Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Powering Restaurants WIth Deep Fried Fuel

samzenpus posted more than 5 years ago | from the the-power-of-grease dept.

Power 148

Mike writes "Here's a brilliant idea for biofuels: rather than filtering used fry oil for use in vehicles, why not simplify matters and use it to heat and power the restaurant itself? The VegaWatt turns used vegetable oil into clean heat and energy for restaurants, eliminating the dirty and costly mess of oil disposal while producing 10-25% of the electricity needed to run a small restaurant. It also produces fuel free of chemicals or fossil fuels, unlike standard biodiesel."

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Like building an IDE in Java... (0, Offtopic)

Smidge207 (1278042) | more than 5 years ago | (#27171777)

...and using it to code Java apps; physically impossible. Now, back to my RAD struts build...

=Smidge=

Soylent heat is people! (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27171799)

Soylent heat is people (leftovers)!

Coming soon, (3, Insightful)

nobodylocalhost (1343981) | more than 5 years ago | (#27171813)

McDonalds Energy,
Solving home heating crisis by providing clean deep fryer vegetable oil!

Re:Coming soon, (3, Funny)

darkdaedra (1061330) | more than 5 years ago | (#27171867)

Now if they could only harness the methane from all those cows -- then we'd be talking about McDonald's as a serious energy company.

Re:Coming soon, (2, Funny)

zaf (5944) | more than 5 years ago | (#27172937)

Or the diners after they've eaten a big mac

Re:Coming soon, (1)

sgt scrub (869860) | more than 5 years ago | (#27174039)

Talking about a replenishable energy supply.

Re:Coming soon, (1)

Thelasko (1196535) | more than 5 years ago | (#27173453)

Now if they could only harness the methane from all those cows

Welcome to the wonderful world of anaerobic digestion. [wikipedia.org]

Bottogas (1)

Kupfernigk (1190345) | more than 5 years ago | (#27173459)

There used to a bottled propane called Bottogas which was sold in the UK. A friend (who admittedly lived in a rural area...) was persuaded when small by his older brother that it was so called because the bottles were filled with the gas from cows' bottoms. You may find this improbable, but buildings have caught fire and burnt down through people carelessly igniting cow fart.

Re:Coming soon, (2, Funny)

McGruber (1417641) | more than 5 years ago | (#27173489)

Now if they could only harness the methane from all those customers -- then we'd be talking about Taco Bell as a serious energy company.

Fixed your post for you!

Re:Coming soon, (1)

Xtravar (725372) | more than 5 years ago | (#27171885)

Oh dear. We're going to have another energy crisis when people stop demanding so much fried food.

Re:Coming soon, (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27171925)

I think McDonald's is a part of a conspiracy...

1) Get people fat
2) Oil runs out
3) Render down said fat people (ala whales) ...
5) Profit!

Re:Coming soon, (1)

Scrameustache (459504) | more than 5 years ago | (#27171943)

McDonalds Energy,
Solving home heating crisis by providing clean deep fryer vegetable oil!

McDonalds has beef fat in it's fryers. I remember that pissed off a bunch of Hindus a while back, they were smearing feces on the face of Ronald statues in India.

Re:Coming soon, (2, Informative)

AmyRose1024 (1160863) | more than 5 years ago | (#27172061)

They've used vegetable oil in their fryers for at least 10 years now. They now use a blend of soy and canola oil. http://www.ilsoy.org/soy-news/article/?sort=14&id=172 [ilsoy.org]

Re:Coming soon, (1)

Scrameustache (459504) | more than 5 years ago | (#27172877)

They've used vegetable oil in their fryers for at least 10 years now. They now use a blend of soy and canola oil. http://www.ilsoy.org/soy-news/article/?sort=14&id=172 [ilsoy.org]

Yeah, that was what those angry Hindus had been told before the scandal broke out ;-)

Re:Coming soon, (4, Informative)

Crazy Man on Fire (153457) | more than 5 years ago | (#27172259)

Google knows all: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/asia/india/1331625/McDonalds-admits-using-beef-fat-for-vegetarian-french-fries.html [telegraph.co.uk]

According to the article, the restaurant locations fry in vegetable oil, but the fries were partially fried in animal fat before they are frozen and shipped out to the restaurants.

