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Cybercrime-As-a-Service Takes Off

timothy posted more than 5 years ago | from the no-need-for-subtlety dept.

Security 113

pnorth writes "Malware writers that sell toolkits online for as little as $400 will now configure and host the attacks as a service for another $50, according to email offers cited by security experts. A technical account manager at authentication firm Vasco said that cyber crime is becoming so business-like that online offerings of malicious code often include support and maintenance services. He said 'it was inevitable that services would be sold to people who bought the malware toolkits but didn't know how to configure them. Not only can you buy configuration as a service now, you can have the malware operated for you, too.'"

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113 comments

Rooted. (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27175251)

First.aaaa/

Re:Rooted. (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27175615)

Yo, dawg! I herd you liek being rooted so I put a computer in your computer so you can be rooted while your rooted!

You really know when its a business... (5, Interesting)

Shivinski (1053538) | more than 5 years ago | (#27175279)

Once you see the toolkits cracked and pirated on torrent site's :P

Re:You really know when its a business... (2, Insightful)

Hurricane78 (562437) | more than 5 years ago | (#27175753)

On torrent site's what?

Re:You really know when its a business... (4, Funny)

clarkkent09 (1104833) | more than 5 years ago | (#27176503)

apparently on torrent site's P drive

Re:You really know when its a business... (1)

eleuthero (812560) | more than 5 years ago | (#27180045)

This only works if the writer of the original post has dyslexia, right? :P vs. P:? or does this windows user not know something basic about linux (are mount points typed in reverse?)

Re:You really know when its a business... (4, Insightful)

timeOday (582209) | more than 5 years ago | (#27175867)

I think your comment is more insightful than funny. The question is, can an unregulated blackmarket grow and thrive without law - no contract enforcement, courts, or police?

Some would point to the large sums of cash in the illicit drug trade as evidence that it can, but I point to the stratospheric markup on illicit drugs as evidence that the market is horribly inefficient. The markups show there's a shortage of suppliers - due in part to law enforcement, I'm sure, but being in the drug trade also means running the risk of being gunned down (or worse) by competitors. Personally I prefer a bit more regulation in my markets than that.

Re:You really know when its a business... (2, Insightful)

zach_the_lizard (1317619) | more than 5 years ago | (#27176007)

The illicit drug trade is regulated, or do you not think that something being made totally illegal counts as a regulation?

It is because of that regulation (your business cannot exist) that drug dealers cannot seek any kind of arbitration, private or government.

Re:You really know when its a business... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27176345)

Oh boohoo. I feel so sorry that the people who go around gunning down others in their drug wars can't seek arbitration for their problems. Oh how will I ever sleep at night?

Re:You really know when its a business... (3, Insightful)

zippthorne (748122) | more than 5 years ago | (#27176991)

Totally not true. If there is enough money on the table, whole illicit governments will form to take care of the people's need for illicit arbitration and such.

That's the true nature of the "protection racket" and the danger to the legitimate government is that it can be supplanted by the illicit government.

The market exists. Whether free or not, open or not, the market has formed and exists. The best you can hope for as a government is to influence it in small amounts here and there to achieve your aims. Push too hard and you'll find that like a river delta, it routes around you or bypasses you entirely.

That is why prohibition is dangerous.

Re:You really know when its a business... (1)

ssintercept (843305) | more than 5 years ago | (#27177545)

the illicit drug trade is completely regulated:

on the state level in illinois there is a $25 dollar tax per 1/4 oz sold. all weed sold must have said stamp.

and on the neighborhood level- if you dont bay back guido for that 1/2 lb of blow you were gonna flip for that killer gaming rig- vinnie and johnny "no nose" vespucci come over and regulate your ass.

~puts on tinfoil hat~
i left the feds out cuz i am still up in the air about the CIA sellin crack...[citation needed]
~removes tinfoil hat~

Re:You really know when its a business... (1)

Anachragnome (1008495) | more than 5 years ago | (#27178875)

Yeah, and with a little luck we'll start finding the heads of "legitmate business owner" hackers in ice chests left in a Mexican desert....

