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Cuba Launches Own Linux Variation

samzenpus posted more than 5 years ago | from the the-people's-OS dept.

Government 494

willclem writes "According to Reuters, it seems that Cuba has launched its own variation of Linux in order to fulfill its government's desire to replace Microsoft operating systems. 'Getting greater control over the informatic process is an important issue,' said Communications Minister Ramiro Valdes, who heads a commission pushing Cuba's migration to free software."

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Terrible News! Please read! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26823207)

At 10:28pm EST Rob Malda was rushed to the emergency room and was found to have a microscopic penis. Yes, folks, Rob "CmdrTaco" Malda, hero to many millions of slashdot nerds around the world, is hung like a 3 year old Asian boy.

Re:Terrible News! Please read! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26823475)

assuming this is true, how does that matter to you? rugay?

Re:Terrible News! Please read! (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26823513)

Yes, I am. What does that have to do with anything?

Tux cant handle the Cuban heat. (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26823229)

Somehow I have a hard time picturing penguins in Cuba.

Re:Tux cant handle the Cuban heat. (4, Interesting)

pushing-robot (1037830) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823319)

Somehow I have a hard time picturing penguins in Cuba.

I don't. [wikipedia.org]

Re:Tux cant handle the Cuban heat. (2, Interesting)

buswolley (591500) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823359)

While I support adoption of open source, I am starting to get worries that it will get strongly labeled as Communist/Socialist.. now that China,Russia,and Cuba have all officially adopted it. Do you actually think that America would join them, even if it is in America's best interest?

It is kind of sad.

Re:Tux cant handle the Cuban heat. (5, Insightful)

GodKingAmit (1192629) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823421)

Since when is russia a communist or socialist country?

Re:Tux cant handle the Cuban heat. (5, Funny)

greenguy (162630) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823675)

In Soviet Russia, Russia is a Soviet country!

Re:Tux cant handle the Cuban heat. (5, Interesting)

Ian Alexander (997430) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823847)

Hey, Americans are dumb (and really, the only place where being "socialist" is something you have to worry about really would be the US). Many probably still associate Russia with communism, even though it was socialist when it was Soviet and hasn't been Soviet for ~20ish years now.

Re:Tux cant handle the Cuban heat. (3, Funny)

Zencyde (850968) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823423)

Shit, you're worried? A friend of mine has been saying Linux is Communist for aeons.

Re:Tux cant handle the Cuban heat. (2, Funny)

VisceralLogic (911294) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823685)

Bill Gates??? Is that you?

Re:Tux cant handle the Cuban heat. (1)

Zencyde (850968) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823703)

Emphasis on "a friend of mine". :P If I were Billy I wouldn't be typing this from a Linux box... or maybe I would? Hmm....

Re:Tux cant handle the Cuban heat. (1)

Who Is The Drizzle (1470385) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823729)

How long have you been friends with Ballmer?

Re:Tux cant handle the Cuban heat. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26823427)

It's not just communists though. Adopting Linux is now just the cool thing to do. The linux effect [youtube.com] is finally taking hold!

You forgot your hat (4, Funny)

iminplaya (723125) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823573)

The whole thing has been cleverly orchestrated by Microsoft. And when they defeat the red menace, they shall be seen as heroes.Beautiful plan. I wish I thought of it myself.

Re:You forgot your hat (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26823841)

Beautiful plan. I wish I thought of it myself.

Ballmer, is that you??

Re:Tux cant handle the Cuban heat. (5, Insightful)

zorkerz (966191) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823665)

I agree that the connection of open source with Socialism in peoples minds and the negative effect this could have on its adoption worries me.

Beyond this though I am sick and tired of the irrational fear of socialism in the United States. Im not saying lets become the USSR that obviously did not work out so well but we are still stuck at a point were it is impossible to have rational discussion about anything that gets labeled as socialist. Its a giant hypocritical mess. Look at public roads thats a beautiful example of socialism central to our society.