The fast-food chain had maintained for more than a decade that only vegetable oil was used in the hope of appealing to vegetarians and religious groups who do not eat beef products. Yesterday's apology triggered a violent protest by Hindus in India.

The American company, which has served more than 200 billion portions of french fries around the world, confessed to a method of using beef fat to partly fry chips before they are sent to restaurants. They are then frozen and refried on the premises using vegetable oil.

Re:Coming soon, (1)

Scrameustache (459504) | more than 5 years ago | (#27174695)

Google knows all: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/asia/india/1331625/McDonalds-admits-using-beef-fat-for-vegetarian-french-fries.html [telegraph.co.uk]

According to the article, the restaurant locations fry in vegetable oil, but the fries were partially fried in animal fat before they are frozen and shipped out to the restaurants.

I sit corrected.

Re:Coming soon, (2, Funny)

Vertana (1094987) | more than 5 years ago | (#27172673)

Solving it the American way baby! Can't shoot at it? Aw. Throwing money at it doesn't help? Aw. Wait... revolutionary idea... let's deep fry it!!! *The suits come out of the conference room giving mental pats on the back to themselves*

How to save energy (2, Interesting)

amclay (1356377) | more than 5 years ago | (#27171823)

This is it. I love this kind of idea and packaging/sale. It's clean, it seems to work, and companies are going to be attracted to that (esp. the $800/month energy savings...) The idea really isn't new, but they've cleaned it up, and that's really what counts these days.

Re:How to save energy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27171859)

I think it's really cool that the fuel is free of chemicals. So what is that, like antimatter or something?

Re:How to save energy (1)

Hordeking (1237940) | more than 5 years ago | (#27172671)

I think it's really cool that the fuel is free of chemicals. So what is that, like antimatter or something?

Can't be much worse than the episode of Star Trek: TNG where the Enterprise puts into port, to have "Baryonic Matter" removed from the ship.

Re:How to save energy (1)

acohen1 (1454445) | more than 5 years ago | (#27172739)

Is that the same one where Tuvok tries to steal the Trilithium waste?

Re:How to save energy (1)

Hordeking (1237940) | more than 5 years ago | (#27172981)

Highly unlikely. Now if you go back into your cave and NEVER, EVER mention to any figment of the Bastard Child of Star Trek (or the fictional counterpart to Tuvok, Tim Russ) ever again, you may still be able to get into Heave (but you still won't get any virgins, or any other female, for that matter).

Re:How to save energy (1)

acohen1 (1454445) | more than 5 years ago | (#27173247)

Haha, totally is http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Starship_Mine [wikipedia.org] What were you saying?

Re:How to save energy (1)

Hordeking (1237940) | more than 5 years ago | (#27173573)

Haha, totally is http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Starship_Mine [wikipedia.org] What were you saying?

I stand corrected. Tuvok was in it. As I think about all the appearances (as different characters) of Tim Russ, I suspect that the original person must be the victim of DNA piracy and copying. Too bad they didn't have DRM (DNA Rights Management) in the 24th century. He can't be the only victim of 24th century identity theft...

Re:How to save energy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27172557)

They'd probably save more energy by installing evaporative multifuel burners (like a backpacking stove) in their stoves to burn the oil directly.

how much veggie oil is needed? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27171847)

fried food is kind of nasty

But... (1)

XanC (644172) | more than 5 years ago | (#27171891)

That's my retirement grease!

My mate's car... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27171901)

My friend runs his diesel car on a 50% mix of diesel and used oil from a fish and chip shop. And it always stinks of fish.

Re:My mate's car... (1)

DanWS6 (1248650) | more than 5 years ago | (#27172119)

Your friend or his car?

Re:My mate's car... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27172211)

The shop

Just one problem (2, Insightful)

Locke2005 (849178) | more than 5 years ago | (#27171907)

If everybody started using used vegetable oil for an energy source, wouldn't the cost of used vegetable oil go way up? Meaning it would be more cost effective to sell the oil and buy the electricity rather than use the oil to generate my own electricity. Trust me, if dead cats were to become a viable energy source, then even the market value of a dead cat would skyrocket. (What?!? There's currently no market for trading dead cat futures?!?)