Re:You really know when its a business... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27176567)

Nature abhors an unregulated market. If there really are no rules, the major players will step in and impose their own brand of order. To avoid this, you need some kind of authority to prevent it, which is itself regulation.

In the case of drugs, you have both kinds of regulation. First, you have the law enforcement. Second, you have the gangs. Both attempt to impose their own kind of order on the market.

Re:You really know when its a business... (1)

Jurily (900488) | more than 5 years ago | (#27178585)

The markups show there's a shortage of suppliers - due in part to law enforcement,

You haven't been to a lot of UK pubs lately, have you? The only shortage is in quality control.

Actually, the problem is the opposite. (3, Interesting)

tjstork (137384) | more than 5 years ago | (#27179207)

Freakonomics had a really good article about the drug business and in a way, it is efficient. There is ample supply, despite law enforcement. And, there are more than enough interested workers, who actually wind up making, on average, slightly less than minimum wage.

Basically, drug culture is an -illusion- of wealth, because while a few do get rich, its ultimately just terrible work for the vast majority of people that participate in it. It tends to thrive in impoverished areas, because, for those people, there's just no work at all.

Re:Actually, the problem is the opposite. (1)

ultranova (717540) | more than 5 years ago | (#27180175)

Basically, drug culture is an -illusion- of wealth, because while a few do get rich, its ultimately just terrible work for the vast majority of people that participate in it. It tends to thrive in impoverished areas, because, for those people, there's just no work at all.

So basically, it's like any other market?

Re:Actually, the problem is the opposite. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27180859)

Ooooh, zing!

If only people set up anti-market comments like this all the time, you guys wouldn't be forced through the indignity of having to come up with, say, an argument, or a better system, at all!

Re:You really know when its a business... (1)

DaFallus (805248) | more than 5 years ago | (#27179487)

Most people stay out of the business because of the high risk of being caught or things turning violent. High risk = high prices = high reward.

Re:You really know when its a business... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27179663)

Wait, are you saying that a free market economy isn't a perfect and self regulating form of market? That...we...I feel sick.

Re:You really know when its a business... (3, Funny)

DNS-and-BIND (461968) | more than 5 years ago | (#27176079)

Apostrophe's are for pural's, dude's

Re:You really know when its a business... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27176115)

And "l"'s are for osers.

Re:You really know when its a business... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27181519)

Really? I don't think so. Maybe I'm just too possessive.

Honesty? (5, Insightful)

LinuxGeek (6139) | more than 5 years ago | (#27175299)

Will the sellers be honest enough to give you all the money they drain from bank accounts?

Re:Honesty? (2)

broken_chaos (1188549) | more than 5 years ago | (#27175567)

Will they even be honest enough to give you the service or support you paid for? I wouldn't even trust them that far.

Re:Honesty? (4, Funny)

interkin3tic (1469267) | more than 5 years ago | (#27176227)

Will they even be honest enough to give you the service or support you paid for? I wouldn't even trust them that far.

I'm not very familiar with people who make malware, but I'd imagine/hope the "support" would look something like this:

Customer: Yes, I'm having problems with your product, the Malwarator 1000
Anonymous support: LOL FUCK YUO NOOB!!1

If it offends any malware writers to be stereotyped like that, particularly the guys behind antivirus 2009, give me your home address and I'll mail you an apology.

Re:Honesty? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27176721)

Sure...

935 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW
Washington, D.C. 20535-0001

I promise. Nothing bad will happen to you....

Re:Honesty? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27177679)

Uuuuuuh....actually antivirus 2009 is run by a real company in the UK, they DO have a mailing address. They're just assholes.

Re:Honesty? (1)

Zironic (1112127) | more than 5 years ago | (#27176519)

The black market deals in trust, you know they'll deliver their service and support to you because they've delivered service and support to other people you know.

Obviously they might one day just pack up and leave with all your money but that's life in the black market for you.

Re:Honesty? (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27175721)

Criminals are actually quite honest when you're the customer rather than the victim. The underground economy is a dangerous place and reputation is everything.

