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Obama Stimulus Pours Millions Into Cyber Security

CmdrTaco posted more than 5 years ago | from the because-they-need-it dept.

Government 156

nandemoari writes "As his administration continues to work on a stimulus plan that can save America's economy, Obama's latest course of action will see millions of dollars being allocated to heighten cyber security. The move will assist government officials in preventing future attacks on the United States. The President recently addressed his 2010 budget, outlining funding plans that will grant the Department of Homeland Security $355 million to secure the nation's most essential computer systems. The money will be spent on both government and private groups, with much of the funding going to the National Cyber Security Division and the Comprehensive National Cyber Security Initiative programs."

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Frist (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27040625)

"The money will be spent on both government and private groups, with much of the funding going to the National Cyber Security Division and the Comprehensive National Cyber Security Initiative programs."

In other words, millions of your tax dollars will be spent paying glorified security guards to sit on P2p networks all day looking for copyright infringers and kiddy porn. As if the FBI needed any competition. What, did you think they were actually saving America from terrorists?

Re:Frist (4, Insightful)

BigHungryJoe (737554) | more than 5 years ago | (#27040759)

Here is my problem with the p2p babysitting -

what guidelines will they be using to determine what is child porn and what is not?

Some of the recent "child model" busts seem to be pushing the limit of what can be called "child porn". It's almost as if they're widening the definition of child porn so they'll have more people to bust.

Re:Frist (4, Interesting)

Shakrai (717556) | more than 5 years ago | (#27040825)

It's almost as if they're widening the definition of child porn so they'll have more people to bust.

Call me cynical but I don't think they care about having "more people" to bust. The Man isn't out to get us. The Man is out to generate splashy headlines and get elected to higher office. Nothing generates splasher headlines than "Think of the Children!"

Re:Frist (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27041135)

I wouldn't call you cynical for that viewpoint, I'd call you naive.

Of course the "Man" is looking for more people to bust - law enforcement is a huge industry worth billions of dollars, and like all industries, it is seeking to grow itself. And in law enforcement, how do you grow your market and secure jobs? You create more criminals.

Re:Frist (3, Interesting)

Hojima (1228978) | more than 5 years ago | (#27042093)

Did any of you even read the summary? Does anyone here even know the jurisdiction of the department of homeland security? Just to clarify something for any of you presumptuous douche bags, this has to do with the Slashdot articles that you have read (assuming you've even looked at the title) that involve China and highly sensitive US data gone missing. This is to protect that data and any intrusion that could happen in the future. Quite frankly, it's embarrassing that anyone managed to get a hold of that data, and it better not happen on this president's watch.

Re:Frist (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27042203)

Oh great, another "Clinton sold secrets to Red-China" conservative crackpot.

Re:Frist (4, Interesting)

Ethanol-fueled (1125189) | more than 5 years ago | (#27041221)

Call me cynical but I don't think they care about having "more people" to bust.

I disagree with that point.

They're obviously not catching a lot of terrorists so they need other numbers to justify their budget. They get their numbers by picking the low-hanging fruit after broadening the definition of "low-hanging" fruit, especially if it goes "across state lines", which almost all internet traffic does.

"The Man is out to generate splashy headlines and get elected to higher office. Nothing generates splasher headlines than "Think of the Children!"

True, and it's convenient for both law enforcement seeking bigger budgets and politicians seeking advancement. It's not convenient for your 16 year old son or daughter who has to register as a sex offender for life because they stored nekkid pics of themselves on their cell phone or computer.

Re:Frist (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27041325)

Nothing generates splasher headlines than "Think of the Children!"

I thought the whole problem was caused by thinking about the children.

Re:Frist (2)

ShieldW0lf (601553) | more than 5 years ago | (#27040913)

They're attempting to secure the economic systems and the critical infrastructure around that so they can maintain and increase the inequality between the rich and the poor without losing control of the citizenry.

We need a meltdown, and the only reason he's there is to prevent it.

MOD PARENT DOWN (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27041093)

Once again, ShieldWolf is being gay with replying to an off-topic first poster. ShieldWolf, I am watching you and will never give up on this. Replying to a FP in an attempt to gain karma is a lousy idea. Sorry.

Re:Frist (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27041425)

Nope, he's just doing what black men do best (asking for money), and what politicians do best (pissing it away).

Re:Frist (1)

Tuoqui (1091447) | more than 5 years ago | (#27041047)

In other words...

They're going to spend millions of dollars on some new routers and STILL leave critical systems connected to the internet or systems which can access critical systems leaving them vulnerable to cyber attack despite any increased security.

Like they say about corporate networks. Tough on the outside, gooey on the inside. That's exactly whats going to happen with this 'stimulus'

Re:Frist (5, Informative)

Zero__Kelvin (151819) | more than 5 years ago | (#27041211)

The fact that this has been modded to +5 is prima facia evidence that Slashdot has gone way down hill. Simply googling National Cyber Security Division will show that they are behind US-CERT [wikipedia.org] . While they are not to be confused with CERT, but they do have the same stated objectives. Computer Emergency Response Teams are the bedrock of Computer Security. They don't monitor Internet traffic, they identify security issues and offer solutions. Taking the recent Obama Helicopter P2P fiasco as an example, they would point out that running P2P without verifying the Sharing settings are not exposing your whole system is a Bad Thing(tm).

In other news, "The People's Cube"... (5, Interesting)

tcopeland (32225) | more than 5 years ago | (#27040671)

...announces the Hope'N'Change Operating System [thepeoplescube.com] . "Only 30% chance of crashing!"

