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World-First VDSL2 Demo Gets 500Mbps Data Transfers

timothy posted more than 5 years ago | from the right-quick dept.

Networking 110

pnorth writes "Ericsson has achieved data transfer rates of more than 500Mbps in what it said is the world's first live demonstration of a new VDSL2-based technology. The demonstration achieved data rates of more than 0.5 Gbps over twisted copper pairs using 'vectorized' VDSL2. Vectoring decouples the lines in a cable (from an interference point of view), substantially improving power management, and reduces noise originating from the other copper pairs in the same cable bundle."

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Well thats great (4, Funny)

0racle (667029) | more than 5 years ago | (#27224875)

Now I know what will be deployed around here 300 years from now. I can't wait.

Never see it in the US (1)

ender06 (913978) | more than 5 years ago | (#27224879)

Too bad the US will never see it.

Re:Never see it in the US (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27225497)

That's what you fucktarded USians get for choosing captialism.

Signed,
The rest of the world.

Re:Never see it in the US (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27225769)

And to all you EuroTrash: you are welcome you are not speaking German now. (Well, except Germany).

Ungrateful shits.

Signed,
The USA

Re:Never see it in the US (1)

Shakrai (717556) | more than 5 years ago | (#27226343)

And to all you EuroTrash: you are welcome you are not speaking German now. (Well, except Germany).

Actually they'd probably be speaking Russian now, because the Germans bit off a bit more than they could chew with that one. Point still stands though.

Re:Never see it in the US (1)

bussdriver (620565) | more than 5 years ago | (#27227119)

And to all you EuroTrash: you are welcome you are not speaking German now. (Well, except Germany).

Anybody notice these kind of "historians" usually lack any real understanding of history? I notice they often do not understand Nationalism or Patriotism if not equate the two! Besides being the center of the world, they think the USA did all the fighting in WW2.

Aside from the fact that hardly anybody posting online was involved in WW2 and can't legitimately take credit for a previous generations' efforts helping another previous generation.

Naturally, the USA would have been able to take on Nazi Russia (or Communist Germany) when they invaded the USA a few decades later with The Bomb we didn't develop in a panic because we stayed out of the war and they had the time to complete their research. (If Hitler didn't run his nuke program like competing corporations they would have gotten further.)

Re:Never see it in the US (1)

commodore64_love (1445365) | more than 5 years ago | (#27228429)

>>>can't legitimately take credit for a previous generations' efforts

Yes we can. We're still paying off the accumulated debt from World War 2 and the Cold War. Our parents and grandparents borrowed the money, and the children are left with the gigantic debt. Yay.

Re:Never see it in the US (1)

wimg (300673) | more than 5 years ago | (#27230901)

>>>can't legitimately take credit for a previous generations' efforts

Yes we can. We're still paying off the accumulated debt from World War 2 and the Cold War. Our parents and grandparents borrowed the money, and the children are left with the gigantic debt. Yay.

You should visit www.iousathemovie.com [iousathemovie.com] then you'll understand you haven't got a clue where your debt really comes from...

Re:Never see it in the US (1)

commodore64_love (1445365) | more than 5 years ago | (#27235529)

Yes I do. I've seen U.S. Comptroller General David Walker on Glenn Beck, and it's quite scary. Our nation owes $110,000 per home. It will be $130,000 by the next presidential election. We are deep, deep "in hock" to the Chinese and other foreign nationals.

We need to learn to live with less and stop borrowing.

German Speaking EuroTrash (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27227185)

Darn, if only I had this argument ready when I had to learn the irregular verbs of German.

Well, schoolers don't have that much choice anyhow.
Nor Historico-Political hindsight.

And no, we're not grateful. Basically because 5 years (three, in fact) of right won't correct the following 50 years of wrongs.

Re:Never see it in the US (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27228727)

What involvement would that be? The last few years? That is very little involvement in ending the war. Only fucktarded USian schools teach otherwise.

BTW, there are continents other than America and Europe.

Signed,
The rest of the world.

Re:Never see it in the US (1)

poopdeville (841677) | more than 5 years ago | (#27230705)

What involvement would that be? The last few years? That is very little involvement in ending the war.

America sent 16 million troops to Europe and the Pacific. That compares to 3.5 million from the United Kingdom, and about a million from France.

America was only involved the last few years, because America ended the war.

Re:Never see it in the US (1)

XcepticZP (1331217) | more than 5 years ago | (#27230739)

We are very grateful, thank you.