Re:Just one problem (1)

mooingyak (720677) | more than 5 years ago | (#27172077)

Where's the problem in that?

Re:Just one problem (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27172461)

Kinda along the same lines as in our rush to use more "bio friendly" fuels, we are rising the price of basic food stuffs (corn) and the people who live day to day eating the food we are burning are going hungry.

Look at all the other countries that have condemned our use of eco-fuels because their people are literally starving as a result.

Way to go environmentalists. Try and save the planet by killing the people on it.

Re:Just one problem (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27172699)

use of biofuels in no way shape or form raises the price of basic food stuffs....

Rising prices of oil / fuel raises the price of food stuffs.

Ban all trading of commodities futures for things like crude oil, grains and watch prices fall and stabilize.

Modify trading of these items so that if you buy something, you buy it (and are asked where to ship / store it)...

You pay for shipping, storing whatever you bought, and the person selling it is done with it.

These small changes to the market would lower the profiteering and margins of those trying to extract every last cent from the market. Prices to those who actually use the products would drop, and the prices for those who sell the product would go up (most middle men would be cut, if they had to pay for shipping/storage of said products) and the markets would equalize into something that would actually improve our economy.

the root cause of our current financial woes is greed... pure and simple...

Re:Just one problem (1)

mooingyak (720677) | more than 5 years ago | (#27173205)

Except used veggie oil is currently waste.

People with bio-diesel cars go up to restaurants and are freely given the stuff because otherwise the restaurant has to spend time/money in disposing of it.

So... still not seeing the problem.

Re:Just one problem (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27173937)

No it's not waste. The companies that pick up used vegetable oil from restaurants resell it to companies that use it to make other products (cosmetics, soap, plastics, etc). The less waste oil available on the market due to it being made into bio-diesel, the higher overall demand for vegetable oil as the companies that used the waste oil seek out other sources.

That is why the push towards bio-diesel is causing the deforesting some tropical areas in order to expand palm oil/soybean plantations. Clear cut and burn is the popular method, releasing more tons of CO2 into the atmosphere than saved by not burning oil.

Way to go greenies!

Re:Just one problem (5, Insightful)

Scrameustache (459504) | more than 5 years ago | (#27172111)

If everybody started using used vegetable oil for an energy source, wouldn't the cost of used vegetable oil go way up?

If the restaurants all start using their used oil for this secondary purpose instead of selling it, how would the market for that now-mostly-free waste product exist?

I've done that fryer-cleaning job. Trust me, if you factor in the man hours it takes to move and store that oil compared to having a hose you could plug in there to drain directly to your fuel tank, you'll chose the option that lets you spend your time scrubbing something instead of messing with fluctuating oil markets.

It'd be worth it just to remove the occasional slip & fall with a couple of buckets full of oil spilling as you drop: The accident that causes itself.

Re:Just one problem (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27172191)

aye, oil deposal is expensive from the reasons you listed. This is used oil which has little purpose left for the company other then deposal or recycle (both have to deal with various issues including transportation cost). If it saves the company money while making good use of the oil, I don't see why they wouldn't do it unless the equipment is too expensive. I actually wonder why this hasn't been done yet considering the technology been available for a while.

Re:Just one problem (1)

shadowbearer (554144) | more than 5 years ago | (#27172509)

  Another thing is that not all cities or towns have local businesses that collect the waste oil - we don't here, the closest collection business is fifty miles away. Factor in the extra fuel burned and pollution created in transporting that used veg oil to collection centers in petro burning trucks, and there's even more of a fuel/environmental savings.

  This is an excellent example of how keeping your recycling as local as possible is a win-win.

  Now we need to promote local food production more... my small (~10k pop) city just spent about five million last year on a "water park" - this after over 11 years of drought - that would have been much better spent on the community gardens and greenhouses that a lot of people around here have been asking for for many years...

SB

Re:Just one problem (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 5 years ago | (#27172609)

I would rather they used a good filtering method and reused most of the oil for frying.

Re:Just one problem (1)

m.ducharme (1082683) | more than 5 years ago | (#27172775)

Which I'm sure they do, but you can only re-filter that oil so many times before it's just not worth the effort any more.

