Beta

Slashdot: News for Nerds

×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Microsoft Brings 36 New Features To Windows 7

kdawson posted more than 5 years ago | from the enormous-changes-at-the-last-minute dept.

Windows 509

Barence writes "Microsoft has unveiled a slew of new features that will appear in the Release Candidate of Windows 7 that didn't make an appearance in the beta. 'We've been quite busy for the past two months or so working through all the feedback we've received on Windows 7,' explains Steven Sinofsky, lead engineer for Windows 7 in his blog. A majority of these features are user interface tweaks, but they should add up to a much smoother Windows 7 experience." In separate news, Technologizer reports on Microsoft's contingency plan, should things not go well in EU antitrust, to slip Win7 to January.

cancel ×

509 comments

So.. (4, Insightful)

jerep (794296) | more than 5 years ago | (#27011775)

.. how many of them are actually useful?

Re:So.. (5, Funny)

von_rick (944421) | more than 5 years ago | (#27011821)

Feature 1: It uses kernel 2.6.28.x....

No? Dammit!

Re:So.. (4, Funny)

Hojima (1228978) | more than 5 years ago | (#27012263)

feature number:

1) overpriced marketing and DRM
2) ???
3) profit!

(seriously seems like their advertising campaign is run my underpants gnomes. And their developers too)

Re:So.. (1)

blueZ3 (744446) | more than 5 years ago | (#27012357)

Your personal underpants gnomes?

Re:So.. (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27012685)

Windows 7 has a new feature -- you no longer need to remember website numbers.

Re:So.. (2, Funny)

forgotten_my_nick (802929) | more than 5 years ago | (#27012171)

I just bought a Mac. So clearly the features are useful to someone.

Meh... (4, Interesting)

mcgrew (92797) | more than 5 years ago | (#27012451)

I have TFA open right now.

1. Windows Flip (ALT + TAB) with Aero Peek

Meh... it doesn't sound like a killer feature to me.

2. Windows Logo + keyboard shortcut

OK, I really don't understan this one. hasn't [alt]+ the shortcut worked before? Seems they had this way back in win95, didn't they?

3. Needy State "Needy window" is the internal term we use for a window that requires your attention

Doesn't seem like much to me. YMMV I guess.

4. Taskbar "Open With"

OK, maybe I need more coffee, but I see apps, not documents, in the taskbar.

5. Taskbar scaling

Meh

6. Anchoring taskbar thumbnails

Meh

7. Newly installed programs we don't even allow programs to pin themselves to the taskbar when they are installed. This is a task expressly reserved for the customer

They're finally starting to catch up with Linux here I guess

8. Jump List length

A lot of these seem to be features we should have had ten years ago.

9. Increased pinning flexibility with Jump List
10. Desktop icon and gadget view options

Touch

the next four have to do with touch screens. As the MegaTouch games you see in bars all run Linux, it looks like Windows may be catching up here as well.

15. Internet access feedback The new network experience from the taskbar's notification area makes it much easier to find and connect to networks

I haven't had a home network for quite a while, but I've never had trouble connecting to my work's network.

16. User Account Control

17. Locking a machine without a screensaver

18. Faster access to High Performance power plan

I guess that may help notebook users

19. Custom theme improvements

Bleh

20-27 Windows Media Player

I hate Windows media player. I use WinAamp in windows, XMMS in Linux.

28. Enriching the Device Stage ecosystem

Market-speak for "we're still behind Linux in this but we're trying".

29. Improving the headphone experience

Bug fix

30. Increased audio reliability

Bug fix

The rest have to do with Windows Explorere. Sorry, Microsoft, this isn't enough to make me want to drop a couple hundred dollars for.

Re:So.. (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27012527)

Dunno, but if I didn't know any better, I'd say they're just borrowing things that have already been done on Mac OSX or various flavors of Linux. So they're more along the lines of playing catch-up than anything really new. (New to Windows perhaps, but not anywhere else.)

Whether or not they're useful probably depends on whether the user finds them useful. Some of the desktop navigation shortcuts may be handy if you do a lot of the multitasking. (At least from former Mac experience.)

36 new features, huh? (3, Insightful)

Huntr (951770) | more than 5 years ago | (#27011787)

Let me know when security is one of those features.

Re:36 new features, huh? (1)

GuyverDH (232921) | more than 5 years ago | (#27011825)

The poster (I wouldn't have modded you troll) has a point... Windows (any version) is still the most violated / open to violation operating system out there.

Re:36 new features, huh? (-1, Offtopic)

BadAnalogyGuy (945258) | more than 5 years ago | (#27011891)

So what, are you blaming the woman for being raped?

She was asking for it?

What an incredibly insensitive and bigoted thing to say.

Re:36 new features, huh? (1)

pato101 (851725) | more than 5 years ago | (#27012313)

So what, you tell your children to go walking anywhere, with any one, at any time during the night?

But she really was asking for it (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27012449)

Except Windows (combined with its apps; I mean the overall system, not just the kernel) is like a woman who literally is asking for it, walking around with a sign that says, "please rape me, I'll even help you do it."

It's actually a good analogy. Imagine if a woman acted like Windows. Her behavior would be so outrageous that even the most compassionate person, would say, "Well, she was asking for it." If you don't think she deserved it, then you haven't anthropomorphized Windows' behavior correctly.

Or maybe a better way to put it, if you still can't think of it as "asking for rape," is to say, "ok, it's not rape." It's consensual. A woman walks around naked, except with a sign on that says, "I'll fuck or suck anyone or anything. Nothing is too degrading for me. Your feeble imagination as a wanna-be depraved pervert cannot even begin to cope with my desire to do things that I don't actually desire. Use me. I am not a person." That's Windows for you.

Re:But she really was asking for it (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27012573)

Wow, that's hot.

Re:36 new features, huh? (2, Insightful)

GuyverDH (232921) | more than 5 years ago | (#27011991)

The sad part is, that they think they can sell *protection* with that...

ie - they try to sell you their live onecare service... If they know their operating system is that vulnerable, why not try to *fix* it - and not with some flaky "would you like fries with that? [ yes ] [ no ]" piece of shit system that *all* the end users who allowed crap to be installed in the first place will *always* answer yes to - that just makes things worse.

