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Berners-Lee Says No To Internet Snooping

timothy posted more than 5 years ago | from the and-what-does-this-guy-know? dept.

Privacy 113

Jack Spine writes "The inventor of the World Wide Web has pointed out some of the dangers of deep packet inspection. Sir Tim said that ISPs 'snooping' on data was similar to the interception of mail. 'This is very important to me, as what is at stake is the integrity of the internet as a communications medium,' Berners-Lee said on Wednesday. TBL's comments come as the UK government is gearing up to intercept all web communications in the UK through the Intercept Modernisation Programme, and echo comments he made last year about Phorm."

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Providence, Miracle, or What Really Happened (-1, Offtopic)

Philip K Dickhead (906971) | more than 5 years ago | (#27155741)

The Modern State of Israel: Providence, Miracle, or What Really Happened
http://www.daily.pk/world/middle-east/9635-exclusive-the-modern-state-of-israel-providence-miracle-or-what-really-happened.html [daily.pk]

Tuesday, 10 March 2009 21:30

The Modern State of Israel: Providence, Miracle, or What Really Happened, Part 1

The following Glossary, abbreviations and essay will help the reader understand how Theodor Herzl on August 29, 1897 predicted that within fifty years there would be a Jewish state.

Zionism: an organization of Jews who believed the Jewish people needed a nation of their own to escape persecution.

Judaism: Jews collectively who practice a religion based on the Torah and the Talmud.

RothIsm or Rothschildism: abbreviation for The Zionist movement corrupted and co-opted by The House of Rothschild and their agents to advance a New World Order agenda. In 1871 Albert Pike founder of one of the Rothschild secret societies, Order of Perfectibilists, received a vision, which he described in a letter dated August 15, 1871 that graphically outlined plans for three world wars that were seen as necessary to bring about the One World Order.
The Third World War must be fomented by taking advantage of the differences caused by the "agentur" of the "Illuminati" between the political Zionists and the leaders of Islamic World. The war must be conducted in such a way that Islam (the Moslem Arabic World) and political Zionism (the State of Israel) mutually destroy each other. Meanwhile the other nations, once more divided on this issue will be constrained to fight to the point of complete physical, moral, spiritual and economical exhaustion...We shall unleash the Nihilists and the atheists, and we shall provoke a formidable social cataclysm ... Then everywhere, the citizens, obliged to defend themselves against the world minority of revolutionaries, will exterminate those destroyers of civilization, and the multitude, disillusioned with Christianity, whose deistic spirits will from that moment be without compass or direction, anxious for an ideal, but without knowing where to render its adoration, will receive the true light through the universal manifestation of the pure doctrine of Lucifer, brought finally out in the public view. [1]

RBZJ: The Rothschild Backed Zionist Jews, acronym used when referring to anyone connected to or related to the House of Rothschild.

RAGENT: Abbreviation for a Rothschild Agent

The House of Rothschild (the Rothschilds): Global financial empire founded in the late 18th century by a dynasty of Khazars, an ancient people from Georgia. [2]

The Rothschilds control a vast portion of the world's wealth and are the hidden hand behind all the social-cataclysms: the French, Russian and American Revolutions; Communism, Capitalism, World Wars and the Modern State of Israel. The Rothschilds are not the Jews of the bible and do not practice Judaism.

Mel Gibson would have been correct if he had claimed, The Rothschilds are responsible for all the wars in the world. The "Labour Leader" newspaper of Britain on December 19, 1891 referred to the Rothschilds when they wrote:

This blood-sucking crew has been the cause of untold mischief and misery in Europe during the present century, and has piled up its prodigious wealth chiefly through fomenting wars between States which ought never to have quarreled. Wherever there is trouble in Europe, wherever rumors of war circulate and men's minds are distraught with fear of change and calamity you may be sure that a hook-nosed Rothschild is at his games somewhere near the region of the disturbance (ibid, p. 12).

In "Imperialism," writer J. A. Hobson wrote: "No Great War could be undertaken by any European State...if the house of Rothschild and its connections set their face against it" (ibid, p, 25).

The "Labour Leader" did not use the term Jew because the Rothschilds are the descendants of Khazars; they are not of Abraham's Seed.

Rothschild founded and funded the Zionist movement to further a New World Order agenda. At the first Zionist conference Theodor Herzl, a Rothschild agent (Ragent) makes it clear Rothschildism (RothIsm) is not about saving Jews,

It is essential that the sufferings of Jews....become worse....this will assist in realization of our plans....I have an excellent idea....I shall induce anti-Semites to liquidate Jewish wealth....The anti-Semites will assist us thereby in that they will strengthen the persecution and oppression of Jews. The anti-Semites shall be our best friends. [3]

UN Resolution (GA 181)

August 29, 1897 Theodor Herzl, the founder of RothIsm at the First Zionist Congress predicted that within fifty years there would be a Jewish state. UN Resolution (GA 181) partitioned Palestine in 1947.

RothIsm is a political movement to encourage, force if necessary, Jews to move to Palestine. All Jews were encouraged; it didn't matter if you were of Abraham's seed, you left for Palestine or else.

Herzl picking 1947 as the end of the Diaspora and the return of the Jews to the "Holy Land" is either one of those "bizarre coincidences", like the same person winning the lottery three weeks in a row, or the partition of Palestine, finalized in 1947, was part of Rothschilds plan for a New World Order, "to effect complete and total control over every human being on the planet and to dramatically reduce the world's population by two thirds."

Rothschild's secret societies, The Bavarian Illuminati, Order of Perfectibilists, the Skull and Bones are no longer classified as prehistoric science fiction and have their origins in the ancient religions and the occult: Jesuits, Knights Templar, Rosicrucians, Freemasons and the Kabbalah.

In 2003, 60 Minutes aired a segment about Alexandra Robbins, staff member at the New Yorker. Robbins, a Yale graduate, penetrated the wall of silence around the Skull and Bones, the American branch of Rothschild's secret society and authored the best seller Secrets of the Tomb: Skull and Bones, the Ivy League, and the Hidden Paths of Power.

Members of the Skull and Bones include some of the most powerful men of the 20th century.

J.P. Morgan, John D. Rockefeller, Abraham Kuhn and Solomon Loeb are all connected to the Rothschilds Global financial empire and secret societies. They are members of the Federal Reserve, the Bank of England, France, and Germany or, for that matter, any central bank anywhere in the world.

RothIsm was not-so-secretly funded when Baron Edmond (Binyamin) de Rothschild purchased 90,000 acres in Palestine launching Israel's future initially as an agricultural society. After the early settlers arrived, they wanted Rothschild to "take his hands from it." Baron Edmond responded, "I created the Yishuv, I alone. Therefore no men, neither colonists nor organisations have the right to interfere in my plans"

Lord Moyne, the British Secretary of State in Cairo, in 1942 tried to interfere in Baron Edmond's plan when he declared "the Jews were not the descendants of the ancient Hebrews and that they had no "legitimate claim" on the Holy Land. In favor of limiting Jewish immigration into Palestine, he was accused of being "an implacable enemy of Hebrew independence," and on November 6, 1944 Lord Moyne was murdered by two members of the Stern Gang (Yitzhak Shamir's group). [4]

A Jewish State, a sacrilege, can be found in the Bible

A Jewish state can be found in the book of Revelation. John, an Apostle of Jesus on the Isle of Patmos in 90 A.D., was told to "Write the things which thou hast seen, and the things which are, and the things which shall be hereafter." John wrote:

And they will tread the holy city underfoot for forty-two months (1279 days). And I will give power to my two witnesses, and they will prophesy one thousand two hundred and sixty days, clothed in Sackcloth. Revelation 11:2&3

Herzl predicted the 1947 UN partition but John, in the spirit, was taken up into heaven and saw that the holy city would be underfoot for forty-two months given over to non-Jewish people until 1967 (688 A.D. + 1279 years), when in the first hours of the Six-day war Jews took control of East Jerusalem and the prophesy in Sackcloth ended when they had their own state on May 14th 1948 (688 A.D. + 1260 years). [5]

A "Jewish state" is a violation of the teachings of Orthodox Judaism

Grand Rabbi Joel Teitelbaum, believed RothIsm is "the work of Satan, a sacrilege, a blasphemy" and The Holocaust, he wept, "was a direct result of RothIsm, a punishment from G-d."

