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MySQL Co-Founder Monty Widenius Quits Sun

timothy posted more than 5 years ago | from the good-luck-with-the-next-thing-monty dept.

Databases 140

BobB-nw writes "Michael 'Monty' Widenius, the original developer of the open-source MySQL database, has left Sun Microsystems and is starting his own company, Monty Program Ab, he said in a blog post Thursday. Widenius and Sun had a slightly rocky relationship since the vendor bought MySQL last year for $1 billion. In a much-discussed November blog post, he trashed Sun's decision to give MySQL 5.1 a 'generally available' designation, saying it was riddled with serious bugs. Meanwhile, Monty Program Ab will be 'a true open-source company,' with only a small number of employees who 'strive to have fun together and share the profit we create.' The company will work on the Maria project, a storage engine Widenius and others developed, he wrote.'"

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140 comments

Thank you, Monty. (5, Insightful)

palegray.net (1195047) | more than 5 years ago | (#26743717)

I've been a fan of MySQL for several years, using it alongside other database platforms for a huge variety of tasks. I appreciate the hard work that has gone into MySQL, regardless of the never-ending flamewars on this-platform-or-that-is-superior. Yeah, I use Postgresql a lot these days, but I also still use MySQL.

I wish him all the best with his new venture, and look forward to seeing what sort of stuff he comes up with next.

Re:Thank you, Monty. (5, Insightful)

jd (1658) | more than 5 years ago | (#26744035)

Most open source databases have a niche for which they are unquestionably "the best". I believe MySQL's niche has changed over the years, but there is no question in my mind that it is superior to any other database at those specific tasks.

Likewise, Postgres, Ingres, Firebird, SQLite, QDBM, etc, are all good at their own thing. I really can't imagine anyone running a website from Ingres, but then I can't imagine anyone running a high-end scientific database through MySQL, trying to do relational work through QDBM, or running a single table database on Postgres.

Different horses for different courses. (NB: The expression does NOT originate in France.)

Re:Thank you, Monty. (3, Interesting)

tcopeland (32225) | more than 5 years ago | (#26744257)

> Yeah, I use Postgresql a lot these days, but I also still use MySQL.

I'm a big fan of PostgreSQL; I recently upgraded RubyForge to PostgreSQL 8.3 [blogs.com] and have been quite happy with the performance.

That said, I kind of feel like MySQL still has an edge on PostgreSQL in terms of replication - I know Slony is out there, but my perception of it is that it doesn't handle schema changes easily, and MySQL replication via binary log shipping is pretty straightforward. I hear the PostgreSQL guys are working on something for out of the box replication though, so we'll see....

Re:Thank you, Monty. (1)

Lord Ender (156273) | more than 5 years ago | (#26744893)

Mind explaining why? Here, we use SQLite for apps with small numbers of users and small DB size. We use Postgres for large or high load databases. So where is the niche for MySQL?

Re:Thank you, Monty. (4, Interesting)

palegray.net (1195047) | more than 5 years ago | (#26746289)

I like the replication features for some tasks, and a lot of common "off the shelf" open source apps are intended for use with MySQL as the backend. Yeah, in a lot of cases you *could* use something else, but I'm already got a few MySQL servers running in virtual machines. It's really just a matter of convenience.

For anything that's going to be really compute-intensive, I don't usually use "any of the above," as I prefer to use a relational database only as a data warehouse, with large chunks of data being loaded into processing programs as big hash tables. In many cases, I'm able to process information many orders of magnitude faster by keeping it all in local memory under the umbrella of the program that's doing the calculations. These are special use cases, however, and don't apply to general database tasks.

Re:Thank you, Monty. (1)

wmac (1107843) | more than 5 years ago | (#26748469)

Postgres did not give us the performance we needed. We now run two websites using MySQL:

- Website 1 is a social network with almost 1 million users. We have a daily visit of 350,000 (peak) and 3-5 million page views/day. Every page has average 3-5 queries.

We use a single web server + 2 replicated MySQL servers (1 master + 1 read only replicated) each with quad CPUs.