Re:Just one problem (2, Informative)

NemosomeN (670035) | more than 5 years ago | (#27173129)

That would cause the formation of trans-fats, a very bad thing.

Re:Just one problem (1)

m.ducharme (1082683) | more than 5 years ago | (#27173703)

Really? filtering creates trans fats? When I last worked in a restaurant, most people didn't care about trans fats, so maybe they don't do it any more.

Re:Just one problem (1)

v1 (525388) | more than 5 years ago | (#27174119)

I'd imagine then you'd be talking about the cost of filters and the economic impact of disposing of them.

Re:Just one problem (1)

blueg3 (192743) | more than 5 years ago | (#27173027)

That seems like an unlikely filter. While it's reasonably easy to filter out particulate matter, deep-fry grease breaks down from being held at high temperatures. I'm not sure you could effectively filter out the breakdown byproducts.

Re:Just one problem (2, Insightful)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 5 years ago | (#27172231)

The price would certainly go up since, as waste, the oil is worthless(or even costs money to dispose of); but there is no reason to expect it to rise in price above other similar energy sources. If the cost of electricity is X, why would I ever pay more than X for vegetable oil? If nobody will pay more than X for vegetable oil, then it won't be cost effective to sell vegetable oil and buy electricity with the profits.

The only exception to that would occur because of fixed costs and economies of scale. If, say, an oil generator costs $10,000,000, or if large generators have far better efficiency than small ones, then it would make sense for everyone in a given area to sell oil to a large producer, and buy electricity. Given that shipping costs money, the savings of centralization would have to be large enough to overcome the costs.

Re:Just one problem (1)

mrchaotica (681592) | more than 5 years ago | (#27174149)

If the cost of electricity is X, why would I ever pay more than X for vegetable oil?

You would pay more because you can't burn electricity in your diesel engine. Restaurants could power themselves using waste veggie oil or electricity from the grid; vehicles (at least, real vehicles as opposed to non-existent electrics and plug-in hybrids) must use diesel, and thus have more inelastic demand.

Re:Just one problem (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27172353)

Meaning it would be more cost effective to sell the oil and buy the electricity rather than use the oil to generate my own electricity.

In perfect competition it would have identical costs to buy electricity and sell oil as just generating electricity directly. Unless economies of scale comes into play somehow.

By the way, that hasn't happened yet; we're not yet in perfect competition. Now is the time to collect economic profits. Later on, only normal profits will be available.

Re:Just one problem (1)

maxume (22995) | more than 5 years ago | (#27172591)

The price will only go up so much. Normal people aren't going to pay more for the used oil than for diesel, so there is a reasonable estimate of the price ceiling (given that there is processing involved to make the oil useful, it would be odd for it to exceed the price of diesel over time (an irrational spike wouldn't be real surprising, look at ebay)).

Re:Just one problem (1)

NemosomeN (670035) | more than 5 years ago | (#27173169)

Well, the prices would converge. Used oil would go up in price, but other energy sources would go down. They would sort of meet in the middle (Well, not the middle, because non-used-oil energy is a huge market). Let's not forget that gasoline used to be garbage, either.

Re:Just one problem (1)

maxume (22995) | more than 5 years ago | (#27173497)

They would converge, but I'm not sure that the coming down would be a big part of that.

Re:Just one problem (2, Insightful)

Thelasko (1196535) | more than 5 years ago | (#27173363)

Meaning it would be more cost effective to sell the oil and buy the electricity rather than use the oil to generate my own electricity.

I doubt it, this technology has three major advantages over selling the oil and buying the electricity.
1) No transmission loss from the power plant to the customer.
2) No waste heat from the power generation, as it is used to heat the restaurant's water.
3) No fuel is burned in transporting the soon-to-be fuel.

In theory, the markets sort out the most efficient use of resources. If this technology is truly more efficient, it will thrive.

Re:Just one problem (2, Insightful)

mrchaotica (681592) | more than 5 years ago | (#27174313)

You're missing the big picture: if the restaurant sells the oil for use in diesel vehicles, that displaces the dino-diesel the vehicles would otherwise use. If you assumed that the electricity the restaurant would use otherwise was created more efficiently than mining, refining, and burning the diesel in the vehicle, then selling the waste veggie oil wins.