Signed,
Countries destroyed by the USA

Re:Never see it in the US (1)

Hurricane78 (562437) | more than 5 years ago | (#27235899)

I AM speaking German. And I like it. You insensitive clod.

Also, your country nearly voted to speak German too, back it the very old days. ^^

Re:Never see it in the US (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27229385)

I'm sorry, so what are the European countries if not capitalist? I mean granted they have a pretty stupid brand of capitalism but it's still capitalism.

BTW -- I hate you.

Re:Never see it in the US (1)

commodore64_love (1445365) | more than 5 years ago | (#27228375)

>>>Too bad the US will never see it.

You're probably right. In many urban areas across the U.S., they are skipping DSL entirely and going directly to FiOS (fiber optics). Also, the U.S. is no more "behind" than the European Union. Overall they both average around 6-7 Megabit/s. In fact many U.S. states are faster than EU states:

1 - Sweden (11 Mbit/s)
2 - Delaware (10)
3 - Washington (9)
4 - Netherlands,RI,NJ,MA (8)
5 - VA,NY,CO,CT,AZ,Germany (7)

If you live in Delaware, Washington, New Jersey, Massachusettes, Virginia, et cetera, the average internet speed is faster than your cousins in England, France, Italy, Spain, Ireland, et cetera.

Re:Never see it in the US (1)

DavidRawling (864446) | more than 5 years ago | (#27234209)

Hey those are interesting numbers. Where do they come from? I'd like to see where my country (Australia) comes in - though I'm thinking top 50 is a bit much to hope for.

Re:Never see it in the US (1)

commodore64_love (1445365) | more than 5 years ago | (#27235467)

Top continents (rounded to the nearest whole integer):

1 Europe and N America - 6 Mbit/s
3 Australasia - 5 Mbit/s
4 Asia - 4 Mbit/s
5 S America - 2 Mbit/s
6 Africa - 1 Mbit/s

Australia by itself is 5 Mbit/s so comparable to France or the UK.

Re:Never see it in the US (1)

commodore64_love (1445365) | more than 5 years ago | (#27228919)

P.S.

>>>Too bad the US will never see it

I still think DSL is the answer to getting highspeed internet to isolated locations like Wyoming or Idaho or Montana. The copper lines are already underground or in the walls of the farmhouses. All the telephone company needs do is install the DSLAM for any customer that requests an upgrade (as mandated by a new law). Even if the wires are relatively poor condition, they should be able to handle 1000 kbit/s speeds, which is far superior to current dialup maximums of 50. And most importantly: It's a cheap upgrade that minimizes the burden on taxpayers.

BTW my current speed happens to be 1000k, not by limitation but by choice. $15 a month is all I'm willing to spend.

Yay! (1)

pete_norm (150498) | more than 5 years ago | (#27224969)

Ericsson has achieved data transfer rates of more than 500Mbps in what it said is the world's first live demonstration of a new VDSL2-based technology.

That should improve their mobile phone business a lot!!!

What?? a cable trailing behing me you say?? I have no idea what you mean!

Re:Yay! (2, Informative)

zwede (1478355) | more than 5 years ago | (#27225787)

Ericsson is not in the mobile phone business. You're thinking of Sony-Ericsson which is a different company (spun off from Ericsson yes, but now independent). Ericsson makes network equipment. Switches, base stations, etc.

Re:Yay! (1)

ivan256 (17499) | more than 5 years ago | (#27230553)

Don't count on it. There won't be enough cable to trail...

The operating distances are too short to matter for most of the US (geographically speaking), and drop non-linearly to less than 10% of max performance when the distance is doubled.

They should ditch this crap, and give people the fiber that we already paid for. Tarring and Feathering for CEOs of US telecom companies that even think FTTN.

Most informative quote from TFA (3, Informative)

foniksonik (573572) | more than 5 years ago | (#27224973)

"Where the technology does have great applications is among Fibre-to-the-Building deployments in commercial areas.

"You might have fibre connected from the DSLAM to the basement of an office building," Goodwin said. "You can then run bonded VDSL2+ up into all the other floors.""

Apparently it's cheaper to roll out fibre to the home these days for new installs and the existing copper to the home is insufficient for last mile where there is fibre to the street (junction)...so looks like it's great for business use or specific regions which fit into some window of installation where they put in redundant copper to the home with fibre to the street.

Re:Most informative quote from TFA (1)

Em Emalb (452530) | more than 5 years ago | (#27225327)

Not only that, but you can use the existing cable more than likely already in the building.