- Website 2 is a weblog website. We have 0.4-0.5 million visits/day and almost 2 million page views. This one is managed using a single MySQL+Apache server (dual quad).

I have run tests and I never ever imagine such performance with Postgres.

Re:Thank you, Monty. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26747099)

Wow what a kiss ass.

Sounds like a plan (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26743721)

The same has happened to the Blogger founders after they were bought by Google. If you're a startup guy working for a 20,000 employee company is not going to cut it. And to make things worse you won't have control over the product you created anymore.

I'm surprised it took him so long to quit.

--
Can you say, piece of shit [mailto] ?

Re:Sounds like a plan (3, Funny)

palegray.net (1195047) | more than 5 years ago | (#26743771)

I have an odd urge to send mail to that address in your sig, if only to inquire as to how a specimen of defecated material managed to land a gig at Google in these troubled economic times.

Re:Sounds like a plan (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26743807)

This may sound dumb, but who is Tom Dillon and why is he hated on?

Re:Sounds like a plan (1)

pdabbadabba (720526) | more than 5 years ago | (#26744051)

Re: Who is Dillon? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26744105)

I don't think that's the right Tom Dillon. I got a first name to associate with the last name by googling "dillon google". I suppose I should have asked if his first name is, in fact, Tom.

Re: Who is Dillon? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26746363)

That's funny, I have a broker with that name. And given what my account looks like since January of last year, I'd say that alias for him fits really well :D

Re:Sounds like a plan (1)

fm6 (162816) | more than 5 years ago | (#26744381)

MySQL had been out of startup mode for many years, and Widenius probably had a lot more control over the development of MySQL than Blogger's founders had over their baby.

That said, there is an obvious disconnect between MySQL's laid-back, decentralized corporate culture and Sun's bureaucratic, highly politicized management.

Re:Sounds like a plan (3, Insightful)

htnmmo (1454573) | more than 5 years ago | (#26745147)

I'm not an insider on either camp and I've been mostly using postgresql on my own projects.

But my sense is that Sun kept wanting to go opensource but MySQL wanted to directly monetize the product and not just be a free add on to sell hardware and other services.

This seemed to happen early on when MySQL announced some new features would not be opensourced shortly after acquisition, then Schwartz came back and spanked them into place.

Re:Sounds like a plan (2, Informative)

fm6 (162816) | more than 5 years ago | (#26746205)

I hadn't heard that (don't follow MySQL issues, even though I work at Sun) but it makes sense. JIS has been open sourcing other key software products (Solaris, Java), claiming that this would help him (as you say) sell hardware and services. He had to overcome a lot of resistance and skepticism to do this. He'd look really dumb if he allowed one prominent new acquisition to deviate from this model.

Re:Sounds like a plan (1)

mysidia (191772) | more than 5 years ago | (#26747953)

I would think the smart thing to do with an acquisition like MySQL would be to more or less give them a budget and let them keep doing what they're doing, under their same management, and let them continue to deliver more of the value that they bought them to obtain, with a little influence over their development agenda.

The MySQL name is part of what makes it worth so much, and for Sun to dissipate its reputation and its management more or less kills half the worth of owning it.

Re:Sounds like a plan (5, Insightful)

Frosty Piss (770223) | more than 5 years ago | (#26744451)

Meanwhile, Monty Program Ab will be 'a true open-source company,' with only a small number of employees who 'strive to have fun together and share the profit we create.'

Until his product becomes HUGE and he sells his company to Sun again...

Sun Swastika (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26744667)

They really must come off as Nazis compared to what he's used to dealing with. Doesn't help their logo bares a striking resemblance to a swastika.

heh then again I think the same thing about the Columbia coats [columbia.com] logo.

I think the Fuhrer would use their products to outfit the Third Reich if he had the option - especially in Ballistic Shell [columbia.com] grey.

Re:Sun Swastika (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26745231)

FYI -- The swastika was used for _thousands_ of years before it was used by the Nazis, and many cultures still use it. It is not an evil symbol.

