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Gnome, KDE, LXDE, IceWM All Working On Android

timothy posted more than 5 years ago | from the options-are-good dept.

Cellphones 194

dooberrymctavish writes "Ghostwalker over at AndroidFanatic has gone and done it again; now he's released clear and concise instructions on how to get X11 server running on your Android device. Not only that, but he has successfully gotten LXDE, and IceWM running at a pace. There is even a photo with the instructions showing the LXDE desktop running right there on the device itself. Apparently, you can also VNC straight onto the phone's new desktop from your PC."

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194 comments

First post (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26953859)

Meh.

Re:First post (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26953873)

Seriously. Linux system runs X server, news at 11.

Driver issue (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26954025)

They may get linux to run on it, but then it won't be able to communicate with any peripherals. WTF is the point???

Re:Driver issue (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26954095)

"Because we can" the neckbearded Linux dweebs living in their mother's basement will tell you in between LARP sessions and shoving greased up Yoda dolls into their asses, while the adults are running rock-solid proprietary software on their server machines to do things which are actually important. Get the facts [getthefacts.com] , people.

Re:Driver issue (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26954151)

Thank you so much for the good work you're doing, I haven't had my facts today.

Re:Driver issue (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26954167)

Anyone who "gets the facts" from the company who is saying they're better need to stop by my shop, I have a couple of things to sell you nobody else is dumb enough to buy.

Re:Driver issue (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26954245)

Like Tobacco companies saying cigarettes are safe, or distillers saying there is no link between spirits and traffic accidents. Tell me that linking to a Microsoft web page to give us a comparison between Windows and *nix systems was a really bad joke.

Re:Driver issue (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26954247)

I really hope thats satirizing anti *nix AC comments.

linux shit (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26953875)

who gives a fuck? just a bunch of faggotry. go back to sucking dicks.

Re:linux shit (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26954139)

Go back?

What makes you think the neckbeards ever stopped?

zelfde (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26953877)

lulzonde

...Well (0, Offtopic)

arogier (1250960) | more than 5 years ago | (#26953927)

Its taken long enough. When will the get cups running? There have been enough non-phone installs to show this OS is building momentum. Even if at Google's glacial pace. The question now is who gets credit for the ath driver on Android.

Re:...Well (1)

sketerpot (454020) | more than 5 years ago | (#26954329)

CUPS? Why would you want to run the Common Unix Printing System on a phone?

Re:...Well (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26954363)

So you can print things? Just taking a wild stab in the dark here ...

So much potential (5, Funny)

cpicon92 (1157705) | more than 5 years ago | (#26953929)

can you make phone calls with it?

Re:So much potential (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26954301)

Mod parent interesting.

Android introduces lots of new innovative features, wrapped up in a simple and elegant design. It fully meets and exceeds he requirements of a super-modern operating system. It includes industry-standard software for serving websites. An open-source project, Android gets its name from being a collection of patches -- software fixes -- to a previous web server project.

The 'toolbox' that developers can build upon defines the requests an application developer can make with a simple and elegant design using expressive icons, vibrant colour, and fluid motion. If you find the colours distracting, there are other options available.

It supports SUN's Java ME platform, expressly designed for the internet, and for distributed environments. Designed to be simpler to use than other programming languages, it enforces an object-oriented programming model. Java applications ought to be able to run on any platform. Android is the only high-volume mobile OS to include Java 2 Mobile Edition 1.3, and Java applications on Android can take advantage of the native appearance -- previously, Java applications on Android often looked and felt like second-class citizens.

Google's Android is based on Linux: The power of the command line with the simplicity and elegance of a GUI. Android provides tools for file sharing, web serving, and network administration while providing greater functionality and reliability, but with the same ease of administration.

Protected memory prevents a badly-behaved application from bringing down other applications or the operating system itself. If an application crashes you can continue working with the other applications, without having to restart. One exception to this involves native applications: if one native application quits, it may affect other running native applications.

Android proudly supports the Universal Serial Bus, used for connecting many commonly used peripheral devices such as scanners, inkjet printers and disk drives. Mac OS X comes with support for many inkjet printers from Canon, HP, and Epson already built in, and allows hot-plugging of devices without the need to restart.

In summa, Android is a robust, powerful, highly-configurable OS and everybody should run it.

Re:So much potential (1)

timeOday (582209) | more than 5 years ago | (#26954999)

Look at it this way, what if the answer were "no"? It might still be a better PocketPC than anything Microsoft or Palm ever put out.