Uhhhhhh....MODS! Mod parent down! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27175919)

This guy has no clue what he is talking about. I am a private investigator and not only through my training but in my experience, I know this to not the case.

Re:Uhhhhhh....MODS! Mod parent down! (0)

Ethanol-fueled (1125189) | more than 5 years ago | (#27176145)

Wow, a private investigator who headlines his post with "Uhhhhhhh...MODS?"

Anyway, what he said certainly sounds plausible...in the underworld, there's a big difference between customers and victims. In the world of legitimate software, users are the victims!

Ethanol... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27176373)

Lick my balls. Suck them. Whatever you want to do as long as it involves caressing.
 
You are really gay and second only to ShieldW0lf in terms of gayness. Good-bye!

Re:Uhhhhhh....MODS! Mod parent down! (1)

Architect_sasyr (938685) | more than 5 years ago | (#27177785)

Not only is it plausable, we have a reference in the torrenting world. Look at some of the torrents you're currently downloading, odds are they will have a fairly common named one in there - why? Because these people are giving something away for free, but have a hell of a reputation to keep up, so they put out the quality equipment.

I see no reason why this should not, and can not, apply to the underground. That said, what do they mean "takes off" - there have been people willing to do this for *years*.

Re:Honesty? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27178021)

Having ordered various prescription drugs (e.g., modafinil) online, I can attest to this. Those offshore pharmacy sites have fanatical customer service, with followups to make sure the shipment got through Customs. (Which it generally does.) They'll re-send an identical order for free if the first one gets confiscated, just on the strength of your word.

They clearly value repeat business a great deal more than many legitimate sellers do.

Re:Honesty? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27178647)

Periodically buying illegal drugs I can attest to this even. Cocaine dealers in London are some of the most polite and helpful people you'll meet - came as a surprise to me the first few times.

I suspect (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27176121)

I suspect that the customers don't give a shit about that as long as the malware service providers hurt their competition/rivals.

At least, that's what we pay for.

Re:Honesty? (1)

nametaken (610866) | more than 5 years ago | (#27177027)

I expect it's like any other kind of crime "service". You generally don't pay someone to just rob some random people for you and give you the money. You pay someone to kill a specific person, or help blackmail a specific person/company, threaten someone in particular or knock off a target you have specific requisite knowledge of. In any case, even if they could rip off their clients, they'd have a hard time marketing their "service" again.

I can't see it usually being people taking $450 to "just get some money from a bunch of people". If that were the job, and possible, they'd be doing it without the paid request from a client.

frist psot (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27175301)

n/t

It's a franchise business model (4, Funny)

earlymon (1116185) | more than 5 years ago | (#27175321)

And given that it's a franchise business model, I guess I'd like to know two things: are there delivery guarantees and does Uncle Enzo know about this?

Re:It's a franchise business model (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27176155)

It's not part of the Mafia franchise, so no delivery within 30 minutes guarantees. This is probably part of Victoras Radvila's Greater Lithuania, go see them. It'll cost you a few trillian, no biggy.

Re:It's a franchise business model (1)

earlymon (1116185) | more than 5 years ago | (#27176421)

It'll cost you a few trillian, no biggy.

Thanks for the tip - at first, I was afraid that was in Kongbucks but if we're only talking bluebacks, it's practically free.

Re:It's a franchise business model (1)

Hordeking (1237940) | more than 5 years ago | (#27177399)

It'll cost you a few trillian, no biggy.

Note to self: Get a few copies of Trillian, burn them to CD, hand them over for mucho payback!

Re:It's a franchise business model (1)

Trent Hawkins (1093109) | more than 5 years ago | (#27180319)

The better question is: do you really want to hand over your credit card number to a bunch of hackers?

Re:It's a franchise business model (1)

fotbr (855184) | more than 5 years ago | (#27180993)

Give them a number that was purchased for cash on the street.

My thoughts on this article. (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27175383)

This whole article is based on some blog posting of an email that is offering a trojan toolkit and hosting for it.