Re:Sounds like a plan (5, Insightful)

PietjeJantje (917584) | more than 5 years ago | (#26744957)

If you're a startup guy working for a 20,000 employee company is not going to cut it. And to make things worse you won't have control over the product you created anymore.

I'm surprised it took him so long to quit.

You don't get it. When your start-up is acquired by big corp, it is usually their demand you stick for at least a year, instead of dumping your crap and taking a run with the money, which I'm sure he would have preferred. He did the year, finished his obligations, and leaves. Nothing to see, please move along.

Bill Gates' influence? (0)

Pope (17780) | more than 5 years ago | (#26743813)

"The company will work on the Malaria project, a storage engine Widenius and others developed, he wrote."

Re:Bill Gates' influence? (0)

jd (1658) | more than 5 years ago | (#26744065)

After his escapade with mosquitos, it's a wonder he's not being locked up on terrorism charges. Oh. Wait. He's rich. Still.

Futt Bucked (0)

Joebert (946227) | more than 5 years ago | (#26743883)

Queue Sun preventing him from doing this with some sort of anti-compete clause in 5,4,3...

Re:Futt Bucked (0, Redundant)

mr_stinky_britches (926212) | more than 5 years ago | (#26743991)

its in california man..

Re:Futt Bucked (1)

Wee (17189) | more than 5 years ago | (#26744089)

I've had to sign non-competes in California. They're actually quite common.

-B

Re:Futt Bucked (2, Informative)

Jack9 (11421) | more than 5 years ago | (#26744231)

With an experienced HR dept. you'll usually see a severability clause wherein, invalidating a contract in part does not invalidate the contract. Most of the time a company silly enough to want you to sign a non-compete IN CALIFORNIA is either too big to have a different process for every state, or too small (read: naive) to include severability, or has lumped it in with your employment contract (which will contain a severability clause). However, it's unenforceable in any case IN CALIFORNIA (probably some other states too).

Re:Futt Bucked (1)

mysidia (191772) | more than 5 years ago | (#26748007)

I want the states to ban severability. Then companies would be more careful to only place legitimate terms in their agreements.

Welcome to Niggerbuntu (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26743975)

Niggerbuntu is a Linux-based operating system consisting of Free and Open Source software for laptops, desktops, and servers. Niggerbuntu has a clear focus on the user and usability - it should "Just Work", even if the user has only the thinking capacities of a sponge. The OS ships with the latest Gnomrilla release as well as a selection of server and desktop software that makes for a comfortable desktop experience off a single installation CD. It also features the packaging manager apeghetto, and the challenging Linux manual pages have been reformatted into the new 'monkey' format, so for example the manual for the shutdown command can be accessed just by typing: 'monkey shut-up -h now mothafukka' instead of 'man shutdown'.

Absolutely Free of Charge

Niggerbuntu is Free Software, and available to you free of charge, as in free beer or free stuffs you can get from looting. It's also Free in the sense of giving you rights of Software Freedom. The freedom to run, copy, steal, distribute, share, change the software for any purpose, without paying licensing fees.

Free software as in free beer!

Niggerbuntu is an ancient Nigger word, meaning "humanity to monkeys". Niggerbuntu also means "I am what I am because of how apes behave". The Niggerbuntu Linux distribution brings the spirit of Niggerbuntu to the software world. The dictator Bokassa described Niggerbuntu in the following way: "A subhuman with Niggerbuntu is open and available to others (like a white bitch you're ready to fsck), affirming of others, does not feel threatened by the fact that others species are more intelligent than we are, for it has a proper self-assurance that comes from knowing that it belongs to the great monkey specie." We chose the name Niggerbuntu for this distribution because we think it captures perfectly the spirit of sharing and looting that is at the heart of the open source movement.

A Monty Utopia? (5, Insightful)

erroneus (253617) | more than 5 years ago | (#26743995)

Meanwhile, Monty Program Ab will be 'a true open-source company,' with only a small number of employees who 'strive to have fun together and share the profit we create.'

This is all good until real money starts pouring in and someone wants/needs more money or claims they are more deserving than another or something along those lines. Then the "fun" arrangement becomes less fun and more bitter. Other things that can spoil the fun are if someone decides to wear only black turtlenecks or attempts to make himself into a god of some sort.