Re:36 new features, huh? (2, Funny)

lukas84 (912874) | more than 5 years ago | (#27012133)

OneCare has been discontinued. It sucked.

Re:36 new features, huh? (5, Insightful)

Huntr (951770) | more than 5 years ago | (#27012115)

Its kind of funny because I wasn't trolling. Look at those 36 features. They're fine additions, but I'd rather read how MS is spending more time/energy addressing fundamental problems in Windows like security. 8 of those 36 features are about WMP, for god's sake.

Re:36 new features, huh? (2, Insightful)

Zironic (1112127) | more than 5 years ago | (#27012281)

Backwards compatibility makes it impossible to actually solve those security issues. If it stopped being backwards compatible it wouldn't really be windows.

Why? (4, Interesting)

khasim (1285) | more than 5 years ago | (#27012557)

Backwards compatibility makes it impossible to actually solve those security issues.

Why do you say that? I can think of multiple ways to address that issue.

And you don't even address the issue of someone NOT having any of those programs that depend upon the insecure configuration.

#1. Virtual machines for insecure apps.

#2. Load the insecure .dll's only if necessary for an insecure program and then put a notice on the desktop which cannot be removed.

The idea is to move towards a more secure system. Not to keep making excuses.

Re:36 new features, huh? (-1, Troll)

mcgrew (92797) | more than 5 years ago | (#27012625)

It's a +5 insightful now. Looks like at least one MS employee had mod points. Not only do I not see anything related to security, I don't see a whole lot related to performance or useability, either.

Re:36 new features, huh? (5, Insightful)

Colonel Korn (1258968) | more than 5 years ago | (#27012497)

The poster (I wouldn't have modded you troll) has a point... Windows (any version) is still the most violated / open to violation operating system out there.

The security problem isn't easily solvable. The computer illiterate will keep getting infected almost no matter what MS does. Remember from last year's OS hacking competition which we talked about on slashdot that when people are actually targeting each OS, OSX was the most easily violated, and Vista was equivalent to Linux. However, no one targets OSX or Linux because of market share. Argue about details all you want, but with Vista already having been shown empirically to be more secure than OSX yet having basically infinitely higher infection rates than OSX, the solution on the OS side of things is anything but obvious.

Re:36 new features, huh? 2 security items pulled (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27012231)

"Let me know when security is one of those features." - by Huntr (951770) on Friday February 27, @10:08AM (#27011787)

As far as security features you mentioned? Microsoft has PULLED 1 very good one (more in how efficient it can be, as it is in older OS by MS like Windows 2000/XP/Server 2003), & totally removed another - read on:

Thus, I have a question to ask...

Do ANY of you folks have an answer, a GOOD SOLID TECHNICAL answer, as to WHY these cripplings have been implemented in VISTA, Server 2008, & most likely their
descendant, in Windows 7:

----

1.) The removal of being able to use 0 as a blocking IP address in a HOSTS file

(vs. 0.0.0.0 or 127.0.0.1, which are bigger, slower on load into the local DNS Cache (as well as slower flushes via ipconfig /flushdns) & also occupy more RAM once loaded, for NO GOOD REASON - 0 blocks as well as the other 2 do, & is smaller + faster!)

In this case, this happened on 12/09/2008 Microsoft "Patch Tuesday" updates, it wasn't LIKE that before then!

E.G.-> Here, using 0 as my blocking IP address in a FULLY normalized (meaning no repeated entries) HOSTS file with nearly 650,000 bad sites blocked in it, I get a 14++mb sized HOSTS file... using 0.0.0.0 it shoots up to 18++mb in size (& even worse using 127.0.0.1, to around the tune of 24++mb in size)... Here? This is SENSELESS bloat creation as the result!

&

2.) The removal of IP Port Filtering GUI controls for it via Local Network Connections properties "ADVANCED" section

(This is up there w/ when MS removed the GUI checkbox after NT 4.0 for IP Forwarding, only, this time, the difference is (and, it's a PAIN) is that it is NOT a single 1 line entry to hack via regedit.exe, but FAR MORE COMPLEX to do by hand)... Port Filtering is a USEFUL & POWERFUL security (& to a degree, speed also) enhancing feature!

Afaik, on THIS case (vs. #1 above)? It has always been that way in VISTA &/or Windows Server 2008... & not just the result of a Patch Tuesday modification.

----

I posted on Mr. Sinofsky's (?) blog -> http://blogs.msdn.com/e7/archive/2009/02/25/feedback-and-engineering-windows-7.aspx [msdn.com]

AND, I have YET to get a SOLID TECHNICAL ANSWER on those things going on in VISTA, Server 2008, & probably Windows 7 as well, that justify doing so...

(They're things I'd really LIKE to get an answer to, as to WHY Microsoft has done the 2 things in my list above, to the above noted versions of Windows)

Sorry Microsoft - I really like your OS & softwares, but this time? Well - Both of those being done? EXTREMELY STUPID!

APK

P.S.=> Does ANYONE know why these STUPID things were done to the latest/greatest versions of Windows? I don't...

Otherwise, consider this "ammo" you 'anti-microsoft/anti-Windows' *NIX fans here can use, because @ this point? I wouldn't blame you IF you did... & hopefully??

It helps FORCE MS to undo them... because, I will be COMPLETELY FORTHRIGHT about this much: They're 2 reasons I won't upgrade beyond Windows Server 2003... apk

36 new features? meh... (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27011795)

I want to hear about 1 feature being removed...

DRM

Let us know when that's been ripped from the OS, and maybe, just maybe, Microsoft might have a winner. Until then, it's just Vista SP2.

Re:36 new features? meh... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27012009)

I want to play my blu-rays, thank you.

Re:36 new features? meh... (5, Insightful)

kimvette (919543) | more than 5 years ago | (#27012251)

I'd vote for another "feature" to be removed even before DRM: activation. Granted, Activation is DRM but it's specific to Windows registration.

Why?

