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DB Query Becomes Browseable In Virtual World

ScuttleMonkey posted more than 5 years ago | from the kill-that-query-takes-on-a-whole-new-meaning dept.

Software 82

Jani Pirkola writes to tell us that Green Phosphor's new project "Glasshouse" allows users to take database queries or spreadsheets and create 3D representations in a virtual world. Man what I wouldn't give to mash my level 80 death knight up with some of the ugly joins I have run across in the past. "Users can see data, and drill into it; re-sort it; explore it interactively - all from within a virtual world. Glasshouse produces graphs which are avatars of the data itself. We've tailored the system for the use of biotech companies, specifically for drug discovery and development. Dr. David Resuehr, a molecular biologist, recently joined Green Phosphor as our Chief Scientist."

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Huh. (1)

Frosty Piss (770223) | more than 5 years ago | (#27217381)

3D data graphing over Second-Lifeish CG landscapes. Groundbreaking.

Re:Huh. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27217427)

My thoughts exactly. Plus the word "avatar" is retarded.

Re:Huh. (3, Funny)

NotBornYesterday (1093817) | more than 5 years ago | (#27217973)

Looks like a mini-nightmare I had when I nodded off during a late-afternoon DB2 class.

Re:Huh. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27220755)

Is he related to DB Cooper?

It's a database query, I know this! (5, Funny)

PotatoFarmer (1250696) | more than 5 years ago | (#27217429)

But the real question, of course, is whether or not a teenage hacker girl can successfully use this to navigate your data and fix your TPS reports before the velociraptors eat you all.

Re:It's a database query, I know this! (1)

maxume (22995) | more than 5 years ago | (#27217977)

In Disclosure, the lead actually uses a 3d filing cabinet system to access some files that he needs (if I remember correctly, the premise was that the virtual system, setup as a demo, let him bypass some physical security).

Re:It's a database query, I know this! (1)

sortius_nod (1080919) | more than 5 years ago | (#27218943)

my eyes, my eyes, will you do nothing about the memes?!?!

Re:It's a database query, I know this! (2, Funny)

sukotto (122876) | more than 5 years ago | (#27219315)

Only if it's Unix. She KNOWS that.

Re:It's a database query, I know this! (1)

magarity (164372) | more than 5 years ago | (#27219967)

I was really suprised there wasn't a new tag: iknowthisitsunix

Re:It's a database query, I know this! (1)

Moskit (32486) | more than 5 years ago | (#27222511)

It's not, it is Deutsche Bahn query, of course.

Re:It's a database query, I know this! (1)

rocketPack (1255456) | more than 5 years ago | (#27229035)

Or teenage hacker boyz stealin' ur garbage filez. LOL I gotz proof!!!!111!11one!!1!1!

The real question... (-1, Offtopic)

Palshife (60519) | more than 5 years ago | (#27217473)

Will it blend?

This just in from the "World of SQL" ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27217535)

Nerf distinct, it's OP!

Re:This just in from the "World of SQL" ... (1)

geminidomino (614729) | more than 5 years ago | (#27228667)

Screw that! Too many query builds depend on it! Do you want to make the whole class worthless?

No, they need to nerf JOIN. Now THAT is a perfect example of a completely imba clause that should never have been added!

Off topic and Gossipping.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27217647)

But I currently work on an app that the current CEO of Green Phosphor, Ben Lindquist worked on back in 200X. For various reasons I'm not going to name anything, but let's just say his lack of commenting on many of the stuff he wrote is enough to drive me to drinking. I can't rag on him too bad for not having an IDE that let you know if assignments or private functions went unused, though.

Seriously, the lack of commenting and hard-coded paths are a thing of the past I hope for his projects.

Anyways, on topic, this is really neat, but unlike sound visualizers, is there going to be a consistent, concrete approach to the that industry professionals can extract information with? It isn't helpful to visualize this flat data if the standard for visualizing changes willy-nilly.

And who's to blame? (1)

Bozzio (183974) | more than 5 years ago | (#27217669)

I blame CSI for generating interest in these tools. Flashiness at the expense of clarity and efficiency.

Now, just add an animated avatar removing its sunglasses and we're set.