Er, no thanks. (4, Insightful)

Speare (84249) | more than 5 years ago | (#26953933)

Even the 800x480 of a Nokia N810 is a bit cramped for normal desktop style window managers. I hate to contemplate what it would be like to use anything like them on the 320x480 screen that is the G1. And I really don't think it's worth building up an Android netbook distro just to rip it back down to use desktop window managers-- if you want that, then run Linux on it already and forget about the Android application stack.

Re:Er, no thanks. (2, Interesting)

poetmatt (793785) | more than 5 years ago | (#26954039)

Why don't you try the phone before assuming? N810 has its own problems because of how its handled.

The G1 tends to handle the sizing better than most phones in all honesty. If there's one thing the phone does noticeably well it's handle an enormous amount of icons while still having a keyboard (and not on screen keyboard) available.

Re:Er, no thanks. (4, Insightful)

outZider (165286) | more than 5 years ago | (#26954311)

.. because he's saying that most window managers can't fit well in the resolution. It doesn't matter how well Android handles sizing if the window manager that you're trying itself is terrible at it.

Re:Er, no thanks. (1)

qw0ntum (831414) | more than 5 years ago | (#26954113)

Did you look at the screen shot in the article? It actually doesn't look half bad.

Re:Er, no thanks. (5, Informative)

Microlith (54737) | more than 5 years ago | (#26954145)

It may not look bad, but I run into situations repeatedly on my Aspire One where the dialog is simply too tall to be usable. Sometimes options, and frequently the Help/Ok/Cancel buttons are below the bottom edge of the screen (even if I set both of the gnome panels to autohide) and cannot be reached.

Frequently I run into default windows that are larger than 640x480, which while small was typical not long ago, and still common among mobile resolutions. GUI designers need to keep this in mind.

Re:Er, no thanks. (3, Insightful)

sketerpot (454020) | more than 5 years ago | (#26954275)

Most of the beauty of the Android's design is looking good and being usable on a tiny screen. I doubt that most software written for people with big monitors is going to be pleasant on a cell phone screen.

Well then (2, Insightful)

Weaselmancer (533834) | more than 5 years ago | (#26954333)

Write new software that does look good on a cell phone screen.

With X11 up and running, that opens up a large bank of developers that know X and can do that, you know.

Re:Well then (2, Insightful)

Ostracus (1354233) | more than 5 years ago | (#26954765)

Ummm, no. Knowing X doesn't mean that one knows HCI as well. In fact looking at the development of Linux GUIs over the years I'd say the odds are against it. Note that's not saying one can't be developed, but it's more work than people really anticipate. A cellphone GUI that tries to be all things to all people (curse of a thousand choices) doesn't fit well into the appliance (does a few things well) nature of the device.

Re:Er, no thanks. (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26954585)

vnc, rdp and citrix logmein are surprisingly useful on my iphone. i can remote from 99% of the places i go pretty efficiently.

Re:Er, no thanks. (2)

qkan (89307) | more than 5 years ago | (#26954905)

I second that. As much as I love my n810, I came to understand that anything less than 1024x768 just does not work nicely in the current world. (And while we're at that - my work notebook is 1024x768 because it's ultraportable; most of the time it's enough but SOME applications are a pain in the back to work with at 1024x768; think constant scrolling). Oh, and on an unrelated note - processor on n810 sucks; yeah, complex sites and video streams kind of work but far from perfect. Don't get me wrong, I love this tablet, but it would be unfair to not mention the issues to fellow geeks.

Re:Er, no thanks. (1)

AliasMarlowe (1042386) | more than 5 years ago | (#26955093)

Even the 800x480 of a Nokia N810 is a bit cramped for normal desktop style window managers. I hate to contemplate what it would be like to use anything like them on the 320x480 screen that is the G1.

The answer may be in repressed nightmarish memories from your youth.
Didn't you ever run a PC with a CGA display in color mode (320x200), or try with a VGA adapter set to MCGA mode (=CGA with more colors)? It only sucks a little if your interface is designed to work with low resolution displays. If the interface was conceived with more pixels in mind, and just supports low resolution as an afterthought, then it really sucks.
Actually, everything sucked on CGA in graphics mode, including Windows 1.0 and GEM.

Re:Er, no thanks. (1)

a-zA-Z0-9$_.+!*'(),x (1468865) | more than 5 years ago | (#26955411)

Even the 800x480 of a Nokia N810 is a bit cramped for normal desktop style window managers. ...