Re:A Monty Utopia? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26744903)

Why Communism is doomed to fail :)

Re:A Monty Utopia? (2, Interesting)

DragonWriter (970822) | more than 5 years ago | (#26744999)

This is all good until real money starts pouring in and someone wants/needs more money or claims they are more deserving than another or something along those lines. Then the "fun" arrangement becomes less fun and more bitter.

And then Monty sells the company and IP to some big firm that likes the big money that's pouring in, and after a suitable transition period quits and goes on starts some other venture with like-minded folks for fun.

And I doubt Monty is going to be hurting for money, himself, if he keeps succesfully doing that. Where the fun ends is if too much time and money are poured into a venture but money never starts pouring in.

Quit? Euphemism for laid-off? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26744027)

Sorry couldnt resist it :)

What about Drizzle? (2, Interesting)

Wee (17189) | more than 5 years ago | (#26744029)

I'm curious as to why he didn't hitch up with the Drizzle guys. It sounds like he's intending to do exactly what Drizzle is doing. Surely he could have leveraged their efforts and they almost certainly would benefit from having Monty and his team around...

-B

Re:What about Drizzle? (1)

glwtta (532858) | more than 5 years ago | (#26744309)

I don't know, maybe because it's something called "Drizzle"?

Actually, having read the Wiki page, I'm not sure what the point of that project is. They seem to want to roll back all the progress that MySQL has made in the last couple of years towards becoming a useful database, and go back to 3.x/4.x days.

So, it's MySQL with even less features, but faster - don't we already have a BerkeleyDB?

A winning proposition. (3, Interesting)

jellomizer (103300) | more than 5 years ago | (#26744173)

Monty Program Ab will be 'a true open-source company,' with only a small number of employees who 'strive to have fun together and share the profit we create.'

Startup: Check
1 out of 10 companies last the first year.

No dependable revenue stream: Check
You don't make money making Open Source Software, you make money supporting it / consulting services, packaging and distribution. Making software is expensive. Being a 'a true open-source company,' leads to little teeth to get a good competitive advantage.

Focus on Employee Happiness not productiveness: Check
Yea a productive employee is a Happy Employee, But a Happy Employee doesn't make them productive. Unfortunatly with work there are always the stinker jobs thar are not fun. You can't expect work to always be fun and to have fun at work.

Profit Sharing: Check
If you work harder then everyone else you should deserve more. But how to you fairly determine who is worth what. Bob program may make a lot of money. But bill spends his time helping out Bob in his product.

Small Size: Check
A Small company against the big guys. It will take a while to gain trust. If you start out big(ish) then you can actually get some automatic cred.

Starting in a bad economy: Check
Where is funding going to start how will you get a loan. If he does get one the banks are stupider then I thought.

Re:A winning proposition. (5, Insightful)

milamber3 (173273) | more than 5 years ago | (#26744325)

Yeah, if I had to pick anyone to fail it would be the guy who cofounded MySQl and sold it for a billion dollars. You nailed it, I'm sure nothing his startup does will be successful or be worth money.

Re:A winning proposition. (3, Insightful)

jellomizer (103300) | more than 5 years ago | (#26744547)

He filled a Gap in the market at the time. It is like getting stuck by lightning, Chances of filling that gap again is slim. MySQL success was that it wasn't a Full Open Source company. It had a closed Source branch too, which actually made the money (a business model).
Secondly it was made in a good economy, Dot Com boom period, where there was a need to get a good but affordable Rational Database system, Most of the guys at the time were very expensive, and not suited for lightweight databases needed for the web.
Third Linux, Apache, PHP success in the web market, putting MySQl in the middle of it.

Past success doesn't guarantee future success. And if you did make a lot of money you may get a big head and not focus clearly. Like most companies 2 parts luck to 1 part strategy.

Re:A winning proposition. (5, Funny)

CrazedWalrus (901897) | more than 5 years ago | (#26744683)

to get a good but affordable Rational Database system,

"Relational." "Rational" isn't a word that's often applied to MySQL.