Restaurants can easily be powered with electricity generated from clean and renewable resources. Vehicles still need fuel, because [synthetic] gasoline and [bio]diesel work much better than batteries (or hydrogen, or any other alternative so far).

Two problems, you get fined for not paying taxes (3, Insightful)

Shivetya (243324) | more than 5 years ago | (#27173493)

http://www.newsobserver.com/news/story/599471.html [newsobserver.com]

It was a really distressing story to see that someone who went out of his way to avoid using oil for powering his car got fined for essentially evading fuel taxes by buying vegetable oil from costo

Re:Two problems, you get fined for not paying taxe (1)

maxume (22995) | more than 5 years ago | (#27173625)

It is kind of a bummer, but if you live near water, there is usually cheaper fuel available that does not contain road taxes, and he essentially did the same thing as going to one of those pumps with his car. It's kind of silly to tax him alone, but on the other hand, there isn't nearly enough oil for everyone to switch, so it isn't really fair not to.

Re:Two problems, you get fined for not paying taxe (1)

Locke2005 (849178) | more than 5 years ago | (#27174333)

When I first got my 2003 Civic Hybrid, Oregon DMV was doing a similarly stupid thing - they slapped a surcharge onto the registration fee for all hybrids, on the premise that I wouldn't be paying as much in gasoline taxes! A couple years later they saw the error of their ways; now they don't charge any more to register a hybrid. Now they just want to put a GPS in every car and tax you by mile instead of taxing you by gallon. But yes, use of alternative fuels does screw up the model they use for assessing highway taxes.

Re:Just one problem (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27174349)

It's not what they already do on Stock Markets today.
Sold you a dead cat, while keep for them the "live cat" (some sort of SchrÃdinger cat )?

Right, right.... (4, Insightful)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 5 years ago | (#27171935)

"It also produces fuel free of chemicals..." As a somewhat tired internet meme would say; "O rly?"

FFS people, virtually everything is made of "chemicals" and that isn't a problem. Sure, there are loads of quite nasty chemicals that will play hell with your chemistry and are to be avoided; but the notion that there are chemical free fuels is beyond asinine.

Re:Right, right.... (2, Funny)

Jeff DeMaagd (2015) | more than 5 years ago | (#27172483)

That's why I use only the top notch dark matter to make my fries.

Re:Right, right.... (2, Insightful)

blueg3 (192743) | more than 5 years ago | (#27172933)

Even if you take it to mean a reasonable interpretation -- free of added or unwanted chemicals (which, as you point out, really means added or unwanted *anything*), it's still not true. Oil that's been held at high temperatures and used repeatedly to fry food is by no means free of impurities. At least some of these chemicals are hazardous or carcinogenic. Maybe the fuel overall is clean compared to the alternatives, but it's not truly clean.

Or we can use clean coal (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27171969)

We can use clean coal, appreciate what it really is, and stop wasting time and money on pipedream alternative energy plans.

Keep eating fried foods... (1)

madhatter256 (443326) | more than 5 years ago | (#27172025)

As long as people keep eating fried foods, then there will be an abundant supply of clean fuel... So F U to those who tell us what we should and should not eat.

Up with trans fats, down with... boiled crap.

Re:Keep eating fried foods... (2, Funny)

guyminuslife (1349809) | more than 5 years ago | (#27172151)

On the other hand, you'll have to burn more of it to drag your fat ass to the McDonald's in the only megavan that it will fit in.

Re:Keep eating fried foods... (1)

maxume (22995) | more than 5 years ago | (#27172657)

Trans fats are mostly used to stabilize shelf foods, they don't taste better or anything (I would say food in general tastes better since the trans fat freak out, they have to use other methods of keeping the food fresh, so it is fresher...).

Mouth-watering smog (3, Funny)

the_therapist (1143675) | more than 5 years ago | (#27172045)

I for one welcome smog warnings that are accompanied by the delicate scent of fries.

What type of conversion? (1)

a1terego (912274) | more than 5 years ago | (#27172087)

So does the vega-thingie burn the oil or harvest heat from used oil? Doesn't burning vegetable oil still produce a lot CO2? I don't get it. I guess you get less smog-forming chemicals.