Isn't that why you want a X-server running, so you can use your HD laptop to run GIMP and Open Office on your phone?

Great Combination. (4, Insightful)

jellomizer (103300) | more than 5 years ago | (#26953953)

The Speed and resolution of a Portable Device, combined with the large size of a Desktop PC.
Yea you get geek cred points but for the most part it is kinda useless, for most real uses.

Re:Great Combination. (4, Funny)

Icarus1919 (802533) | more than 5 years ago | (#26954091)

But what about fake uses? Like when your server farm goes down and you need to set up a network of cell phones to get your site up and running again? Did you stop to think about that?

Re:Great Combination. (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26954163)

Whenever somebody says "server farm" I imagine some guy wearing plaid and overalls out in a barnhouse milking servers.

Re:Great Combination. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26954267)

Or reboot the electric fence when the server room is full of Velociraptors..

Re:Great Combination. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26954535)

You mean your server farm isn't a network of cell phones? That's so 2008.

Amazing how people fail to understand... (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26954541)

Screw every buying a laptop again. The future is carrying around your cellphone and docking it to a local thin machine and VNC'ing over to your cellphone.

Cellphone + fast processor + cloud computing. We're done guys.

give it up queers (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26953971)

no one really gives a fuck about linux bullshit. linux fails it in every way. just put a fork in it.

Re:give it up queers (1)

Ash-Fox (726320) | more than 5 years ago | (#26954053)

no one really gives a fuck about linux bullshit. linux fails it in every way. just put a fork in it.

Wow, your argument is so compelling.

Seriously, what's wrong with this troll? Is he drugged up or something and can't troll properly?

Re:give it up queers (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26954109)

You have to admit he has a point however. Linux does fail very hard.

Re:give it up queers (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26954241)

Depending on the type of fork he uses, he might have 3 or 4 points.

Re:give it up queers (1)

x2A (858210) | more than 5 years ago | (#26955439)

err, actually if you put a fork() in linux you get a pid, not a point, duh :-p

Re:give it up queers (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26954591)

So true. This is offtopic but do you have any tips of how to speed up compilation on linsux?

I gotta compile my browser and video player before I can watch some pr0n action as is recommended on all linux forums.

BTW I heard that some rogue has silently introduced very subtle buffer overflows in part of the kernel. It explains why the linsux servers constantly get rooted.

Even slashdot servers crashed on new years.

http://patchwork.kernel.org/patch/612/ [kernel.org]

I mean seriously.. even my 2 yr old niece can crash linux.

https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/linux/+bug/257666 [launchpad.net]

Does anyone besides the basement dwellers (aka losers) here use this crap? Should MS throw cash at ubuntu just like they did for Apache?

LOL..

Re:give it up queers (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26954451)

linux is like a hydra, if you fork it two will rise from the ashes...

Well thats all an good (1)

renegadesx (977007) | more than 5 years ago | (#26953995)

If your running Android on a desktop however for stuff like Smartphones KDE and Gnome are bascially useless. I would suggest porting across Enlightenment E17, especially if the rumors are true about an Android run eeePC

Re:Well thats all an good (4, Interesting)

TinBromide (921574) | more than 5 years ago | (#26954069)

There was a slashdot article a month or so ago about how they got android to work on a small pc, but the GUI wasn't all there and they couldn't get it to work. So if they combine the desktop work with this gui combination, android will be a competitor in the netbook market.

No Xfce? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26954007)

So disappointed.

What's not to like? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26954029)

X could make a great UI on a phone, especially considering the current X server's new dpi awareness UI and font scaling. There's nothing that would prevent a mobile theme from being both usable and highly legible on a low-resolution device.

Re:What's not to like? (3, Insightful)

mrsteveman1 (1010381) | more than 5 years ago | (#26954103)

X11 was left behind by a number of different commercial Unix users for a reason. Apple being the most prominent i can think of, one of their engineers even left a rather long post on slashdot explaining why they went with their own system (hint: adding all the things they needed that X11 lacked and probably still does, would have required so much work it was easier to do something else).

And now Android has done something similar albeit for different reasons.

Personally X11 is the last thing i want to see on Linux devices going forward. I hate the thing and want to see it suffer if only for irrational reasons.

Re:What's not to like? (1)

Culture20 (968837) | more than 5 years ago | (#26954293)

And yet X11 is still so incredibly useful that vendors that want compatibility between their OS and another OS still use it. Thankfully there's a way to get X11 working in OSX.