Activation has not deterred "piracy" (arrr!) in the least; if you visit any torrent site you will see many torrents of "activation cracked" Windows XP and Vista. When I reinstall Windows XP or Vista and need to install updates for testing client projects, I need to activate Windows; This requires a 20-minute call to the Activation hotline each time. This is even with the MSDN version, which allows for 10 concurrent installs on separate workstations (PER subscription - I have three subscriptions, which allows me 30 seats). I should never, ever have to call in to activate Windows for a distribution which is intended to be frequently reinstalled.

Every time I have to call Microsoft about anything, or any time they ever call me, I rip the rep a new one about the activation scheme. I refer them to the torrent sites and pointedly ask them why I should be penalized with this activation scheme when I paid literally THOUSANDS for Microsoft Windows while non-paying ("pirate") users don't encounter any inconvenience at all. I ask them why I should buy genuine Windows when the counterfeit is actually SUPERIOR to the "genuine" product.

I also drop the L-word every time they call me; it is a five-letter word which has Microsoft shaking in their boots. I inform them that Windows only hangs around for Quickbooks, Adobe's creative suite, and for Windows development projects, and that our servers and the workstations for day-to-day productivity run Linux. It's a better solution which requires less downtime (er, "scheduled maintenance windows" in Microsoft-speak - redefining "downtime" is how they boast less downtime in their marketing drivel), requires less resources, and maintenance can be fully automated - and administered remotely via a command line shell. In fact, I have scripts running in nagios to automatically correct many minor faults and warning conditions should they occur.

The reps are usually apologetic but does upper management have ANY clue?

We sell systems with Windows preinstalled - many to the DoD however I flatly refuse to become a Windows OEM. I'd rather pay $10 to $15 more to continue buying from the distributors I'm buying from because the OEM agreement is 100% one-sided. Why should I give Microsoft permission to enter my office at-will? They won't find license violations - they'd probably claim 'patent infringement' however since I run the F/OSS distros I don't have RedHat or Novell covering my back.

My mail server is currently scalix (probably going to switch to Openxchange soon since Scalix has stagnated with Xandros' buying them out - I needed a single support incident but they sell them only in blocks of five - forget Scalix! I dug in and fixed the problem myself, although it probably cost me more time than it was worth).

Microsoft really needs to consider long-term impact of how "anti-piracy" features devalue their products compared to the counterfeit options. and how IT personnel recommendations are going to affect adaptation of their future offerings. Hell, as it is Vista was as close to stillborn as a monopoly OS can get. People buy it only because Worst Buy, Circuit City, etc. did not offer a choice. I've had quite a few customers call me and ask if I can still get Windows XP (Yup! Sure can, and because I didn't ever sign the OEM agreement I can legally purchase OEM Windows and resell it without hardware, per first sale doctrine) and I've UP-graded (not downgraded) them from Vista to XP.

Having said that, I'm ordering a new notebook - either a Dell E6500 or M4400 (the Precision is tempting because of the workstation chipset and I'll still get decent runtime with the power slice!) and it's going to come with Vista Ultimate + Windows XP down^H^H^H^Hupgrade rights. It's more than enough to run Vista well (It should run even better than my desktop workstation runs Vista) but 300GB of the drive will be Linux - XP will be on there for specific client projects and to run a few games Crossover doesn't support. Linux + KDE + Compiz-Fusion FTW!

At most clients when I'm documenting work (network configurations, etc.) and writing scripts I'll be using Linux, and when they see me flip screens (desktop cube) they ask me about the OS and "Is that Vista?" (I run a Vista theme courtesy of Emerald - I don't care what you say about Vista's quality, you have to admit its default theme is pretty) so I give them brief tours of Linux - they're invariably impressed and ask if they can run it on their home systems. Most can't - either industry-specific apps, autocad, or quickbooks ties them firmly to Windows.

Re:36 new features? meh... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27012711)

Activation isn't all bad. My only beef with it is that it limits the functionality of the computer. If it just threw up a nag dialog every so often I think that would be enough. Obviously it does not stop piracy, but it was never designed to. It does, however, help people who have unknowingly had pirated software installed; I try to think of it more along the lines of consumer protection. I mean seriously, have you actually seen the isos and cracks? Many of them are legit, but a few package some kind of malware into the installation. Of course there have been problems with false positives, but nothing is perfect. I think if they got rid of the "reduced functionality" nonsense and just had a nag dialog everything would be fine.

Re:36 new features? meh... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27012289)

Let me know when DRM* can be removed from other operating systems/media players and not have the manufacturer get their ass handed to them in court.

* Such as the DRM on DVDs, BluRays, iTunes format....

In other news... (0, Troll)

janeuner (815461) | more than 5 years ago | (#27011839)

Microsoft announces 36 security patches for zero-day vulnerabilities.

When you beta-test a product, shouldn't you test the complete product?

Re:In other news... (2, Interesting)

kimvette (919543) | more than 5 years ago | (#27012309)

Yes. However, Microsoft has stated that they're in a mad rush to compile and ship Windows Se7en to replaced the failed abortion that Vista is.

Seriously though, what the hell are they thinking? A public beta, minus GUI changes that are not significant, then the general release? That does not live up the standard definition of Beta, certainly not the one endorsed by Microsoft Publications. Do they even glance at the software development model books they publish?

Want more responsive network drive access (5, Insightful)

BadAnalogyGuy (945258) | more than 5 years ago | (#27011845)

Anyone who uses VPN knows the pain of accessing network shares. You go to the server you want, wait while Windows loads all the contents of the folder, click on a folder, wait until Windows loads all the contents of that folder, and so on.

It would be nice if it could let you select an item as it appears in the list, instead of having to wait for the whole folder to be enumerated. It would also be nice if it didn't lock up Explorer when the network is slow.

Re:Want more responsive network drive access (4, Insightful)

Captain Splendid (673276) | more than 5 years ago | (#27012005)

Want more responsive network drive access

Somebody mod parent up please. My Suse box handles network shares better than Windows does and that's just plain stupid.

Re:Want more responsive network drive access (5, Interesting)

MightyYar (622222) | more than 5 years ago | (#27012057)

I'm still on XP... you are saying that not only is this not fixed in Vista, but it's not fixed in 7 either? Yuck. I'm with you... I do a lot of VPN stuff and the responsiveness of the shell during network operations is my biggest beef with XP.