I think generations of Americans have been conditioned/brainwashed to attack at the first mention of the word socialism before considering what is being proposed. The irony of it all is that public schools the major institution doing this brainwashing is a socialist model.

I don't believe that socialist systems work everywhere. I am a fervent capitalist and believe in designing free markets with appropriate incentives. All I want to do is be able to have a rational debate about plans that might contain socialist components without people freaking out.

Re:Tux cant handle the Cuban heat. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26823691)

Fuck off fascist pig!

Re:Tux cant handle the Cuban heat. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26823697)

While I support adoption of open source, I am starting to get worries that it will get strongly labeled as Communist/Socialist.. now that China,Russia,and Cuba have all officially adopted it. Do you actually think that America would join them, even if it is in America's best interest?

It is kind of sad.

You forgot Vietnam.

Re:Tux cant handle the Cuban heat. (0, Redundant)

nawcom (941663) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823593)

Somehow I have a hard time picturing penguins in Cuba.

Unfortunately you fail, for not all penguins [wikipedia.org] live life on a frozen continent.

Countries and open source (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26823233)

Countries developing their own open source software? How about open source software developing [metagovernment.org] its own countries?

Re:Countries and open source (0, Offtopic)

buswolley (591500) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823431)

Let's fly to Mars where we will make sweet revolutionary love baby! C'mon fly with me!!!

first post (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26823235)

cuba libre!

Well, I guess this means they aren't stupid. (4, Insightful)

Jane Q. Public (1010737) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823239)

That is to say, that's one of the smarter things I have heard about a government lately.

In Soviet Cuba.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26823245)

source opens YOU!

CigarOS (4, Funny)

russlar (1122455) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823247)

Gives new meaning to the term patch rollup.

If we are voting, I vote for Castrix (4, Funny)

tlambert (566799) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823333)

If we are voting, I vote for Castrix

-- Terry

Re:If we are voting, I vote for Castrix (5, Funny)

sapphire wyvern (1153271) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823367)

Castrix does seem to go well with Unix...

Re:If we are voting, I vote for Castrix... (3, Funny)

davidsyes (765062) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823487)

I vote "Fidelity" or "Fidelix" (Raulix doesn't sound quite right....) ... in honor of the Regime outlasting multiple US administrations...

Re:If we are voting, I vote for Castrix (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26823511)

That's good!!!

I was thinking Cubuntu.

Re:If we are voting, I vote for Castrix (2, Funny)

jejones (115979) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823775)

I watched too much I Love Lucy when I was a kid; I was thinking Babalubuntu.

Linuba (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26823787)

Linuba sounds cubanish

Re:If we are voting, I vote for Castrix (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26823447)

Oddly enough, "Castrix" has been used as a trade name for a particularly nasty rat poison [nih.gov] .

Re:If we are voting, I vote for Castrix (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26823629)

Thankfully trademarks are industry-specific, but more to the point if the Cuba government want to call it "Microsoft Diet NikeCoke Levis" in Cuba then who's going to stop them?

Re:If we are voting, I vote for Castrix (0, Troll)

UnixUnix (1149659) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823659)

Infidelcastrix?

Re:CigarOS (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26823371)

Che-buntu is the name.

Re:CigarOS (2, Funny)

woof69 (952829) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823613)

cubix?

Re:CigarOS (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26823373)

Viva Cuba LIbre!

Coño!!

Re:CigarOS (5, Funny)

uberjack (1311219) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823577)

I vote for 'CommUnix'

How did microsoft get around the embargo? (3, Interesting)

TinBromide (921574) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823249)

Seeing as you have to go through great hoops, (most of them not legal), to get anything Cuban around here, how is the Cuban government running american products? I suppose they purchased from south american, european or asian retailers, but one has to wonder, how many legit copies of windows are in Cuba? Can Microsoft go in to sue the Cuban government about illegal copies? What jurisdiction would Microsoft have to keep Cuba from enjoying their cracked copies until communism dies?