Re:In other news, "The People's Cube"... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27040955)

One Big Ass Mistake, America.

Operation: Teabag Obama

Send Obama two tea bags. Mail two unused tea bags to 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue on April 15th and tea bag the Marxist Wealth Redistributor!


OBAMA SUCKS

MOD PARENT UP (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27041095)

Since when did the truth become Flamebait? Pussies.

Re:MOD PARENT UP (0, Troll)

irishdaze (839248) | more than 5 years ago | (#27041899)

His truth became Flamebait the second he posted it as a cowherder.

Re:In other news, "The People's Cube"... (1)

Zero__Kelvin (151819) | more than 5 years ago | (#27041017)

"...announces the Hope'N'Change Operating System. "Only 30% chance of crashing!""

It is obviously another Mojave experiment [mojaveexperiment.com] ;-)

I know, right? (-1, Troll)

copponex (13876) | more than 5 years ago | (#27041139)

Obama should cut taxes for millionaires and take away basic rights like due process if he wants any real support. I mean, he has the support of 65% of Americans, but not the richest ones.

Aww, boo...

Re:I know, right? (4, Insightful)

TheUglyAmerican (767829) | more than 5 years ago | (#27042181)

This is not a democracy. It is a republic. You should learn the difference before you end up with neither.

Re:I know, right? (-1, Troll)

copponex (13876) | more than 5 years ago | (#27042379)

Awww. False dichotomy win?

Palin/Romney 2012! I'll take leaders who believe that the earth is 6,000 years old for $200, Alex.

Re:I know, right? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27042579)

Awww. False dichotomy win?

Palin/Romney 2012! I'll take leaders who believe that the earth is 6,000 years old for $200, Alex.

The sad thing is, you probably really believe what you just posted is actually true.

Because it sure isn't like news media to deliberately paint an inaccurate picture of any candidate, now is it?

Or are you too brain-addled to remember "fake-but-accurate"?

And FWIW, I'd rather have someone in charge who believes wrongly about irrelevant things like how old the Earth is than some pandering twit who things he can tax and spend his way out of a recession despite all evidence to the contrary.

Re:I know, right? (1)

TheUglyAmerican (767829) | more than 5 years ago | (#27042729)

Your bigotry does not disguise the fact that you cannot explain the difference between a republic and democracy. Actually I think Obama is a good thing for America. Each generation needs to learn how vacuous his ideals are. Too many today were not around while Carter was president so the lessons need to be learned again. So let's get this out of our system so we can get back to the idea that growth and prosperity are driven by PEOPLE pursuing "self interest rightly understood." (Dazzle me copponex by telling me where that quote is from.)

Re:I know, right? (2, Informative)

MinistryOfTruthiness (1396923) | more than 5 years ago | (#27043121)

I was at first really upset by all the brain-dead people out there considering themselves so enlightened by voting for this guy because he was "the intelligent choice." It's amazing how easily manipulated by corporate interests these people were.

Think about it: Who, in his first month, has quadrupled the national deficit and keeps pushing for more -- most of which is being funneled to rich Liberals on Wall Street. (I work there, and believe me, most of New York -- Wall Street included -- are liberal Democrats and socialists. Don't believe me? Just try to hold a conversation with these people and espouse fiscal conservative ideals. Traders might be more libertarian, but most of the rest are socialist.) In fact, Wall Street was one of the biggest donors to Obama's inauguration.

I swear, liberals are some of the worst critical thinkers on the planet. Just gobble it up.

Look, everyone is saying "He's only been there a month - can't turn it around that fast - etc, etc." but the fact is that he's not only not slowing the spiral, he's making it worse by spending like a drunken sailor, selling ill-conceived Congressional spending bills, nominating corrupt cabinet officials and the "genius" Geithner who can't seem to come up with a plan that makes any sense at all.

Re:Let me be the first to ask... (1)

steelfood (895457) | more than 5 years ago | (#27041809)

...but does it run on Linux?

Is this I or G? (1)

BadAnalogyGuy (945258) | more than 5 years ago | (#27040693)

Consider that C is shrinking, so in order to balance Y, G must be increased. However, one side effect of G is that such spending becomes a longterm part of the equation. However, if we consider the G to be at least in part I in this case, we can see that there will be positive feedback due to the return on I.

I'd even go so far as to say that the entire stimulus is a massive increase in I masquerading as an increase in G. If this is true, then we may be out of the woods in just a few years.

Re:Is this I or G? (1)

Vectronic (1221470) | more than 5 years ago | (#27040843)

I, dunno what u talkin bout G.

Re:Is this I or G? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27040909)

It may come as a surprise to you, but there are, in fact, more ideas than there are letters. And if you didn't just read your high school economics book, the meanings of these letters won't be clear.

Re:Is this I or G? (1)

bondjamesbond (99019) | more than 5 years ago | (#27040977)

AIG, otoh, is getting billions more. There is no balance.

Re:Is this I or G? (2, Insightful)

DriedClexler (814907) | more than 5 years ago | (#27041489)

Well, thanks, BadAnalogyGuy, for demonstrating exactly what's wrong with mainstream macroeconomic thought these days.

In case anyone didn't understand all that, he's referring to the infamous "GDP equation" that "gross domestic product", a poor attempt at capturing the total value of goods and services produced in an economy each year, is equal to:

Consumption (C) + Investment (I) + Government purchases (G) + net imports (X - M)

I don't know what he's using to mean Y, but I think he's referring to the rewrite of the equation that puts it as:

C + I + X - M - Y = GDP - (G + B)

where Y is net private savings and B is net government borrowing. That's how they derive the misleading identity that "net private savings equals government borrowing".

