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Major Cache of Fossils Unearthed In Los Angeles

kdawson posted more than 5 years ago | from the sticky-underfoot dept.

Earth 215

aedmunde sends along news from the LA Times: "A nearly intact mammoth, dubbed Zed, is among the remarkable discoveries near the La Brea Tar Pits. It's the largest known deposit of Pleistocene ice age fossils... in what might seem to be the unlikeliest of places — under an old May Co. parking lot in L.A.'s tony Miracle Mile shopping district. ...huge chunks of soil from the site have been removed intact and now sit in large wooden crates on the back lot... The 23 crates range... from the size of a desk to that of a small delivery truck... There were, in fact, 16 separate deposits on the site, an amount that, by her estimate, would have taken 20 years to excavate conventionally. ... Carefully identifying the edges of each deposit, her team dug trenches around them and underneath, isolating the deposits on dirt pedestals. After wrapping heavy plastic around the deposits, workers built wooden crates similar to tree boxes and lifted them out individually with a heavy crane. The biggest one weighed 123,000 pounds."

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DUH (1)

timpdx (1473923) | more than 5 years ago | (#26899121)

Well, it is right next to the La Brea tar pits, so, DUH. The building site is easily seen as you enter the new Renzo Piano-designed wing to LACMA

Not politically correct. (5, Funny)

iYk6 (1425255) | more than 5 years ago | (#26899129)

They are called, "old people", and yes, there are a lot of them in L.A.

Re:Not politically correct. (2, Funny)

Puffy Director Pants (1242492) | more than 5 years ago | (#26899149)

Not any more. Anybody in Los Angeles that looks to old is sent to the "Valley" where they're happier and the rest of the city doesn't have to look at them, or risk them being seen on TV.

Re:Not politically correct. (2, Funny)

MaskedSlacker (911878) | more than 5 years ago | (#26899191)

I live in the Valley.....*sob*

Re:Not politically correct. (3, Funny)

chill (34294) | more than 5 years ago | (#26899199)

Then we're going to have to ask you to turn in your webcam.

Re:Not politically correct. (1)

RockWolf (806901) | more than 5 years ago | (#26899389)

Then we're going to have to ask you to turn in your webcam.

Some people enjoy seeing old people on webcam, you insensitive clod! Especially if they're in North Korea.

Re:Not politically correct. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26899587)

I literally live across the street from the museum. I have been here over 3 years and although I do take occasional walks there and have shown friends the tar pits, I have not gone into the museum. I always thought, "been there done that"

I had no idea that there was this big of a find right next door.

Honestly, I thought the biggest claim to fame of the tar pits was that Tommy Lee Jones movie about a volcano erupting from the middle of the tar pits. http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0120461/

Which I always thought was kinda cool.

And last summer they did film part of the new Land of the Lost movie http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0457400/ there also but I never did run into any Sleestaks.

Who's Zed? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26899167)

Zed's dead baby, zed's dead.

Re:Who's Zed? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26899801)

It is a fossil, obviously it is NOT alive but rather dead. Sometimes I really do wonder why every single captain-obvious on the internet has to join slashdot....

Re:Who's Zed? (2, Informative)

d3m0nCr4t (869332) | more than 5 years ago | (#26899939)

I take it you've never seen Pulp Fiction?

Re:Who's Zed? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26900971)

whoosh!

Re:Who's Zed? (1)

Nogg (780777) | more than 5 years ago | (#26900015)

I am Zed's excavated pelvis.

Re:Not politically correct. (5, Funny)

Mr. Conrad (1461097) | more than 5 years ago | (#26899235)

They better have evidence to backup their claims, as they're going against conventional wisdom. Everyone knows that the largest deposit of fossils is in Naples, Florida.

Wow (3, Funny)

hiojay (1318063) | more than 5 years ago | (#26899145)

Wow, that's a mammoth of a find.

Re:Wow (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26900305)

Lame.

Flintstone (1)

unlametheweak (1102159) | more than 5 years ago | (#26899181)

I'll be impressed if they find the fossilized remains of Fred Flintstone.

Re:Flintstone (5, Informative)

spineboy (22918) | more than 5 years ago | (#26899341)

They've found COMPLETE frozen wooly mammoths in the Artic tundra in Russia, complete with hair and all
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2005/03/0324_050324_mammoth.html [nationalgeographic.com]
So while this find is quite nice, it's by no means the best ever.