Re:What's not to like? (3, Insightful)

Draek (916851) | more than 5 years ago | (#26954853)

X11 was left behind by a number of different commercial Unix users for a reason.

How many of them are still alive, though? other than OSX which has fed on OS9's marketshare rather than UNIX's, all of the rest seem to have bit the bullet a long time ago. Meanwhile, Linux, the *BSDs and Solaris seem to be going fairly strong despite being 'stuck' with X11.

Seems like UNIX admins are still too attached to being able to run their apps remotely, among other things.

Re:What's not to like? (3, Interesting)

mrsteveman1 (1010381) | more than 5 years ago | (#26955193)

None of those systems have been doing well in the mainstream desktop space, which is what all the excitement over Android is about.

UNIX admins have little to do with the need for a good clean display system on portable devices and desktops. In fact the needs of geeks seem to guide the FOSS world far too much, thats why it was a big headline one or 2 Xorg releases ago that input and display devices would be hotpluggable years after everyone else solved that problem, it wasn't a dire need of the geeks in charge of the project nor anyone using it.

Re:What's not to like? (4, Informative)

PrescriptionWarning (932687) | more than 5 years ago | (#26954173)

Ubuntu Mobile [wikipedia.org] certainly has my ears perked up :)

Re:What's not to like? (1)

rhinokitty (962485) | more than 5 years ago | (#26955033)

Aargh. I wish. The moment I can run Ubuntu on a mobile phone and still make GSM (regular phone) calls on it is when I will buy a new device. For now I have a cell phone for GSM and a laptop for everything else.

Re:What's not to like? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26954199)

No, it couldn't.

Re:What's not to like? (-1, Redundant)

larry bagina (561269) | more than 5 years ago | (#26954327)

X is short for X11 Window Manager. But on a device with that size screen, with no 3-button mouse, you don't want to manage windows, you want fullscreen apps. So using the frame buffer directly (with a simple layer on top, like SDL or QT) is better than wasting memory and cycles dicking around with X and wasting screen real estate with window borders and decorations.

Re:What's not to like? (4, Informative)

msuarezalvarez (667058) | more than 5 years ago | (#26954503)

X is not short for "X11 Window manager". If you do not know that X is not a window manager, you should probably be reading up on what X is instead of trying to makecomments about frame buffers, memory usage and other things you do not know about...

Re:What's not to like? (4, Insightful)

Sir_Lewk (967686) | more than 5 years ago | (#26954771)

You have no fucking clue what you are talking about.

Just thought I'd let you know.

Re:What's not to like? (1)

scientus (1357317) | more than 5 years ago | (#26954991)

im not arguing, but X11 says nothing about decorations, borders, and doesn't even mandate a re-parenting window manager (although flash broke ICCCAP compliance by assuming that all X11 window managers are re-parenting)

not to say that it is necessary, but it is a very flexible system, and mandates little (if anything) in terms of appearance.

Re:What's not to like? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26955083)

Fuck off back to windaids, homo.

No credit for the actual developers? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26954031)

Ghostwriter didn't go and do anything again - he's just posting poor summaries of other people's work, with no credit for the original developers.

Fuzzy photo fail (3, Interesting)

Shimmer (3036) | more than 5 years ago | (#26954043)

You'd think someone smart enough to create this hack would be able to use a camera to take a decent picture of it... but no.

Re:Fuzzy photo fail (1)

physicsphairy (720718) | more than 5 years ago | (#26954237)

In fact, these guys were so geeky they hacked their own brains to image what they saw directly.

But being basement nerds their eyesight is roughly on par with that of an Euglena.

Re:Fuzzy photo fail (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26954657)

Fuzzy photo? Must have been taken using an iPhone...

To merge your phone with your PC... (4, Informative)

sonamchauhan (587356) | more than 5 years ago | (#26954061)

Synergy (http://synergy2.sourceforge.net/) and X2VNC (http://directory.fsf.org/project/x2vnc/) can be useful to 'merge' your phone and home PC screens. Move your mouse over to your android screen, copy something, paste it onto your PC application.

From Synergy website:

Synergy lets you easily share a single mouse and keyboard between multiple computers with different operating systems, each with its own display, without special hardware. It's intended for users with multiple computers on their desk since each system uses its own monitor(s).