We do not know if the email is legit or fake.

This was pimped at some security convention as proof that security online has somehow changed recently. Of course the people discussing it have a motive to make money of the folks who buy security services/software for their companies.

I find this article to be of little value, nothing revolutionary was mentioned, and on the whole barely worth posting to slashdot.

And even if it ISN'T fake. (5, Funny)

Ungrounded Lightning (62228) | more than 5 years ago | (#27175553)

This whole article is based on some blog posting of an email ... We do not know if the email is legit or fake. ... This was pimped at some security convention ... Of course the people discussing it have a motive to make money ...

And even if they're being honest:

Any bets whether they found one of the law-enforcement "sting" operations?

Re:And even if it ISN'T fake. (1)

lxs (131946) | more than 5 years ago | (#27180047)

It's obviously viral marketing for the sequel to Uplink [wikipedia.org]

Leet's all hack IP address 422.220.512.13 again.

Someone should tell this story (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27175449)

I know, troll me, but I'm desperate to get the word out. Friends told me that Direct TV was crooked but I thought I checked into everthing. I ordered a package at a special rate of 49.99 for 12 months (in tiny print they say based on "other" things). They are charging me $84.99 a month and won't let me out of the agreememnt. They say I had to sign up for "paperless" electronic billing prior to my service being activated. I ordered the service and while the guy was here installing it, I signed for paperless. What a bunch of crap. They also told me I had to have the special adaptors for network access at $25.00 each. Guess what they were. Powerline ethernet adaptors. So, I told him I didn't need it and he said that ther were 3 on my account and that I should just keep them as he couldnt take them back from me. Mind you never opened or used. So.. I'm out 75 for that, 34.99 a month x 12 months. Oh and ANYONE THINKING OF DIRECT TV BEWARE- THE BOX YOU "BUY" AT COSTCO IS NOT YOURS!!! THAT 2 OR 3 HUNDRED DOLLARS YOU JUST SPENT IS AN "UP FRONT" LEASE FEE! Basically, this country is setup for corporations to run you. If you don't givre them whatever they want, they can, and will, ruin your credit. Yes, you have recourse. Spend countless hours trying to fight them with litigation and tell you the truth, they are covered somewhere/somehow. Telling the true story and being trolled for it, on a forum like this really is the only way I can think of to do ANYTHING about this BS.

Re:Someone should tell this story (-1, Offtopic)

easyTree (1042254) | more than 5 years ago | (#27175549)

[IANAL] You need to realise that a contract is an agreement between two parties. If you claim that they tricked you into agreeing to stuff you weren't aware of, the contract is invalid and you are free.

Inform them in advance, by letter (registered delivery, so you can demonstrate at a later date that they've received your letter) of your position then stop paying them the excess to which you didn't agree.

If they threaten to take you to court, take them up on their offer then if you are asked to go to court, explain in detail how they have abused your trust.

I've been through something similar with T-Mobile. I followed the procedure above; they sent me perhaps five letters over the course of six months threatening me with court action. Each time I replied to tell them that I'd be happy to attend court to detail their dodgy business practices; I haven't heard from them for six months now.

Contracts are there to protect both parties, not as a tool to allow corporations to trick consumers then bind them to compliance.

Once again, IANAL.

Re:Someone should tell this story (1, Offtopic)

phantomfive (622387) | more than 5 years ago | (#27175581)

Telling the true story and being trolled for it, on a forum like this really is the only way I can think of to do ANYTHING about this BS.

Then you are not being creative enough. Here is a much better place to complain about it. [complaints.com] Basically, all TV providers will give you trouble. Just do what I do and stop watching TV. :)

Bastards (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27175483)

Closed-source malware hurts the developer community!

I demand FOSS malware!

Malware Public License (1)

troll8901 (1397145) | more than 5 years ago | (#27177507)

PREAMBLE
The MNU Malware Public License is a free, copyleft license for malware and other kinds of works...

Re:Bastards (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27177979)

Would that be viral GNU/Malware or free for everyone MIT-Licensed OpenMalware?