Rothschild was well aware of Jewish history and Jews, according to the Christian New Testament, persecuted and crucified Jesus Christ and most of his early followers. America's traditional churches in the 19th Century would never stand for a Jewish occupation of Jesus' homeland.

Rothschild Backed Zionist Jews (RBZJ) and a con artist Cyrus Scofield were used to change America and its religious orientation by the use of the Scofield Reference Bible from Oxford University Press.

Scofield, after being released from prison was introduced to Samuel Untermeyer, the President of the Koren Hayesod, and the RothIsm movement in America.

Untermeyer, an attorney, was instrumental in preparing the Federal Reserve Banking law in 1910, and the financing of Scofield's Reference bible.

The Scofield bible has hundreds of easy-to-read footnotes in the margins and at the bottom of the pages that misleadingly weave parts of the Old and New Testaments together as though the same people wrote them at the same time. The most convincing evidence of RothIsm influence on Scofield are the notes themselves, below are examples taken from the revised 1967 Edition:

For a nation to commit the sin of anti-semitism brings inevitable judgment.

God made an unconditional promise of blessings through Abram's seed to the nation of Israel to inherit a specific territory forever.

In fact there is no sin of anti-semitism in the bible and Abraham did not bequeath a "specific territory" to his descendants.

Pat Robertson and Jerry Falwell weave Scofield's "Jews" into Genesis 12:3, "And I will bless them that bless thee, and curse him that curseth thee: and in thee shall all families of the earth be blessed" and falsely conclude:

God has blessed America because America has blessed the Jew. If this nation wants her fields to remain white with grain, her scientific achievements to remain notable, and her freedom to remain intact, America must continue to stand with Israel.

John McArthur, author, pastor at Grace Community Mega-Church came up with a "Just War" explanation for the Iraq War because of Scofields "specific territory" note. On CNN he told Larry King, "Iraq is 'a just war' because Iraq has not only rejected the Gospel of Jesus Christ, but has done everything it can possibly do to stamp out the people of God, namely Israel."

Robertson, Falwell and McArthur because of Scofield, ignore the central tenets of Christianity: Seeking peace and loving one's enemies, "Peace be with you, that the meek and those who work for peace -- rather than the powerful and violent -- are blessed by God."

Then he will say to those on his left (Robertson et all), 'Depart from me, you who are cursed, into the eternal fire prepared for the devil and his angels. For I was hungry and you gave me nothing to eat, I was thirsty and you gave me nothing to drink, I was a stranger and you did not invite me in, I needed clothes and you did not clothe me, I was sick and in prison and you did not look after me.' "They will answer, 'Lord, when did we see you hungry or thirsty or a stranger or needing clothes or sick or in prison, and did not help you?' "He will reply, 'I tell you the truth, whatever you did not do for one of the least of these, you did not do for me.' MT 25:41

Pre-millennialism, Dispensationalism, Judeo-Christianity and "Christian Zionism" all rely on the Scofield footnote "A Curse Laid Upon Those Who Persecute The Jews" to justify the Iraq war and Israel's human rights violations in Gaza and the West Bank. [6]

It is impossible to overstate the influence of Cyrus Scofield and the Oxford Press on twentieth-century Christian and Jewish sectarian beliefs. With limitless advertising and promotion, the Scofield Bible became the most important instrument for spreading the message of Christian Zionism: that the Modern State of Israel is the fulfillment of biblical prophecy.

Uganda is not Jerusalem

In 1903, Joseph Chamberlain, the British Colonial Secretary, brought the "Uganda Project", a Jewish settlement in East Africa, to Theodore Herzl. Herzl initially rejected the idea but the April 1903 Kishinev pogrom, the Medieval Outbreak where 49 Russian Jews were killed, 92 severely wounded, 500 slightly wounded changed his mind and he recommended the controversial solution as a temporary measure.

Herzl did not live to see the rejection of the Uganda Plan in 1905. He, and further discussion of a homeland other than Palestine, died unexpectedly when Herzl was 44.

David Wolfson succeeded Herzl but he failed to convince the Young Turks to give up Palestine after the Ottoman Empire collapsed. Dr. Otto Warburg (related to Paul and Max, Rothschild's agents) was put in charge and the movement was moved to Berlin.

WWII is over but not for the Palestinians

The war ended in 1945 and after the bitterest episode in Jewish history the refugees were moved from Concentration to Displaced Persons camps until the world was willing to give the Holocaust survivors the Palestinian's Land.

As the United Nations debated a resolution to divide the Palestinian land, the UN- appointed mediator Count Folke Bernadotte thought the resolution offended

Basic principles to prevent these innocent victims of the conflict [Palestinians were not to blame for the Holocaust] from returning to their homes, while Jewish immigrants flood into Palestine and, what's more, threatening to permanently replace the dispossessed Arab refugees who have been here for centuries." He described, "Zionist pillage on a grand scale and the destruction of [Palestinian] villages without apparent military need.

His report (U.N. Document A. 648) was filed on September 16, 1948. The next day Count Bernadotte and his assistant were assassinated in the part of Jerusalem occupied by the Zionists. [7]

Finally the British navy attacked the 4,500 Holocaust survivors ("Exodus 1947") on their way to Palestine and a Rothschild Homeland was a fait accomplis.

On May 14, 1948, the British Mandate over Palestine expired and Rothschild had established the Jewish State, located in the only place in the world that could have a clash of civilizations, Jerusalem.

The Jews return to the "Holy Land" portends Armageddon.

Armageddon, the final battle, will come when someone blows up the Dome of the Rock. That magnificent golden domed mosque built on the site of Solomon's Temple (the abomination of desolation) is preventing the return of the messiah. Radical Christians and Jews believe Christ will not come back to earth until the Jews rebuild the Temple.

Should the Dome be demolished, then for the first time in history, thanks to Sadaam Hussein when he destroyed 90 percent of Iraq's Wetlands, 200 million people could cross the Euphrates for a holy war in Jerusalem. [8]

A war that will rid the planet of millions of useless eaters.

The Rothschild New World Order only needs 500 million of us for slaves.

Note: This is Part 1 of a series, and the author acknowledges help from M.E. Young.

Footnotes

[1] 4. Cmdr. William Guy Carr: Quoted in Satan: Prince of This World, Albert Pike received a vision, which he described in a letter that he wrote to Mazzini, dated August 15, 1871. http://www.threeworldwars.com/albert-pike2.htm [threeworldwars.com]

[2] Shlomo Sand, When and How the Jewish People was Invented, Arthur Koestler, The Thirteenth Tribe, published in 1976.

[3] From the diaries that Theodor Herzl kept between 1895 and 1904 -- Part I, pp. 16

[4] Original document in German Auswertiges Amt Archiv, Bestand 47-59, E224152 and E234155-58. Complete original text published in: David Yisraeli, The Palestinian Problem in German Politics 1889-1945 (Israel: 1947) pp. 315-317.