Re:Most informative quote from TFA (1)

commodore64_love (1445365) | more than 5 years ago | (#27228723)

>>>Apparently it's cheaper to roll out fibre to the home these days for new installs and the existing copper to the home is insufficient for last mile where there is fibre to the street (junction)...so looks like it's great for business use or specific regions which fit into some window of installation where they put in redundant copper to the home with fibre to the street.
>>>

I wish I understood what you just said.
This must be some kind of advanced grammar
that follows rules different from English circa 1400 to 2010.

You can use your existing cable! (1)

symbolset (646467) | more than 5 years ago | (#27229417)

And in the future after you've invested in this technology that approaches the limits of copper, you'll find that your neighboring building isn't finding any such limit because he did what you should have done: drag the damned fiber optic cable.

He'll save money too because he'll be working with commercial off the shelf equipment available at NewEgg. As his speeds go up to 100Gbps per strand you'll be standing there with your copper in your hand going "lol wut?"

Re:Most informative quote from TFA (1)

afidel (530433) | more than 5 years ago | (#27232013)

Hmmm, perhaps this will make AT&T's Uverse offering useful after all depending on what kind of throughput it can achieve over the distances to the average remote shelf. I still wish they would roll things out like Verizon did with true fiber to the home.

Wee bit limited (4, Insightful)

Brian Stretch (5304) | more than 5 years ago | (#27224985)

FTA: "It showed aggregated rates of above 0.5Gbps at 500 metres, bonding six lines."

So if you happen to have six unused lines lying around and happen to be within half a kilometer of the fiber node and nothing else goes wrong you could get 500Mbps. Realistically you won't be that close to the node, you won't have that many spare lines, and for the sake of a "consistent user experience" (hi AT&T!) you'll get the same craptastic service that someone at least 1km out with at most two pairs would get.

But some PHB will decide to deploy it because his spreadsheet says that FTTH is too expensive, even if it is a one-time expense, and marketing swears that most people can't tell that their upstream is slow and their HDTV channels have been recompressed into mush. The only people who would notice are the ones who'd buy high-end service tiers if they didn't suck...

Re:Wee bit limited (1)

bugs2squash (1132591) | more than 5 years ago | (#27225161)

The node however, will still only have a T1 uplink to the internet

Re:Wee bit limited (1)

TheLink (130905) | more than 5 years ago | (#27227407)

If they're bonding six lines and all that, I think an important question is: "What's the latency?"

Re:Wee bit limited (1)

wimg (300673) | more than 5 years ago | (#27231083)

In Belgium, VDSL2 connections are always hooked up to the closest street cabinet, which is usually less than 500m away. At that point, your connection moves on to fiber to the first node (usually 1 o 2 per small town).
Bonding six lines is a bit tricky though, as most houses have only 2 pairs connected. Though I wouldn't mind getting those 2 bonded ofcourse ;-)

FTTH is not just expensive, it's impractical, since it means opening up not just the streets, but entry points into each house (or worse, appartment buildings that don't have proper tubes).
And HDTV looks just fine on VDSL2. 720p is no problem, even while recording 1 channel and watching another one, while surfing the net.

Re:Wee bit limited (1)

Jay L (74152) | more than 5 years ago | (#27232527)

So if you happen to have six unused lines lying around

I built a suburban house in VA in 1996, and in MA in 2000. Both times I asked Verizon to run a new 5- or 10-pair cable (roommates, faxes, spares, all that stuff we no longer need), and both times they were happy to oblige. Sounds like that's an unusual experience?

And the point? (5, Insightful)

nurb432 (527695) | more than 5 years ago | (#27224997)

It will just be throttled.

Re:And the point? (1)

rpmonkey (840379) | more than 5 years ago | (#27225271)

The point is you can reach your monthly download cap up to 333 times faster!

*snorts* (1)

Kokuyo (549451) | more than 5 years ago | (#27224999)

People keep complaining about the US...

But frankly, the Japanese show us how fast and cheap it can be. And what do we have? 25MBit downlink is considered the best you can get without selling your first-born here in Switzerland.

It's nice that humankind as such is able to transmit data like that, but unless the populace gets to enjoy that technology at a reasonable price, I don't quite see a point in getting excited.

Re:*snorts* (1)

Austerity Empowers (669817) | more than 5 years ago | (#27225063)

Not to mention how many of our ISPs block inbound connections including ssh and http(s). They may build it, but we won't need it when it arrives.