Re:Flintstone (2, Interesting)

kiwijapan (1293632) | more than 5 years ago | (#26899759)

So while this find is quite nice, it's by no means the best ever.

Considering where it was found, I don't think the researchers will be complaining. The interesting point to this story though is the fact that the "nearly intact" (FTA: "he appears to be about 80% complete") mammoth was found in L.A., which is hardly frozen Artic tundra.

Researchers from the George C. Page Museum at the La Brea tar pits have barely begun extracting the fossils from the sandy, tarry matrix of soil

If it was the composition of the soil in which the body was buried that preserved it for so long, then perhaps similar finds could be made in other non-tundra climes.

Re:Flintstone (2, Informative)

geobeck (924637) | more than 5 years ago | (#26901117)

If it was the composition of the soil in which the body was buried that preserved it for so long, then perhaps similar finds could be made in other non-tundra climes.

Uh-oh, maybe they'll have to declare all of northern Alberta [wikipedia.org] a protected archaeological site...

Re:Flintstone (1)

wisty (1335733) | more than 5 years ago | (#26900311)

If I recall correctly, the medieval Russians used to eat wholly mammoths during banquets, and mammoth ivory was an export to China.

Re:Flintstone (3, Funny)

Keeper Of Keys (928206) | more than 5 years ago | (#26900825)

I've only ever been able to manage a partial mammoth.

Sorry, I'll get my skins.

Re:Flintstone (1)

GaryOlson (737642) | more than 5 years ago | (#26900961)

But it is significantly different. The mammoths in Siberia are just chillin'. The mammoth in LA is truly stoned. The LA mammoth was more committed to the results of his actions.

Not unlikely at all (4, Funny)

heretic108 (454817) | more than 5 years ago | (#26899193)

The fossils were found under a parking lot.

Obvious really - Thag and his wife Urga came back from the show to find their trusty mammoth leg-clamped for over-parking. They couldn't afford the unclamping fee, so had to walk home. The rest is history.

Re:Not unlikely at all (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26899207)

Pre-history, actually.

(I'll be here all night, try the veal)

Re:Not unlikely at all (1)

Plutonite (999141) | more than 5 years ago | (#26899451)

Some people really do deserve to get towed away by a troop of Velociraptors, especially those unevolved idiots who park in front of the mammoth stables. Some of us have to go hunting in the morning, you know.

Re:Not unlikely at all (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26899559)

Zed's dead, baby. Zed's dead.

Clear your cache (0)

enter to exit (1049190) | more than 5 years ago | (#26899205)

If you cache mammoth size data for too long, it can negatively effect your browsers speed.

Re:Clear your cache (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26899259)

We also would have accepted jokes about how a mammoth is too big to fit in cache and you would probably get better performance by using -Os rather than -O3.

hmm (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26899217)

How did they fit on Noah Ark though?

Re:hmm (0, Offtopic)

darinfp (907671) | more than 5 years ago | (#26899569)

I don't know about "flamebait", but this would make a great "ask Slashdot". Another 1200 comment thread would certainly drive up the ad revenue.

Re:hmm (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26899773)

That'd still be a flamebaiting "Ask Slashdot" and would be full of more flamebait threads.

doh! (5, Funny)

djupedal (584558) | more than 5 years ago | (#26899279)

> "in what might seem to be the unlikeliest of places..."

Hey, Marge! I found fossils in a known tar pit - who would have guessed.....!!

Yes, at Leisure World (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26899297)

talk amongst yerselves

ObFuturama (2, Funny)

Chris Tucker (302549) | more than 5 years ago | (#26899299)

(Leela and Fry are in the Planet Express ship, trapped deep in the La Brea tar pits! Seeking any means of escape from Certain Doom, Leela scans the endless depths of their petroleum prison...)

[Leela looks at a scanner.]

                                                                          LEELA
                                                  It's some kind of hollow tube, devoid
                                                  of human life. The Los Angeles subway!
                                                  We can blast our way in and escape!

A pocket of stuff (-1, Flamebait)

msormune (808119) | more than 5 years ago | (#26899327)

That's one of God's storages of intelligent design material, you insensitive clod! He has to have spare parts somewhere, you know.

They may have found Zed (-1, Redundant)

Bysmuth (1362639) | more than 5 years ago | (#26899331)

But did they find Zed's dead baby?

As seen on Dirty Jobs! (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26899377)

These guys were on Dirty Jobs, I think two weeks ago. (Maybe three.) They've been working on that single fossil for a LONG time. (With good reason - it's a freaking mammoth.)