Re:How did microsoft get around the embargo? (4, Informative)

zxjio (1475207) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823365)

It seems likely that their government would just buy from ISVs in another country. Microsoft can't see it, can't stop it, can't be held liable. Remember the recent case of HP selling a significant amount of printers to Iran in just such a way?

Re:How did microsoft get around the embargo? (0, Troll)

b4upoo (166390) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823375)

I'll bet money that our government has spying code built into official Windows copies as well as pirated versions. It was actually to our strategic benefit that Cuba continued to use proprietary software.
        Hiding spy like code within Linux distros will be far more difficult as the OS is transparent.
        We can only hope that people are running a lot of proprietary games or other software in which our codes can do their thing in Cuba. We do know that in the past some very good espionage materials have been hidden within printers.

Re:How did microsoft get around the embargo? (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26823453)

I am from Finland so I think I dont have your mindset. Could you explain to me, why exactly would we ever want to hope that. Cuba isnt any threat to the safety of the world or anything...

Re:How did microsoft get around the embargo? (-1, Troll)

fishbowl (7759) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823517)

>Cuba isnt any threat to the safety of the world or anything...

Not very long ago, Cuba targeted the United States with armed nuclear missiles. The people who have been in power in the United States since that time, still carry quite a grudge over that incident. It is of course open to debate, but the status quo most certainly does hold Cuba as a very serious threat.

Re:How did microsoft get around the embargo? (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26823583)

Still the same AC here... I hope you arent referring to Cuba Missile Crisis, because that indeed was very long ago. Even if you arent and there has been something later than that, it is hardly a valid argument. Doesnt USA target numerous countries with nuclear missiles? And support more countries that have those?

I can tell that there are a lot of people who are more worried about Israel than Cuba, seeing Cuba isnt even very militaristic country. Why in hell would they fire a missile to a country they cant invade? Just because they are (nearly) communists and thus evil?

If you wish to not answer because of it would take this too far offtopic, I can understand that and not automatically assume that you somehow lost. Just felt the need to mention that at least over here, I have never heard that Cuba would have somehow threatening imago.

Re:How did microsoft get around the embargo? (5, Informative)

jrumney (197329) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823617)

The embargo stared in February 1962, 8 months before the Cuban missile crisis.

Re:How did microsoft get around the embargo? (-1, Redundant)

scottrocket (1065416) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823689)

"Not very long ago, Cuba targeted the United States with armed nuclear missiles. The people who have been in power in the United States since that time, still carry quite a grudge over that incident. It is of course open to debate, but the status quo most certainly does hold Cuba as a very serious threat."

Let's not forget Red Dawn! [wikipedia.org] Meh-seemed plausible at the time.

Re:How did microsoft get around the embargo? (1)

DiegoBravo (324012) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823751)

The CIA is a worldwide agency, and collects information from most (or all) the countries. Getting information from non too friendly countries is obviously more interesting (for example, emails sent from Venezuela, Russia, etc.) And locally, what about preventing another of nuke-crisis, or some action over Guantanamo?

Re:How did microsoft get around the embargo? (4, Interesting)

QuantumRiff (120817) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823623)

Why did this post get labeled troll? Honestly? The US has admitted to sneaking code into valve controllers made by a company that the US knew that the russians were discreetely and secretly buying, that would cause them to go wonky when certain circumstances happened, leading to a huge explosion on one of their main siberian gas pipelines. http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/northamerica/usa/1455559/CIA-plot-led-to-huge-blast-in-Siberian-gas-pipeline.html [telegraph.co.uk] Why would it be different for cuba?

Re:How did microsoft get around the embargo? (3, Funny)

xPsi (851544) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823395)

How did microsoft get around the embargo?

They aren't a company, man. They're their own frickn' weather system. They just need the coriolis force the tell them which way to spin.

Re:How did microsoft get around the embargo? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26823471)

I would guess that Cuba A) pirate them all and/or B) buys them from an ISV in a country that doesn't care about the embargo.