Re:*snorts* (1)

Spazztastic (814296) | more than 5 years ago | (#27225153)

Not to mention how many of our ISPs block inbound connections including ssh and http(s). They may build it, but we won't need it when it arrives.

Is that a problem in Europe? I've run a SSH server for over a year now along with a simple website for my IP address. I've never heard any complaints, any e-mails, etc. The most I would expect is for them to tell me to upgrade to a business account if I want to run services like that.

Re:*snorts* (1)

Shakrai (717556) | more than 5 years ago | (#27226391)

I've run a SSH server for over a year now along with a simple website for my IP address. I've never heard any complaints, any e-mails, etc. The most I would expect is for them to tell me to upgrade to a business account if I want to run services like that.

I wouldn't try to run a website on my residential connection but I've run SSH for years and never heard any complaints. Of course I keep it firewalled off and only open it up using port knocking [wikipedia.org] , so unless they are illegally wiretapping my connection they have no way to know that I'm running it anyway.

Re:*snorts* (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27227181)

In the US, I believe that wiretap refers to voice. Data lines are regulated differently. You need to consult your contract about how they will monitor traffic.

Re:*snorts* (1)

Shakrai (717556) | more than 5 years ago | (#27227541)

I don't give two shits what my contract says. Here is what the penal law of the State of New York says:

A person is guilty of eavesdropping when he unlawfully engages in wiretapping, mechanical overhearing of a conversation, or intercepting or accessing of an electronic communication.

My service provider doesn't have the right to monitor my traffic.

Re:*snorts* (1)

thetoadwarrior (1268702) | more than 5 years ago | (#27231293)

I'm not sure who has problems with using SSH (unless they're using some cheap service) because I have BT which isn't the greatest but the modem has built in dynamic dns support and built-in presets for various servers. So my Ubuntu machine is set up so I can ssh, remove desktop or acess my tomcat server from anywhere.

Re:*snorts* (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 5 years ago | (#27225185)

Not to mention how many of our ISPs block inbound connections including ssh and http(s).

Only on the cheapest residential tiers. Once you upgrade to "business class" service, these blocks disappear.

Re:*snorts* (1)

billcopc (196330) | more than 5 years ago | (#27227281)

Not true. At least where I live, every single ISP has network-wide blocks on FTP, SMTP, SSH, POP and WEB. Even the business cable at our office is crippled, so we use non-standard port numbers for remote access.

It's friggin' weak sauce, but that's what happens when you let a telecom get too big.

Re:*snorts* (1)

DavidRawling (864446) | more than 5 years ago | (#27234273)

Not true. At least where I live, every single ISP has network-wide blocks on FTP, SMTP, SSH, POP and WEB.

So no-one in your country can receive email or host your own web server? Not even large companies and government departments?

I call bulldust.

Yawn (2, Interesting)

dmomo (256005) | more than 5 years ago | (#27225007)

It's blazing fast for dsl, but it's still dsl. You might find a way to make a snail slide along at 3 mph. That'd really shake up the racing-snail community, but don't think you'll be entering that snail into a horse race any time soon.

All fun aside, I suppose this is useful to a lot of people, and a great tech achievement. I'm just pretty confident that by the time it's consumer-ready, there will be much faster alternatives in place.

What is the role DLS today in the broadband world? Is it merely a bandaid for places with no other options, or something more that I am missing?

Re:Yawn (1)

epdp14 (1318641) | more than 5 years ago | (#27225165)

I live in an area where I have two choices: Comcast and ATT DSL. I don't feel like paying $80 a month for Comcastic service and speeds... so the $45 a month for direct dsl at 6mbs isn't a bandaid, its the best choice. The cable conglomerates need competition. If that competition comes from FTTH, dsl or any other technology so be it, but cable is not the answer.

Re:Yawn (3, Insightful)

CXI (46706) | more than 5 years ago | (#27225179)

What is the role DLS today in the broadband world? Is it merely a bandaid for places with no other options, or something more that I am missing?

Around here, cable internet is absolute crap due to all the students sucking the bandwidth dry. I don't care what they claim to provide speed wise, it was always slow. The connection would also just disappear for over an hour at a time most nights around 10PM. DSL doesn't provide the theoretical rates of cable, but what it does provide is a fixed rate and the phone company, as much as they suck, sucks a lot less than the cable company when it comes to reliability.