Redirecting the mouse and keyboard is as simple as moving the mouse off the edge of your screen. Synergy also merges the clipboards of all the systems into one, allowing cut-and-paste between systems. Furthermore, it synchronizes screen savers so they all start and stop together and, if screen locking is enabled, only one screen requires a password to unlock them all. Learn more about how it works.

Re:To merge your phone with your PC... (1)

rrohbeck (944847) | more than 5 years ago | (#26955367)

Seconded. I've been using Synergy between my Windows and Linux desktops and it's seamless - you roll the mouse cursor across the edge of the screen and the other system has focus. I only have to use the KVM to switch over to the Linux box (yeah, I'll admit it, Windows is still my main desktop at work, so sue me) after the screen went to power save mode, and for text consoles. Is there a command line utility to tell X to wake up the display?

Rolling our own mobile desktop (3, Interesting)

graft (556969) | more than 5 years ago | (#26954111)

While I agree with other commenters that existing desktop environments are an extremely bad fit for the Android and smart phones in general, what this development allows (and encourages me to think will happen soon) is a user-created free software platform built specifically for mobile phones. Phones need to have a lot of creativity applied to them; the iPhone was a big step forward in that department, but I'm inclined to think that the community of free software developers will be able to find myriad new uses for such devices - and implement them, to boot. Hopefully this can happen in a way that pays close attention to the much stricter design constraints of a handheld device.

Re:Rolling our own mobile desktop (4, Insightful)

sketerpot (454020) | more than 5 years ago | (#26954303)

Android is already a free software platform where users can write software without being locked out. Isn't that what you're looking for? Sure, it came from Google and is promoted by a consortium of telecom giants, rather than springing straight from the People, but as long as a cat catches mice, does it really matter what color it is?

Re:Rolling our own mobile desktop (1)

zappepcs (820751) | more than 5 years ago | (#26954413)

It's what I'm looking for. Personally, I'd be happy with something slightly bigger than most smartphones are now given that it supports bluetooth and wired earbuds for phone use. I'd like more USB support and a cradle that allows me to plug a keyboard into it as well as perhaps software that allows an X window on my desktop to be what is on the Android. Not quite a laptop, but just below that level of functionality. To be truly useful, I'd like to be able to plug a keyboard into it that is sized for my fingers like normal keyboards are. Some level of high integration to the desktop so that the work I do on the go is merely a mini version of what I do on the desktop. Drive-by and auto-sync. I don't want to have to spend time doing sync functions.

I'm waiting. My old SKII is getting old. I'm holding out hoping that Android or something will come along and make everything else seem pointless. I don't want just another smart phone that is locked into someone's services.

Re:Rolling our own mobile desktop (1)

megrims (839585) | more than 5 years ago | (#26954753)

Sounds like an evil cat to me. And do you really want an evil cat playing with your children?

For that matter so is the iPhone (0, Flamebait)

SuperKendall (25149) | more than 5 years ago | (#26954985)

Android is already a free software platform where users can write software without being locked out.

So is the iPhone.

If you have a developer account, you can deploy any software you like to your own phone (and a few others).

Or if you jailbreak a phone, you can deploy any software you want or have someone else send you whatever software they like.

Just as open in the end.

I do see value though it being able to re-write things with source code at the lowest level, but mostly for study and not so much for usability. It's hard to beat the guys who developed the low level device stuff for the iPhone or the G1 as they know the hardware inside and out in addition to the tradeoffs the hardware best lives with...

Re:Rolling our own mobile desktop (1)

scientus (1357317) | more than 5 years ago | (#26955039)

well they did create a system that is almost entirely differnt from all the other systems, it uses a non-standard c-lib (not gnu libc nor uclibc), no access to the filesystem by applications, and the whole system has to be done with google's custom java api on their proprietary SDK.

This is certainly better than Verizon's stance, and Apple on he iPhone, some of the wierd things they did may have merit, and they did open up alot of code, but this does not mean the system is entirely open.

For example, the phones are locked, and it is impossible to get root on the released phones. (AFAIK) This greatly hampers users abilities to tinker with the phone, and what they are doing may be disallowed if it was under gpl3. The platform is designed for google to stay in change, and give the phone producers and cell networks control, but it is not designed to give end users control, only for them to write the software to make it a successful platform for google.

If you want a more standard (for better or for worse) Linux mobile platform you may want openmoko [wikipedia.org] .

Hello, I just installed Ubuntu... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26954243)

It has changed my life and made me happy. Please mod me informative or insightful. Thank you.