Confusing (5, Funny)

clarkkent09 (1104833) | more than 5 years ago | (#26899379)

from the size of a desk to that of a small delivery truck

For those of you who prefer more conventional measurement units, that's between 0.35 and 2.5 volkswagens.

Re:Confusing (5, Funny)

argStyopa (232550) | more than 5 years ago | (#26900739)

I am so sick of every thread turning into some goddamn crusade for the metric system.

Look, people, this was in the US, so we're simply going to use the imperial system (.08 to 0.6 Chrysler Imperials).

Re:Confusing (0)

Inda (580031) | more than 5 years ago | (#26901211)

Browsing at +3, yours is the only post that mentions metric.

56 tons, 56 metric tons, 56,000 kg.

Funny though, 2nd result on Google for "123,000 pounds in metric tons" is this thread.

Re:Confusing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26900747)

from the size of a desk to that of a small delivery truck

For those of you who prefer more conventional measurement units, that's between 0.35 and 2.5 volkswagens.

Sorry, what's that in Buicks, football fields, and Libraries of Congress?

Fossils in LA: Susan Saradon??? (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26899381)

Was Susan Saradon among those fossils unearthed?
How about her son, Tim Robbins?

Really?? No jokes about Susan Saradon?? (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26900167)

When the Hell did it become trolling to make jokes at the expense of Susan Saradon?

Multiple redundancy (5, Informative)

techno-vampire (666512) | more than 5 years ago | (#26899401)

Just in case anybody cares, "La Brea" is Spanish for "the Tar," so "The La Brea Tar Pits" translates into "The The Tar Tar Pits."

Re:Multiple redundancy (2, Funny)

Killer Orca (1373645) | more than 5 years ago | (#26899425)

Just in case anybody cares, "La Brea" is Spanish for "the Tar," so "The La Brea Tar Pits" translates into "The The Tar Tar Pits."

Don't you mean The Tar the Tar Pits?

Re:Multiple redundancy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26899445)

No ÂÂ

Re:Multiple redundancy (1)

techno-vampire (666512) | more than 5 years ago | (#26899517)

No. Translate the words in the order you see them, and you get "The The Tar Tar Pits." What you're doing is moving things around to come out the way you want.

Re:Multiple redundancy (1)

oodaloop (1229816) | more than 5 years ago | (#26900755)

Uh, that's exactly what he wrote.

Re:Multiple redundancy (1)

gEvil (beta) (945888) | more than 5 years ago | (#26901141)

Uh, that's exactly what he wrote.

Are you honestly saying you can't see any difference between "The Tar the Tar Pits" and "The The Tar Tar Pits"?!?

Re:Multiple redundancy (1)

c0p0n (770852) | more than 5 years ago | (#26900557)

No, The Jar Jar Binks

Re:Multiple redundancy (5, Funny)

clarkkent09 (1104833) | more than 5 years ago | (#26899457)

Mmmm, tartar pits..... picks up a fried fish finger

Re:Multiple redundancy (1)

elthicko (1399175) | more than 5 years ago | (#26899467)

That should be fried mammoth finger.

Re:Multiple redundancy (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 5 years ago | (#26901197)

Mmmm, tartar pits..... picks up a fried fish finger

You can get them next to the fried chicken lips place.

Re:Multiple redundancy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26899469)

Like /. can talk.

Re:Multiple redundancy (2, Funny)

Chris Tucker (302549) | more than 5 years ago | (#26899491)

Tar Tar Pits. He's going to be a character in the Clone Wars series.

Search your feelings! You KNOW it to be true!

Please mod parent up insighful Re:Multiple redunda (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26899627)

Needed that one (tough day/week/month whatever).

Thanks! ^_^

Re:Multiple redundancy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26899565)

Just in case anybody cares, "La Brea" is Spanish for "the Tar," so "The La Brea Tar Pits" translates into "The The Tar Tar Pits."

Being that they haven't been cooked yet, what's wrong with calling them "Tar Tar"?

Re:Multiple redundancy (0, Redundant)

hab136 (30884) | more than 5 years ago | (#26899797)

Just in case anybody cares, "La Brea" is Spanish for "the Tar," so "The La Brea Tar Pits" translates into "The The Tar Tar Pits."

Is there somewhere in The La Brea Tar Pits where I can put my PIN number into an ATM machine?