[5] The Mosque of Omar built in 688 A.D., The Dome of the Rock is the correct identification of the abomination of desolation. Biblical scholars acknowledge the words of Ezekiel who wrote, "I have appointed thee each day for a year." http://canadafreepress.com/index.php/article/9109 [canadafreepress.com]

[6] Reverend Jerry Falwell erroneously denied that many evangelicals opposed the U.S.-led war in Iraq. Appearing opposite Sojourners editor-in-chief Reverend Jim Wallis on the February 11 edition of FOX News' Hannity & Colmes, Falwell called Wallis's claim that "evangelicals around the world were against the war in Iraq" "baloney" and remarked: "You could fit your [antiwar evangelical] crowd in a phone booth." After Wallis told Falwell that "there are evangelical Christians who don't share your pro-war views," Falwell replied, "I know -- you and William Sloane Coffin." Coffin is a longtime peace activist and former Yale University chaplain.

[7] For the assassination of Count Bernadotte see the report sent to the UN the same day as the attack (17 September 1948) by General A. Lundstrom (who was sitting in Bernadotte's car). See also the book published by the same general for the 20th anniversary of the crime : L'assassinat du Compte Bernadottel, printed in Rome (pub. East. A. Fanelli) in 1970 under the title : 'Un tributo a la memoria del Comte Folke Bernadotte'. Also Ralph Hewins' book : 'Count Bernadotte, his life and work' (Hutchinson, 1948). And in the Milanese weekly Europa', Baruch Nadel's confessions (quoted in Le Monde, 4 and 5 July 1971).

[8] In 1994, 60 percent of the wetlands were destroyed by Saddam Hussein's regime. They were drained to permit military access and greater political control of the native Marsh Arabs. Written By Robert Singer

Robert Singer is a retired information technology professional and an environmental activist living in southern California. In 1995 he and his cousin Adam D. Singer founded IPC The Hospitalist Company, Inc., where he served as chief technology officer. Today the company manages more than 130 practice groups, providing care in some 300 medical facilities in 18 states. Prior to that he was president of Useful Software, a developer and publisher of business and consumer software for the personal computing Industry.

Re:Providence, Miracle, or What Really Happened (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27155859)

Your ideas intrigue me and I wish to subscribe to your newsletter.

We Are the Village Green Preservation Society (-1, Offtopic)

Philip K Dickhead (906971) | more than 5 years ago | (#27156201)

We are the village green preservation society
God save donald duck, vaudeville and variety
We are the desperate dan appreciation society
God save strawberry jam and all the different varieties
Preserving the old ways from being abused
Protecting the new ways for me and for you
What more can we do?

We are the draught beer preservation society
God save Mrs. Mopp and good old Mother Riley
We are the custard pie appreciation consortium
God save the George Cross and all those who were awarded them

We are the Sherlock Holmes English speaking vernacular
Help save Fu Manchu, Moriarty and Dracula
We are the office block persecution affinity
God save little shops, china cups and virginity

We are the skyscraper condemnation affiliate
God save Tudor houses, antique tables and billiards
Preserving the old ways from being abused
Protecting the new ways for me and for you
What more can we do?

God save the village green.

Re:Providence, Miracle, or What Really Happened (1)

mcgrew (92797) | more than 5 years ago | (#27156451)

Dude, there are these things here at slashdot called "journals" [slashdot.org] where you can post any damned fool thing you want without wasting your sock puppet's karma on needless "offtopic" mods.

I usually write about hookers and other women (oddly, people actually read them!). You could post your Israel trolls.

Re:Providence, Miracle, or What Really Happened (1)

Philip K Dickhead (906971) | more than 5 years ago | (#27166731)

Yeah.

But... FP! ;-)

Re:Providence, Miracle, or What Really Happened (1)

mcgrew (92797) | more than 5 years ago | (#27169931)

I never could understand why everyone wanted to drink that frosty piss. There were times I'd have something funny or informative to say, and got modded down (initially, anyway) just because it was FP.

I hate getting first post.

Inventor of the world wide (5, Funny)

ericrost (1049312) | more than 5 years ago | (#27155747)

The inventor of the world wide what?

Re:Inventor of the world wide (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27155795)

I accidentally the whole world wide. Is this bad?

pants (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27155833)

world wide pants!

No he's not! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27161577)

That was David Letterman!

Hey fudgepacker! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27155839)

I just heard a screaming moron run by...
 
...or maybe it was your sense of humor running away from you!

Re:Inventor of the world wide (4, Funny)

Godwin O'Hitler (205945) | more than 5 years ago | (#27156033)

Its a typo. It should read "word wide". TBL invented the word "wide" because prior to then most things were narrow.

Re:Inventor of the world wide (2, Funny)

vishbar (862440) | more than 5 years ago | (#27156149)

There's a goatse joke to be made here. I'm just not quite sure what it is.

Re:Inventor of the world wide (0, Redundant)

jslater25 (1005503) | more than 5 years ago | (#27157575)

You don't know what goatse is? Hi, and welcome to /.

Re:Inventor of the world wide (1)

Obfuscant (592200) | more than 5 years ago | (#27156211)

The inventor of the world wide what?

Not the world wide what, the world wide has. If you elide the prepositional (of) clause, you get "The inventor pointed out...".

Re:Inventor of the world wide (0)

ccguy (1116865) | more than 5 years ago | (#27156757)

The inventor of the world wide what?

You'll probably find it interesting that google returns more than 500 entries for Berners-Lee goatse.

The dream of encryption (5, Insightful)

CRCulver (715279) | more than 5 years ago | (#27155787)

I remember 10 years ago that every nerd had a PGP key and Schneier's Applied Cryptography [amazon.com] was a standard text for our crowd. Now, the majority of even the hard-core geeks no longer have much interest in encryption. Somewhere along the way we forgot that every step forward on the net demands a way to guarantee privacy. Berners-Lee might regret the lack of privacy now, but he and other luminaries weren't vocal enough about the need for encryption and lots of it.

Re:The dream of encryption (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27155965)

The promise of the internet is free and open data. Encryption is anti-everything the internet is about.

The real death of the internet was ~10 years ago, when anonymous posting disappeared.

Re:The dream of encryption (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27156131)

Well that's the thing. Anonymous posting provided one form of security that's no longer feasibly available. Encryption allows better privacy. As more and more cultures/subcultures/thought-pattern-sharers participate on the web, conflicts and clashes are more and more likely to happen. Opportunistic encryption, as long as it is controllable, will make the web a mutual haven for all cultures. One community can keep their convos/files/culture to themselves, while others can still broadcast theirs. The hearts and minds of people, no matter where they are geographically, are the final battlefield for a fight that should never take place, and encryption is one way to help ensure it never does.

Posting AC because I have mod points and also I seem to have started rambling.

Re:The dream of encryption (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27160157)

Anonymity can still be had with TOR servers, anonymizer services, darknets, freenets, and MAC spoofing. Keeping data hidden requires either encryption, putting it in an unexpected context ("Why is the binary graphics data for that 10 minute powerpoint presentation 450 MB?"), or splitting it up into multiple pieces (like XOR'd diff files) that only make sense when put together correctly. Lots of messages got moved around before the advent of strong encryption, many using simple one-time pads.

Re:The dream of encryption (4, Interesting)

lenski (96498) | more than 5 years ago | (#27156163)

the promise of the internet is free and open communications.

What we do with our data is entirely up to us, and nobody else. Not "the government", not ISPs. This includes encrypting whatever is being transmitted.

You may share any paper, report, program, comment that is yours to publish. Some communications using the Internet should be more like a phone conversation (before USAPATRIOT stupidity), in which a modicum of privacy is a reasonable presumption.

Re:The dream of encryption (3, Insightful)

ClosedSource (238333) | more than 5 years ago | (#27159133)

"The promise of the internet is free and open data."

I thought the promise of the internet was free porn.

Seriously, it started as a government program and open and free communications was not the goal.