Re:How did microsoft get around the embargo? (3, Insightful)

plasticsquirrel (637166) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823473)

The embargo is only between the U.S. and Cuba. They no doubt buy from another country, and there's no real reason Microsoft would want to lose them as customers. Corporations aren't really moral entities with benevolent scruples about freedom of the press, good vs. evil, etc.

Looking at the record of foreign policy, privacy, and civil liberties in this country, we also have to ask ourselves if we really have the moral high ground to make judgments about other countries like this, as well. When was the last time Cuba started an international conflict? The expression "Physician, heal thyself" springs to mind.

*BSD spurned again (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26823255)

The End of FreeBSD

[ed. note: in the following text, former FreeBSD developer Mike Smith gives his reasons for abandoning FreeBSD]

When I stood for election to the FreeBSD core team nearly two years ago, many of you will recall that it was after a long series of debates during which I maintained that too much organisation, too many rules and too much formality would be a bad thing for the project.

Today, as I read the latest discussions on the future of the FreeBSD project, I see the same problem; a few new faces and many of the old going over the same tired arguments and suggesting variations on the same worthless schemes. Frankly I'm sick of it.

FreeBSD used to be fun. It used to be about doing things the right way. It used to be something that you could sink your teeth into when the mundane chores of programming for a living got you down. It was something cool and exciting; a way to spend your spare time on an endeavour you loved that was at the same time wholesome and worthwhile.

It's not anymore. It's about bylaws and committees and reports and milestones, telling others what to do and doing what you're told. It's about who can rant the longest or shout the loudest or mislead the most people into a bloc in order to legitimise doing what they think is best. Individuals notwithstanding, the project as a whole has lost track of where it's going, and has instead become obsessed with process and mechanics.

So I'm leaving core. I don't want to feel like I should be "doing something" about a project that has lost interest in having something done for it. I don't have the energy to fight what has clearly become a losing battle; I have a life to live and a job to keep, and I won't achieve any of the goals I personally consider worthwhile if I remain obligated to care for the project.

Discussion

I'm sure that I've offended some people already; I'm sure that by the time I'm done here, I'll have offended more. If you feel a need to play to the crowd in your replies rather than make a sincere effort to address the problems I'm discussing here, please do us the courtesy of playing your politics openly.

From a technical perspective, the project faces a set of challenges that significantly outstrips our ability to deliver. Some of the resources that we need to address these challenges are tied up in the fruitless metadiscussions that have raged since we made the mistake of electing officers. Others have left in disgust, or been driven out by the culture of abuse and distraction that has grown up since then. More may well remain available to recruitment, but while the project is busy infighting our chances for successful outreach are sorely diminished.

There's no simple solution to this. For the project to move forward, one or the other of the warring philosophies must win out; either the project returns to its laid-back roots and gets on with the work, or it transforms into a super-organised engineering project and executes a brilliant plan to deliver what, ultimately, we all know we want.

Whatever path is chosen, whatever balance is struck, the choosing and the striking are the important parts. The current indecision and endless conflict are incompatible with any sort of progress.

Trying to dissect the above is far beyond the scope of any parting shot, no matter how distended. All I can really ask of you all is to let go of the minutiae for a moment and take a look at the big picture. What is the ultimate goal here? How can we get there with as little overhead as possible? How would you like to be treated by your fellow travellers?

Shouts

To the Slashdot "BSD is dying" crowd - big deal. Death is part of the cycle; take a look at your soft, pallid bodies and consider that right this very moment, parts of you are dying. See? It's not so bad.

To the bulk of the FreeBSD committerbase and the developer community at large - keep your eyes on the real goals. It's when you get distracted by the politickers that they sideline you. The tireless work that you perform keeping the system clean and building is what provides the platform for the obsessives and the prima donnas to have their moments in the sun. In the end, we need you all; in order to go forwards we must first avoid going backwards.