I used to see GDP as "imperfect, but a good appoximation of economic health, once you understand its limitations". Now I see mainstream macroeconomics taking its imperfections and amplifying them to the point of bad policy. They're so concerned about getting government-recorded spending to show up that they completely ignore whether that spending is actually producing anything of value. If people wisely move, in some area, to a more efficient "bartering of services", such as a babysitting co-op, that shows up as a sharp drop in consumption and thus GDP, yet has made everyone involved much better off. Add up imperfections like these, and you get a bunch of economics advocating the zombification of the economy by propping up obsolete businesses and business models, forever delaying meaningful recovery.

Re:Is this I or G? (1)

im_thatoneguy (819432) | more than 5 years ago | (#27042927)

Co-ops are largely untaxable. Why would we want to record that sort of financial exchange? ;)

Facts on Cyber Security: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27040707)

Gaius Baltar is a Java programmer.

Good. (1, Interesting)

slimjim8094 (941042) | more than 5 years ago | (#27040721)

Aside from the obvious benefit of security (see the earlier story re: idiots sharing blueprints on p2p), this will also help stimulate the economy.

I'm no huge fan of Obama, especially with the RIAA lawyers and the wiretapping thing, but spending money is the right idea here. The government is the only entity who can spend money here, so they need to spend it. That's Keynesian economic theory, and it's probably the best theory we have (at least, it's been tested).

The idea is: save money when the market's good, like Clinton managed. Then spend it when the market's bad.

The idea is, any spending is good. Including that grass at the Capitol. And spending it on us nerds helps the tech. industry across the board.

Re:Good. (4, Informative)

Ogive17 (691899) | more than 5 years ago | (#27040851)

If it creates a bunch of jobs, then it's good. if it's just throwing money at the problem, then it's bad. The spending bill should be separate from the stimulus bill, and that's what the Republicans have been griping about. There's a lot of money going to programs that need the money, but should not be on the stimulus plan.

Re:Good. (5, Insightful)

A. B3ttik (1344591) | more than 5 years ago | (#27041621)

Contrary to popular opinion, "creating Jobs" is not always good and is not always entirely different from "throwing money at the problem." "Creating Jobs" only helps when the jobs are useful and produce something else of value.

I don't know anything about how cost effective the Hoover Dam or various bridges and public works projects have been in the past, but assuming that they _were_ cost effective, these are examples where "Creating Jobs" is a good thing that stimulates the economy in a good way, because it not only gives people money to spend, but it adds overall value to the system. The Hoover Dam added irrigation, water supply, and power, while bridges add lower transportation costs.

On the other hand, paying someone to sit like a night watchmen on P2P Networks or paying someone to replace the White House Carpet or repaint the ceilings doesn't really help anyone because nothing of value is being created. You're just shuffling money around, and its really no different economy-wise than just _giving away_ the money. People are going to spend it either way.

This isn't to say I don't support re-carpeting or re-painting the White House if it needs it, I am merely saying that the catch-phrase "creating jobs" doesn't do the system any good unless the jobs are worth doing.

Re:Good. (2, Interesting)

triffid_98 (899609) | more than 5 years ago | (#27041961)

You mean like the trolls at the airport with the impressive looking Homeland Security badges?

Contrary to popular opinion, "creating Jobs" is not always good and is not always entirely different from "throwing money at the problem." "Creating Jobs" only helps when the jobs are useful and produce something else of value.

Re:Good. (1)

rts008 (812749) | more than 5 years ago | (#27042079)

Excellent post!

There is no long term benefit to 'creating jobs' that are not able to be self-sustaining(or readily transferable to another project) in a reasonable time frame.
As you said:

Contrary to popular opinion, "creating Jobs" is not always good and is not always entirely different from "throwing money at the problem." "Creating Jobs" only helps when the jobs are useful and produce something else of value.

I know I don't have all of the answers, but some specifics are not too difficult to grasp.

Re:Good. (2, Insightful)

Lumpy (12016) | more than 5 years ago | (#27041801)

Why is everyone believing that "creating" a bunch of temporary jobs is good?

They are just throwing money around with hopes that it will do something. It wont. If it creates 30,000 jobs that last for 1 year it's simply going to cause a secondary aftershock in the economy.

Spend the money to create permanent real solutions instead of this, "OMG!OMG! hurry spend money! HURRY!" thing they are doing now

I personally wished they would have not even voted on the damn thing until May and took the time to make it right. They rush this crap and then it always ends up a half assed cluster fornication that does nothing for anyone but a bunch of in people that helped pen the damned thing.

Plus the Republicans are as bad as the Dems on this, both sides have thrown in bullshit riders on the bill to turn it into a money-grab for pet interests. I so wish the president had line item veto so he could strike off all the crap that rides on things like this.

Create a real IT-CERT system that has real experts not some useless CIO or CTO and let them advise the country on IT needs. Kind of like the Surgeon General. But an IT-General that actually has degrees and active knowledge in IT and CS.

Re:Good. (1)

jcnnghm (538570) | more than 5 years ago | (#27043185)

Plus the Republicans are as bad as the Dems on this, both sides have thrown in bullshit riders on the bill to turn it into a money-grab for pet interests.