Re:The dream of encryption (3, Interesting)

icebike (68054) | more than 5 years ago | (#27155989)

PGP keys only help with email.

Far better to move the entire web to ONLY ssl based servers, (after fixing ssl of course).

Re:The dream of encryption (2, Informative)

Sloppy (14984) | more than 5 years ago | (#27156947)

PGP keys only help with email.

Far better to move the entire web to ONLY ssl based servers, (after fixing ssl of course).

And the way to fix SSL, is to switch to using PGP keys [gnu.org] .

Re:The dream of encryption (4, Interesting)

Creepy Crawler (680178) | more than 5 years ago | (#27156007)

Where have YOU been living?

1. I have _multiple_ active GPG keys. All Ubuntu has GPG on them by default.
2. I use TOR regularly, which uses multiple levels of encryption.
3. I use HTTPS sites regularly. Not the old dinky 40bit keys either.
4. My filesystem on my laptops are encrypted via DM_CRYPT and Luks.
5. Every machine I communicate with has SSH. Therefore, I also have encrypted data tunnels for everything.
6. I use W.A.S.T.E.

Yeah. That whole encryption thing died out a while back. Uh huh.

Re:The dream of encryption (3, Funny)

FooAtWFU (699187) | more than 5 years ago | (#27156057)

Weirdo.

Re:The dream of encryption (4, Informative)

Creepy Crawler (680178) | more than 5 years ago | (#27156245)

What do you mean "Weirdo"?

Anybody that uses a Unix based system (BSD, Linux, Solaris) all use a variant of OpenSSH.
Anybody that buys stuff on the net uses 128bit SSL.
Even that child porn dude that's in the supreme court knew enough to use TrueCrypt.

Or even another encryption used: WEP and WPA. There's 2 very standard, "non-weird" encryptions. They just arent terribly strong.

Re:The dream of encryption (1)

Amazing Quantum Man (458715) | more than 5 years ago | (#27156425)

Apparently, you've turned off your sarcasm detector.

Re:The dream of encryption (1)

Logic and Reason (952833) | more than 5 years ago | (#27156851)

Ooh, a sarcasm detector. That's a real useful invention.

Re:The dream of encryption (1)

xmundt (415364) | more than 5 years ago | (#27157617)

Greetings and Salutations..
Hum...this looks like an excellent proof of the observation that inability to detect sarcasm is an early sign of dimentia.
          G,D, R
          Dave Mundt

Re:The dream of encryption (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27158017)

Hey! I think I need a refund! My detector didn't go off!

Re:The dream of encryption (2, Funny)

sortius_nod (1080919) | more than 5 years ago | (#27160271)

It did, you just bought the Vista version...

A slashdot poster would like to use sarcasm.

[Cancel] [Allow]

Re:The dream of encryption (2, Insightful)

hairyfeet (841228) | more than 5 years ago | (#27160243)

And you just accidently hit on the reason why having that stuff can have you sent to PMITA prison. Did you catch it? Here I'll point it out-"Even that child porn dude that's in the supreme court knew enough to use TrueCrypt.". The simple facts are that law enforcement HATES encryption, because it means they have to bust their ass instead of running a simple scan for *.whatever. So I have no doubt you will see more and more prosecutors using "You know why he has that stuff and won't let us go through his files? It is because he is a child molester! Are you going to let him get away with that?" And sadly juries who think all the crap they see on CSI and Numbers is real will think you must be some "elite child molesting super hacker" because the cops can't crack your crypto and you will get to rot in jail until you let them go through your stuff because "If you did nothing wrong you have nothing to hide".

I have had talks with a friend working state crime lab and believe me, they would love nothing more than to only allow crypto that had state approved back doors in it. He told me the reason the only "child pornographers" you see arrested is the loser in his basement whacking off to the same crap that has been floating around since the old BBS days is because the REAL bad guys are passing encrypted DVDs to each other through the mail. He said the few they have busted were because one of their victims talked but when they snatched all the data everything was so locked down with crypto there was no way to trace it back to their partners. And when a guy is already facing 400+ years good luck with getting him to rat.

Sadly right there is the problem, good men that can not see the evil they are pushing. He and his friends in the lab see nothing wrong with demanding everyone's data be accessible because they are not evil men and would only use it to protect kids. What they don't see is that for every one of them there are a thousand Karl Rove style scumbags that would happily abuse any power they can get their dirty little hands on if it meant that their "enemies" got burnt. Just look at the spying on civil rights leaders in the 60s or warrantless wiretapping now. But how to convince the good men that allowing some evil doers to escape to protect us all is the dilemma that we all must face. Because with "child porn" being like the red scare of the 50s, with parents scared to death that pervos are hiding around every bush, it is simply becoming too easy to use that word and get any law passed that they desire.

While I hope we don't end up with "Trusted Internet" or some other way to ensure that those in power can always access your data that certainly seems to be the way that those in law enforcement want it to go. We just have to find a way to convince people that defending the idea of privacy is not the same as advocating criminal sexual activity. Because ATM all it takes is for a prosecutor to bring up "those two words" in front of a jury and you're screwed, even if all you are doing is trying to keep Big Brother out of your data. Privacy doesn't really mean anything anymore as long as those two words hold so much power in the minds and hearts of juries. It is truly scary times we are living in.

Re:The dream of encryption (1)

Creepy Crawler (680178) | more than 5 years ago | (#27162587)

What you underlaid was the idea that encryption is just a "Big Red Flag" saying something good is in here. Well, of course. It all comes down to that idea of plausible deniablity.

If you use full disk encryption, its to encrypt my business and personal information. You prepare this partition as if somebody will look at it. The FDE is "just for looks". On the FDE level, you have most of your computing environment. You have your games, function apps, system stuff, database with receipts and business purchases. Put nothing really incriminating here.. Maybe a few movies and a bit of MP3s. They expect _something_ so give them something lame.

Then comes that weird blank spot as if you forgot to extent a partition to the whole hard disk. There's no partition type.. Hell, there's no partition. Now, if you run a command, it makes a partition appear as a device on /dev. Hmm.. You mount it, and it's a partition image that's runnable within a VM. Running this image then asks for a boot passphrase. Game over if your forensics lab even got this far.

Inside the VM is where the goodies are at. Basic install of Debian, with GPG, ToR and WASTE client. This is where you do your safe encryption stuff in:Encrypt, Decrypt, receive messages passed from ToRland (what? you dont use .onion domain?)

And if there's any questions asked, just mix in TrueCrypt with the multiple-container mode. as said in Taken: Good Luck.

Re:The dream of encryption (1)

Hordeking (1237940) | more than 5 years ago | (#27157165)

Where have YOU been living?

1. I have _multiple_ active GPG keys. All Ubuntu has GPG on them by default. 2. I use TOR regularly, which uses multiple levels of encryption. 3. I use HTTPS sites regularly. Not the old dinky 40bit keys either. 4. My filesystem on my laptops are encrypted via DM_CRYPT and Luks. 5. Every machine I communicate with has SSH. Therefore, I also have encrypted data tunnels for everything. 6. I use W.A.S.T.E.

Yeah. That whole encryption thing died out a while back. Uh huh.

We Await Silent Tristero's Empire.

Re:The dream of encryption (1)

bob.appleyard (1030756) | more than 5 years ago | (#27160745)

Back in your bin

Re:The dream of encryption (1)

knewter (62953) | more than 5 years ago | (#27157879)

Is W.A.S.T.E. still under active dev? I used that thing for around a year after aol killed it in ~2003/4, and then me and my cousin stopped sharing files as frequently (really the only person I shared files with via WASTE)

Re:The dream of encryption (1)

pilgrim23 (716938) | more than 5 years ago | (#27158039)

Ha! I always send text written with an Enochian font (look it up) after first translating into Voynich script! Now if only I could figure out how to decode it I would be able to read this shopping list....