By the way, in the article I had to chuckle a little bit when I got to the graphs at the bottom. Even MS can't make Excel graphs look pretty. They look like the same Excel 5.0 default graphs we've been seeing for 15 years now, only with some translucency and overlaid on a weird rounded rectangular, ugly yellow gradient.

Re:Want more responsive network drive access (3, Informative)

BadAnalogyGuy (945258) | more than 5 years ago | (#27012111)

My PC runs Vista, so I can attest that it is slightly better than XP. At least Vista gives you a visual cue that it is busy and a basic progress bar while it is busy loading the folder contents.

But it still takes a long time and you can't access any of the contents that are displayed until the operation completes.

Re:Want more responsive network drive access (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27012641)

Just use the command line. It will not waste your time and network bandwidth downloading stupid icons, creating thumbnai9ls of every image on the share, making the crappy antivirus(they're all crappy) scan multimeg files needlessly and so on. Fast.

GUIs are overrated.

Re:Want more responsive network drive access (3, Interesting)

kimvette (919543) | more than 5 years ago | (#27012351)

Well, to be fair, Linux is the same way. Well that's not quite true; both nautilus and konqueror will display SOME of the folder contents while it's loading, but only a tiny portion, then freeze as you wait and wait and wait for the rest of the folder contents to load. This isn't a Windows-only flaw; it's a quality inherent in accessing CIFS shares over a slow WAN, regardless of OS or file manager. What WOULD help is if the file managers were fully multithreaded.

Not smart to add features post-beta (5, Insightful)

StuartHankins (1020819) | more than 5 years ago | (#27011855)

Beta is a test phase before rolling your RC and then retail. You don't add features that late in the game, you fix bugs. You fork features into the next release, service pack etc.

Re:Not smart to add features post-beta (4, Insightful)

camg188 (932324) | more than 5 years ago | (#27011949)

Project plan vs. reality. The project plan often doesn't win.

Re:Not smart to add features post-beta (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 5 years ago | (#27012757)

Project plan vs. reality. The project plan often doesn't win.

AKA "Marketing vs. Engineering". Marketing nearly always wins. When Marketing wins, Customers lose.

Re:Not smart to add features post-beta (2, Insightful)

gbarules2999 (1440265) | more than 5 years ago | (#27011971)

Well, the stuff that this article claims is a "feature" is more along the lines of "Changing how windows flash when they pop up" kind of nonsense.

Re:Not smart to add features post-beta (1)

deserted (1422401) | more than 5 years ago | (#27011975)

Since the word "beta" was used to describe the software to be tested, that should disallow any minor feature enhancement? It will probably be close to a year before you can get this software on a PC. Plenty of time to add minor features. I mean, that's what, double the release cycle between Ubuntu releases?

Re:Not smart to add features post-beta (1)

Bill, Shooter of Bul (629286) | more than 5 years ago | (#27011995)

Depends on the scope of the feature and what you consider to be a feature. If user feed back indicates that having a cancel button on a dialog, That really doesn't need to wait for the next release. With out getting into specifics and a through knowledge of the windows code base, its tough to judge.

Re:Not smart to add features post-beta (1)

dnwq (910646) | more than 5 years ago | (#27012003)

Less "beta" and more "it's not WinME/Vista redux, honest!", I guess.

Re:Not smart to add features post-beta (1)

ILikeRed (141848) | more than 5 years ago | (#27012225)

> Less "beta" and more "it's not WinME/Vista redux, honest!", I guess.

Windows 7 is Mojave , not Vista 1.5!

Re:Not smart to add features post-beta (2, Funny)

Dreen (1349993) | more than 5 years ago | (#27012061)

Unless your beta is a PR element

Re:Not smart to add features post-beta (2, Funny)

jo42 (227475) | more than 5 years ago | (#27012107)

More turd polishing is another way to look at it...

Re:Not smart to add features post-beta (1)

Kenshin (43036) | more than 5 years ago | (#27012179)

Aren't you aware? "Release Candidate" has just become a fancy, more "progressive" name for "Beta".

Re:Not smart to add features post-beta (1)

ildon (413912) | more than 5 years ago | (#27012319)

If you actually look at the list, they're more like UI/usability refinements rather than features.

Re:Not smart to add features post-beta (1)

SaDan (81097) | more than 5 years ago | (#27012657)

Who really thought this was a beta? This is just a marketing trick by Microsoft to get people hyped about a "new" OS release.

This is barely a minor update to Vista.

36 features? (0, Troll)

Seriousity (1441391) | more than 5 years ago | (#27011879)

Don't go rushing out to be the first in your neighbourhood to own a copy based on this tripe... Best to wait and see how many of these are anti-features :)

Re:36 features? (1)

Joce640k (829181) | more than 5 years ago | (#27012089)

They fixed the "Messenger isn't annoying enough" problem, that certainly makes it a must-have for me.

mod parent properly (0, Flamebait)

unity100 (970058) | more than 5 years ago | (#27012823)

who is STUPID enough to mod something that is valid for EVERY product & service since the dawn of trade on this planet ?

keep your fanboyism locked up your butt. use your logic and reason while spending mod points.

Correction (1, Funny)

Thelasko (1196535) | more than 5 years ago | (#27011897)

That should say:

Microsoft Brings 36 New Bugs to Windows 7

Fixed it for ya!

Re:Correction (1)

Thelasko (1196535) | more than 5 years ago | (#27012717)

Come on! That was funny! I don't see how the parent post is any more of a troll than the other posts on this story.

Damn.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27011919)

There goes Windows 7 being the first Windows OS to use less resources than it's predecessor. On the plus side you can now enjoy it's use with the added benefit of your desktop performing random 360 spins to prevent boredom.