Re:A winning proposition. (1)

trawg (308495) | more than 5 years ago | (#26746511)

Past success doesn't guarantee future success.

Nope, but neither does it mean its doomed to fail. There's plenty of startups out there that probably aren't headed by Monty, but I know which one I'd be leaning towards if I was throwing money around!

Re:A winning proposition. (1)

mabhatter654 (561290) | more than 5 years ago | (#26747701)

actually though, he's starting in a good point.

First, he sold his company for a billion dollars! He doesn't need a loan. He can pay employees cash.

Companies need time to develop a good product.. jumping the gun is really bad. Good thing we're in a recession and companies aren't throwing around cash. That's a good thing because they can make a quality product.. find a good niche and get strong about the same time this recession starts to thaw!

The people planning and building new, exciting companies now, will be the "overnight" rockstarts in 3-5 years.

Re:A winning proposition. (1)

mysidia (191772) | more than 5 years ago | (#26748067)

We don't have enough information to judge. He knows more about his chances of success, because he knows more about the product he wants to develop, and what market he wants to develop for, and what part of that market will be willing to pay the most for it.

Just because past success doesn't guarantee future success doesn't indicate he doesn't know what he's doing.

Re:A winning proposition. (4, Insightful)

idontgno (624372) | more than 5 years ago | (#26745315)

You need to read your prospectuses: "Past performance is no indicator of future success."

Monty's not the golden goose; he will not lay golden eggs each time he squats. He is not the child of destiny, the master of The Street, the database Messiah. He's just a very naughty boy. Ok, maybe not. But he is a guy who created a good product, sold it to desperate overcapitalized suckers, and jumped ship just before the balloon collapsed and sent the economy screaming "Oh the Humanity" into the ground.

I wouldn't even credit him with a good sense of timing, if he thinks this is the time for a startup like he's proposing.

We shall see.

Re:A winning proposition. (2, Insightful)

mabhatter654 (561290) | more than 5 years ago | (#26747745)

It's an excellent time for a startup if you have cash... he sold MySQL for a billion dollars!

Even Steve Jobs said "cash is king" just last week. Monty will be able to get whatever he needs cheaper than last year. Remember, that it takes 2-5 years to be an "overnight" success like the first MySql had. Recession is the perfect time to build a company if you can float the start up capital.

Re:A winning proposition. (1)

nurb432 (527695) | more than 5 years ago | (#26746565)

Some think he failed in the morality department, slowly squeezing out the 'free' and then finally selling out.

Money doesn't make you a good person.

Re:A winning proposition. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26744501)

"You don't make money making Open Source Software, you make money supporting it / consulting services, packaging and distribution."

Mozilla.org might disagree with you there.

Re:A winning proposition. (2, Insightful)

Lonewolf666 (259450) | more than 5 years ago | (#26745289)

Starting in a bad economy: Check
Where is funding going to start how will you get a loan. If he does get one the banks are stupider then I thought.

Why should he need a loan? He got 1 billion from selling his last company. He can use some of that as venture capital for his new project

Re:A winning proposition. (3, Insightful)

Anthony (4077) | more than 5 years ago | (#26747749)

Good pint, and Paul Graham seems to think that starting in a bad economy [paulgraham.com] has benefits. Apple and Microsoft started the the 70s.

Re:A winning proposition. (1)

mysidia (191772) | more than 5 years ago | (#26748085)

He didn't necessarily get the full proceeds of the sale, there were very possibly other interest holders involved.

Re:A winning proposition. (1)

Antony T Curtis (89990) | more than 5 years ago | (#26748691)

Why should he need a loan? He got 1 billion from selling his last company. He can use some of that as venture capital for his new project

I think that about 80% of the $1bn stock purchase by Sun went to the Venture Capital companies.
The remaining $200m was divided between the employees who held stock options and other private investors.

Re:A winning proposition. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26745495)

He's also like ... oh wait ... rich. Idiot.