Only 3 RINO Republicans in the entire congress voted for this. Not a single house Republican had anything to do with it. The house minority leader [youtube.com] threw the bill and criticized the congress for not having even taken the time to read the damn thing.

This bill is as partisan as it gets. The Republicans had practically nothing to do with this mess, and opposed it every step of the way. You can't sit back and say that the Republicans are just as bad as the Democrats, when only three even voted for it.

Re:Good. (3, Interesting)

Straif (172656) | more than 5 years ago | (#27041045)

The government is a very inefficient way to create jobs and most jobs it creates are temporary at best. At worst they can create an artifical job market that when the projects are completed, leads to higher unemployment as people are now trained for jobs that no longer exist.

Buying your way out of a recession, as many, if not most, ecomomist have come forward and said, at best leads to a temporary bump but will more than likely lead to an extended downturn in the economy. Spending like a drunken sailor on shore leave is no way to stimulate the economy; it's just a way to ensure a huge debt load.

That's not to say the government shouldn't play a huge role in the recovery, but they should be background players, creating oppourtunities for small businesses to grow (lower taxes on small/independant business, job grants, etc...).

And as for Keynesian economic theory. It was Keynes himself who suggested that Hoover's tax increases (much the same as Obama's proposed corporate and income tax increase) actually signifigantly lengthened the depression.

Re:Good. (2, Interesting)

korbin_dallas (783372) | more than 5 years ago | (#27042193)

Um, so do you REALLY think that Obama and ilk DON'T KNOW THAT???

Of course they know that. What better way to solidify power and wealth that to continue the problem? The stimulus bill was the perfect way to embed cool stuff like Electronic Medical Records (which was the real goal) the enable more government. Not to mention gaining 36% of Citibank.

Problem is this however, IF you let the economic pain go on too long, people are liable to start screaming for your beheading on public TV. Ukraine today is on the verge of major riots, they want ALL of their government and banks exiled.

Thialand wants the same thing last week. They had the best quote of the week: "This government is full of robbers!"

So in 18 months they will reimplement Reaganomics (and call it something else, Pelosiomics?).

Re:Good. (1)

vertinox (846076) | more than 5 years ago | (#27043093)

And as for Keynesian economic theory. It was Keynes himself who suggested that Hoover's tax increases (much the same as Obama's proposed corporate and income tax increase) actually signifigantly lengthened the depression.

Of course taxes increased the length of the depression, because taxes cause deflation by taking money out of the supply.

However, simply cutting taxes would not have fixed the depression.

The problem was a lack of credit and liquidity in order to make people do something with their money. If you had money during the 1930's, chances are you are sitting on it on your mattress or someplace other than a bank.

If it is doing that, instead of being in a bank, it can't be used to give out a loan by the bank and the economy does not move.

Secondly, even if you are willing to put your money in a bank (after they instituted FDIC guarantees), you may be in the large percentage of Americans who did not have an income.

So without government spending there was really no one willing to pay people in which they in turned put it in a bank or put it directly back into the economy with goods and services purchased.

So, the depression was and primarily caused by the collapse of credit and faith in banking which we are seeing now.

The only way to counteract is sadly, inflation. Like it or not, the money supply has to be increased and people have to be forced not so save their money. Sounds strange, but if everyone did sit on their money and not do anything with it, then no one would do anything for each other.

The end goal of capitalism is to have people do and make things for others This is a two way street and someone has to spend money. If people and businesses aren't, then only government spending will resolve it.

I don't like the idea either, but the current system is too far gone to socialism that you can't simply implement a laissez faire at this point because the system currently requires government intervention or would face a complete meltdown.

The GDP of the USA is currently about 40% government spending so you can just say "tonight we stop government spending!" or we would face tantamount revolution and failure of our economy.

So rather than argue "no at every turn" you must suggest that we encourage a gradual change during a time of non-crisis.

Re:Good. (1)

vertinox (846076) | more than 5 years ago | (#27043115)

I would like to add...

"Capitalism is a polite way of getting people to do things voluntarily without forcing them."

Without the "getting to do things" part, then capitalism is a big as failure as communism.

Obama's Excellent Bankruptcy Plan, +4, Helpful (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27040737)

is to continue the expenditure of U.S. federal dollars on military [ourfuture.org]
fiascos.

Good luck in the Gulag.

Yours In Communism,
Kilgore Trout

Here's an idea... (2, Insightful)

sunking2 (521698) | more than 5 years ago | (#27040745)

How about stimulating jobs that actually produce something that others might want? Oh wait, we don't do that anymore so the best we can do is deficit spend and divy out the money to a bunch of service industries. Might as well just allocate $500 million for the waitresses and valets parking stimulus.

Re:Here's an idea... (4, Funny)

tcopeland (32225) | more than 5 years ago | (#27040811)

> How about stimulating jobs that actually produce something that others might want?

Fool! You've got it all wrong! I refer you to Iowahawk's Memo to America's Irresponsible Tea Party Whiners: STFU [typepad.com] . A sample:

The most ludicrous aspect of these protesters is their utter lack of understanding that the mortgage bailout benefits everyone - even them. Let me explain to these unpatriotic whiners how the economy works: The money that government is now wisely investing in our mortgage system will free up billions of extra dollars in spending by Americans like me, which will directly create jobs. For you economic illiterates, this is what experts call the "multiplier effect."