Re:The dream of encryption (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27160297)

Tor is run at the disembarkation points by governments and private corporations....so how is it secure? (oh, and the routers are wide open)

Re:The dream of encryption (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27156067)

Sure, you are right, but who would have guessed that western governments would come over more right wing than Hitler?

Re:The dream of encryption (5, Insightful)

0100010001010011 (652467) | more than 5 years ago | (#27156123)

Because most of us came to this realization: http://xkcd.com/538/ [xkcd.com] or the fact that 90% of it doesn't matter.

All of my Tax documents and other financial stuff is on a 256-bit encrypted disk image. But why the hell do I need to encrypt the message to my mom about my Easter plans? Furthermore, how do I explain to someone that just learned to use a computer that Obama wants to know if it's going to be Ham or Turkey.

And the last time I planned something big and illegal we sure as hell didn't EMAIL each other about it, we met in person. (3 friends of mine all worked at Taco Bell through High School. Summer before college we planned a heist of the flags off the top. I still have a flag I fly on Rugby trips with the Taco Bell Dog.)

Re:The dream of encryption (5, Insightful)

Red Flayer (890720) | more than 5 years ago | (#27156381)

Because most of us came to this realization: http://xkcd.com/538/ [xkcd.com] or the fact that 90% of it doesn't matter.

The problem with the xkcd cartoon is that it only applies if whoever wants your information knows that you have it.

The point of general encryption is that fishing expeditions are impossible... so the "juicy" stuff that would warrant attention from the powers that be is hidden in the morass of all the other encrypted data.

Yes, a ten-dollar hammer can be used to get my keys from me... but how do you know I've got the goods if you've never been able to read anyone's data?

Re:The dream of encryption (1)

houghi (78078) | more than 5 years ago | (#27157097)

Yes, a ten-dollar hammer can be used to get my keys from me... but how do you know I've got the goods if you've never been able to read anyone's data?

I hit the guy who gave you the goods with a ten-dollar hammer.

Re:The dream of encryption (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27163591)

but how do you know I've got the goods if you've never been able to read anyone's data?

Just another use for a ten dollar hammer. Only people with something to hide use encryption and those packet headers weren't pointing to amazon.com. So that makes you a suspect and the shmuck at the other endpoint too.

People tend to forget how much 'intelligence' can be gleaned from communications even though the content of the communications are encrypted. It doesn't take deep packet inspection to map interrelationships and mine the stored data for correlations between cause and effect.

There is also geographical information contained within the communication - a trace route or reverse DNS of my IP address will place me within my county of residence - my ISP can supply the rest but even without going that far, adds another set of data points to the map.

Then there is phone communication. Who do you call and who calls you, and when. How long do you talk. More data points to the map and a statistical model of your behavioral patterns can be built. Triggers can be assigned should you or someone you know break pattern. Maybe it was something you did. Perhaps it would be something you didn't do.

Red light cameras record the movement of your vehicle should you have one. Just because you broke no law doesn't mean the information cannot be stored for later reference or made available to a greater database. And your friends and acquaintances... and theirs. More data points added to the map.

It is a very useful map given information routinely available to governments as it is now and data miners need not know what you said or wrote. Indeed, they may not even care in a general context. Should attention be drawn to you the impetus changes obviously, your case handed off to more specialized agencies, some of who will pick through your garbage. Another well spring of information.

Total Information Awareness: We can see where this is going and every time a new set of data points can be added to the map, intelligence increases. Right now efforts are underway to aggregate collections of public information with many eyes on the prize of access to private data as well. One example is a national database of everyone's medical records. A government sponsored program; a good friend is working on that now. The plum has to be credit/debit card transactions and other routine (or not) financial matters. There is mandated reporting of some transactions now but if capital flows could be tracked in near real time???

A person cannot help but think that somewhere, someone working for a three letter acronym or derivative thereof is looking at the current global financial problems and thinking what a great opportunity this is. Given that, it probably won't be long before some Economic Recovery & Consumer Confidence Restoration bill is enacted that just so happens to include the needed data gathering and analysis provisions as required for hook, line and sinker conformance, with such bill safely protected within several layers of bacon wrap.

In time, the evaluative algorithms of statistical analysis will be able to predict with reasonable accuracy events before they happen spawning preemptive detention, interrogation and arrest with corresponding remedial reforms should you cooperate and take the plea deal. If not then expect to be introduced to incarceration at any one of several detention centers within the greater complex of private prison industry and they don't care why your there just as long as you are. A buck fifty a day making shopping carts for WalMart at the end of a cattle prod. Enough money to supplement your daily allotment of Koolaid and Nutriloaf with a candy bar in support of America's hedge against imports from China.

Unless or course you actually being worth a ten dollar hammer. On the other hand that tends to get messy. A few days shackled in a stress position much less so. Electroshock therapy seldom leaves visible marks when properly applied and then there is any number of rather painful chemical cocktails to sear your veins and torture your brains on the way to vegetable-ville. It all depends on you and don't forget to sign your organ donor card. Heheheh.

And all this because you didn't hand over your encryption keys to the court when demanded. Oh, once upon a time you might have held the illusion of rights against self incrimination but we operate under the auspices of limited liberty these days all thanks to Allah, Anthrax Terrorism and Child Molesters.

An other neat thing about encrypted files is the prosecution getting to allege what they might contain. Just about anything really and whatever fits the search warrant best. Makes a tasty snack for Judge or Jury and really isn't evidence but makes for a great emotional pry bar when laying conspiracy tracks for a railroad.

In the end, collection of information intelligence can safely ignore actual content until such time that it becomes desirous and a point when the achilles heal that is your correspondents is laid bare. You may be conscientious and reliable at your end of communication security but can you stake your life on all others within that loop? There is always one link in the chain that's weakest and perhaps sports a vulnerability otherwise unknown and unrelated to you yet things that show up on the relational computer maps of information collectors with unlimited resources in comparison to your own.

I'd suggest getting used to the new reality around here, and doing what your told.

Re:The dream of encryption (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27156463)

But why the hell do I need to encrypt the message to my mom about my Easter plans?

Because the phrase "mom" is a code-word for "Al-Quada" and "Easter Egg" is a code-word for "dirty nuke".

So obviously you are not talking about Easter plans with your mother, you are running a sleeper cell intent on unleashing chaos & destruction.

Expect to see some nice men in dark suits at your house shortly.

Yes I phrased this with sarcasm, but I am indeed serious. All it takes is one criminal to use a coded conversation, and anyone holding a similar conversation becomes suspect as well.

Re:The dream of encryption (5, Insightful)

TrekkieGod (627867) | more than 5 years ago | (#27156509)

Because most of us came to this realization: http://xkcd.com/538/ [xkcd.com] or the fact that 90% of it doesn't matter.

All of my Tax documents and other financial stuff is on a 256-bit encrypted disk image. But why the hell do I need to encrypt the message to my mom about my Easter plans?

Because if somebody's watching you send all those messages to your mom about Easter plans and then suddenly see encrypted traffic, they're going to know that the encrypted traffic must have been special and then come after you with the wrench?

Re:The dream of encryption (4, Insightful)

0100010001010011 (652467) | more than 5 years ago | (#27156657)

The world has moved beyond simply sending encrypted e-mails back and forth. Steganography, torrents, tor, etc.

If I REALLY wanted to coordinate killing the president or something big. I'd probably use YouTube or Craigslist where the Signal to Noise is infinitely small. I'd embed an encrypted stegano message inside video of a guy lighting farts on fire or 'casual encounter' ad. Heck, put up some eBay listings with big pictures. How do you know that latest version of Heroes you downloaded from Bit Torrent doesn't have a 5MB image embedded in it with the President's route on some foreign trip?