Re:What type of conversion? (3, Informative)

jhantin (252660) | more than 5 years ago | (#27172245)

It's CO2 that was pulled out of the atmosphere when the vegetables it came from were grown, so in that respect it's carbon-neutral. The CO2 emitted by farming equipment, fertilizer production, and so forth would have happened anyway.

Re:What type of conversion? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27173765)

It's CO2 that was pulled out of the atmosphere when the vegetables it came from were grown, so in that respect it's carbon-neutral. The CO2 emitted by farming equipment, fertilizer production, and so forth would have happened anyway.

...and if the energy being replaced is from fossil fuels, it's effectively better than carbon-neutral.

Re:What type of conversion? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27174129)

The increased demand for vegetable oil has encouraged people to clear land for the purpose of growing palm oil. Burning down a tropical rain forest in order to grow bio-fuel is not carbon neutral.

Re:What type of conversion? (1)

mrchaotica (681592) | more than 5 years ago | (#27174523)

The CO2 emitted by farming equipment, fertilizer production, and so forth would have happened anyway.

And there's no reason that stuff couldn't also have been run on biofuels anyway!

Not just for soap anymore! (4, Funny)

Scrameustache (459504) | more than 5 years ago | (#27172159)

Plastic surgery clinics could do that too. It would be better than just leaving their lipid waste in big plastic bags in bio hazard dumpsters, where anyone can just jump the fence and steal it.

Re:Not just for soap anymore! (4, Funny)

MightyYar (622222) | more than 5 years ago | (#27172309)

I have a friend who fuels his lipid car simply by following Star Jones around from liposuction clinic to liposuction clinic.

He also has a methane motorcycle that is fueled entirely by Rosie O'Donnell, and a composting house heater fueled entirely by tuning the radio to Rush Limbaugh.

Re:Not just for soap anymore! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27172769)

I have a friend who fuels his lipid car simply by following Star Jones around from liposuction clinic to liposuction clinic.

He also has a methane motorcycle that is fueled entirely by Rosie O'Donnell, and a composting house heater fueled entirely by tuning the radio to Rush Limbaugh.

Tell your friend that I am pretty sure he is to blame for global warming.

Re:Not just for soap anymore! (1)

MightyYar (622222) | more than 5 years ago | (#27172969)

Silly AC, everyone knows that has to do with the decline in piracy [venganza.org] !

Re:Not just for soap anymore! (1)

Qzukk (229616) | more than 5 years ago | (#27174291)

That graph needs to be updated to reflect the recent activity by Somali pirates and the consequent winter storms throughout the US.

really? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27172171)

It also produces fuel free of chemicals or fossil fuels, unlike standard biodiesel.

Free of chemicals? What are they burning then? Certainly there are emissions, so what are they?

No chemicals? (1)

White Flame (1074973) | more than 5 years ago | (#27172195)

It also produces fuel free of chemicals or fossil fuels, unlike standard biodiesel.

How does that work? Maybe they meant "hazardous chemicals" or something.

Re:No chemicals? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27172357)

I hear my girlfriend say that all the time (...); it seems to be common terminology in the wanna-be green world. Chemical == Bad.

Re:No chemicals? (1)

Fieryphoenix (1161565) | more than 5 years ago | (#27172613)

It's a little known fact that used cooking oil is so evil that it dissolves all molecular bonds, leaving only individual atoms. That's why fast food is so bad for your heart.

Free of chemicals? (1)

RecoveredMarketroid (569802) | more than 5 years ago | (#27172343)

What the hell does that mean, anyway? People throw that phrase around, and I guess you have an idea of what they are getting at, but as a claim, isn't it problematic?

Re:Free of chemicals? (1)

PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) | more than 5 years ago | (#27172617)

What the hell does that mean, anyway?

That means that, whoever wrote it, is free of intelligence.

Clean? (1)

H0p313ss (811249) | more than 5 years ago | (#27172477)

Aren't they burning a hydrocarbon? How does this qualify as clean?

Re:Clean? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27172661)

Reminds me of an article I read about biodiesel. According to the author, biodiesel was 100% efficient. It also makes your amp go up to 11.