A package tour of another persons computer? (4, Interesting)

AHuxley (892839) | more than 5 years ago | (#27175513)

Old people go on low-budget package tours of countries.
If your a Mac, Linux or Windows user and all you have is instant messenger details. At very best a non-static IP thats days or weeks old?
To be able to skype a real business-like cyber crime expert and have them talk you thru entering another persons computer is so worth $400.
The thrill of reading the real name of the computer owner.
To see the desktop.
Looking deep into the directories, emails, draft letters.
Compressing and sending out all other chat logs.
Leaving malicious code behind so you can always stay in contact.
If there is a hardware upgrade or software problem, friendly help is a just call away.
All from the comfort of your own home.

Re:A package tour of another persons computer? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27175599)

Creepy basement guy.

Re:A package tour of another persons computer? (1)

AHuxley (892839) | more than 5 years ago | (#27176119)

No data was harmed, like the boats that go out to see the whales or a walk in a state park.
All you come back with is a copy of data.
In one case its pretty pictures of critters and landscapes, in the other its lots of reading.

Re:A package tour of another persons computer? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27177059)

Seriously dude, seek help. And don't EVER work an IT job with access to peoples machines.

Underground Revenue (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27175541)

The FBI and CIA really need to do something about this. The revenue generated by spamming and malware could be going directly to funding terro... aww, who am I kiddin, the FBI and CIA already knows that terrorism gets all of its funding by pirating movies and music.

Re:Underground Revenue (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27177045)

Sadly, the majority of terrorist funding comes directly from the FBI and CIA.

Law enforcement (4, Insightful)

Phroggy (441) | more than 5 years ago | (#27175563)

So, if they're selling support, presumably there's a way to contact them, and if there's a way to contact them, shouldn't it be possible to identify them?

Are these activities not illegal?

Re:Law enforcement (4, Interesting)

QuoteMstr (55051) | more than 5 years ago | (#27176409)

Money laundering. Over at Wikileaks, there's a fascinating letter [wikileaks.org] written by a member of the child pornography community. The author goes into quite a bit of detail about the overall organization and operation of the black hat community. You should take the letter with a grain of salt, of course, but it's certainly very interesting.

Re:Law enforcement (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27177581)

Wow. That letter gets a +10 insightful. It's a shame that the very people who most need to read (and more importantly THINK ABOUT) its contents never will. Even were the subject not the #1 taboo of the Western world, the fact that it's a small minority being targeted means that the average person simply won't care. After all, small minorities who indulge in far lesser taboos (like the canonical example of pot growing) are rotting in jail and the average person doesn't care.

Re:Law enforcement (1)

pipingguy (566974) | more than 5 years ago | (#27178725)

I read bits of that link and wondered if the writer is a parent.

Re:Law enforcement (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27180165)

Did the lack of paragraphs give it away?

Re:Law enforcement (1)

Renraku (518261) | more than 5 years ago | (#27177701)

They're illegal, but the people are either proxied to hell and back so they could be about anyone.

In reality, they're probably in a country that doesn't give a damn and will refuse to let them be extradited anyway.

Not long now... (1)

The Raven (30575) | more than 5 years ago | (#27175605)

... before we can visit the 'hacker dude' who lives in his apartment, never leaving, sure the government is after him, and who provides shady services for a steep price.

Just as has been predicted by nearly every sci-fi cyberpunk fiction in existence.

The difference being that there will be no plot-forwarding exposition in person... it'll be a credit transaction through a forum or website.

I wonder if evil hackers use credit? Who would trust them enough to give the info out? Do they Paypal? Who would trust any arbitration service that they use... if they get banned by Paypal and switch to 'money-laundering.com', wouldn't that immediately stigmatize the completely innocent and legitimate business of 'money-laundering.com'?

We live in interesting times.

Re:Not long now... (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27175709)

Actually, I think I'd be more willing to trust websites cybercriminals use for money transactions. After all, if they think it's secure enough to trust their revenue stream to it, it probably is.