For example, now that my mortgage worries are over, I was able to afford the down payment on a sweet new jet ski, directly creating jobs at Coralville Kawasaki. I also purchased a few items from my friend and local small business entrepreneur Randy Hansgard. Randy used that money to make high tech capital improvements in his business, like new grow-lights and an Ohaus 3-beam electronic scale. After I wrecked the jet ski, this created jobs at the Coralville Kawasaki service department. I also splurged by sending Linda a thoughtful Jenny Craig gift certificate with my partial January mortgage payment, because she's really been packing on the pounds lately.

See how it works? Now, go pay more taxes!

Re:Here's an idea... (3, Informative)

sunking2 (521698) | more than 5 years ago | (#27040881)

Oh, now I see! What we really need and just about everyone would support is the Jenny Craig stimulus! We could lump it under "beach beautifcation" or something.

Re:Here's an idea... (1)

clickety6 (141178) | more than 5 years ago | (#27041167)

the Jenny Craig stimulus!

Well, I heard Obama was all for trimming the pork !

Re:Here's an idea... (1)

sunking2 (521698) | more than 5 years ago | (#27041337)

I think he was refering to his wife's ass though.

Re:Here's an idea... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27041583)

Bwahaha! Fantastic link. I'm especially amused at how all the True Believers on Slashdot have modded you "Insightful" because they don't realize they're being mocked. A choice quote from the article that'll ensure this comment stays at 0:

That's why I have a message for you America-hating, bailout-protesting morons: put down the tea, and have a nice steaming hot cup of STFU. Instead of whining about your past mortgage paying mistakes [that is, paying your mortgage -ed], start focusing on the future. Because let's face it - another bailout gravy train is coming down the tracks and tickets are limited. Continuing your same irresponsible behavior only creates a moral hazard, endangers the recovery, and screws up a good thing for the rest of us in the job creation sector.

And speaking of morals, let's all remember the moral of "The Ant and the Grasshopper." That frugal food-saving ant can bitch all he wants about the lazy grasshopper. But it won't matter when summer's over and the grasshopper plague comes to town.

Is it too soon for .... (1)

zappepcs (820751) | more than 5 years ago | (#27040873)

"Router to nowhere" jokes? or should that be "Layer 3 switch to nowhere" I can't decide, but in view of the Psion news, we should remember that "bridge to nowhere" has already been taken.

BTW: Anyone know where to _BUY_ a Psion Netbook?

Re:Is it too soon for .... (1)

Tuoqui (1091447) | more than 5 years ago | (#27041705)

Regardless it's still a Layer 8 problem.

What needs funding? (2, Insightful)

kaaona (252061) | more than 5 years ago | (#27040761)

I'm curious to know what critical cyber security projects or activities are "shovel ready" and awaiting funding...

Re:What needs funding? (1)

Hordeking (1237940) | more than 5 years ago | (#27040999)

I'm curious to know what critical cyber security projects or activities are "shovel ready" and awaiting funding...

Hopefully, "shovel-ready" means those projects are ready to be dead and buried, for a change.

Hot damn! What *else* can we all get for FREE!!!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27040781)

My God, what were we all thinking!

We could have had all this FREE STUFF years ago!

HERE'S TO HOPE AND CHANGE!!!!!

The mission, the people... (5, Interesting)

GPLDAN (732269) | more than 5 years ago | (#27040813)

Obama's campaign was approached in the fall of 2008 by the NSA, to let him and Axelrod know that either the Chinese or the Russians hacked his campaign systems.

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/world/us_and_americas/us_elections/article5105027.ece [timesonline.co.uk]

So, he knows what he's up against. If you run any sort of port knocker or ssh logging at a target IP range, you know that near round the clock brute forcing is going on by Chinese networks. They now are distributing the problem into botnets to prevent being blackholed, but they continue at it.

Obama has Janet Napolitano to run this group. They will work with US-CERT, but their mandate should be defense, not offense. They could start by approaching the US Tier-1 providers and saying, in essence, we want to use tools from companies like Arbor Networks and others that track botnets to isolate better signatures and reject them at the national perimeter, sort of an IDP at the edge of major networks.

The NSA probably has access to all domestic US websites encryption keys, at least the ones that come from Verisign. So, inspect all encrypted traffic headed back to Chinese networks, on any port. If you can't decrypt it, consider it hostile. Shunt it.

I may get modded down as flamebait, probably by Chinese slashdot readers - but the fact is, we are at war with the Chinese.

MOD PARENT UP! (1)

Alan426 (962302) | more than 5 years ago | (#27040903)

Nothing against the Chinese, but the constant barrage of bots flinging themselves against my firewall needs to stop! In our case, it's more likely script kiddies on a rr.com connection, but nevertheless, better use packet inspection at the Tier-1 level would help here too.

Re:The mission, the people... (1)

micronicos (344307) | more than 5 years ago | (#27040923)

A1 - you got there while I was still dithering how to say it. I could add some personal worries like how HUAWEI software's in every darn internet cellphone dongle in the UK (and it's really good too).

Re:The mission, the people... (1)

GPLDAN (732269) | more than 5 years ago | (#27041703)

Well, I'd personally like to thank the British.

It's been YOUR journalists who reported that the US Government knows the Chinese have an action plan. In the article published in the UK Times

http://technology.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/tech_and_web/the_web/article2409865.ece [timesonline.co.uk]

they go into the details that the Chinese have an action plan to cyberattack a US naval fleet systems.

Thank god you chaps still have a free press over there, and I thank my stars for the Guardian every day.