IceWM ftw (2, Interesting)

deadearth (906654) | more than 5 years ago | (#26954365)

I was just happy to see IceWm in a slashdot headline. It's a great little WM that doesn't always get the attention from users it deserves.

This is heinous (1, Insightful)

guyminuslife (1349809) | more than 5 years ago | (#26954379)

No! X must not be ported! X must die!

Re:This is heinous (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26954459)

Those who do not understand X, are doomed to scream for its death while begging for someone to reimplement X poorly.

Re:This is heinous (4, Interesting)

Paradigm_Complex (968558) | more than 5 years ago | (#26954571)

Actually, I was far more excited to hear that X was ported than any given desktop because this is exactly where X shines.

I $ssh -x quite often from my eeepc in class. It's nice to be able to use my desktop computer's far superior processing power for things like compiling LaTeX documents (it's the format I take all my notes - lots of math stuff). Additionally it's nice to be able to take advantage of my computer's superior disk space for all sorts of things. The problem is, this is highly dependent on getting a wifi signal.

I ssh from my blackberry quite a bit as well. It'd be great if I could ssh some X stuff over it, for all the same reasons it works wonderfully on my eeepc - but when I don't have the eeepc or are lacking wifi. I can manage without it (my command-line-fu is not weak), but it'd be great if I did not have to do things like rip out the text from a PDF before reading it remotely, etc.

Hopefully I can keep from breaking my blackberry until a viable option for $ssh -x'ing from a new phone will be available.

Re:This is heinous (1)

Deltaspectre (796409) | more than 5 years ago | (#26955197)

You need X forwarding to compile \latex documents?

I can't really see how that would be the case for anything you would have the time to type up during a class session. :\

Most of the stuff you described I do on my eee or cli on my desktop.

(However, I can't say anything about the blackberry since I don't have one)

Re:This is heinous (1)

jipn4 (1367823) | more than 5 years ago | (#26955433)

No! X must not be ported! X must die!

Too late. X runs everywhere. It's a good, flexible set of protocols, and there are dozens of different implementations. Microsoft and Apple have been making their window systems more and more X-like over the years--but they are slower and less efficient.

The X Window System is like UNIX/Linux: so-called experts have hated it because they thought it should all be done differently, but in the end, it turns out that X (and UNIX) got it right from the start.

HTC Wizard (1)

TClevenger (252206) | more than 5 years ago | (#26954431)

Anybody got Android running on the HTC Wizard yet? I'd love to dump Windows Mobile.

Re:HTC Wizard (1)

fm6 (162816) | more than 5 years ago | (#26954581)

Probably not possible without support from HTC. Which won't happen. Phone makers basically consider a phone and its OS a matched set.

Re:HTC Wizard (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26954921)

Almost all the hardware already works under Linux. Android should work, but nobody cares enough to try it.

X is network transparent (1)

MSDos-486 (779223) | more than 5 years ago | (#26954547)

Can you do X forwarding? Aka have your display on one machine and your client on another, or vice versa.

Re:X is network transparent (1)

timmarhy (659436) | more than 5 years ago | (#26954689)

yes but why would you want to, x forwarding over low bandwidth networks is a total dog.

Improvement? (1)

Xs1t0ry (1247414) | more than 5 years ago | (#26955005)

This is pretty neat. I believe it would be better to have something lighter than KDE, GDM or even LXDE. Maybe dwm, scrotwm or xmonad... something like that. From a practicality standpoint it would be more suited to the comparitively weaker hardware of a mobile device. Not that this seems very practical in the first place!

Developer addition? (1)

rhinokitty (962485) | more than 5 years ago | (#26955111)

Please jump in if I am misinterpreting, but I can't seem to see it any other way. Google offers a developer edition [google.com] of the Android OS for a few extra dollars. It boasts a, "SIM-unlocked and hardware-unlocked device."

If this phone is only available to people who register with the Android Market, doesn't that mean that the regular consumer version is SIM-locked and hardware-locked?

If so, that would make it non-free software [gnu.org] .

VNC not native X (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26955449)

One thing to keep in mind here, this is being viewed over a VNC session. Due to this you don't get 2D nor 3D acceleration... nor accelerated video or codecs.

I'd be much more interested in this if there was a way to replace the Android environment with a proper GNU/Linux environment including an accelerated X server.

(or I'd love to see the alternative, Android running in a window on X...) :)

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