To the paranoid conspiracy theorists - yes, I work for Apple too. No, my resignation wasn't on Steve's direct orders, or in any way related to work I'm doing, may do, may not do, or indeed what was in the tea I had at lunchtime today. It's about real problems that the project faces, real problems that the project has brought upon itself. You can't escape them by inventing excuses about outside influence, the problem stems from within.

To the politically obsessed - give it a break, if you can. No, the project isn't a lemonade stand anymore, but it's not a world-spanning corporate juggernaut either and some of the more grandiose visions going around are in need of a solid dose of reality. Keep it simple, stupid.

To the grandstanders, the prima donnas, and anyone that thinks that they can hold the project to ransom for their own agenda - give it a break, if you can. When the current core were elected, we took a conscious stand against vigorous sanctions, and some of you have exploited that. A new core is going to have to decide whether to repeat this mistake or get tough. I hope they learn from our errors.

Future

I started work on FreeBSD because it was fun. If I'm going to continue, it has to be fun again. There are things I still feel obligated to do, and with any luck I'll find the time to meet those obligations.

However I don't feel an obligation to get involved in the political mess the project is in right now. I tried, I burnt out. I don't feel that my efforts were worthwhile. So I won't be standing for election, I won't be shouting from the sidelines, and I probably won't vote in the next round of ballots.

You could say I'm packing up my toys. I'm not going home just yet, but I'm not going to play unless you can work out how to make the project somewhere fun to be again.

= Mike

--

To announce that there must be no criticism of the president, or that we are to stand by the president, right or wrong, is not only unpatriotic and servile, but is morally treasonable to the American public. -- Theodore Roosevelt

Replace Microsoft? (1)

magarity (164372) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823261)

US companies aren't supposed to be doing business with Cuba in the first place; shouldn't their computers not even have MS products? And what make are these machines they have? Given other recent news, I assume they're HPs...

Genuine Advantage (1)

unlametheweak (1102159) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823265)

Since Microsoft isn't allowed to sell (and presumably license) its software to Cuba or Cuban companies, then it would appear that Cuba would have illegal copies of Microsoft Windows that would fail the Genuine Advantage checks.

Not that I had used those... *cough* (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26823303)

...but many pirated copies can pass those checks. Have been able to do that for a long time.

And they could have bought computers from some European retailer with pre-installed Windows.

What I am impressed with is a country that just made having personal computers legal is developping Linux distro.

Ever since hearing that, I have been aspiring to move to Cuba after getting my degree in CS. It will be pretty rapidly growing market there in a while.

Re:Not that I had used those... *cough* (1)

unlametheweak (1102159) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823347)

...but many pirated copies can pass those checks

I would think Microsoft would get suspicious of IP addresses coming from Cuba, or maybe I'm making the wrong assumptions on how the Genuine Advantage cracking is done.

At any rate I'd be interested in knowing if all these Linux operating systems that are coming out of politically dubious countries (Russia, China, and now Cuba) will be completely open source, or if there will be any proprietary back-doors, etc.

Re:Not that I had used those... *cough* (3, Interesting)

setagllib (753300) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823397)

Yes, in stark contrast to the politically flawless United States, having no record of any government involvement with production of open source or proprietary software. Pleeeeeaaaaassssssssseeeee.

Re:Genuine Advantage (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26823381)

Microsoft obeys laws that limit its profitability?

I am sure that there is some middle man between Microsoft and the Cuban government, but I cannot see Microsoft passing up even one country, especially one as educated as Cuba.

My understanding is that buying from Cuba is much harder than selling to Cuba, as overselling to a Venezuelan distributer is pretty much guaranteed to result in Cuban sales. However if the Cuban products are not stamped made in Venezuela, they won't make it through US customs.

Insane import-export duties and artificial exchange rates are as close as a government can come to passing a law requiring an underground smuggling network for their intelligence agencies to use for moving contraband around.

Re:Genuine Advantage (1)

ChunderDownunder (709234) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823881)

It would be quite simple, really, for Cuba to go 100% legit.