Startups (5, Interesting)

sjbe (173966) | more than 5 years ago | (#26745877)

I've started a number of companies and you're saying a bunch of stuff that isn't really accurate.

You don't make money making Open Source Software, you make money supporting it / consulting services, packaging and distribution. Making software is expensive.

Actually making software can be pretty cheap, relatively speaking. Engineering costs for any pure software company are 10%-25% of total costs. Most of the cost is actually in sales, marketing, and administration. Don't take my word for it - look up the income statement of any publicly traded software company from Microsoft on down.

Being a 'a true open-source company,' leads to little teeth to get a good competitive advantage.

That doesn't necessarily have to be true at all. If you are the developer of a given piece of software and if companies will pay for services relating to that software, the primary developer is in the best position to provide those services since no one knows the software better. Furthermore it is impossible to undercut open source software on price so deep pockets don't help the big guy like they might if the company depended on revenue via a traditional software business model. Once the software is installed companies find it expensive to switch platforms which can mean recurring revenue and barriers to entry. That's certainly the basis for competitive advantage though not any assurance of such advantage.

If you work harder then everyone else you should deserve more.

Deserve? Maybe, but maybe not. The party that takes the most financial risk is who deserves and will get the most reward or take the biggest losses. Hard work is a factor but not even close to the biggest one. You don't make the biggest bucks unless you have the most skin in the game.

A Small company against the big guys. It will take a while to gain trust. If you start out big(ish) then you can actually get some automatic cred.

A guy with a track record of starting successful organizations (like MySQL) often gets to skip this step. The hardest company to start is usually the first one because no investor knows who the hell you are and they certainly don't trust you. Plus pretty much no one starts off big. Only guys with a track record are able to raise the large dollar amounts necessary to start "big".

Where is funding going to start how will you get a loan. If he does get one the banks are stupider then I thought.

Very, very few startups get funding from a bank. Banks want tangible assets as collateral for the money they loan and startups rarely have such assets. Usually funding comes from friends, family, angels [wikipedia.org] , private equity, venture capital, government small business loans and various other sources. Banks, not so much.

Re:A winning proposition. (1)

mysidia (191772) | more than 5 years ago | (#26748057)

I would reason to guess MySQL AB had most of those things going against it to... look how that turned out?

MySQL wasn't successful by random chance, they had a good idea, and provided better options to suit a common demand than what was available at the time.

However, open source OSes are so mature now, that it would be a lot harder for a project to reach the critical mass MySQL has.

I'm sure they'll have some great fun, whatever the outcome, and their chances of hitting the jackpot are better than buying a state lottery ticket every week.

Why did he allow sun to purchase MySQL? (3, Interesting)

Cutting_Crew (708624) | more than 5 years ago | (#26744179)

Seems to me as CO-founder he would have had to approve such a move and even if he did perhaps to make some stipulations on future development instead of constantly being in that 'rocky road' development.

Re:Why did he allow sun to purchase MySQL? (2, Insightful)

PylonHead (61401) | more than 5 years ago | (#26744415)

Maybe it was the one billion dollars they offered?

Re:Why did he allow sun to purchase MySQL? (1)

Cutting_Crew (708624) | more than 5 years ago | (#26744519)

i understand that - but being the co-founder there were no stipulations of how MySQL were to be maintained in the future? seems to me he would have wanted to make sure all his hard work would not have gone down the drain to brain-dead decisions.

Re:Why did he allow sun to purchase MySQL? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26745753)

Perhaps at the time of the sale he felt that Sun would maintain the project well, and after it was bought Sun went in a direction that he did not expect and was not ready for.

None of us can tell the future, what looks great one day can turn to a disaster the next.

Re:Why did he allow sun to purchase MySQL? (1)

DragonWriter (970822) | more than 5 years ago | (#26746297)

i understand that - but being the co-founder there were no stipulations of how MySQL were to be maintained in the future?

Again, $1 billion buys a lot. Even a very small fraction of that (don't know how much Monty got) means you can easily quit and do your own thing (as Monty is) if you don't like what your new employer is doing; its pretty easy to see why taking the money without stipulations rather than imposing stipulations which would have scuttled the deal or reduced the value to Sun could easily make sense.