Re:Yawn (1, Interesting)

causality (777677) | more than 5 years ago | (#27225755)

What is the role DLS today in the broadband world? Is it merely a bandaid for places with no other options, or something more that I am missing?

Around here, cable internet is absolute crap due to all the students sucking the bandwidth dry. I don't care what they claim to provide speed wise, it was always slow. The connection would also just disappear for over an hour at a time most nights around 10PM. DSL doesn't provide the theoretical rates of cable, but what it does provide is a fixed rate and the phone company, as much as they suck, sucks a lot less than the cable company when it comes to reliability.

You make a good point. I use DSL as well and I generally don't have the problems with unpredictable slowdowns or outright downtime that most of my friends with cable Internet are experiencing. True, they do have higher maximum throughput but I'm satisfied with the speeds I experience and especially with the consistency. Additionally my ISP does not block any ports and does not cap or throttle my connection, which is also nice. I know people often dislike DSL but really, the benefits of a dedicated connection over a shared connection are not to be underestimated.

The few times I had to call technical support really weren't that bad either, especially not for a major telco. The folks I talked to still had the annoying habit of following their "script" too closely and disregarding the fact that I already tried basic obvious things (such as power-cycling the modem/router) before I asked for help. I realize their position and that they feel a need to do that because of the tremendous number of frankly incompetent/ignorant users who will incorrectly perform those basic tasks. However, when it's apparent that I'm at least as knowledgable as the front-line tech support person (whom I generally only call when the issue is on their end and so I cannot solve it myself), I don't consider it unreasonable to expect them to stop making such assumptions. Anyway, I just described front-line tech support in general and did not mean to give the impression that this is unique to my telco.

Re:Yawn (1)

techdojo (1409685) | more than 5 years ago | (#27227173)

True that. I'm a network engineer and during the course of troubleshooting, I'd start pinging something and forget about it. 40,000 pings later, I'd have dropped about 400 pings during my cable-modem days. I switched to Verizon FIOS and when I'd do the same thing, I'd have dropped ZERO packets.

Likewise, we're using a VOIP solution in our house and when I was doing the cable-modem thing, for some reason, my ATA would lock up and I'd have to power cycle it at least once per week. When I switched to FIOS, the problem went away. I have no idea why it would make any difference, but it really has. Knowing what I know now, even if the prices and speeds were the same, I'd still switch to FIOS.

My only frustration is that I've got 5Mbps upstream and the places I try to upload to cap their downstream (cough)HOSTROCKET(cough) so I'm still pushing content at 1Mbps. This is despite their swearing that they aren't rate-limiting... That kind of stuff may have been OK in 2004, but five years later, I'm a whole lot less forgiving.

____________________________________
http://techdojo.org/ [techdojo.org]

Re:Yawn (1)

electrosoccertux (874415) | more than 5 years ago | (#27229037)

Yeah! The rascally evil students are wasting all the bandwidth on things like youtube, games, iTunes and Netflix movie downloads, etc. Perfectly illegitimate uses, the cable company should cut them off.

Re:Yawn (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27226433)

You might find a way to make a snail slide along at 3 mph. That'd really shake up the racing-snail community, but don't think you'll be entering that snail into a horse race any time soon.

Can anyone translate this for me? I work in the auto industry.

Re:Yawn (2, Informative)

LordKaT (619540) | more than 5 years ago | (#27226471)

DSL is for:

-People who don't care how fast their connection is so much as that the connection is up and running

-People who want a generally fast Internet connection that provides a reliable amount of bandwidth

-People who don't want, or can't afford, to put up with download caps

-People who are not serviced by a cable company (rural farmers, people who don't live in a big city, etc...)

-People who want a static IP address without buying into a business package (depends on the DSL providers, of course)

-People who are sick of paying $90/month for 20/1 cable service when they only get 7/512 on the best days because the local cable loop is over saturated, so they opt to pay $120 for 15/1 ADSL2+ and generally get more bandwidth

-People who are not going to pay ISDN prices to get more bandwidth than 56k dialup.

-People who don't care about their Demonoid share ratios and don't make piracy a necessary part of their lives.

-People who realize that while they could download that latest UBuntu ISO faster on a cable connection, they're still going to forget about the download and do something else, until tomorrow when they suddenly remember "oh yeah, that Ubuntu CD..."