Oh I hate the needy state (5, Insightful)

rolfwind (528248) | more than 5 years ago | (#27011939)

3. Needy State

"Needy window" is the internal term we use for a window that requires your attention. Since the '90s, the taskbar has always provided some type of visualization to alert the customer to this state such as by flashing the button. A careful balance must be struck between providing information and not irritating the customer. With the new taskbar, we received feedback that Outlook reminders or a Messenger chat sometimes went unnoticed because needy windows were too subtle. For example, Mudassir opened a bug to say "The flashing is not obvious enough to get user's attention. Sometime I don't even notice it. It flashes for a little bit and then stops. If I am away the icon flashes and stops before I come back. The icon is not noticeable." We've made three changes that should address the issue. First, we changed the flashing animation curve to make it more noticeable (from a sine to a sawtooth wave). Second, we used a bolder orange color. Finally, we wanted to double the number of flashes which is currently set to three. As a nod to Windows 7, we decided to go with seven flashes instead.

Oh, in OS X (at least Tiger), I hate this "needy" state of constantly jumping up and down like a student wanting to give an answer. It's usually an app wanting just to be clicked on like it needs attention with absolutely no reason for it. I know way too much of Vista also tends to be needy out of the box pestering you with bullshit. After a few flashes, why don't they just silently invert the colors on the icon or rectangle (or give it a halo or something) on the task bar so that it sits there quietly, STFU, stays still, and lets you get to it in your own time?

Redmond, start the copiers... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27012143)

As a mac owner, I read this list with some surprise. Since nearly all these features have been in mac osx for years I had assumed, incorrectly, that equally polished analogs of them were Already in XP or vista. e.g. things like eye-catching but not annoying bouncing icons that need your attention, usefully short hot lists of recent files, something like expose' for an application switcher...

even linux has had these.

Well redmond has really started the copiers.

by the way, if you find the mac jumping icons insufficiently subtle, then you will find they are much less intrusive when you move the dock to side of the screen and set it to smallish icons using magnification.

Re:Redmond, start the copiers... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27012343)

They had them in some form since Windows 95 or even Windows 3.11, you flamebaiting moron. They improved them now.

Re:Redmond, start the copiers... (1)

Colonel Korn (1258968) | more than 5 years ago | (#27012579)

As a mac owner, I read this list with some surprise. Since nearly all these features have been in mac osx for years I had assumed, incorrectly, that equally polished analogs of them were Already in XP or vista. e.g. things like eye-catching but not annoying bouncing icons that need your attention, usefully short hot lists of recent files, something like expose' for an application switcher...

even linux has had these.

Well redmond has really started the copiers.

by the way, if you find the mac jumping icons insufficiently subtle, then you will find they are much less intrusive when you move the dock to side of the screen and set it to smallish icons using magnification.

All of these features, in the vague terms you describe, have been around since Windows 95. The new implementations mentioned in this post, however, are further streamlined versions. In some cases, they're not as good as the OSX versions. In some cases, they're better. In a lot, they're equivalently good but different.

Re:Oh I hate the needy state (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27012479)

Actually I think they're missing the real right way to do it: check user idle time. If the user has been idle for a while, keep the notification going until you see that they've become active again.

When the user comes back, or is NOT idle, make the notification more obvious but short lived. After that, yes, settle in to a state like you suggested where the app's state is quite obvious but non-distracting.

Re:Oh I hate the needy state (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27012503)

The bouncing icons are a big improvement over the normal mode of operation that Windows applications seem to use; popping up in the middle of the screen and stealing focus from whatever you were working on, thus often resulting in you pressing enter and closing the screen without ever knowing what it was that just popped up.

Re:Oh I hate the needy state (1)

Gldm (600518) | more than 5 years ago | (#27012559)

Wow, you mean MS actually has one up on Apple for once? Needy windows (like new IMs) flash on the taskbar a few times and then become the solid "attention orange" if you ignore them. I only wish the name of the user/title of the window on the taskbar icon would change to reflect which one has updated last, rather that which one I interacted with last (i.e. sometimes it looks like someone has messaged but it's really another user's window in the group). I'm not sure if this falls upon the application (Pidgin, Google Talk) or the OS to update that info, since I don't know if the attention code just needs to be updated to change to the title of the updated window displayed on the taskbar as the representation for a group, or if it's actually the application deciding what to show in the taskbar.

Re:Oh I hate the needy state (2, Interesting)

xouumalperxe (815707) | more than 5 years ago | (#27012707)

Not sure whether Vista or 7 actually do this, but at least from Tiger onwards, OS X provides you with much better alternatives to the bouncing "needy window" metaphor, which is dynamic icons (in fact, I don't think I've seen a bouncing window for anything that doesn't need my attention to continue in a while). Basically, Adium (an instant messenger program) has a duck for an icon, and the duck will flap its wings when you have unread messages. It's quite visible, but doesn't actually exceed the space normally reserved for the icon, and doesn't involve strong palette changes (like blue/orange flashing does), so it's not quite as annoying. Stuff that's even less priority (like e-mail, which doesn't imply real time like IM) can make use of this in subtler even ways. For example, Apple mail's icon gains a red star addition to the icon when you have unread messages, that just stays there with the number of unread messages written on it.

Re:Oh I hate the needy state (1)

Ifandbut (1328775) | more than 5 years ago | (#27012745)

I hope there is a way to turn off the "needy state". If I have 6 different programs running I dont want to be constantly bothered when one of them finishes the task I told it to. If it errored, maybe make a sound but dont sit there flashing saying "I'm done, I'm done please give me something to do".

Mozilla has the biggest problem with it. I tell it to start downloading something then I tab back to web browsing. 5 min later the task bar pops up with a big flashing orange box just to let me know the download is done. Yes, the download is done, that's GREAT! Thank you SO MUCH for interrupting my enjoyment of this YouTube video just to tell me YOU DID WHAT I WANTED YOU TO DO. FINE! I'll click on you once if it will make you happy and GO AWAY.

Re:Oh I hate the needy state (1)

owlnation (858981) | more than 5 years ago | (#27012813)

Yep, Needy State is a killer app for me -- killer, as in "dead to me". While I was never intending to downgrade to Windows 7 from XP, the addition of "needy state" has only stiffened my resolve.

The taskbar is already far too intrusive. So many pointless apps are popping up with messages or status announcements. It's already far, far too intrusive -- and they actually want to make it more so? That's a productivity killer right there.

I'd caution ANY business about using Windows 7 with this feature. It's already hard for most staff to keep focused on productivity with IM or Outlook constantly open. A number of firms instruct staff to only read mails between certain times of the day to maximize productivity as it is.