How about those Spam messages that look like a ton of gibberish, do you know they're not some secret code?

I'm sure if a few Slashdoters put their minds to it, they could come up with a bit more ingenious ways of sending messages than 'plain text' encrypted PGP e-mails.

The next terrorist isn't going to suddenly start sending encrypted messages from a normal account.

Re:The dream of encryption (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27160211)

Or, with NO explicit steganography, (changing bits that "don't matter") to give away your message, you could have a set of messages. Each message would for each word, have several synonyms or replacements. Each of these could be considered bits, or sets of bits. This is still steganography of a sort, but not detectable without knowing the people involved intimately.

To make it simpler, send a picture of a quilt. Each square could contain a series of "bits", (red, blue, stripped horizontal, vertical, both, diagonal etc) and how the bits were interpreted could vary randomly (one layout per X/Y position) to avoid a detectable pattern.

This isn't new:
THE WALRUS IS MASSAGING A PORPOISE WITH CHEESE
(Weird Al video mocking high security)

Uncle George is picking apples

When, where and under what username you post may contain the message, with the literal message being completely innocent.

This is why national eavesdropping makes no sense. You can't possible catch a professional.
An amateur, worried will plan in advance, meet in person, and all they'll ever post is "go". Even if you suspect that means "attack", what does it mean to attack?

True security can't come of paranoia and eavesdropping, it has to be based around one of two things:
1. utter extermination of the threat and all who are believed to be harboring remnants (bad idea, the rest of the world will soon team up against you)
2. removing the reasons of those who would attack you
if for religious reasons, a blanket threat to destroy the meteorite, bomb a town with water balloons containing pig entrails etc so that jihad would result in their soul's destruction instead of automatic heaven (something similar is used in isreal to some success to stop bombings)
if for political retaliation, apologize, make reparations and stop doing whatever you're doing (hopping out of Iraq, in response to some terrorism being political, after we pulled several coups in various middle eastern countries)
if for political power, meet with those involved, set tough limits. If you do X, we'll do Y. We'll make sure you can't maintain a force large enough to run anything.
if for financial gain, payments to key people for NOT doing bad that are lost upon any evidence of wrongdoing

Re:The dream of encryption (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27160263)

The world has moved beyond simply sending encrypted e-mails back and forth. Steganography, torrents, tor, etc.

If I REALLY wanted to coordinate killing the president or something big. I'd probably use YouTube or Craigslist where the Signal to Noise is infinitely small. I'd embed an encrypted stegano message inside video of a guy lighting farts on fire or 'casual encounter' ad. Heck, put up some eBay listings with big pictures. How do you know that latest version of Heroes you downloaded from Bit Torrent doesn't have a 5MB image embedded in it with the President's route on some foreign trip?

How about those Spam messages that look like a ton of gibberish, do you know they're not some secret code?

I'm sure if a few Slashdoters put their minds to it, they could come up with a bit more ingenious ways of sending messages than 'plain text' encrypted PGP e-mails.

The next terrorist isn't going to suddenly start sending encrypted messages from a normal account.

Wtf? I for one am not "the next terrorist." This isn't about trying to do anything illegal, it's about privacy. If I'm trying to send my lawyer some confidential files I don't want to direct him to find some image on facebook. I want to send him the file. And I want the communication to look no different than any other message I send him or my mother.

Re:The dream of encryption (1)

tsotha (720379) | more than 5 years ago | (#27162447)

Bah. The Secret Service has a pretty easy job for the next four years. The president has the ultimate assassination insurance - Joe Biden.

Re:The dream of encryption (1)

AmiMoJo (196126) | more than 5 years ago | (#27163019)

Actually, there is a much easier way to defeat what the UK government is planning to do. The key is that they require the ISPs to do all the logging, so if you run your own SMTP server or use one in a safe country (e.g. Russia) they they don't get to monitor you.

Sure, your communications are not encrypted, but most people don't have PGP and wouldn't know how to use it anyway. It also breaks web mail (now there's a feature I'd like to see for gmail, don't know how it would work securely though). If you use Tor or a web proxy in a safe country it would be almost impossible for the government to tie you to the account anyway, even if they have access to the receiving party's account.

Re:The dream of encryption (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27156769)

Because most of us came to this realization: http://xkcd.com/538/ [xkcd.com] or the fact that 90% of it doesn't matter.

Yes, people - not their machines - are always the weakest link in the technology chain. (At least that's what I got out of reading Dune. :-)

Plus, most of what you would protect has less value than you think. [satirewire.com]

Re:The dream of encryption (2, Interesting)

broken_chaos (1188549) | more than 5 years ago | (#27156793)

Encryption works for very important data (that you would die to protect), less important data transferred over a network (moderately important e-mails), and unimportant data as a form of misdirection (if everything is encrypted, no one can tell what's important or not).

Full disk encryption, while nice, is not a protection for your data from someone who really wants it, unless you will die to protect it. It is protection from casual thieves for things like passwords, credit card data, personal information (your contact lists, for instance).

Re:The dream of encryption (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27160589)

And you've just hit on one of the BIG reasons for encryption. Protection of SSN, credit cards etc. Every law that makes data "open" just opens the possibilities for identity theft. Everyone has something to hide, typically bank account routing numbers if nothing else.

Encryption isn't for criminals (who don't need it if they arrange simple innocuous signals ahead of time), it's for those looking to protect themselves FROM criminals.

Re:The dream of encryption (4, Insightful)

Sloppy (14984) | more than 5 years ago | (#27157127)

A lot of very foolish people have overgeneralized the point of that cartoon.

The $5 wrench attack does work to defeat encryption, but it only works when someone is specifically interested in you.

The bad guys cannot put a $5 wrench on the backbone and slurp up everything. The only way they can do that, is if people agree to not encrypt.

If you encrypt, you defeat massive-scale surveillance. And you are not defeating a theoretical attack; you're not even defeating a plausible attack. You defeat an attack that the US government is known to be using.

You don't need to read phrack or 2600 to know about this; read the New York Times or turn on your TV and watch Frontline. Get your head out of the sand.

Re:The dream of encryption (1)

severoon (536737) | more than 5 years ago | (#27159335)

If I suddenly had a need to send something encrypted, but I didn't want it to appear encrypted, I would take the encrypted block and bury it steganographically in an image attached to the email, an image relevant to the innocuous message about Easter dinner that is in the body of the message...like a picture of a ham or something.

In fact, I suspect that most of the innocuous-looking traffic that's flying around the web right now is actually bearing a different encrypted message to the intended recipient as well. How do we know everyone's not already encrypting everything worthy of being encrypted? -X Files music-

Re:The dream of encryption (4, Insightful)

Sloppy (14984) | more than 5 years ago | (#27157239)

But why the hell do I need to encrypt the message to my mom about my Easter plans?

Because I might be looking for houses to burgle on Easter.

Because privacy should be the default. Instead of asking why your plans should be secret, ask why your plans should be public. It's just as legitimate of a question.

And the last time I planned something big and illegal we sure as hell didn't EMAIL each other about it, we met in person.

Good for you. But there's more to life than planning crimes, and there are other threats than government law enforcement (they just happen to be the most high-profile). I know some people think that the only purpose of the internet is for pedophiles to trade porn, but really, people do have other uses for it. Most of those uses are nobody else's business. If you wanted the world to know your Easter plans, you could have posted them to Usenet. Instead, you chose email.

Re:The dream of encryption (1)

noidentity (188756) | more than 5 years ago | (#27158099)

And the last time I planned something big and illegal we sure as hell didn't EMAIL each other about it, we met in person. (3 friends of mine all worked at Taco Bell through High School. Summer before college we planned a heist of the flags off the top. I still have a flag I fly on Rugby trips with the Taco Bell Dog.)