Re:Why did he allow sun to purchase MySQL? (0)

Cutting_Crew (708624) | more than 5 years ago | (#26746483)

Maybe Sun will start to lay people off now and offer them jobs of a lifetime in china and india like IBM announced this week(im surprised this didnt make it on slashdot, maybe i should submit a story)

ONE BILLION REASONS (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26746465)

To put one billion dollars in perspective:

If you were paid $500 an hour and worked a full 2000 hours a year, you'd earn one billion dollars in:

ONE THOUSAND YEARS.

Think about that. What material or intellectual property would you give up for that much money?

What material or intellectual property wouldn't you give up is probably a much, much shorter list.

Hell, what dear relative would you give up for that much money.

A Honorable Step (0, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26744305)

Independently how 'Monty Program' will get along, or perform, this is a honorable step (and may even be beneficial for MySQL - Sun is not in the best shape today). Big Corporations tend to eat your soul, no matter how hard you try to avoid this.

Congratulations, Monty.

Okay someone has to say it... (4, Funny)

BlindSpot (512363) | more than 5 years ago | (#26744523)

Why didn't he go all the way and name it "Monty Program's Flying Code Circus"?!

Re:Okay someone has to say it... (1)

arndawg (1468629) | more than 5 years ago | (#26745575)

Why didn't he go all the way and name it "Monty Program's Flying Code Circus"?!

I think Python already took out a patent for that. Sorry!

Re:Okay someone has to say it... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26746587)

Why didn't he go all the way and name it "Monty Program's Flying Code Circus"?!

If you've ever used MySQL you soon realize this was the project's original name.

[/humour]

Monty is just a dick. (2, Insightful)

tjstork (137384) | more than 5 years ago | (#26744687)

I'm sorry, as I really like MySQL, but, Monty's just taking his billion dollars and trashing Sun as a cover. The bugs that he talks about, that he complains about, all have dates back to 2001... so, he could have fixed that stuff before Sun even bought him out. The bottom line is, Monty's pointing the finger at Sun when the reality is, he's probably doesn't want to work for anyone other than himself, and is just looking for an excuse to cash out. If he would just say that, I think everyone would get it, but, when you can look at the defects he's blogged about and see how old these bugs are, one has to ask, come on dude, why didn't you fix it, like, years ago?

Re:Monty is just a dick. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26746203)

Why is this modded as redundant?

!WideAnus (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26745037)

While it is a loss to the community, don't say you didn't see it, I sure did.

I wish them the best of luck with their new company startup.
They will certainly need all the luck in the world at this moment in time... as will I and many others.

Why did Sun buy MySQL? (1, Interesting)

larien (5608) | more than 5 years ago | (#26745353)

This is something I wondered at the time. Sun paid a lot of money (~$1B) for a free database, even after they'd been bundling Postgres on Solaris 10 (you now get both Postgres & MySQL on the latest release of Solaris 10, FWIW).

Having chatted to some people at work, the concensus seems to be that it was primarily to piss off Oracle; "look, we can do databases too, we don't need you". So, Oracle have gotten into bed with HP & linux, just to spite Sun after having largely given Sun "favoured OS" status for a number of years.

All seems to be one big corporate soap opera/bitchfest...

Re:Why did Sun buy MySQL? (2, Interesting)

Antony T Curtis (89990) | more than 5 years ago | (#26748775)

This is something I wondered at the time. Sun paid a lot of money (~$1B) for a free database, even after they'd been bundling Postgres on Solaris 10 (you now get both Postgres & MySQL on the latest release of Solaris 10, FWIW).

Having chatted to some people at work, the concensus seems to be that it was primarily to piss off Oracle; "look, we can do databases too, we don't need you". So, Oracle have gotten into bed with HP & linux, just to spite Sun after having largely given Sun "favoured OS" status for a number of years.

All seems to be one big corporate soap opera/bitchfest...

Sun didn't pay $1bn for just some free software. If that was all they wanted, they could have simply downloaded it for free.