Re:Multiple redundancy (1)

Anynomous Coward (841063) | more than 5 years ago | (#26900143)

Your post was modded Redundant :)

Re:Multiple redundancy (2, Funny)

laejoh (648921) | more than 5 years ago | (#26900109)

That's why there is the -z option, so that you can include gzip compression.

Re:Multiple redundancy (1)

martin-boundary (547041) | more than 5 years ago | (#26900171)

Crazy Americans! What will they think of next? Perhaps some website named aitch tee tee pee colon slash slash slash dot dot com?

Re:Multiple redundancy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26900617)

do they have ATM machines there where i can use my PIN number?

10 000 - 40 000 years old fossils? (0, Troll)

Dionysus (12737) | more than 5 years ago | (#26899483)

Lies. All God fearing Americans know the Earth is only about 6000 years young [conservapedia.com]

Re:10 000 - 40 000 years old fossils? (2, Insightful)

schnikies79 (788746) | more than 5 years ago | (#26899597)

Way to re-hash the same 'ole shit over, and over, and over. It wasn't funny a year ago, It's not funny now. Yes people think that way, everyone here knows that. You know what? The only ones I hear bringing it up every discussion I read is you guys making fun of it. The people that actually believe talk about it less.

It's off-topic and it's annoying.

Re:10 000 - 40 000 years old fossils? (0, Offtopic)

DavoMan (759653) | more than 5 years ago | (#26899727)

Actually its a serious problem. That creationist stuff is a good reflection of social progress. f it keeps up, soon you will find the USA in the dark ages.

Re:10 000 - 40 000 years old fossils? (1)

hvm2hvm (1208954) | more than 5 years ago | (#26899811)

Yes, but talking about it offtopic is not helping anyone. I agree with schnikies79 that the ones that bring it up are mostly people trying to make fun of it and it's not funny. Here comes the karma burning for 'trolling'.

Re:10 000 - 40 000 years old fossils? (0, Flamebait)

ag0ny (59629) | more than 5 years ago | (#26900027)

Wrong. Making fun of religion and religious nuts is ALWAYS funny.

Especially if it involves the Pope, Texas, and a midget or two.

The pope? (3, Informative)

Moraelin (679338) | more than 5 years ago | (#26900095)

Especially if it involves the Pope, Texas, and a midget or two.

I seriously don't see the link between the Pope and US puritan nuts. Or between the pope and the young-earth idiocy for that matter.

If you look as far as back as St Augustine Of Hippo [wikipedia.org] , he wrote in no uncertain terms that only an idiot would take the Genesis literally. "It is too disgraceful and ruinous, though, and greatly to be avoided, that he [the non-Christian] should hear a Christian speaking so idiotically on these matters, and as if in accord with Christian writings, that he might say that he could scarcely keep from laughing when he saw how totally in error they are." That's pretty much a thorough flaming of that point of view. He got sanctified by the catholic church, btw.

Plus, whatever bigotry the catholics might have had against science, were gone in the counter-reformation. (They had to try to stop losing ground to the protestants _somehow_.) The Society Of Jesus [wikipedia.org] for example, is pretty much a scientific order sponsored by the Vatican. Those guys operate research labs and universities. And yes, they teach evolution and the big bang.

Also let's remember that the Vatican, including the current pope, btw, has officially proclaimed Darwinism as correct. So you won't find _them_ arguing that dinosaur fossils were placed there to test your faith.

Now I'm not saying the catholics are without fault. But ffs, blame them for their real faults, not for bullshit strawmen. Lumping them together with the young-earthers just shows massive ignorance. Blaming it on the pope is like blaming the fall of Byzantium on the emperor of China. That freaking stupid.

It seems to me like some people aren't in it even for the science-vs-religion parts, but just because they're cretin trolls seeking to annoy someone, anyone for attention.

Re:The pope? (0, Troll)

brightmal (1467167) | more than 5 years ago | (#26900677)

Actually, I always thought of Creationism as the Raving Right's version of the Loony Left's Anthropogenic Global Warming. Both systems work if looked at through the eyes of a four year-old child. However, when looked at a bit more critically, Biblical Theology and Natural Philosophy both turn out to be a bit more complicated, and not quite so easily turned to political ends. Or condensed into media friendly sound-bites.

Re:The pope? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26901097)

Blaming it on the pope is like blaming the fall of Byzantium on the emperor of China. That freaking stupid.

If the emperor of China had successfully contained and subjugated the Turks or their predecessors, then there would have never been any Ottomans to annex Constantinople.