Re:Not long now... (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27175831)

Do they Paypal?

Mainly they use e-payment brokers in .ru that are relatively anonymous, especially if you're using fake identities which they of course are.

Re:Not long now... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27176701)

Just as has been predicted by nearly every sci-fi cyberpunk fiction in existence.

Except without the hot chicks.

Re:Not long now... (1)

mevets (322601) | more than 5 years ago | (#27177627)

| I wonder if evil hackers use credit...
I think they just take the money from your bank account.

It's true (5, Funny)

phantomfive (622387) | more than 5 years ago | (#27175645)

A few months ago I was really getting sick of working support lines for Intel, with all the stupid users calling in and complaining about stupid things, and I could do nothing about it (I mean really, if your computer isn't plugged in, it's not my fault!!). So I heard about this new business, and applied for a job as a first-line support rep for a certain malwa^W ahem Alternative Software for the Dark Side company whose precise name I will not reveal for privacy reasons.

The hours aren't great, and the severance package is well, horrible, BUT it does have the advantage that I can send any cases over to the hitma^W ahem Planned Termination and Collections department. Customers are so much more respectful somehow. Maybe I should post this anonymously.

Slashvertisement (1)

joeflies (529536) | more than 5 years ago | (#27175763)

Clicking the link on Vasco in the story just takes you to their home page, but it does not provide any additional content regarding the story on Malware toolkits.

That's pretty dystopian (3, Interesting)

Dr. Spork (142693) | more than 5 years ago | (#27175783)

There are many smart people who predict the waning importance of states in the new global order, and I'm sure they'll be very excited to hear this. Already, criminal gangs are formidable competitors to many states (for example: Afghanistan, Columbia and Mexico - but the full list would be far longer).

Open source methods of terrorism will mean that the state will probably no longer be the most effective source of personal security in the future, and global financial breakdowns might further encourage something like a new tribalism. In a situation like that, armed criminal gangs might in effect become the government in many regions. Witness, for example, that the Taliban just took over a huge swath of Pakistan and imposed their own crazy law. Pockets like these will be immune to reach of international diplomacy, and they'll probably host stuff like this (and maybe the next Pirate Bay, if they can make money doing it). It's gonna be a crazy future!

Re:That's pretty dystopian (1)

Darkness404 (1287218) | more than 5 years ago | (#27176283)

If effectively these organizations become the new state, does that make them terrorist organizations or simply another form of government? Government existed for centuries (and still does) on who has the best weapons and the biggest army. Theres a few reasons though why this won't happen so long as the constitution is protected. A) The ability for the public to arm themselves, a small gang can easily terrorize a neighborhood, however, if the neighborhood happens to be well armed, then the fact that the gang member has a gun isn't too big of a deal because the other ~100 people in the neighborhood do also. In the countries you named, either there was strict gun control or the poverty level was such that the average person could not afford a firearm along with ammo to defend themselves. The second amendment is crucial to our protection from a gang government. B) Cyberwarfare levels the playing field. No longer is economics an issue, a person using old, cheap, outdated hardware can just as easily write a damaging worm as someone on the newest Core i7 box, unlike traditional warfare where those with the best (physical) weapons win. C) Internet vigilantes. Just look at the /. effect for an innocent example, but think about if there was a truly evil website (not just the RIAA, etc) out there, I imagine that it wouldn't be too long before a small group of internet users with decent bandwidth either managed to find an exploit or DoS the site.

So is it a possibility? Yes, but as long as the second amendment is protected and the group of those opposing the gang government is larger then the gang, I just can't see it happening.

Re:That's pretty dystopian (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27177821)

our democracy is open source terrorism
1 we elect bush
2 bush invades iraq?
3 profit

Re:That's pretty dystopian (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27177609)

Open source methods of terrorism will mean that the state will probably no longer be the most effective source of personal security in the future

The state isn't the most effective source of personal security, not when the Supreme Court rules that the government/police have no legal obligation to protect you. The only effective source of personal security is (surprise) individual persons.