Re:And who's to blame? (4, Funny)

Seakip18 (1106315) | more than 5 years ago | (#27217809)

[Outside a Miami office building, a quick shot to a broken window several floors up.]
[Then a cut to the street where Horatio knells over a bloodied monitor, with the attached tower in parts. Delko pokes at the nearby keyboard various instruments]
D: It looks like a lot of energy was transferred from the keyboard to this monitor.
H: You can tell by the missing keys on the keyboard, this was an old fashion capacitor driven board...
D: Well whoever did this did a select * on destruction with both hands.
[Horatio stands, removing his sun glasses]H: He didn't just go Select *...he committed the changes without a rollback.
[Intro to the The Who's "Won't Get Fooled Again"]

Re:And who's to blame? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27218165)

Haha, but it won't work because it always rains just before they get to outdoor crime scenes--or anywhere outdoors, actually.

Re:And who's to blame? (1)

Firehed (942385) | more than 5 years ago | (#27220093)

Flashiness and clarity don't have to be mutually exclusive - and aren't when executed well (which admittedly isn't too often). As for efficiency... the code may or may not be fantastic, but leaving end-users to wander around data visualizations leaves more time for you to do something that's actually important.

Re:And who's to blame? (1)

arkowitz (1185265) | more than 5 years ago | (#27220419)

LOL those "user interfaces" in CSI are so cheesy - Arkowitz

Re:And who's to blame? (1)

Nefarious Wheel (628136) | more than 5 years ago | (#27220761)

Now, just add an animated avatar removing its sunglasses and we're set.

"Hi. I'm Ray. Ray Tracer. I surf the net."

I miss Reboot.

Death Knights (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27217695)

I hate Death Knights - they are almost always terribad players who think they can tank because they are wearing plate armor. "I'll just throw on frost presence and we'll go."

As if.

Re:Death Knights (1)

Meski (774546) | more than 5 years ago | (#27221151)

Some of them can. There are bad tanks from every class. The ones that think they can tank heroic raids because they've tanked hVH...

DNA got there first (4, Insightful)

Kupfernigk (1190345) | more than 5 years ago | (#27217927)

Remember when Zaphod Beeblebrox fixes things in the galactic accounting system by entering a virtual old-style accounting world? How many other big ideas did DNA get to first? - including his request for the universal power brick.

More seriously, the point about visualisation of data is well made. How many people who think they are information literate produce incomprehensible spreadsheets and graphs that conceal reality? However, the example on the web page (oil production) is a terrible one - very hard to read, unnecessary wodges of solid color, everything that upsets Tufte. To make a project like this really work, I think they are going to have to concentrate on what to leave out, as much as what to leave in. And silly avatars don't cut it. Learn from Clippy, guys. I am sure that there is a right way to use data to virtual reality 3D modelling, but, and I can't say this too strongly, when marketing demands more color, more widgets and exciting background sound tracks, tell them to go fornicate off. Thousands of data analysts will thank you.

Re:DNA got there first (1)

cencithomas (721581) | more than 5 years ago | (#27218119)

when marketing demands {*anything at all*}, tell them to go fornicate off.

Yeah right. Sounds like a fast way to get "rightsized" where I work.

Re:DNA got there first (3, Insightful)

lennier (44736) | more than 5 years ago | (#27218317)

"How many people who think they are information literate produce incomprehensible spreadsheets and graphs that conceal reality? "

You say that as if revealing reality were what corporate reports were about in the first place.

Survival got there first (2)

Ostracus (1354233) | more than 5 years ago | (#27222445)

They are if the company's small, private, and doesn't have the concept of a "golden parachute" for anyone.

Golden Thingies (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27228563)

They are if the company's small, private, and doesn't have the concept of a "golden parachute" for anyone.

But, when I worked for a giant publicly held US company we had that "golden thingy" whether we liked it or not! Oh, wait, that was a golden shower.

Never mind.

Re:DNA got there first (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27218353)

I am sure that there is a right way to use data to virtual reality 3D modelling

It might possibly be used to generate different landscapes... On the other hand, trying to fit complex multidimensional data into a 3D environment is a foolish idea. There are many highly efficient and perfectly usable 2D graphing techniques available. The cost of navigation and lost clarity does not outweigh the advantages of only having to drop 997 dimensions, as opposed to 998, especially when the the 3D environment will then have to be projected on a 2D screen, anyway.