Even better, you posted about it on Slashdot!

Re:The dream of encryption (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27160199)

All that aside, how does the dog like the Rugby games?

Re:The dream of encryption (1)

kinnell (607819) | more than 5 years ago | (#27164329)

But why the hell do I need to encrypt the message to my mom about my Easter plans?

For the same reason people feel the need to send most written letters in envelopes rather than on postcards.

Privacy for the rest of us (5, Insightful)

schwaang (667808) | more than 5 years ago | (#27156403)

Encryption gives a sometimes false sense of security, and the technology is a hassle. It's better to reinforce societal expectations for privacy where it is due, and let social mechanisms (like laws and market reputation) do the job.

Consider e.g. that if you use https from your workplace and see the happy little lock icon in FF or IE, you probably feel safe.

But some workplaces insert a proxy in between you and gmail (or what have you), having stuffed the proxy's certificate on your (their) work machine through local policy. Unbeknownst to you, your employer then sees the communication which you thought was totally private. Now imagine if an ISP could do that and get away with it.

The point is that even if you do *care*, the technology is hard to keep track of, and there is an arms-race ladder of one-upmanship that makes this a never-ending game, which some nerds can win, and most of us will lose.

What will really keep you safe is to stand up for a reasonable expectation of privacy where it should exist, and create norms and laws that protect this. Saying "NO" to Phorm or other invasions by ISPs is part of that approach, and creates legal and commercial consequences that are more effective than asking every grandma to mess with PGP.

Re:The dream of encryption (2, Insightful)

Lord Ender (156273) | more than 5 years ago | (#27156467)

Key exchange is hard.

If we had signed DNS, and DNS started distributing X.509 certificates ("type CERT queries"), then secure email really would hit the mainstream.

Re:The dream of encryption (3, Insightful)

Sloppy (14984) | more than 5 years ago | (#27156905)

Now, the majority of even the hard-core geeks no longer have much interest in encryption.

Then they're not hard-core geeks.

Geez, they're not even soft-core geeks. In December 2005, paranoid what-if rants about theoretical risks, became mainstream knowledge. If you're awake (geek or not), you know we have to start encrypting.

Re:The dream of encryption (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27159535)

It gets worse than that. I just asked the admin how the new encryption method at my work handled key distribution, he didn't know what I meant. Further conversation revealed he didn't know vpn was encrypted already, and had never heard of SSL.

Posting AC because of an NDA

Re:The dream of encryption (2, Interesting)

geekgirlandrea (1148779) | more than 5 years ago | (#27162691)

We never went anywhere. I still read Applied Cryptography from time to time. I also:

  • Run a private XMPP server for me and my girlfriend which only accepts SSL connections.
  • Operate a tor exit.
  • Attach a PGP signature to every e-mail I send.
  • Still think anonymous digital cash schemes are a really cool idea.

The problem is mostly that there are so few other people who seem to care. I send a digital signature on every e-mail, but as far as I know no one ever verifies it. I've sent and received maybe two *encrypted* messages in my life. I talk to my girlfriend through a private XMPP server, because she's a huge nerd just like me, but pretty much every other IM conversation I have goes out over the wire in plaintext and passes through some faceless corporation's servers. Anonymous digital cash is full of awesome, and I keep meaning to write a implementation of it one of these days, but there just don't seem to enough of us anarchistic crypto nerds around thinking that to make it economically viable. Of all the cool cryptographic tricks I've read about, the only one that seems to have gotten to the point of a practical, usable system is tor.

I think part of that is that a lot of the existing cool ideas have had flawed implementations that impede practical use. I think PGP's web of trust is seriously flawed, for example. Most of the time the only thing about a key that I care about is whether the person that knows the private key is also the legitimate owner of the associated e-mail address, but in order to sign someone's key, I also need to assent to whole list of other, harder to verify statements about that key. It should have had people sign separate statements relating the key to some other form of identity rather than the key itself, so I could say "The person who knows the private key corresponding to public key ID 20344213 also has the e-mail address blah@blah.com" without also having to say, for every other bit of identity attached to their public key, "The person who knows the private key corresponding to public key ID 20344213 also has the legal name Blah X. Blahson" or even "The photograph attached to public key ID 20344213 is a photograph of the person who knows the corresponding private key".

Somehow, I think if that issue went away, we wouldn't magically see everyone in the world suddenly using PGP, though. Fundamentally, the problem is that 99% of the people just don't give a damn about privacy. Out of the remaining 1%, most either still don't care enough to bother with cryptography, or don't understand how it works and are convinced the NSA has a secret backdoor in everything or something. Look at every Slashdot article about electronic voting. Everyone complains that, as actually implemented, it fundamentally depends on trusting the voting machines, and there is every reason to believe that they can't be trusted. Okay, that's pretty much true, but then the proposed solution is always "leave a paper trail", but that just requires you to trust a handful of corruptible humans instead of a machine. Maybe that's better, but it's not much better. No one ever mentions those all those lovely cryptographic voting protocols from Applied Cryptography, that, if implemented properly, could let you vote from your own machine using an open-source client speaking a standard protocol, and not have to trust *anyone*. Well, I guess for the mindless masses understanding cryptography like that is so far over their heads that they might as well just be blindly trusting the protocol designers, but I would have hoped for better from Slashdot geeks.

At this point does it need to be said? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27155975)

Encrypt everything. Even if you have no reason to, encrypt everything, because someday it might bite you in the ass.

Re:At this point does it need to be said? (1)

Shakrai (717556) | more than 5 years ago | (#27156113)

Even if you have no reason to, encrypt everything, because someday it might bite you in the ass.

Like when you forget your encryption key ;)

Re:At this point does it need to be said? (2, Funny)

Boomerang Fish (205215) | more than 5 years ago | (#27156157)

Yeah, I used to do this...

Then I lost the key due to a hard drive and floppy disk failure within the same week (wow, that dates this a bit...)

Now I have these wonderful encrypted documents that contain proof of alien intervention with the history of our planet and I can't get at it anymore...

D*MN YOU GRAYS!!!

--
I drank what?

Re:At this point does it need to be said? (5, Funny)

Obfuscant (592200) | more than 5 years ago | (#27156289)

Now I have these wonderful encrypted documents that contain proof of alien intervention with the history of our planet and I can't get at it anymore...

Just mail a copy of each one to yourself at another account and someone will decrypt them for you. I can't tell you who, I've already told you too much and I'm afraid awi3qu91 108OI)

[NO CARRIER]

Just curious (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27161145)

"No Carrier" to you is purely a Slashdot meme, right?

Re:At this point does it need to be said? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27167379)

...I've already told you too much and I'm afraid awi3qu91 108OI)

[NO CARRIER]

What I want to know is how did he "Preview", enter a CAPTCHA, then "Submit" after the carrier dropped?

Re:At this point does it need to be said? (3, Insightful)

Obfuscant (592200) | more than 5 years ago | (#27156347)

Not because it will bite you in the ass, but because by encrypting everything you 1) give them more stuff to look at and if they are looking at you they aren't looking at me, and 2) it won't be obvious that you are trying to hide something when you DO encrypt that particularly incriminating file. They'll have to spend time decrypting your email to Mom as well as the picture of cousin Julie when she was 4.

Re:At this point does it need to be said? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27158135)

the picture of cousin Julie when she was 4.

Anonymous Pedobear likes...

Re:At this point does it need to be said? (2, Interesting)

element-o.p. (939033) | more than 5 years ago | (#27158333)

I'd encrypt everything simply to protest the big-brother mentality that seems to be taking over here in the U.S. >:]

Freedom to Conspire (4, Funny)

MarkvW (1037596) | more than 5 years ago | (#27156037)

Which side are you on: CONTROL or KAOS? That is the question. The Government can only answer that question if it can intercept your communications. Are you going to let them? Can you stop them? Do you care?