Re:Clean? (3, Informative)

SydShamino (547793) | more than 5 years ago | (#27173019)

When was that carbon last in the atmosphere? If the answer is "within the past two years" then it doesn't make things worse.

If the answer is "fifty-seven million years ago" then there may be a problem.

Re:Clean? (1)

H0p313ss (811249) | more than 5 years ago | (#27173499)

When was that carbon last in the atmosphere? If the answer is "within the past two years" then it doesn't make things worse.

If the answer is "fifty-seven million years ago" then there may be a problem.

Carbon neutral and clean are not the same thing.

Re:Clean? (1)

mrchaotica (681592) | more than 5 years ago | (#27174597)

Biodiesel has reduced emissions [biodiesel.org] (warning: PDF) compared to dino-diesel for every category of pollutant except NOx (oxides of nitrogen).

Economies of scale (1)

westlake (615356) | more than 5 years ago | (#27172519)

I still think it cleaner, safer and more responsible to leave bio-fuels to the pro - the experienced commercial operator.

The restaurant is a fire waiting to happen.

They survive on very thin margins. They hire kids for jobs like this. They don't pay them much. They don't train them well.

Re:Economies of scale (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 5 years ago | (#27172631)

If they can stand and use a deep fryer, then that can plug a hose from the fryer to the automated system.
 

Or we could make lipstick? (1)

migla (1099771) | more than 5 years ago | (#27172601)

At one restaurant I worked at 15-20 years ago, the spent frying oil was collected and then picked up by someone. The chef said it was like returning bottles or selling scrap metal. One use was allegedly that the cosmetics industry would purchase the processed oil and put it in lipsticks. Was he taking a piss?

Re:Or we could make lipstick? (1)

PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) | more than 5 years ago | (#27172779)

Was he taking a piss?

It depends. Did he shake it any more than three times?

In either case, you've put me off eating out for a week.

Re:Or we could make lipstick? (1)

mrchaotica (681592) | more than 5 years ago | (#27174663)

Yes, you could make lipstick from WVO. Of course I'd rather have biodiesel, personally.

By the way, the by-product of biodiesel production is glycerin, so you could probably make the biodiesel and the lipstick at the same time if you wanted.

what's with the second picture on the linked page? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27172721)

Is it just me or is the picture with the guy standing next to the VegaWatt photoshopped?

Re:what's with the second picture on the linked pa (1)

Jogar the Barbarian (5830) | more than 5 years ago | (#27172975)

No, it's just the dramatic contrast in the wall behind them.

Obligatory.... (1)

davidsyes (765062) | more than 5 years ago | (#27173149)

"NOW you're COOKIN'"...

McDonalds (1)

tsa (15680) | more than 5 years ago | (#27173213)

McDonalds powers their trucks with the old oil for the fries here in NL. I calculated that you don't have to use any extra diesel to get the truck to all the McDonalds's here to pick up their trash. Very cool concept.

KISS Principle (1)

McGruber (1417641) | more than 5 years ago | (#27173541)

Why not use the biofuel to heat and power the deep fryer?

But the smell... (1)

graemdrake (925258) | more than 5 years ago | (#27173561)

I can see how this would be and appealing solution to oil disposal and energy costs at McDonald's or another fast-food fryer joint. But what about a larger market? As any owner of a car that runs on vegetable oil can tell you - one of the side effects of burning fryer oil is a strong and persistent smell of fried food.

This may be acceptable at some restaurants that are already saturated with this odor, but wider adoption of such appliances may be limited by nuisance and customer concerns.

Powering the burning process (1)

owlstead (636356) | more than 5 years ago | (#27173947)

Why not start with the heating of the fat itself? Make a frying pan that cleans itself and uses the leftover/bad oil to heat the new/filtered oil. One machine that powers itself. You can of course use some of the energy for the electronics/pumps and maybe even power a few other devices. Or would this not be technical feasible? I like self sufficient devices.

Go go Glass Nickel Pizza Grease Mobile!! (-1, Offtopic)

hackus (159037) | more than 5 years ago | (#27174657)

Sorry.

I love Glass Nickel Pizza.

Best Pizza in Madtown!!

Any Slashdotter's out there who want to meet and have some pizza in Madtown let me know!

-Hack

Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?