Sun purchased the MySQL (r) registered trademark and full rights to the source (including the ability to relicense as desired).

Don't forget, also the couple hundred staff who they don't need to pay any headhunters to find.

And, of course, the most important asset they purchased was "goodwill"... Which is hard to build but quite invaluable.

Hypocrite? (2, Interesting)

nurb432 (527695) | more than 5 years ago | (#26746027)

Isn't this the guy who moved MySQL towards a commercial end before SUN stepped in and bought them?

Sounds to me like its all good and well, unless its someone else that is getting most of the cash.

If he wasn't the driving force behind it, then forget what i just said.

MySQL just isn't MySQL anymore... (5, Interesting)

DavonZ (13344) | more than 5 years ago | (#26746101)

I have to admit that I am glad to see him leave Sun. I am developing an Open Source POS system and originally I was using MySQL as the database. I sent an email to MySQL about distribution questions and was then contacted by different sales people trying to talk me out of Open Sourcing my project. "Do you really want you competitors to have your POS code"... "How are you going make money off of Open Source". I felt bullied.

Understand that MySQL is only GPL (Free) if everything touching it is also GPL (or internal use only). If we distribute it with MySQL and make it commercial, we need to pay yearly for MySQL ($$$). That is understood when dealing with GPL software. Just don't try and talk me out of GPL'ing my code to line your pockets. Business models like this hurt the Open Source community and don't promote Open Source software!

Re:MySQL just isn't MySQL anymore... (1)

mysidia (191772) | more than 5 years ago | (#26748123)

This primarily impacts you if you need to write your application in C.

If you write your program in a scripting language like PHP or Perl, your code doesn't include the GPL'ed MySQL client library, and you get to distribute your program under terms as restrictive as you like

People can and do distribute proprietary PHP applications that are backed by a MySQL database distributed with the software under the GPL.

Access to the PHP script sources can be protected through automatic obfuscation and encryption (there are commercial tools to do this).

On the other hand, if you want to write your application in C, then you have an issue linking your binary directly against the MySQL client libraries, as those libraries are GPL.

Re:MySQL just isn't MySQL anymore... (2, Interesting)

Antony T Curtis (89990) | more than 5 years ago | (#26748735)

I have to admit that I am glad to see him leave Sun. I am developing an Open Source POS system and originally I was using MySQL as the database. I sent an email to MySQL about distribution questions and was then contacted by different sales people trying to talk me out of Open Sourcing my project. "Do you really want you competitors to have your POS code"... "How are you going make money off of Open Source". I felt bullied.

Understand that MySQL is only GPL (Free) if everything touching it is also GPL (or internal use only). If we distribute it with MySQL and make it commercial, we need to pay yearly for MySQL ($$$). That is understood when dealing with GPL software. Just don't try and talk me out of GPL'ing my code to line your pockets. Business models like this hurt the Open Source community and don't promote Open Source software!

You should be chatting to the MySQL developers and the community... A lot of them are quite passionate about open source.

Most inquiries tend to go direct to the sales staff who (understandably) are tying to maximize the revenue. Remember that MySQL AB was a profitable company, despite having to pay the salary of >150 full time developers.

Martin Mickos going too! (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26746105)

Martin Mickos, the old CEO and Current Sun Database Technology Group SVP is leaving too.

Damn! He will be missed.

Generally Available? (1)

NoMoreFood (783406) | more than 5 years ago | (#26747685)

Last time I checked the term was "General Availability". Generally available sounds more like it'd be hit-or-miss downloading it...

Um (1)

wdr1 (31310) | more than 5 years ago | (#26748371)

You know that part where you quote something he said in his blog? Yeah, a link would have been nice there.

Sqlite and Postgresql and Oracle (1)

twoblink (201439) | more than 5 years ago | (#26748389)

I use sqlite in ramdisk for all prototyping.

I use postgresql for production.

I use Oracle for mega-productions.

I actually don't have a place where mysql is the answer. with sqlite, I can email the entire database or back it up as a file with no problem.

postgres handles large loads better.
Oracle handles everything better but is $$$.

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