-People that actually like gaming and don't want to be throttled back by their cable company for "unusual traffic usage patterns"

-People that runs servers as a hobby and don't have the means to pay for a full business class service (and, in reality, don't need to)

Generally, DSL isn't for the person who absolutely needs to use every ounce of bandwidth available to them. If you need to listen to streaming radio, while sharing 75 files on BitTorrent, playing YouTube videos on a second monitor while you run around WoW leveling up.

Re:Yawn (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27226937)

Well, In spain if you choose not to have a highly-asymetric (6Mb dn, 300Kb up) ADSL line (which costs 40â/month) you must have a 56k modem that never ever connects at more that 44000bps.

Re:Yawn (1)

commodore64_love (1445365) | more than 5 years ago | (#27229117)

Spain must have really lousy phone lines. I get 53,000k every time (the maximum possible).

Re:Yawn (1)

daoine_sidhe (619572) | more than 5 years ago | (#27226665)

You know, people keep saying this as if the experience in their local area is the same everywhere. It's not. The maximum available (from the one single cable provider) bandwidth in my area is 6Mb/s, at $60/month. I've used it, at peak times it drops to around 1Mb/s, and the upload never exceeds 2Mb/s. My DSL service (I have a choice of three DSL providers; I use the smallish local one) is 10Mb/s, and I routinely download at a stable ~900KB/s - 1MB/s, which is around 80% of max. DSL's role (in my area) is to provide the competition and thus superior level of service that cable doesn't.

Re:Yawn (1)

mstrick44 (1213530) | more than 5 years ago | (#27235271)

I take your point, but please remember there are some countries -- or at least regions of countries -- where DSL lines are the only option. Most of South America falls in this catagory.

Blu-ray in 10minutes (1)

davegravy (1019182) | more than 5 years ago | (#27225009)

That's a blu-ray movie download in 10 minutes.

They're missing the tightly integrated monitoring/filtering scheme that will have to exist before the MAFIAA lets deployment occur.

Re:Blu-ray in 10minutes (3, Interesting)

jellomizer (103300) | more than 5 years ago | (#27225319)

Well lets go back in time to get a perspective.
We are talking about Average Home use not corporate high end use.

1992 9600bps 3 megs an hour
1994 14.4k became the norm. 6 Megs and hour.
1996 28.8k became the norm. 10 megs an hour (after 14.4k we rarely ever got full speed connection over the modem)
1998 56.6k became the norm. 13/14 megs and hour that much more flaky.
2000 Cable Modem/DSL started to enter the market. In my area peak speed was about 500kbs so about 225 Megs an hour
2002 1mbs
2004 2mbs
2006 4mbs
2008 8mbs
2009 we are at about 10mbs/15mbs (with paying extra for 15mbs)

So roughly we double in speed every 2 years. So I doubt we will see 500mbs for home use until...
2010 16mbs
2012 32mbs
2014 64mbs
2018 128mbs
2020 256mbs
2022 512mbs

2022 Wow. All my predictions are seeming to fall in 2022 lately, Real Time Ray Tracing, Dukenukem forever, Now home use at 500mbs. 2022 will be a cool year.

Re:Blu-ray in 10minutes (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27225811)

speak for yourself. im on 768/320kbps

Re:Blu-ray in 10minutes (2, Funny)

Mister Whirly (964219) | more than 5 years ago | (#27225879)

All hail 2022! And with these new DSl speeds, we will actually be able to stream in real time the new Duke Nukem Forever game, which will also have Real Time Ray Tracing! Huzzah!

Re:Blu-ray in 10minutes (1)

Shakrai (717556) | more than 5 years ago | (#27226549)

1996 28.8k became the norm. 10 megs an hour (after 14.4k we rarely ever got full speed connection over the modem)

That wasn't my experience. Living in town with a fairly decent outside plant I had full speed connections most of the time on my v.34+ (33.6k) USR Courier modem. Occasionally it would connect at 31.2 but that was rare. Even when we lived out in the sticks I always got at least 26.4 but usually 28.8 or 31.2.

On the other hand, v.90 was a joke. Even in town with the good phone lines I rarely got connections faster than 45k and they seemed to deteriorate to <28k as time went on. I actually had better luck with the old school banks of analog v.34+ modems vs the digital trunk lines/v.90 setup. Particularly when downloading compressible data -- I can recall a few times that the speed of the serial port became the bottleneck.

Ah, those were the days. My first IT job was working for the small town ISP. Before the digital trunks came in we literally had banks and banks of USR Couriers plugged into actual phone lines. At one point we had almost 700 pairs of copper coming into our building and represented >40% of the installed phone lines at the local CO.