Instead of an entry tax, every foreign national must declare on arrival a boxed copy of Windows. I'm not sure how many visitors Cuba receives a year but if that happened for a year, the rate of adoption for Windows 7 would be higher than most western countries.

Whether the MS EULA has explicit clauses on "this software may not be installed in regions for which the US has an embargo", I dunno.

Now if, instead of Windows, they modified that scheme to OLPC (One Laptop Per Cubano), every Cuban could legitimately have a netbook. The benefit for the tourist? Uncle Raul could drop the dual economy that sees Westerners being fleeced wherever they pay for goods and services in dollars instead of pesos. Plus, the goodwill of knowing they were improving the lot of the average Cuban in a material way.

Vive Cuba ! Linux? (1)

WiiVault (1039946) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823295)

or just Fuck Capitalists Linux? So many choices!

linux == commie (1)

timmarhy (659436) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823297)

I knew it.

I heard.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26823301)

the default WM is the new 'Commiz'?

Cuban Linux distro name (5, Funny)

Aranwe Haldaloke (789555) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823361)

Tell me I'm not the only one who expected its name to be Cubuntu.

Not if it's Red Hat based (5, Funny)

russlar (1122455) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823459)

If it's Red Hat based, I say Sombrero!

Re:Cuban Linux distro name (2, Funny)

caustin_sd (1475253) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823781)

I've been reading slashdot since it started. I registered today just to say that's f*cking hilarious.

I hate this mentality (1)

Coder4Life (1396697) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823369)

From the article: "Private software can have black holes and malicious codes that one doesn't know about," Rodriguez said. "That doesn't happen with free software." While i'm not backing M$ here by any means, this type of thinking is dangerous. Both proprietary and open source software are going to have "black holes" and "malicious codes", it's naive to think otherwise. It should have read: "When black holes and malicious codes that one doesn't know about appear in software, the open source community is going to be more aware and quicker to patch said vulnerabilities"

Re:I hate this mentality (1)

nsaneinside (831846) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823579)

I don't know (but I suspect) that we'd be quicker, but at least we have the option to look without being accused of paranoia.

Or perversion.

Re:I hate this mentality (2, Interesting)

QuantumG (50515) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823667)

Gah. Are you retarded or what? The whole fucking point of the article is that the Cuban government wants to be able to look for back doors in the software. They're not relying on the open source community being "more aware and quicker to patch said vulnerabilities", at all. This is simply a case of Cubans saying "why are we running software we can't even inspect?"

Re:I hate this mentality (1)

timmarhy (659436) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823761)

you sir are the retarded one. there are better ways to protect and detect against backdoors than viewing the source.

name me one case of a trojan being detected via open source.

Re:I hate this mentality (1)

QuantumG (50515) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823861)

Bwahaha.. that'd be all of them.

Please, do tell us these other ways of discovering back doors, we'll wait.

Re:I hate this mentality (1)

The End Of Days (1243248) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823805)

I imagine adding back doors might be more their aim, actually.

This quote from the summary:

Getting greater control over the informatic process is an important issue

certainly doesn't sound to me like concern over inspection so much as the ability to add surveillance. Control over information isn't exactly a goal you can label "open."

Red (Castro) Hat Linux? (1)

kkrajewski (1459331) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823377)

(that is all.)

Ramiro Valdes for President of Cuba (1)

digitaltraveller (167469) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823425)

Sounds like the smartest Cuban leader I've heard about in awhile...

I vote for.. (1)

doomicon (5310) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823435)

Castrate Linux

i hear obama is going to follow suit (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26823437)

he's in talks with castro right now. he can't wait to get his dick in the white mans ass.