Re:The mission, the people... (5, Interesting)

scubamage (727538) | more than 5 years ago | (#27040975)

War in the conventional sense is the incorrect term. New cold war is more like it - and sadly this time we are completely out-gunned. The US has spent so much time dumbing down its educational system, ignoring math and sciences in lieu of budget increases to school sports, and completely ignoring the fact that college loans are the second leading cause of bankruptcy in the US (and you can't escape them through bankruptcy!). An educated populace is the only thing we could use to win a technical cold war. And we ain't got it.

Re:The mission, the people... (1)

steelfood (895457) | more than 5 years ago | (#27041879)

Well, there's this huge body of technologically-inclined people in China and India... oh wait...

Re:The mission, the people... (1)

dkleinsc (563838) | more than 5 years ago | (#27041083)

And we're definitely not just throwing money down a black hole: among other things, this sort of project could easily lead to some improvements to SELinux.

Re:The mission, the people... (2, Insightful)

FiloEleven (602040) | more than 5 years ago | (#27041743)

...which just goes to show you exactly why horrible ideas like bailouts & stimulus can survive. "Well, as long as I might get a slice..."

Re:The mission, the people... (1)

Dayze!Confused (717774) | more than 5 years ago | (#27041523)

I wouldn't really like that very much, seeing how I live in Taiwan currently, and although Taiwan is its own country our great new Secretary of State refuses to admit it to the Chinese.

I still work for a US company and use a vpn to communicate back and forth. I am sure there are also plenty of US workers in China that do the same. If I can't use my vpn then I can't do my work.

Why should the government be able to look at everything that I do, I thought that there was the right to privacy, or do we not believe in extending that to others. Many have quoted the words of Franklin concerning those willing to give up rights for security; I think we may also do well to remember the Golden Rule, "Do unto others as thou wouldst have them do unto you."

Re:The mission, the people... (1)

GPLDAN (732269) | more than 5 years ago | (#27042069)

Note that I didn't say they could "look at it". I said they should be able to decrypt it.

The government has the ability to perform warrantless wiretapping and they use voice recognition software on the entirety of every major US carrier's cellphone network. Don't be naive.

A control channel is a control channel. The Chinese are looking to place rootkits in powerplants, water treatment facilities, etc. These places don't have the sophistication necessary to IDP their systems against well constructed keystroke loggers. The risk mandates finding these control channels, and cleaning up the US infrastructure and defending it. Your privacy is entirely a secondary matter, and has been for a long long long time.

Re:The mission, the people... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27042327)

Parent post reads like a crappy cyperpunk novel. "Shunt it"?

PC? (2, Interesting)

micronicos (344307) | more than 5 years ago | (#27040845)

No-one's mentioned the Chinese governments vast expenditure on active (read - aggressive) cybersecurity - is it not PC anymore to say this?

I'm in London UK & all for your US nerds defending our cyber frontiers 'cos we certainly can't! BO rocks!

Re:PC? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27040947)

I'm in London UK ... BO rocks!

Yes, we all know you Brits smell bad, but you don't have to rub our noses in it.

Re:PC? (3, Insightful)

Hordeking (1237940) | more than 5 years ago | (#27041157)

BO rocks!

Actually, America has a BO problem at the moment. Don't be fooled. Adding a lump of sugar to the poison doesn't make any less poisonous.

FYI, GW did this as well. Every president is going to do some things right, and a lot of them wrong.

Never forget, the goal of the presidents since the USA were founded has been to expand their own power. BHO will be no different in this respect.

Does a Database guru have a chance? (1)

bogaboga (793279) | more than 5 years ago | (#27040849)

I am a Database guru. Yes, I know myself and have worked on countless DB systems mostly on the west coast.

Question is: While I know I have a shot at this do I have a chance to be considered for one of these cyber security jobs? I would not mind even if I am on the not so fancy team.

I am kind of tired of the same-old, same-old routine.

Re:Does a Database guru have a chance? (3, Funny)

Zero__Kelvin (151819) | more than 5 years ago | (#27041061)

"Yes, I know myself ..."

Well your a step ahead of me. I'm still waiting to meet myself.

Re:Does a Database guru have a chance? (1)

will_die (586523) | more than 5 years ago | (#27042095)

If you have a U.S. security clearance then probably yes.
Plenty of jobs for DBAs with a security clearance all along the west coast.

As for getting the security clearance that is the problem, if you cannot find a job in your local market that will hire people who are just eligible for clearance then there is not much chance of getting one.

355 million... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27040891)

to Google? I mean, I see why keeping everyone's endless amount of data that Google has collected is important and how it makes it the nation's most important database, but shouldn't this money be going to improving the cybersecurity of the government?

This is just another example of government handouts to big business! EVIL!

Weak Postulate (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27040919)

As an AC no one will ever see this comment, but I have to say it anyway.

The summary: "As his administration continues to work on an stimulus plan that can save America's economy.." makes it sound as if this is an accepted postulate, but nothing could be further from the truth. Many economists (and others) have serious doubts that such a stimulus package can "save" anything. And while economics is anything but intuitive, one does wonder how borrowing a trillion or so dollars -- at interest -- will work towards putting the economy "back on track."

Re:Weak Postulate (1)

im_thatoneguy (819432) | more than 5 years ago | (#27043139)

The same way every other loan works.

By spending on capital now, you can leverage your potential to pay it back plus pocket profit in the future.

What is with the right wing of our population suddenly becoming stupid to basic business management?

"A loan just has to be payed back in the future it's useless."
"A deficit is just an equal tax on the future and in the long term is nothing but damaging to the economy."
"The government borrowing is just putting off the inevitable."