Re:Blu-ray in 10minutes (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27226867)

...Linux on the desktop?

Re:Blu-ray in 10minutes (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27231033)

Keep wishing.

Re:Blu-ray in 10minutes (1)

jon_cooper (746199) | more than 5 years ago | (#27231059)

2010 16mbs

2012 32mbs

2014 64mbs

2018 128mbs

2020 256mbs

2022 512mbs

2014 + 2 =

Answers on the back of an envelope, please.

Re:Blu-ray in 10minutes (1)

jellomizer (103300) | more than 5 years ago | (#27231573)

Dag Nabit, When counting evens I always skip 6. 2,4,8, not 2,4,6,8. It must be all that binary in college.

Re:Blu-ray in 10minutes (1)

wimg (300673) | more than 5 years ago | (#27231383)

Just to compare (not meant to make you guys depressed), in Belgium :
1997 : cable 10Mbps/768kbps (upstream limited to 128kbps) - ADSL 8Mbps/630kbps (limited to 1Mbps/256kbps)
2009 : cable 25Mbps/1Mbps - VDSL2 17Mbps/512kbps

Cable should move to EuroDocsis 3.0 by 2010, allowing for 200Mbps/30Mbps, but in reality they'll cap it, so they can gradually give customers more.

Re:Blu-ray in 10minutes (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27232603)

I doubt you will see 500Mb/sec on copper in a realisting deployment anywhere.

Copper pairs in the street will not be able to handle it - the noise from hundreds of VDSL/ADSL/ISDN/POTS/Frame-relay circuits will kill the high-speed components of the signal.

Nup - Fibre to the home gents - stop fannying about with copper and move into VCEL Lasers and 9um fibre to the home - 1GB/sec in an INSTANT.

Where do you live? (1)

cadu (876004) | more than 5 years ago | (#27234109)

"2009 we are at about 10mbs/15mbs (with paying extra for 15mbs)" wtf??

i'm on 100mbit/100mbit unmetered FTTH :)

Capped Connections (2, Funny)

sam0vi (985269) | more than 5 years ago | (#27225029)

Too bad that when the day this technology is deployed monthly bandwidth caps will probably be the rule. It would be nice being able to run a proper server at home (can't afford T1,and adsl here in Spain have very restricted upload capacity), without worrying about hogging your bandwidth with pr0n and torrents. We'll see how this goes.

Improved distance from the DSLAM? (2, Insightful)

transporter_ii (986545) | more than 5 years ago | (#27225051)

A much greater distance from the DSLAM would be much more needed than the improved speeds. Many people in rural areas can't get anything and would be happy with 5 Mb down if they could just get it.

transporter_ii

Re:Improved distance from the DSLAM? (1)

adh72 (1161643) | more than 5 years ago | (#27225325)

I'd be happy with anything above 28k. It sucks living in a rural area served by AT&T. 1 county to the north a small phone company that serves primarily rural areas has DSL available to every home they serve. The also just announced that they are rolling out fiber the the home over the next 5 years to every address in their area. ATT will never do that because they only see profit margins while the small companies who provide the same services just sees profit.

exactly the same here (1)

zogger (617870) | more than 5 years ago | (#27226919)

Rural area, att/bell south. Lucky to get anything above 28.8 anymore, and they have no plans whatsoever to improve service that I have been able to determine from them. The last place we lived, which was way, WAY the heck more out in the sticks and up multiple dirt roads, was/is served by a smaller community telco and unfortunately for me but good for everyone else there, just when we were moving that little telco ran really decent thick underground copper to EVERY residence in their area that needed an upgrade, so they could offer good quality broadband, etc.

My conclusion is, if it is profitable for those little bitty service providers to do it, the only reason the larger ones don't is because they are complete jerks about things and outright lying about what it costs them.

Re:Improved distance from the DSLAM? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27227537)

What kind of mobile phone services do you have available out there? It might be worthwhile and faster to just upgrade your cell service and use that as a modem instead of paying for dial-up.

Re:Improved distance from the DSLAM? (1)

powerlord (28156) | more than 5 years ago | (#27229177)

Good idea, but most mobile internet Terms of Service specifically prohibit using it as a "replacement for a landline" (WTF?)

Some even throttle you back (for a month or so) if they've seen too much traffic on one tower for too long.

Sprint! (1)

name_already_taken (540581) | more than 5 years ago | (#27230063)

Good idea, but most mobile internet Terms of Service specifically prohibit using it as a "replacement for a landline" (WTF?)