The big deal (3, Interesting)

moniker127 (1290002) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823441)

I dont see the big deal here. Governments would love to have direct control of operating systems, so that they can place undocumented "features" inside them. Even if they release the source code (which I suppose they have to, theoretically), 99.99% of the users who will be employing their distro will not be able to understand what source code even is, or how to interpret it.
Well, I guess there are still people (the people who are reading this message) who will be able to report any backdoors/home phoning they notice placed into the source, but that will only make a difference provided:
1- Cuba releases the source
2- The distro is popular enough to have people using it
3- People carefully examine the source code
4- Said examiners are able to spot a problem
5- Said problem is heard by the end users of the distro
6- End users of the distro have options as to what operating system they are able to use, if it is mandated by the government, they pretty much have to live with it.

Re:The big deal (1)

The End Of Days (1243248) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823815)

Why would they have to release the source code, exactly? Is Stallman going to march the GNU army into Havana and depose the government for ignoring his manifesto?

Fidel Penguin? (5, Interesting)

jtara (133429) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823443)

I'd love to see the logo be an image of Fidel dressed-up as a penguin.

I'm pretty sure the guy has a sense of humor. When I was a kid, I was a "shortwave listener" (before I got my ham license) and sent of to Radio Havana (among others) for a "QSL" card, confirming that I had heard their station.

Besides the card, I got other periodic mailings, including a Christmxxxx New Year card one year, bearing the cartoon likeness of Fidel Castro, laid-out on the dining-room table as a pig, complete with an apple in his mouth. I kid you not. I'll bet he had a big laugh.

Wish I still had it - could probably sell it for a bundle on eBay!

(Other "interesting" material I received included a copy of the Little Red Book from Radio Peking, and a subscription to China Pictorial - a beautifully-printed bled-to-edge full color magazine with gorgeous pictures of fields and tractors...)

Commercial apps are in for REAL trouble. (2, Interesting)

WindBourne (631190) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823461)

There market is about to shrink in a BIG way. If they were smart, they would jump on a couple of distros of linux and make sure that they are the standards. Adobe, Intuit, AutoCad all have programs that are in demand. If they port to this, they can quit having to compete against MS on MS's turf. More importantly, they would get a WHOLE NEW market with minimal competition.

Re:Commercial apps are in for REAL trouble. (4, Interesting)

zappepcs (820751) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823547)

I said something similar [slashdot.org] regarding the Russian decision to use Linux. It wasn't received too well. I think that this sort of event truly does mean trouble for MS and proprietary software in a rather large way.

I think that it is more likely that F/OSS developers will beat large proprietary vendors to the punch though. There will be a new market for proprietary Linux software though. When Adobe does port to Linux it doesn't have to be Free or Open Source to run on Linux, but it will be hard to sell software to people that are happy to use the F/OSS alternatives.

It should be interesting times.

Re:Commercial apps are in for REAL trouble. (3, Interesting)

WindBourne (631190) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823631)

You are Right. You have red flag in China; The new one in Russia; Various South American states are talking about doing more. Funny thing is, NOW is the time to fire up new apps on Linux. The other companies like Adobe, Intuit, etc are NOT there. A start-up can make a killing by not having commercial competition. As to FOSS beating them to the punch, FOSS works GREAT for OSs and MAJOR apps. But when you have SPECIALIZED apps, like say design a deck for a house, or design your yard, etc. than Commercial really shines; Service, Market or Trade Data, etc. I would not be surprised to see a number of new start up companies around the world taking on these companies because they have the Windows system locked up. That is how it happened on the move from mainframe to DOS and then Windows. The companies that had the mainframe locked up did not move until new and better competition came along.

Re:Commercial apps are in for REAL trouble. (1)

spandex_panda (1168381) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823585)

There market is about to shrink...

err... Sorry to be a grammar Nazi, but... since your sig is:

I prefer the "u" in honour as it seems to be missing these days.

It seems timely to let you know that you should have used "their".

Re:Commercial apps are in for REAL trouble. (1)

WindBourne (631190) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823597)

hehehe. Hangs head in shame. It is late.

Where do you get the parts? (2, Funny)

Steauengeglase (512315) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823485)

Lunix can run on a '59 Eldorado? Impressive.