I can see no reason why there can't be a "silent mode" for everything. Not even Windows update manager, nor antivirus need to pop up with urgent messages and nag you until you deal with them. Nothing needs to do this. It should be possible for competent users to turn off system messages such that they are only shown when chosen. A color change, as the parent suggests, is fine.

Silverlight (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27011981)

I think the whole, big Windows 7 push is to get Silverlight installed on computers.

Some are bug fixes, not new features (2, Informative)

EmbeddedJanitor (597831) | more than 5 years ago | (#27011983)

eg. Improved headphone experience. Fixes a bug or improves an existing feature, but is not a new feature.

But hell, 36 specific features more in an overloaded interface does not improve ease of use for most customers.

Needy state and focus (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27012063)

its been a long time since I did Win32, but I remember when they changed it so applications couldn't "steal" focus from another application if the focused application hadn't seen mouse or keyword activity in X seconds (X configurable through the registry). The number of times the taskbar window flashed was also a configurable registry setting... somehow, though, applications like Outlook could ALWAYS steal focus. I always wondered what API call they used to do that, because I could never find it, and I scoured MSDN.

Now it looks like even their own apps can't steal focus? Good, that used to annoy the shit out of me.

32 new features in the NEW Windows 7 Supreme (5, Funny)

nnnich (1454535) | more than 5 years ago | (#27012105)

36 new features in windows 7:

1.More!
2.New!
3.7!
4.Personalize!
5.Stuff!
6.Things!
7.Easy!
8.Faster!
9.Oh Yeah!
10.An even worse network stack!
11.No Crash! *Cross Fingers*
12.Vista?
13.Improved!
14.Progressive!
15.Compatible!
16.The Newest!
17.More!
18.7!
19.Personalize!
20.Stuff!
21.Needy Windows!
22.Alt+Tab!
23.Screen Savers!
24.Customizationalizeable!
25.Safe! *Cross Fingers*
26.Improving Performance Through Data! (an actual quote!)
27.Keyboard Shortcuts! (Previously not available since Windows 95)
28.7!
29.Even a 4 year old is doing it you idiot!
30.Saves Time!
31.Reduced Confusion with Drag/Drop!
32.More!

boy, I can't wait!

Wait.. (1, Insightful)

abigsmurf (919188) | more than 5 years ago | (#27012117)

This is the daily Microsoft article on Slash Dot... But there's no negative spin! I'm dissapointed, all they had to do was stick in an 'only' and you've changed a positive story into a negative.

This is most troubling!

Re:Wait.. (2, Insightful)

mcgrew (92797) | more than 5 years ago | (#27012737)

But there's no negative spin! I'm dissapointed, all they had to do was stick in an 'only' and you've changed a positive story into a negative.

I dodn't see a lot positive in TFA, and it was written by Microsoft! I can't see anyone wanting to shell out money for any of these new "features". I do see a lot of honest but negative comments modded "troll" though. I guess Redmond gets a lot of mod points.

instinctive habit... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27012135)

Why did I read that headline as if the word features were in quotes?

Re:instinctive habit... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27012453)

Too much time on slashdot makes your ability to read air quotes pick up. Air quotes are an undocumented feature of most modern character sets

MMMmmm (3, Interesting)

ledow (319597) | more than 5 years ago | (#27012139)

I read through this list the other day and the only thing that I thought was:

Still nothing more than a Service Pack.

Seriously, #1 concerns Alt-Tab, ffs. #2 is a shortcut key. #3 is about taskbar windows flashes. #4 is about a shortcut to Open With. #5 is an adjustment to the size of icons. #6 is something to do with thumbnails. #7 is about showing "newly installed programs" in a different way. #8 is about the maximum number of items shown by default in a list. #9 is about file associations. #10 is a GUI change to seperate two types of things.

#11 is about a new gesture. #12 is allowing multi-touch devices to perform... well.. multitouch. #13 is the same. #14 is about text selection. #15 is a GUI change to the way networks are displayed. #16 is about making UAC even more annoying with a tiny (probably one-line) fix. #17 is allowing a machine to be locked without a screensaver specified (woopie-do!). #18 is a GUI change to the way power schemes are displayed. #19 is some tweaks to the way themes are displayed. #20 is an ACTUAL FIX to do with playing Internet radio (because such a task REALLY taxes a modern computer).

#21 is about adding long-established things like SEEKING and playing certain MOV files to media player. #22 is a UI change to "Now Playing" in media player. #23 is a GUI change to the way Media Player shows files that are corrupt/unplayable. #24 is about resuming from sleep properly while playing an audio CD. #25 is about cutting out dialog-overload when you plug in an MP3 player. #26 is about moving some settings/menus around. #27 is a GUI change to "JumpList". #28 is an internal change to the API for providing extra device driver functionality automatically. #29 is about plugging headphones in. #30 is a change to Windows Logo Testing to stop sound drivers being so crap.

#31 is GUI changes to explorer. #32 is the REMOVAL of an ability to drag/drop files into Libraries. #33 is about looking like XP when you see My Computer. #34 is about FAT32 still being supported as a filesystem. #35 is a GUI change. #36 says they actually profiled the users and their OS and "improved Start Menu opening times".

There is still *nothing* on that list worth the price of Windows 7. There is also nothing on that list that a single person with access to the source code couldn't do in a handful of days, except possibly the last one. You are seriously trying to tell me that out of the many thousands of people who tested the Beta, these were the only real problems that they encountered that MS has bothered to fix for the RC? That's the *most* affecting stuff that they needed to fix and shout about on a blog post? You're telling me that all the feedback from testers was about minor GUI changes, shortcut keys and unlikely/rare/pathetic hardware scenarios (like multitouch input devices and resuming a playing Audio CD from sleep?).

And MS wonder why people laugh at them.

Re:MMMmmm (2, Insightful)

faloi (738831) | more than 5 years ago | (#27012297)

You are seriously trying to tell me that out of the many thousands of people who tested the Beta, these were the only real problems that they encountered that MS has bothered to fix for the RC?