Re:That's pretty dystopian (1)

mevets (322601) | more than 5 years ago | (#27177647)

| The only effective source of personal security is (surprise) individual persons.

If history is any guide, it is "other individual persons", the more, the better.

Re:That's pretty dystopian (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27177929)

My school board used the delphi process [wikipedia.org] as an open source extortion tool!

Re:That's pretty dystopian (1)

Kjella (173770) | more than 5 years ago | (#27181209)

There are many smart people who predict the waning importance of states in the new global order, and I'm sure they'll be very excited to hear this. Already, criminal gangs are formidable competitors to many states (for example: Afghanistan, Columbia and Mexico - but the full list would be far longer). In a situation like that, armed criminal gangs might in effect become the government in many regions.

Not disputing that organized crime is plenty powerful, but in a historical perspective I really doubt the current incarnations are worse than Al Capone, the Mob, various creepy dictators and genocides all over the world. In fact I'd say it's getting tougher and tougher to get away with shit because people have cameras and satellite connections and mass media which means that the kind fo mass exterminations that Pol Pot did wouldn't go so "unnoticed" anymore. The more quiet "don't mess with our business, and we won't mess with you" is pretty much like it's always been.

Can I..... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27175977)

Cool, Can I hire them to go after the creators of the ConFicker Worm?

Re:Can I..... (1)

AHuxley (892839) | more than 5 years ago | (#27176225)

That would harm the only growth area of the US computer ecosystem. The home computer security developers.

My new business (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27176061)

Anonymous Labs plc would like to announce their new business venture!

SCAAS - Sex Crime As A Service. Our strapline is: 'You will be drugged and comotosed, when we screw you with a hose.' It's a spin-off from the work we were doing, for the US military, in Gitmo.

Oh, and last post!1!!1one [slashdot.org], by the way.

grand larceny, pickpocketing way up (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27176189)

as well as a variety of even worse unsane behaviours. scary. all we're here for is to care for one another. failing that, our purpose is skewed by the trappings of man'kind', which are primarily illusionary.

do not confuse 'religion' with being a spiritual being. the lights are coming up all over now.

Don't rush in, give it 18 months ... (2, Interesting)

w0mprat (1317953) | more than 5 years ago | (#27176231)

Pay services start out expensive, proprietary and monopolised. So starts the three stages of business in the information age.

Eventually they become affordable and ubiquitous with competition driving down the market rate.

Finally it becomes difficult to charge for services at all, and micro payment schemes become a stop gap before it becomes unprofitable.

So wait a while and there will be ad-supported crime services!

I expect the major vendors to give it a try first (1)

Narnie (1349029) | more than 5 years ago | (#27177383)

*ker-plink*
"It looks like you're trying to herd a botnet. Would you like me to automatically setup your command and control algorithm?"

Yes | No

Do they support Linux? (0)

erroneus (253617) | more than 5 years ago | (#27176263)

I suppose this is yet another "Windows Only" type of thing. It's not all bad being excluded I guess.

It has to be said... (1)

Fishbulb (32296) | more than 5 years ago | (#27177605)

Now that it's a push-button operation:

Announcer: Oh how long can trusty Cadet Stimpy hold out? How can he possibly resist the diabolical urge to push button that could erase his very existence? Will his tortured mind give into its uncontrollable desires? Can he withstand the temptation to push the button that even now beckons him ever closer? Will he succumb to the maddening urge to eradicate history with the mere push of a single button? The beautiful SHINY button. The jolly CANDY-like button. WILL he hold out folks? CAN he hold out?!

Stimpy: NO I CAN'T! (presses the button)

Announcer: Tune in next week, as... *poof*

Old News (1)

clickclickdrone (964164) | more than 5 years ago | (#27178441)

I saw another article on this about 18-24 months ago that had a link to a site which looked just looked like Amazon or any other eCommerce site. You got to choose from a variety of attacks, how many attacking PCs you wanted in your botnet, pick a target then enter a credit card and the job was done. Heck, it even looked 'cheery' - all bright colours and all. It was bizarre scrolling down the list looking at the options available.
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