Re:Where do you get the parts? (1)

Dahamma (304068) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823715)

Yeah, but the newest version they could get was 0.98. They are still maintaining it, though!

I can hear the cries now... (0, Flamebait)

Lord Kano (13027) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823561)

Godless communists.

Seriously though, how can software be free when the people aren't?

LK

Re:I can hear the cries now... (3, Insightful)

kcbanner (929309) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823817)

Well, if they aren't worshipping a god, looks like they are free already.

Freedom in Cuba (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26823589)

Cuba has always been the shining star among the dark empires of the world when it comes to the freedom and happiness of its people. Adopting its own Linux distro goes directly along with the spirit of complete freedom that gives every aspect of life there its character.

Its! Its! Not it's! (1, Flamebait)

DaveBarr (35447) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823595)

If only we could invent a version of Linux that had a spellchecker which would shoot the user in the head for not one but two typos of "it's". Jesus Christ folks, YOU CAN'T EVEN FUCKING CUT AND PASTE THE CORRECT SPELLING FROM THE ORIGINAL FUCKING ARTICLE!?

Re:Its! Its! Not it's! (1)

bcrowell (177657) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823795)

Aw, come on. Sure, there were two "it's" mistakes in the article, but they both occurred in one sentence. The entire second sentence was completely free of "it's" mistakes. That represents real progress for slashdot. Actually, I believe slashdot's Central Committee For the Eradication of "It's" Mistakes (also known as COMINITS) has set a goal of reducing the average rate of "it's" mistakes to no more than three per sentence by the end of the current five-year plan. That means that production of "it's"-mistake-free sentences is actually 783% ahead of last year's production!

Re:Its! Its! Not it's! (1)

Chonnawonga (1025364) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823885)

"According to Reuters, it seems that Cuba has launched it's own variation of grammar in order to fulfill it's government's desire to replace Microsoft operating systems. "Getting greater control over the idiomatic process is an important issue..."

Copyleft (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26823601)

What makes anyone here think Cuba will honor the GPL copyleft license? They're packaging this shit to spy on the populace, plain and simple ... any source code you get is not what people will be running.

Re:Copyleft (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26823711)

Any proof for this is or is it just more rantings of an Ameriturd talking out of his ass? You Ameriturds don't really have much to gloat over considering how widely your own government was spying on your fellow Ameriturds with the help of the Ameriturd telecoms.

Nova, eh? (1, Interesting)

photomonkey (987563) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823621)

Chevy had some trouble in Mexico and South America with it's 'Nova,' because the name is a play on no va, or it doesn't go.

Funny that Cuba would pick such a name for their new OS.

Re:Nova, eh? (4, Informative)

dido (9125) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823653)

Apparently that old story just isn't true [snopes.com] .

Five Year Plan (0)

LuYu (519260) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823639)

How is Linux supposed to shed its very undeserved "communist" image if these commie countries keep using it? ;-P

Seriously, though, it is nice to know that even communist countries are starting to avoid the old MS 5 Year Plan.

Oblig. Strongbad (1)

nonpareility (822891) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823649)

If you want it to be possessive, it's just I-T-S.
But if it's supposed to be a contraction, then it's I-T-apostrophe-S.
Scallywag.

CUBIX (1)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823825)

"Cubix"? Isn't that the name of Palin's new kid?

lowering the expectations (5, Interesting)

JoeZ99 (999617) | more than 5 years ago | (#26823851)

I've been living in cuba for the last 6 years. I've been using linux since the slackware 100 diskettes era (about 12 years ago).
  • cuba is absolutely windows friendly. everybody in everywhere uses windows. The goverment itself announced a few years ago it was going to migrate to linux. So far nothing yet.
  • cuba works around the embargo thing by means of massive pirate copies (I'm perfectly OK with that).
  • it's a usual thing to announce something with great fireworks that ends up in nothing, so I would have not so many expectations on this .
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