The economy will inevitably bounce back. At which point yes we will need to pay back the loan. The idea is that we have underutilized resources that need to be employed in order to maximize our current capacity.

If you have a factory that's missing a component you take out a loan buy the component and get the factory operational again.

The US Economy is a large factory that's producing at reduced capacity because one component is seriously broken. The US Government is theorizing that by borrowing against the future when the factory is profitable it'll easily be able to pay back the loan.

Also since the GDP has risen and tends to rise with time what 50 years ago was an absurd deficit is now pretty easily repayable. Take out a trillion dollars now. Keep our economy to stagnate for 10 years and a decade from now the trillion dollars is pretty easy to repay.

It's like my college loan. I couldn't afford college so I took out a loan. Then once I used my college education to get me a nice paying job I payed it back in 6 months. Working through college would have reduced my education time and resulted in a lower paying job which would have taken much longer to pay off. By taking out a larger loan I was able to pay it off faster. I invested in my potential.

Jobs shipped overseas (4, Insightful)

Windrip (303053) | more than 5 years ago | (#27040941)

The money will go to $5.00/hr bidders on RentACoder. There's no incentive in this bill to keep the money in the US

Re:Jobs shipped overseas (1)

dbcad7 (771464) | more than 5 years ago | (#27041645)

Where do you read that this money will go overseas ? .. wouldn't fly IMHO, with the new showing where the money goes web site thingy.

How about a bit less cheerleading? (5, Insightful)

EQ (28372) | more than 5 years ago | (#27041077)

For example: "stimulus plan that can save America's economy"

"can"? That remains to be seen, and many say it will not. Try being less of a cheerleader and tell the truth. "may save" is a better selection, and much closer to the truth, given several hundred prominent economists (and the CBO) have said this "stimulus" may end up hurting the economy due to the wasteful "political repayment" spending and huge debt load it contains.

Per the CBO a recovery, albeit slow, is predicted for later this year even were no "stimulus" package passed.

Go read up on the Nixon-Ford-Carter economy that used similar big-government Keynesian methods to stimulate the economy, and ended up producing "stagflation", high interest rates, high unemployment and high inflation (the latter two both in double digits).

Then go read Hazlitt and Hayek for why this Keynesian stuff doesn't work as intended.

In engineering terms, most learned this lesson in statics and dynamics class: You cannot push a rope.

B-b-b-ut you forget hopenchange (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27041405)

Hopenchange can overcome reality.

So STFU and start paying your great-great-great grandkids taxes!

Re:B-b-b-ut you forget hopenchange (1)

Mille Mots (865955) | more than 5 years ago | (#27043151)

So STFU and start paying your great-great-great grandkids taxes!

ITYM, "...start spending your great-great-great grandkids taxes!"

HTH. HAND.

cyber? (3, Insightful)

Lord Ender (156273) | more than 5 years ago | (#27041101)

Of the $355 million, $36 million will be spent on improving sensor and surveillance systems that will protect the nation against potential biological attacks. Another $36 million will be spent on the development and installation of new long-range sensor systems that will be used by the U.S. Coast Guard.

That's not "cyber"security at all! Cybersecurity would be pushing for signed DNS architecture, IPv6, and a DDoS mitigation infrastructure. Sonar and radar systems are physical security, not cyber security.

DHS? WTF? (4, Insightful)

EQ (28372) | more than 5 years ago | (#27041131)

Why DHS? Talk about throwing money into a trash disposal.

Why not NSA/CSS? They are already tasked with this and have budget. Plus they have produced viable useful solutions, SE-Linux for example. And they have competence, unlike the DHS, who seem more concerned with political correctness than securing the nation and the borders.

This smells of political back-scratching, not a solution to a problem.

Secondly how is this supposed to stimulate demand in the economy? Remember, that was the purpose of the huge debt load we just got saddled with.

Watch for crony-contracts, and the money to not produce anything other than rich politically connected friends.

Re:DHS? WTF? (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27041253)

Bush did this to the Coast Guard. He gave DHS the money, shorted their budget, and then DHS made them an offer they can't refuse. I'll be interested to see if the NSA gets fully funded.

If not, DHS will task the NSA, eventually. That's where all the brains are. If that's what's happening, this is Big Brother coming, fellas. Obama's starting to make me nervous, by supporting this monocultured, centralized structure. I want DHS disbanded and dismantled.

But then again, Tolkien warned us what power does. As Franklin said, "I have given you a Republic if you can keep it." We will have the government we want if we don't "keep it."

Politics matters.

Re:DHS? WTF? (2, Interesting)

Hordeking (1237940) | more than 5 years ago | (#27041473)

But then again, Tolkien warned us what power does.

Enlighten us. How did Tolkien warn us about power?

I think a fitting quote, from John Dalberg, Baron of Acton: "Power tends to corrupt, and absolute power corrupts absolutely. Great men are almost always bad men, even when they exercise influence and not authority: still more when you superadd the tendency or certainty of corruption by authority. There is no worse heresy than that the office sanctifies the holder of it."

Re:DHS? WTF? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27041397)

This smells of political back-scratching, not a solution to a problem.

hey now, we have a winner. the entire stimulus package is nothing but political back scratching and no one wants to believe it because obama has been painted up as such a darling by the media. top economists have already said it will do nothing. top investors are pulling back because they know it's a losing game. when the pros are squeamish you know it's a bad deal for everyone.

so obama did in 30 days what it took dubya three years to do and we're still hearing more about what michelle is wearing on any particular day than where the stimulus money is going. it's going to be a fun next 10 years or more...