But as you say, this is stupid. Constantinople already fell to western crusaders who erected their own empire in the region. By the time the Turks were powerful enough to seriously threaten them, they were fragmented and greatly weakened. Had it not been the Turks it have been someone else.

Re:10 000 - 40 000 years old fossils? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26900947)

Actually its a serious problem. That creationist stuff is a good reflection of social progress. f it keeps up, soon you will find the USA in the dark ages.

And then it won't be long until the USA starts a series of crusades against Muslim countries.

Re:10 000 - 40 000 years old fossils? (1)

geobeck (924637) | more than 5 years ago | (#26901195)

All God fearing Americans know the Earth is only about 6000 years young

That just means He had them on ice for a while before he found a use for them. "These humans are going to be my most gullible creations evar! Let's see what they make of these! *snicker*"

AND IT'S CALLED... (1)

Jane Q. Public (1010737) | more than 5 years ago | (#26899497)

Beverly Hills!!!

What I don't understand is why this is news.

TAR PITS! (2, Funny)

n6kuy (172098) | more than 5 years ago | (#26899563)

(Pico and Sepulveda...)
(Pico and Sepulveda...)
Doheney...
Cahuenga...
La Brea...
TAR PITS! [youtube.com]

Re:TAR PITS! (1)

adavies42 (746183) | more than 5 years ago | (#26899595)

zippy? someone let you out of your cage?

This is a good thing? (2, Interesting)

Jflatnote (926337) | more than 5 years ago | (#26899581)

And by quarrying the fossils in bulk sections, the geomorphic relationship is completely lost. Much, if not most of the scientifically valuable information that can be gained from a fossil site comes from the relationship of the fossils in situ to the stratigraphic setting, etc. While this may seem like news, it is just a report of the same business-as-usually destruction of valuable scientific information by paleontologists who should know better but who somehow do not know or do not care.

Re:This is a good thing? (1)

mbone (558574) | more than 5 years ago | (#26900393)

And by quarrying the fossils in bulk sections, the geomorphic relationship is completely lost.

That is not what I got from the article - "huge chunks of soil from the site have been removed intact and now sit in large wooden crates on the museum's back lot" precisely because "researchers are perhaps even more excited about finding smaller fossils of tree trunks, turtles, snails, clams, millipedes, fish, gophers and even mats of oak leaves. In the early 1900s, the first excavators at La Brea threw out similar items in their haste to find prized animal bones, and crucial information about the period was lost."

So while, yes, they are in a hurry, it seems to me that they are trying hard to preserve the context and stratigraphy and are fully aware of the benefit of such information.

Re:This is a good thing? (1)

gEvil (beta) (945888) | more than 5 years ago | (#26901193)

That's the thing though. They're trying hard to maintain the context and stratigraphy given the circumstances. Every single one of them would tell you that they'd much rather be working with the material in place in the ground rather than out of crates in the back lot.

old dead things (3, Funny)

DavoMan (759653) | more than 5 years ago | (#26899715)

Have they found the MPAA's business model yet?
ziiing! ;)

Uh.... (1)

Spasemunki (63473) | more than 5 years ago | (#26899839)

Maybe I'm the only sixth grader in the room, but anyone else think they might want to rethink the lettering in that little sign in the picture?

Re:Uh.... (1)

biduxe (541904) | more than 5 years ago | (#26900225)

Maybe I'm the only sixth grader in the room, but anyone else think they might want to rethink the lettering in that little sign in the picture?

Come on the lettering is perfectly undertandable even for a sxth grader.

As a side node That bone is really huge!

For those asking for metric... (5, Funny)

PhilHibbs (4537) | more than 5 years ago | (#26899877)

This story is tagged "metricplease", but they didn't have the metric system in the mesozoic era. Sheesh.

Re:For those asking for metric... (1)

tpheiska (1145505) | more than 5 years ago | (#26900767)

I thought the imperial system is dated to be from about that age.

Obviously not an American Mammoth (1)

doublecuffs (914081) | more than 5 years ago | (#26900009)

I was wondering why they called it Zed and then I remembered - The United States is only a couple of hundred years old, so it couldn't have been American and that's why they called it Zed rather than Zee.

Zed died prematurely (1)

neonsignal (890658) | more than 5 years ago | (#26900041)

Mammoths normally lived to about 60, so Zed died prematurely.

Well, you'd die prematurely too if you stepped into a pool of petrochemical quicksand.