I'm not a big fan of MS...but no. What they're seriously trying to get you to believe is that on top of the fixes that are going into the RC, they added a lot of simple fixes and posted about them to attempt to maintain buzz about their new OS.

Re:MMMmmm (0, Troll)

TobyWong (168498) | more than 5 years ago | (#27012337)

MS added a bunch of new features - good for them. Does your enjoyment of life hinge on trashing MS at every available opportunity? If you hate Windows 7 so much then use something else instead. You sound like a bitter ex-girlfriend.

Yeah yeah, mod me down now.

Re:MMMmmm (1)

abigsmurf (919188) | more than 5 years ago | (#27012353)

People laugh at Microsoft because they said they made 36 changes to the beta and they presented a list of 36 changes? Those fiends!

Re:MMMmmm (1)

Kocureq (1191079) | more than 5 years ago | (#27012359)

I would say these are the new features added in post-beta, not bug fixes.

Re:MMMmmm (2, Informative)

ildon (413912) | more than 5 years ago | (#27012377)

Perhaps you missed the first paragraph where it's explicitly stated that it was ONLY a list of UI/usability changes, and specifically ones that were based on user feedback.

I quote:

This blog post talks about a few of the improvements that will be in our Release Candidate (RC) based upon customer feedback. There are many under the hood changes (bug fixes, compatibility fixes, performance improvements, and improvements) across the entire dev team that we just don't have room to discuss here, but we thought you'd enjoy a taste of some changes made by three of our feature teams: Core User Experience, Find & Organize and Devices & Media.

Re:MMMmmm (3, Informative)

A. B3ttik (1344591) | more than 5 years ago | (#27012387)

I am glad that you went ahead and characterized all of the improvements, that's very helpful and I thank you for it.

Thankfully, none of them look like they will require Processes, because when I first saw this article, I immediately thought "Bloat." But these are more "tweaks" than "new functionality."

As for your commentary, I think you're dead wrong. You seem to think that these are the only fixes and improvements that Microsoft is making based on user critique. I'm sure there are thousands, if not millions, of tweaks and bug fixes that they didn't mention. These, on the other hand, are pieces of untested functionality that didn't appear in the Beta _at all_.

Re:MMMmmm (1)

Puffy Director Pants (1242492) | more than 5 years ago | (#27012427)

Dude, nothing on that is list trying to make you pay for Windows 7. Don't confuse a list of things we've done with a list of very important and meaningful stuff.

Not all updates are important ones. Some may not even matter to you.

Re:MMMmmm (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27012545)

lol - the rest of us (other than idiodic mods) are laughing at you. This is the delta between Beta and RC. Not the delta between Vista and Win7. These are just tweaks made on the beta feedback. Leave it to /. to turn "responding to customers" into a bad thing.

Re:MMMmmm (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27012729)

I sent them several reports, each for different things. I told them the version of Windows where it worked well (W2K or XP, usually), what they did wrong in Vista (and why) and then how what they'd done in Win7 was the same or worse and why it should be fixed.

Most of this was related to searching and how they'd made it harder to understand and/or slower to use. Likewise for explorer itself, and system restore (its now really obscure how to create a restore point, no way someone like my father could find out how to do that now - no wonder he has jumped ship to Ubuntu).

And not one of these has been modified (well, its not on that list).

Re:MMMmmm (1)

DevStar (943486) | more than 5 years ago | (#27012829)

You do realize that this is just stuff added since the beta. But here's a better question for you, what would be bigger than a service pack?

Because in Win7 here are some of the features that I think are MUCH bigger than service packs:
1) User mode scheduler
2) A new service controller model
3) Federated search
4) New taskbar
5) Fast window tiling
6) Multitouch support
7) Home group sharing
8) Device stage
9) And just in Media Center: support for ClearQAM, turbo scroll, home media sharing for recording, on screen keyboard, and a fair bit more http://www.missingremote.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=3253&Itemid=1 [missingremote.com] .

And this is just a partial list. You can argue that you don't like the features, but to say that this isn't a full release is just absurd. This is on par with virtually every other major OS release in recent years by any vendor.

Does one of them include (1)

Icegryphon (715550) | more than 5 years ago | (#27012255)

Options to remove things some of us don't use. I.e. in XP Msn messanger removal needs to modifiy C:\windows\inf\sysoc.inf Removal of Outlook Express, Or how about Removal of Internet Exploder? Oh wait, That wont happen any time soon. How about fixing Exploder so it wont lock up as much?

Palette update... (5, Funny)

fahrbot-bot (874524) | more than 5 years ago | (#27012257)

"Blue Screen of Death" now "Azure Notice of Discomfort" in preparation for new cloud [microsoft.com] computing initiatives.

tweak != Feature (1, Insightful)

gnalre (323830) | more than 5 years ago | (#27012301)

Nuff said.

Native Quicktime support! (5, Informative)

VMaN (164134) | more than 5 years ago | (#27012317)

Apparently quicktime will be supported natively.... So that's about 4 fewer processes running on the standard install (quicktime agent/quicktime update/"quicktime install safari and set as default browser for my friends and family who are conditioned to press "yes" to remove dialog boxes - agent")

yay MS, this is years overdue :D

Reminds me of Apple (1)

UnknowingFool (672806) | more than 5 years ago | (#27012397)

Although every OS X does have advantages over the last version, Apple does stretch things a bit when they say "200 new features" in the latest OS X. There are maybe a dozen really cool new features while they others are tweaking the way OS X did something.

I guess MS just has to keep up with the PR about Windows 7 and the constant "don't pay attention to the man behind the curtain" releases to make the public forget about Vista.

Re:Reminds me of Apple (1)

Colonel Korn (1258968) | more than 5 years ago | (#27012673)

Although every OS X does have advantages over the last version, Apple does stretch things a bit when they say "200 new features" in the latest OS X. There are maybe a dozen really cool new features while they others are tweaking the way OS X did something.

I guess MS just has to keep up with the PR about Windows 7 and the constant "don't pay attention to the man behind the curtain" releases to make the public forget about Vista.