Re:DNA got there first (1)

Reality Master 101 (179095) | more than 5 years ago | (#27218427)

Remember when Zaphod Beeblebrox fixes things in the galactic accounting system by entering a virtual old-style accounting world?

I'm as big a DNA fan as anyone, but you must not be that old. They've been talking about 3D data visualization (and other forms of virtual reality) for about 50 years now.

Re:DNA got there first (2, Insightful)

StormReaver (59959) | more than 5 years ago | (#27220049)

> How many people who think they are information literate produce incomprehensible spreadsheets and graphs that conceal reality?

And that is why this "technology" won't displace any current business methods. Producing business data in 3D won't tell you anything more interesting than it will in 2D (with the exception of a few specialized fields which already represent their data in 3D). Anyone unethical enough to intentionally hide business reality in 2D will still unethically hide business reality in 3D. This is not magic pixie dust that will eliminate white collar deceit and crime. It is just another way to show the same data we've been showing since the invention of business graphics.

There will be no additional business specialty that doesn't already exist. This is a neat tinker toy, and nothing more. The author is just very easily impressed.

Re:DNA got there first (4, Insightful)

arkowitz (1185265) | more than 5 years ago | (#27220357)

The magic pixie dust is the realtime collaboration. That's why it matters that the data is in the virtual world. Also, I have to respectfully disagree with your assumption that using three dimensions to display data gets you no more understanding than using two. Just the ability to see time, grouping, and magnitude all at once exposes relationships that were not obvious in two dimensions. This is why scientists have been using 3+D visualization for a long time. Why not apply the same techniques to business and to government? Arkowitz

3D got there first (1)

Ostracus (1354233) | more than 5 years ago | (#27222391)

It cam be more than that when local frames of reference and their magnitudes along individual axis are considered. In other words X+,X- (same with other axis) with respect to point of local origin can represent different things. Add in other qualities like color, texture, transparency, and even sound (everyone neglects sound) along with positional relationship to other frames as well as time and the information density can be higher than 2D

The main question for 3D representations are the prevention of information overload, and focusing on the relevant to the task at hand.

I think we'll see a growth with this as 3D hardware matures.

Re:DNA got there first (2, Insightful)

arkowitz (1185265) | more than 5 years ago | (#27220111)

Tufte unfortunately did not have an actual 3D world in which to experiment. He was stuck on the page. Screenshots are bullshit no matter what you do; 3D requires motion. Try it someday. Arkowitz

Re:DNA got there first (1)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 5 years ago | (#27257975)

when marketing demands more color, more widgets and exciting background sound tracks, tell them to go fornicate off.

Being employed and being right sometimes conflict. In this bad economy, I'll pick the first for now. They want dancing teddy bears, I'll give them dancing teddy bears. Just shower extra long when you get home.
     

Ford Prefect's Expense Account (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27217943)

Another idea from Douglas Adams stolen and put forward as original.

New excuse (5, Funny)

clarkkent09 (1104833) | more than 5 years ago | (#27218029)

No boss, I'm not playing rpg games at work, I'm working on my quarterly sales report

Loot (1)

castorvx (1424163) | more than 5 years ago | (#27218053)

What drops?

Has to be asked... (1)

Linker3000 (626634) | more than 5 years ago | (#27218069)

Has someone been watching TRON? "Bring in logic probe!"

Re:Has to be asked... (1)

arkowitz (1185265) | more than 5 years ago | (#27220279)

hey man that's one of my favorite movies.

Re:Has to be asked... (2, Funny)

Tim_UWA (1015591) | more than 5 years ago | (#27222123)

Yes... I mean no

Eye candy (1)

jayemcee (605967) | more than 5 years ago | (#27218099)

This is for the CEO of a small bioitech to pitch his shill to the VC, hard to imagine a molecular biologist seeing any need for it...

ObDilbert (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27218147)

I can't help but notice that most of the objects are purple.

Re:ObDilbert (1)

SQLGuru (980662) | more than 5 years ago | (#27219059)

But Mauve has the most RAM.

Re:ObDilbert (2, Funny)

Linker3000 (626634) | more than 5 years ago | (#27219233)

This is to prevent rouge programs.