All I can say is that you should Get Smart!

This is good (5, Insightful)

damburger (981828) | more than 5 years ago | (#27156089)

People like Sir Tim need to speak out on such issues, because their contributions to science and technology are touted by our leaders as 'proof' of Britain being a modern, forward thinking society - rather than the withered, reactionary, largely technophobic old empire we in fact are.

About mail (1)

rogere (1353247) | more than 5 years ago | (#27156173)

Is normal paper mail 'snooped' nowadays? Big box mail usually is, but envelopes? Sensible question, but if it is... in that sense snooping packets would make sense.

Re:About mail (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27163543)

UK postalfag here. We don't currently intercept mail; packages are (selectively) electronically sniffed for drugs and explosives and probably a few other things. If they're damaged and something illegal falls out, it gets reported, but otherwise stuff is not opened. However, the facilities exist to do so - most of the major sorting offices have intercept rooms where a percentage of mail can be pulled off the lines, opened, checked, and replaced. Most haven't been used for a very long time (within institutional memory, where I work) but they are still there and procedures are in place and in the manual for their use.

For specific individuals, such as terrorist suspects, their mail is opened at the branch that does the final delivery.

Use an envelope (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27156301)

'snooping' on data is NOT similar to the interception of mail.

It is similar to the postman reading the information on the postcard. For people who do not like that the envelope was invented.
Encryption is your envelope.

HTTPS (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27156321)

That's it. https.

Server operators that care for it will have it. Stupids will be snooped on. We do need some substitute for natural selection, after all.

Nothing to see here, move on.

What a fucking fantasy land Sir Timmy lives in... (-1, Flamebait)

GPLDAN (732269) | more than 5 years ago | (#27156331)

Get over yourself. Hoover had the phone system built to tap in the 1950s. The cellphone networks have voice recognition software all over it. Spy satellites watch people leave their homes. There are radiation detectors at all major ports. You are scanned to the nines when your board a public passenger jet.

Yet Sir Timmy wants an unfettered control channel free from snooping that is so fast, it can be used for real-time feedback, to come in and out of every corporation, every public utility, every school and every home in a nation under threat from global nuclear attack and information warfare around the clock by the Chinese? And I'm not just talking to US citizens out there in Slashdotland, all Europeans, all Russians, everyone - set up SSH and tcpdump and watch the brute forcers from China start in on you.

Net Neutrality is a good thing, lack of QoS on the internet is a "good thing". Being free to set up an IP stream to do ANYTHING, safe in the knowledge that nobody is watching? That is a bullshit Ivory Tower shithead thing, and he ought to STFU.

Re:What a fucking fantasy land Sir Timmy lives in. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27156617)

It's fucking sad to read this, and think you actually believe what you're writing.

Re:What a fucking fantasy land Sir Timmy lives in. (4, Insightful)

Timosch (1212482) | more than 5 years ago | (#27156713)

So basically the consequence of what you're saying is "Ban encryption, because those bloddy terrorists/chinese spies/pedophiles/software pirates might use it to do something evil"? Yeah, good idea. Tomorrow on CNN: Door locks banned. They prevent police from entering criminals' homes, police say.

Re:What a fucking fantasy land Sir Timmy lives in. (1)

rogere (1353247) | more than 5 years ago | (#27157081)

Is this a reply for another parent? I'm not implying anything, I want to know if there are countries where envelope mail is opened for 'snooping'.

Re:What a fucking fantasy land Sir Timmy lives in. (1)

GPLDAN (732269) | more than 5 years ago | (#27157261)

Did I say ban encryption? No, I don't think I did.

Investigate encrypted IP streams from US IP ranges to Chinese ones? You betcha.

Re:What a fucking fantasy land Sir Timmy lives in. (1)

geekgirlandrea (1148779) | more than 5 years ago | (#27162755)

So helping Chinese people get around the Great Firewall should get you investigated by a bunch of Gestapo wannabes? That's idiotic.

Re:What a fucking fantasy land Sir Timmy lives in. (2, Insightful)

DMUTPeregrine (612791) | more than 5 years ago | (#27156747)

Lack of QoS is not a good thing. I want routers to respect the IP TOS field. It's there for a reason. Lack of non-standard QoS is the bad thing. With QoS I can use bittorrent and play games at the same time, without it there's no prioritization and the game lags. It's the deep-packet inspection that's intrusive crap.

bad long-term solution (5, Interesting)

a2wflc (705508) | more than 5 years ago | (#27156503)

When governments start snooping on everything they make it harder to snoop on criminals in the future. This makes lots more people want secure networks, which makes more people create tools to make it easy to send/receive encrypted data, which makes even the people who don't know about the issues aware of the issues and tools. Once the tools/protocols become normal, police won't be able to snoop on suspected criminals even with a court order because everything is encrypted.

That'll just make them pass more laws and restrict ISPs so that unsnoopable content isn't allowed. Which will make people start creating stenogrphy tools so things look snoopable, which will make other people aware of the issues and wonder why the gov't is so concerned and start using them.

Then people start using those tools and snooping becomes more expensive (trying to detect stenogaphy) and still useless. But it will get lots of otherwise innocent people in trouble for using encryption or stenography to do something unimportant like send email to their mother.

If police stick to treating everyone as innocent until they had a valid reason to think otherwise and then got a court order they will have a lot more ability to snoop in the future.

Post office also ask about the content in mail (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27156815)

>> Sir Tim said that ISPs 'snooping' on data was similar to the interception of mail

Actually, if you think about it, the Post Office also ask about the _type_ of content in your mail: document (letter) ? CD/books ? or fire arms ? ;-)

i admit Post office does not read the words in your letter.

In Soviet UK.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27157431)

..Internets browse you!

NP (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27157513)

Encrypt, encrypt, encrypt. Strong encryption. Nothing more to say.

He's lying! (1)

KiwiCanuck (1075767) | more than 5 years ago | (#27157549)

Everyone knows Al Gore invented the www. ~:-)

TBLs personal view (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27157931)

Sir Tim, posted his personal view to #swig on irc.freenode.net [1]

http://www.w3.org/DesignIssues/NoSnooping.html

[1] http://swig.xmlhack.com/2009/03/11/2009-03-11.html#1236787895.276276

I'd like to know (1)

Slumdog (1460213) | more than 5 years ago | (#27158341)

What Al Gore thinks of this.

Obscure reference (1)

ClosedSource (238333) | more than 5 years ago | (#27159221)

That's like asking Al's father what he thinks of the CHP or state troopers.

Heh. (1)

Kingrames (858416) | more than 5 years ago | (#27159303)

The internet then defiantly turned around and screamed, "YES!"

So just like the US but late to the game (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27162065)

The ability to intercept and scan all of a users incoming internet traffic --isn't that exactly like what the US has been doing for years and years with Carnivore, Omnivore (the windows version), Packeteer, etc. for years and years... excpet that Britain is about 10 years behind in their draconian tactics. Its good to see that others can be as draconian as the US.

Sweden beat you to it! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27164911)

This already happens to every electronic transmission in Sweden - in full violation of EU laws because inter-border transmissions are the target. Denmark and Finland protested..Norway said less than it could have, but by-and-large, this was brushed aside and the EU just kept quiet about it. Now it is spreading. It's no coincidence

This is intellectually dishonest. (1)

rindeee (530084) | more than 5 years ago | (#27165167)

Even thinking that this is reasonable is amazingly foolish. If you are concerned that Internet snooping is a problem, then the solution isn't to demand that it not take place. The solution is to nullify it. You can only be assured that it won't happen if it cannot (technically) reasonably happen.
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