Uh, MS didn't say these were new features. Only the OP did. These are 36 "Some Changes Since Beta for the RC" specifically in the UI and made because of user feedback (that thing that Apple replaces with the RDF). There are a couple thousand other changes/fixes since the beta not in the UI and not based on user feedback, too. They're also not touted as "features."

Wow, they actually fixed mine! (3, Interesting)

Gldm (600518) | more than 5 years ago | (#27012435)

Here's my most frequently bitched about UI complaint:

18. Faster access to High Performance power plan

Clicking on the battery flout from the taskbar notification area offers two different power plans: Balanced and Power saver. Windows 7 laptops are configured by default to use the Balanced plan since this setting best balances a good experience while promoting more environmentally friendly power use. However, some customers tell us they want to be able to quickly toggle between Balanced and High Performance (yet another power plan). Weâ(TM)ve taken a change to now show the latter in the flyout menu when it is enabled under the Power Options Control Panel.

This has been perhaps my biggest complaint (which goes to show you something) about Win7 beta on my laptop (Acer Aspire 6930). It takes 2 clicks to switch from high performance or power saver to balanced. But to switch from high performance to power saver or vice-versa takes 5. For no good reason. It involves clicking the taskbar icon, opening a window for "more power options", clicking "show additional plans" despite ample room to show the third plan, clicking the selection button, then closing the window. 5 clicks vs 2, because we can't handle a third power choice? I'm glad someone is awake over there.

And here's probably my second most bitched about UI complaint:

33. Reviving familiar entry points

Mando writes, âoeIn Win7 the Win+E shortcut opens an explorer window but the path is âoeLibrariesâ instead (which isnâ(TM)t where I want to go most of the time). Is there a way to configure the target folder of âoeWin+Eâ or is there an alternate shortcut that will get me to the âoeComputerâ path like it did in Vista?â RC reverts the behavior and now the shortcut will launch the âoeComputerâ Explorer. Also, we changed the link in Start Menu -> Username to match the Vista behavior.

And bonus, here's my most bitched about hardware support complaint, which I mentioned in another slashdot thread a couple days ago [slashdot.org] :

29. Improving the headphone experience

Customers informed us that sometimes their audio streams did not properly move from the default speakers to their headphones. The fix required an update to the algorithm we use to detect new devices. In RC the transition works more reliably.

Most of the rest of the stuff sounds pretty good too. I'll admit I've been a bit skeptical about this whole pinning things on taskbar which is now also the quicklaunch at the same time type deal. Mostly because I'm used to all my quicklaunch apps being on the left and not having to hunt between open apps to launch a new one. But that win-# shortcut sounds like it will justify the whole deal for me, so I will withdraw my complaint on it pending testing of that feature.

Re:Wow, they actually fixed mine! (0, Flamebait)

AndrewNeo (979708) | more than 5 years ago | (#27012779)

A lot of slashdotters are complaining (surprise) but they probably never tried the Windows 7 beta, either. These aren't 'new features', they're what's improving in the RC over the beta. I've been running the beta on my laptop and I'm rather happy about most of these changes.

These are *NEW* features ? ? (1)

cheap.computer (1036494) | more than 5 years ago | (#27012469)

I am surprised that these are listed as *new* features, I must admit the last windows I used was W95, so I have lost track of what windows can do. But what is listed as *new* is pretty standard on other operating systems I have used.

Dont fall for this (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27012599)

Its 1993 versions behind Windows 2000, which itself is pretty old. Better stick with what you have!

They're NOT slipping anything... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27012603)

...because they have never *officially* announced a release date. Clue deficit again.

ISO Mounting? (5, Interesting)

nlawalker (804108) | more than 5 years ago | (#27012651)

This is great, but I still don't see ISO mounting, which (as far as I know) has been asked for repeatedly by power users everywhere, and is one of (if not *the*) top request on Connect.

Filter content rather than support it?! (3, Interesting)

ifrag (984323) | more than 5 years ago | (#27012663)

23. Filtering content that cannot be played

Media Player's library view is designed to surface and showcase one's content. However, in some cases items were displayed that couldn't be played. For example, Apple's lossless .M4A or .H263 MPEG-4 content would be shown in a library even though Media Player could not play them. In RC, this content will no longer appear in the library view so that there is better expectation of what is supported by the player.

Here's a thought, why not instead of filtering out content Windows cannot deal with just support playback of the format?! These formats are not exactly on the fringe here. The way it's being dealt with is as surprising as the fact they are not supported.

The Flight Sim crew are aboard, huh (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27012675)

It's quite obvious, with Aero and all the other non-sense, the Flight Sim team has been folded into Win7.

Thanks MS. Take the one cool thing you had a lock on, and destroy it. I was keeping my boot camp partition around for FS11. At least I can have my 25g back. Effers.

I wonder if one of the features.... (1)

roc97007 (608802) | more than 5 years ago | (#27012691)

...is bytes-per-second network transfers. :-)

Seriously, this is a little suspicious. That's at least 36 features that weren't beta tested. I ran the beta for a few weeks, and thought it was pretty solid; was actually considering adopting Windows 7 (having decided to skip Vista). Now I'm worried. More worried, I mean. If these are new features and not just last minute fixes, at least some of them won't be usable until the first service pack, if past history is any indication.

Oh well, it's not like XP is suddenly going to stop working.

Here they are : (2, Funny)

unity100 (970058) | more than 5 years ago | (#27012741)

1 - Warner Bros DRM

2 - Disney DRM

3 - Sony BMG DRM

4 - Universal Music DRM

5 - Stronger Warner Bros DRM

6 - More Powerful Disney DRM

7 - Catch-All Sony BMG DRM

8 - No shit Universal Music DRM

9 - You aint seen nothing yet DRM

10 - All your computer belong to us DRM

why, but these are fantastic features !

Win7 ripping off Ninnle! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27012837)

I'm starting to think that Micro$oft is deliberately pirating Ninnle Linux for so many of their ideas. Take a look at the Win7 desktop...it's a dead rinnger for NinWM. Same with the latest incarnation of MS Office...straight from Ninnle Office. So many other things look like near duplicates. Yet Ninnle Labs hasn't given any authorization of licensing to M$ for any of it. I suspect Gates, Ballmer and Co are up to their usual trickery...
Load More Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...