythmbox - comes with Debian Online Music: Amazon mp3 - artist get paid some, but no DRM Portable player: Sansa Clip - plays ogg & mp3 I burn my existing CD collection to ogg enjoy.

Re:Amazon MP3 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26712155)

You know, if your wife had her own user account on your machine, and purchased her music on that account, you wouldn't run into that problem.

Re:Amazon MP3 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26712065)

As an American living temporarily abroad, I can attest to the fact that Amazon MP3 will in fact work for you, provided it did when you were in the US (I guess you need an American address and credit card?)

There was a small hiccup once where it randomly decided to complain about my location, but I went through a proxy to set up my credit card again, and then without the proxy it worked fine.

Re:Amazon MP3 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26712237)

Uh, that's US-only too. Not going to help the OP's problem. Really, this is all a mountain out of a molehill. This has always been the case with iTunes - if you have a US credit card, you are not allowed to use the Japanese or European stores. Same for vice versa. Because of the regionalization of all the labels, this will always be the case for every online store everywhere. iTunes is as close as a global solution for online music as anything at the moment.

Re:Amazon MP3 (5, Informative)

Lars T. (470328) | more than 5 years ago | (#26712317)

Try out Amazon MP3 [tinyurl.com].

It's cheap, DRM-less, and easy. Plus

... it can't be used outside the USA either. Great alternative there.

Re:Amazon MP3 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26712359)

And it doesn't work outside the US. Unlike iTunes. Jeez, would people stop with the Amazon bullshit. Apple has most of it's catalog DRM-free as of a week ago. I would love to use Amazon as well as iTunes but being an American working outside the US Amazon happily takes my American credit card. And then blocks me from downloading the song (using IP geotagging) I just paid for. Amazon MP3 can go to hell.

Re:Amazon MP3 (2, Informative)

ceoyoyo (59147) | more than 5 years ago | (#26712941)

And it's not available out side the US and (now) the UK. At all.

Apple offers iTunes stores for most of the countries in the world, you just can't buy from the wrong store.

Completely out of control (4, Insightful)

paulthomas (685756) | more than 5 years ago | (#26711175)

The last time I was presented with the "agreement" for the iTunes store, I pulled up a terminal and ran wc on it. It was 4,931 words long, not including referenced agreements. You can go buy a CD at a store with out signing a contract, much less one nearly 5,000 words long.

It contained all manor of claims of how Apple could unilaterally change the terms for purchased music and required that you "agree to agree" to future terms.

Having taken some contract law courses ( but IANAHPAADL - I am not a highly paid Apple attack dog lawyer), much of it seemed unconscionable. Specifically, consideration from Apple (ability to play already purchased songs, access the store, etc.) seems weak-to-non-existent in light of the fact that it can be arbitrarily revoked according to the terms.

Also, I am generally an Apple fan, but this is one area where I think they are really out of control.

Re:Completely out of control (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26712923)

Having taken some contract law courses ( but IANAHPAADL - I am not a highly paid Apple attack dog lawyer), much of it seemed unconscionable. Specifically, consideration from Apple (ability to play already purchased songs, access the store, etc.) seems weak-to-non-existent in light of the fact that it can be arbitrarily revoked according to the terms.

If the contract is prima facie unconscionable, sign it and when necessary, take Apple to court. If the contract is truly unconscionable, you won't even have to hire an attorney, because the Judge will see the contract for what it is.

OTOH, maybe your definition of unconscionable and the legal definition are not quite one and the same.

Do you have a credit card? (1)

CubeDude213 (678340) | more than 5 years ago | (#26711281)

AFAIK, Apple will allow you to purchase from the US store if you have credit card with a US or APO billing address. That's how they check.

Also, I'm pretty sure the ToS for the store has had this rule ever since it was opened up to other countries. Each country has its own store due to licensing restrictions from the labels.

Re:Do you have a credit card? (2, Informative)

davecb (6526) | more than 5 years ago | (#26711693)

Either they're not checking or the credit card company isn't allowed to disclose the customer's address without a court order, as my canadian card works fine.

--dave

Proxy. (1)

senorpoco (1396603) | more than 5 years ago | (#26711897)

ProxyProxyProxyProxyProxyProxyProxy I use OpenVPN it just runs happily in the background allowing me to access Hulu and all kinds of other US only content.

Re:Proxy. (1)

Nabeel_co (1045054) | more than 5 years ago | (#26712631)

Why thank you for that sir. Now I have an alternative to mashing the "New Idenity" button in Tor/Vidalia and hoping I get someone in the US.

Same Problem in Canada (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26712421)

I'm a US citizen, living in Canada.
I have a Canadian iPhone, but cannot purchase anything from iTMS using my US credit card, even using my Canadian address. I don't have a Canadian credit card, making buying anything impossible.

So when I went to the states, I used my US credit card and US address, and I could purchase apps. I went back, synced, and a mysterious error appeared not letting me load the application. Translation of message: "Unable to load application"

No idea if it's the same for music, because I would never buy music from Apple.

LooooooL... (1)

Nabeel_co (1045054) | more than 5 years ago | (#26712505)

When the iTMS first came into existence, I was so eager to use it that I borrowed my aunt's credit card (who lives in the states) and bought music in Canada through her and her credit card! Aaahh... those were the days...

You can always try talking to Apple (2, Interesting)

JonahsDad (1332091) | more than 5 years ago | (#26712777)

A friend of mine ordered the MLB.TV video streaming package, then had to spend most of the baseball season in China. After he tried unsuccessfully to use the service, he contacted MLB.TV's tech support, and although 1st layer support was no help, he eventually worked his way up to someone who was able to grant him access.
Obviously, since Apple doesn't own the music, they might be less flexible. Doesn't cost anything other than time to try.

US iTunes gift cards worthless as well (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26712831)

I had two iTunes gift cards each worth $15 from Christmas. The iTunes app wouldn't let me use them, because I'm trying to use them in Europe. When I had calmed down over their stupidity, I decided to use a public proxy. Problem solved.

Stupid Apple. I was going to start buying from them now that they had DRM-free songs but not any more. They go from stupid (for DRM) to smart (for DRM-free) and back to stupid (for just being stupid and not letting their users give them money).

Gift cards do the trick (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26712991)

My family abroad buys gift cards and uses those to buy from the US iTunes. Works like a charm.

Load More Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Sign up for Slashdot Newsletters
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...