Cathartic (2, Funny)

clarkkent09 (1104833) | more than 5 years ago | (#27218155)

Users can see data, and drill into it; re-sort it; explore it interactively - all from within a virtual world.

Can you shoot at a stock prices chart until it explodes in a huge fireball? Can you chop it up with an axe? Can you take a dump on it? I can see some value in this after all

Make it look like hackers (1)

insomniac8400 (590226) | more than 5 years ago | (#27218179)

Now just set up a file system that looks like buildings.

You couldn't make this up... (1, Insightful)

BlackSabbath (118110) | more than 5 years ago | (#27218303)

From the article:
"First off I believe that visualization of money in/money out could have turned authorities on to the fishy accounting Enron was up to, and caught them earlier. Perhaps better visualization would have revealed Madoffâ(TM)s ponzi scheme as well."

Hahahahahahaha....hmmm...maybe?...nah!....
HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!

Priceless!

Re:You couldn't make this up... (2, Interesting)

BlackSabbath (118110) | more than 5 years ago | (#27219069)

In a slightly more considered tone I will say this:

This tool (assuming it has some diagnostic benefits), can be just as easily deployed to mislead as to inform. Anybody that's looked at company reports knows they're full of graphs that for the most part tend from lower left to upper right. "That's good isn't it?"

Re:You couldn't make this up... (1)

arkowitz (1185265) | more than 5 years ago | (#27220223)

Yes, garbage in garbage out. There has to be a mechanism to vet data. Let's see, I think in the scientific community it's called peer review... Arkowitz

Re:You couldn't make this up... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27221347)

Indeed. However, I didn't mean so much that the data itself could be wrong (although that is certainly possible). What I meant was that what you see is not always the full picture. Its not that the numbers are necessarily "buried" in some report, but that the multitude of interlinked companies related through convoluted paths, across jurisdictions, makes a clear picture of the totality most unlikely regardless of the tools used.

The problem of corporate malfeasance is not one of lack of appropriate diagnostic tools (although they certainly help). Its that the playing field itself lends an air of opaqueness that is difficult to pierce.

Re:You couldn't make this up... (2, Insightful)

BlackSabbath (118110) | more than 5 years ago | (#27221357)

The above post (AC) belongs to me. For some reason I was logged in to one tab but not in another (FF 3.07). Weird.

Re:You couldn't make this up... (1)

arkowitz (1185265) | more than 5 years ago | (#27225397)

I agree with you, and I also think this raises major issues around the extent to which we want the government to have access to information. The truth is a double-edged sword and hopefully we will someday have a system where the government has the data and analysis tools to catch the Enrons of the world, and the public has the data and tools to catch the governments when they abuse power.

I've looked at this... (2, Informative)

argent (18001) | more than 5 years ago | (#27218769)

It works, surprisingly well, but it really needs a richer scripting environment than Second Life provides to really produce good feedback. Also, it would benefit from having the ability to manage and maintain the parameters of the display outside the 3d world, because editing and retyping a database query in "chat" is not pretty.

Re:I've looked at this... (1)

arkowitz (1185265) | more than 5 years ago | (#27220175)

Try the new beta! There's an applet which runs via Java webstart, and gives you a UI for defining graphs - no more typing commands in chat. Arkowitz

Re:I've looked at this... (1)

argent (18001) | more than 5 years ago | (#27235839)

Oh good. Instead of a small simple web page with a set of pulldowns, a command line and history, which could be implemented without even involving javascript and would be simple enough to run in a secure browser, they do something that needs JAVA?

Who came up with that idea? Bergholt Stuttley Johnson?

Re:I've looked at this... (1)

arkowitz (1185265) | more than 5 years ago | (#27236051)

Look mon. Java is a sweet technology; the java app run through webstart (rather than applet within a browser sandbox [though you can still use the JApplet class :)]) is a great way to write code which can access the local filesystem, open sockets, do all the things a real programmer would want to do. Besides, one needs JRE or JDK 6 anyway to run the lg3d-wonderland application. Come on. Microsoft, whom you may or may not dislike strongly (I worked there in Redmond for a year and I am not a fan), screwed Java in a big way by "embracing and extending" it... J++ or whatever the **** they were calling it. The power of the Java applet-cation remains largely untapped while people keep muddling around with web-based applications. All those layers. They are actually counterproductive sometimes! Arkowitz

Re:I've looked at this... (1)

arkowitz (1185265) | more than 5 years ago | (#27236551)

what? no pro-Java meta-moderatoroators? I should get a 4 on this at least...