Re:DHS? WTF? (2, Interesting)

Hordeking (1237940) | more than 5 years ago | (#27041593)

This smells of political back-scratching, not a solution to a problem.

That smell...that's the smell of shit. And napalm burning. Oh dear...is our country on fire? I say...we better go smother it with these exceedingly flammable dollars!

so obama did in 30 days what it took dubya three years to do and we're still hearing more about what michelle is wearing on any particular day than where the stimulus money is going. it's going to be a fun next 10 years or more...

Took W a little more than 3 years to blow $2x10^12. He got started with eroding civil liberties about a year in, though.

Re:DHS? WTF? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27043335)

Took W a little more than 3 years to blow $2x10^12.

How much of that raised the national debt as Obama's plan is sure to do? Where are all the howls of corporate welfare like we heard for dubya? Where's the consistency?

Bunch of little Obama faggots. We got another bunch of little faggot goose steppers under a different flag but the same mentality. Think you're different, think you're better but you're not.

Re:DHS? WTF? (1)

aztektum (170569) | more than 5 years ago | (#27042111)

Huge debt we "just got saddled with"? You haven't been paying attention much for oh, say the last 30 years. [zfacts.com]

$335 million?? (1)

Zarniwoop (25791) | more than 5 years ago | (#27041217)

That's enough for TENS of jobs, or even twice that if they invest in tech school graduates instead of so-called 'experts'!

Wa wa wee wa!!

Re:$335 million?? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27042321)

Yeah with all the headlines lately about billions and trillions, isn't it weird that a number in the millions feels like pocket change?

I can't help thinking of Doctor Evil, with his pinky in his mouth: One...MILLION...dollars!!! ha ha huh?

and the second after its spent (1)

CHRONOSS2008 (1226498) | more than 5 years ago | (#27041219)

POOF they get hacked.
HAHA
watch and see how stupid this is, go hire hackers that get caught...gooo go gogogo go

Intrusion Detection Systems (2, Informative)

oakleeman (939179) | more than 5 years ago | (#27041339)

I don't see why anybody with a network connection isn't running some sort of intrusion detection/prevention system whether it be hosted based or network based....this should especially include the government's systems as well. Snort is now included in quite a few of the specialized security distros. In fact I know of at least two distros that are specifically designed for IDS/IPS only and can be up and monitoring traffic in less than 30 minutes.

EasyIDS: http://sourceforge.net/projects/easyids/ [sourceforge.net]
Strataguard from Stillsecure: http://www.stillsecure.com/strataguard/ [stillsecure.com]

*Disclaimer: Yes I am a developer for EasyIDS but it doesn't change the fact that people should still have an IDS/IPS in place.

Re:Intrusion Detection Systems (1)

cyriustek (851451) | more than 5 years ago | (#27042387)

Some people with network connections do not bother running an IDS, as it is easily bypassed, and often offers little value added. Additionally, if one were to have an IDS, what good would it do you unless you are actually watching it, and tuning it? The staffing required for something like this on a national scale would be prohibitive.

We also have to consider that to monitor all of the traffic with an IDS, you must have access to all of the traffic. Although we believe this is already occurring, you can be certain that your traffic will be watched if a country-wide IDS system is in place, and there will not be a law preventing the US govt from spying on you and others.

The USA and Britain are losing so many rights in the name of security today. It is alarming.

Re:Intrusion Detection Systems (1)

Lord Ender (156273) | more than 5 years ago | (#27042457)

Perhaps because IDS is almost worthless? The days of single-packet exploits seem to be nearly at an end. The only really worthwhile detection method we are seeing today is digging through network and application logs, checking them against blacklist, grep -v'ing away known-good stuff, and looking for unusual stuff. This means a really, intelligent human is required, not a bunch of Snort signatures looking for packet attacks which haven't been used since 1997.

DHS? (1)

Spatial (1235392) | more than 5 years ago | (#27041383)

It should be a fine production [wikipedia.org] .

Wow, with $325 million (1)

smchris (464899) | more than 5 years ago | (#27041509)

That'll be a _really_ secure version of SELinux.

Pork, pork, pork (1, Insightful)

DerekLyons (302214) | more than 5 years ago | (#27041591)

As with yesterday's story [slashdot.org] we now begin to see the reality of the 'stimulus bill' - endless pork, pandering to special interests, and earmarks.

Re:Pork, pork, pork (1, Troll)

Hordeking (1237940) | more than 5 years ago | (#27041625)

As with yesterday's story [slashdot.org] we now begin to see the reality of the 'stimulus bill' - endless pork, pandering to special interests, and earmarks.

Ironically, I prefer the smell of real swine to this shit. Pig shit I can stand. Political shit is just nasty.

Can it really be saved? (1)

aztektum (170569) | more than 5 years ago | (#27042071)

The economy that is. Or rather, should it be saved? If it means we still have ridiculous copyright and patent laws on the books? Government granted monopoly of what should be public infrastructure (cable/data/phone lines)? No real barrier for lobbyists to buy off our politicians?

Our economy woes are entirely thanks to big business and lazy, greedy politicians. What exactly do they want to "save"? They legislated and lobbied their way into a system that benefited them at the expense of true progress and the average Joe the Plumber.

Obama Stimulus Pours Millions Into Cyber Sexurity (1)

M8e (1008767) | more than 5 years ago | (#27042573)

Obama Stimulus Pours Millions Into Cyber Sexurity
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