Parking lot for aryans only (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26900101)

It is worth mention that charred remains of Adolf Hitler and wife Eva Braun were buried under a parking lot by the soviets. When the East German headquarters of KGB was relocated circa 1973, the parking lot was to be demolished as well, so the russians dug up the crates and burned them, dumping the ashes into a river, nobody knows exactly where. Neo-nazi groups offer big cash reward to any person who can proof the final resting place of Hitler. Mossad says you will not be happy with that reward for long...

123,000 pounds in modern money? (2, Insightful)

fantomas (94850) | more than 5 years ago | (#26900117)

What's that in less historic money? ;-)

interesting - do you guys over the pond use tons for big numbers or do you stick to pounds all the way up? Curious about the expression "123,000 pounds" - isn't that something like 100 tons or so? (he says plucking a figure out the air and being lazy ;-) )

Here we'd say kg for small numbers, but once we'd got to a thousand we'd shift to (metric) tons, e.g. "over 123 tons" not "over 123,000 kg". Or is that domain specific? do some things get measured in pounds all the way up, but others you shift into talking about tons? What do you measure aircraft carriers etc in? millions of pounds?

Great news though on the main topic, it will keep some university researchers happily employed for a good while!

Re:123,000 pounds in modern money? (2, Funny)

repvik (96666) | more than 5 years ago | (#26900811)

Aircraft carriers are measured in ounces.

Re:123,000 pounds in modern money? (1)

Muad'Dave (255648) | more than 5 years ago | (#26901035)

You'll probably not get any other serious replies, so here I go.

At least in my experience, the use of the unit 'ton' is most often encountered when dealing with some sort of profession that deals in things by weight. The average citizen really has no benchmark as to how much a ton of anything is, so laypeople use pounds. Large trucks and cranes are rated in tons, and scrap iron dealers, lumberjacks, etc use tons, but you don't normally hear it in everyday conversation. Interestingly, our roadway load limit signs [trafficsign.us] are in tons, unless the limit is low or would require a fraction of a ton, I assume.

Re:123,000 pounds in modern money? (5, Interesting)

Teun (17872) | more than 5 years ago | (#26901073)

You got a point.

But the explanation is rather mundane, lets take some hypothetical super tanker accident.

The oil company will claim less than ten thousand tons of oil might have leaked away.
The clean up company will report about fifty five thousand barrels of oil to collect and Green Peace will talk about a disaster involving over twelve million litres of crude oil polluting the environment.

... so (0)

dominious (1077089) | more than 5 years ago | (#26900163)

The 23 crates range... from the size of a desk to that of a small delivery truck...

...Is that... one person desk or two persons desk? ... ...?

Zed should be renamed - (1)

gluefish (899099) | more than 5 years ago | (#26900195)

Considering it was found under a County Museum parking lot, it should be named Steven Anthony.

Just down the street from the La Brea tar pits (1)

mbone (558574) | more than 5 years ago | (#26900309)

I don't see why this is so surprising a location - it is just down the street (Wilshire) from the La Brea tar pits.

Not fossils - bones! (5, Informative)

benwiggy (1262536) | more than 5 years ago | (#26900503)

I was shown around the crates late last year. They are not fossils - they are bones that have been preserved by the tar. They have not undergone transformation in sedimentary rock.
I also gave the tar a good poking with a stick. It's easy to see how large four-legged animals would get stuck in it.
The museum also has a huge collection of sabre-tooth tigers - who thought all the stuck prey would be an easy catch....

Simpson's Did It (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26900675)

Simpson's did it

Worldtrack manipulation (1)

thespeech (1335765) | more than 5 years ago | (#26900843)

I don't suppose anyone knows where the nearest Thousander math is located?

Hrm, this reads like a "new" find (3, Informative)

BLKMGK (34057) | more than 5 years ago | (#26900997)

but the article says they took over 3 months to unearth them TWO YEARS ago. Kind of took a little excitement out of it to get nearly through the whole article to find out this all took place years ago. Would have been nice to have more pictures of the process and maybe an explanation as to how they found the edges of the deposits - ground penetrating radar maybe?

This couldn't happen in Scotland... (0, Offtopic)

Muad'Dave (255648) | more than 5 years ago | (#26901085)

..because as we all learned from Bugs Bunny, "Therrr'es no La Brrrea Tarrr Pits in Scotland!" [wikipedia.org] . And since their find is not Scottish, it must be CRAP!

British Translation (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26901149)

A nearly intact mammoth, dubbed Zed,

Translation for British /.ers:

A nearly intact mammoth, dubbed Z,

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