Re:I've looked at this... (1)

argent (18001) | more than 5 years ago | (#27243055)

Besides, one needs JRE or JDK 6 anyway to run the lg3d-wonderland application.

I have no idea what it's like in Sun's virtual world environment, I looked at it in Second Life.

Java is a sweet technology; the java app run through webstart (rather than applet within a browser sandbox [though you can still use the JApplet class :)]) is a great way to write code which can access the local filesystem, open sockets, do all the things a real programmer would want to do.

No thanks, I don't care whether they call it "Java Webstart" or "ActiveX", that whole class of technologies is a non-starter for me. No web content outside a sandbox, thanks.

Re:I've looked at this... (1)

arkowitz (1185265) | more than 5 years ago | (#27243297)

It's not web content. I have no interest in "web content". The program is actually an instance of Glasshouse; it can access an Excel file locally and transmit visualization definitions to, and respond to commands received from, a virtual world through use of a protocol we created called CICP. The web is just a way to launch it. One benefit of this is we don't have to be in the business of storing people's data files. They never get uploaded; the application running on people's local pc's produces the visualizations. This also allows visualization of a database inside the firewall, within a virtual world that is outside the firewall.

Re:I've looked at this... (1)

argent (18001) | more than 5 years ago | (#27243945)

The web is just a way to launch it.

Having the ability to launch unsandboxed code directly from the web is inherently insecure. If I am going to run unsandboxed code I'm going to download and install it, explicitly, as a local application. Anything else makes it too easy for "this application is going to install a virus on your computer, OK/CANCEL" type attacks.

Re:I've looked at this... (1)

arkowitz (1185265) | more than 5 years ago | (#27244091)

The ability is there, and I'm using it. You know it's weird that I'm having this frustrating argument with a guy who hand-codes his html, optimizes for lynx, and is (or was?) an Amiga user. These are all things I respect, and have in common with you. And hey, even a total hatred of EJB, despite my use of Java.

Re:I've looked at this... (1)

argent (18001) | more than 5 years ago | (#27244379)

The ability is there, and I'm using it.

It's people using things like this that turn them from security holes into security tarpits.

Re:I've looked at this... (1)

arkowitz (1185265) | more than 5 years ago | (#27245385)

Are you against people creating any software designed to run locally on a PC, or just programs written in Java?

Re:I've looked at this... (1)

argent (18001) | more than 5 years ago | (#27245701)

I'm against the use of any facility that downloads and runs unsandboxed content directly from a web page, with or without "do you really want to infect your computer" dialogs. If it's going to run outside a sandbox, then the user should explicitly download and explicitly install it.

Re:I've looked at this... (1)

arkowitz (1185265) | more than 5 years ago | (#27248337)

Webstart lets us package everything as an appliance which can be placed behind a customer's firewall and gives their people access to the local piece of the software without requiring installs.

Again, the reaon for running locally is so that people can choose what to visualize, whether it be an Excel spreadsheet or a SQL query hitting any JDBC-accessible db, and the server doesn't have to have the data - only the visualization definition.

While I could certainly take the same application and require people out there on the Internet to install it in order to try out our beta, rather than just clicking it and then approving it to run via webstart, I'm not in the business of making things more difficult.

You've found a nice little point to make about security - more power to you. It would be cool if Slashdot had a "simultaneous post" thing so we could end this thread without one of us having to have the last word.

Re:I've looked at this... (1)

argent (18001) | more than 5 years ago | (#27248741)

Webstart lets us package everything as an appliance which can be placed behind a customer's firewall and gives their people access to the local piece of the software without requiring installs.

Not precisely. What it does is let you hide the install behind a "security dialog".

I spent almost a decade cleaning up after people who clicked the wrong thing in these kinds of dialogs.

This isn't a "nice little point about security", this is the biggest security problem I had to face as a system/network admin from 1997 (when Microsoft introduced this as 'Active Desktop') until I quit that job. This whole approach is inherently insecure and unfixable. Everyone who uses and promotes it is part of the problem.

Re:I've looked at this... (1)

arkowitz (1185265) | more than 5 years ago | (#27249453)

Would you at least agree that if it is deployed on an appliance sitting behind the firewall, and not public on the Internet, that it is not contributing to the problem?

Re:I've looked at this... (1)

argent (18001) | more than 5 years ago | (#27254433)

"Intranet" use of ActiveX has been frequently mentioned as justification for not killing it, so no. It is not possible to design this technology so it's safe. The closest is Firefox XPI installers, and they're more annoying to sit through than downloading a package and installing it would be. It's not acceptable, whether it's ActiveX, Webstart, Internet-enabled disk images, "Open Safe Files After Downloading", or XPI.

Re:I've looked at this... (1)

arkowitz (1185265) | more than 5 years ago | (#27254499)

What if we deployed it in a boat, with a goat?

Not part of the solution. (1)

argent (18001) | more than 5 years ago | (#27257743)

I don't think that's part of the solution.

In fact, if you put a boat in a goat, pretty soon you're going to have a bunch of precipitate to deal with.

Re:Not part of the solution. (1)

arkowitz (1185265) | more than 5 years ago | (#27259221)

Well it seems the only thing you will accept is if it's in a box with a firefox.

Re:Not part of the solution. (1)

argent (18001) | more than 5 years ago | (#27259241)

No, no, firefox is part of the precipitate too.

These tools.. (2, Interesting)

mewsenews (251487) | more than 5 years ago | (#27218841)

.. always seem fun and then never seem to go anywhere. Anyone else remember psDooM [sourceforge.net] ? Blast away unwanted processes with a shotgun? Sounds great, right?

Well.. turns out, when you actually want to terminate a process, Windows Task Manager, or ps & kill are vastly more efficient, effective, and obvious tools to do the job.

Earlier generation was "Adventure Shell" (5, Interesting)

billstewart (78916) | more than 5 years ago | (#27219117)


You are in a small dusty directory called "$HOME".
A stairway called ".." leads up and a stairway called "docs" leads down.
There are files here.
> throw file "foo" at lineprinter daemon.
The lineprinter daemon eats your file and belches.
> Delete file "bar"
What? With your bare hands?

Doug Gwyn's Adventure Shell added a layer of Adventure-like syntactic sugar to the regular Bourne Shell. It wasn't terribly useful, but it was fun for 15 minutes, and since it was written in shell, you could hack on it yourself, and everything worked relatively normally.

If I were using the 3D visual interface, I'd expect my data to be slightly out of focus and to get carried off by pterodactyls if I didn't pay enough attention to everything at once...

Not all that original... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27218851)

This company doing the same thing, but specialized to financial market data: www.aqumin.com.

Virtual too bad for ya bro (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27220817)

"Man what I wouldn't give to mash my level 80 death knight up with some of the ugly joins I have run across in the past."

Still can't get laid, huh.

"The power of interacting with data in 3D..." (1)

SystematicPsycho (456042) | more than 5 years ago | (#27222567)

Isn't that what data warehousing is for, OLAP - Online Analytical Processing? Slicing data into cubes in a multi-dimensional space? Which has only been around for two+ decades?

Re:"The power of interacting with data in 3D..." (1)

arkowitz (1185265) | more than 5 years ago | (#27224979)

An OLAP database is the perfect backend for Glasshouse. What OLAP has been missing is a 3D user interface; now it's here.

This is stupid (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27224335)

I deal with Second Life every day, I work on specs and code relating to the client and even the open-source server components and even I think this is stupid. It's crap like this which makes me post under Anonymous Coward.

WTF with the WoW references? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27227967)

"Man what I wouldn't give to mash my level 80 death knight up with some of the ugly joins I have run across in the past."

You are pathetic. Are you so starved for approval that you have to "offhandedly" mention your MMO characters in articles that have nothing to do with games? You should stop.

More visualization; email inbox in a virtual world (1)

rexping (1505799) | more than 4 years ago | (#27341521)

I used neural networks to categorize data first.. read yourself. [cybertechnews.org]
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