Some even throttle you back (for a month or so) if they've seen too much traffic on one tower for too long.

So far in my experience, Sprint does not throttle, cap or limit.

They have something in their TOS about not using it to replace a landline, but I've had my Sprint card plugged into a Linksys WRT54G3G-ST for over a year on their $59.99/month unlimited business plan (the "business" part may be important, but you're a home business, right?) and I can report that it pretty much is unlimited, and they've never throttled it.

One time I glanced at the usage part of the bill and wrote in the commas to separate the thousands, millions and billions on the "bytes used" - it came to something like 5TB that month.

If you think about it, you're not using it to replace a landline, you're using it as something better.

Re:Improved distance from the DSLAM? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27231031)

5Mb? I get 1.5Mb and am happy about that. My sister lives 5 miles away (by road, it's about 1 mile cross-country) and still can't get DSL at all. Yes, this is an area that doesn't have cables even run to it.

Doesn't solve the real problem (1)

Chrisq (894406) | more than 5 years ago | (#27225109)

From TFA

"Its speed is best over thye hundreds of metres," he said. "But beyond 1km you will find that ADSL2+ is actually faster."

Which means that it will do nothing for the people who complain about speed now, either being unable to get broadband or only get a slow link. Actually it will probably make things worse for them as the web designers in "connected" cities decide that they can have high-definition video on their web-site front pages. Many people have to wait five minutes to see the existing flash pages.

Re:Doesn't solve the real problem (1)

causality (777677) | more than 5 years ago | (#27225873)

From TFA

"Its speed is best over thye hundreds of metres," he said. "But beyond 1km you will find that ADSL2+ is actually faster."

Which means that it will do nothing for the people who complain about speed now, either being unable to get broadband or only get a slow link. Actually it will probably make things worse for them as the web designers in "connected" cities decide that they can have high-definition video on their web-site front pages. Many people have to wait five minutes to see the existing flash pages.

If the problem there is infrastructure, it makes me wonder whatever happened to WiMax? Isn't that supposed to address exactly the situation you describe?

One would almost get the impression that we dislike broadband which does not come from a government-regulated monopoly.

Re:Doesn't solve the real problem (1)

Miseph (979059) | more than 5 years ago | (#27226935)

Look at it less as government regulated monopolies, and more as monopoly regulated governments, and I promise that you'll start to see a pretty clear pattern with these things.

Re:Doesn't solve the real problem (1)

powerlord (28156) | more than 5 years ago | (#27229115)

If the problem there is infrastructure, it makes me wonder whatever happened to WiMax? Isn't that supposed to address exactly the situation you describe?

One would almost get the impression that we dislike broadband which does not come from a government-regulated monopoly.

No, we just like out TV better than our Internet.

Some of the frequency blocks that were bought, in order to deploy WiMax solutions, are currently occupied until the changeover to Digital Broadcasting actually happens.

Once that frequency range is open, hopefully Verizon (and the other players) will move quickly to start deploying actual products, I mean, they could have everything ready to go now, and merely be waiting until the June cut over date when the frequency is free to turn everything on and start offering WiMax come July (although I wouldn't bet on it).

mediaDSLAM anyone?! (1)

carvalhao (774969) | more than 5 years ago | (#27225281)

There is this portuguese company called "PT InovaÃão" that developed a far superior technology that holds 100 Mbps@5 Kms. Whay should they be working on improving bandwidth in a technology with such short range capabilities? If you get fiber that close, you might as well go all the way to FTTH...

Re:mediaDSLAM anyone?! (1)

Smallpond (221300) | more than 5 years ago | (#27225401)

The problem is that nobody can reach their website.

Re:mediaDSLAM anyone?! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27225679)

http://www.ptinovacao.pt/

Don't hold your breath in the US... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27225345)

because the US population is widely spread around the total area of the US. I keep saying this and you guys keep ignoring it so I'll just keep saying it: using Japan and Korea as a benchmark for rolling out new communications networks is an epic failure on your part; as each of those country's populations are condensed to a small portion of the entire country.

Japan has 128M people, and 35M live in Tokyo alone. The country encompasses 377,873 kilometers squared, and Tokyo city itself is 622 kilometers squared. USA has 300M people, and 8M live in New York City. USA encompasses 9,826,630 kilometers squared, and New York City itself is 17,400 kilometers squared. All stats provided by wikimedia.

Just from those stats it should be clear that it's much more cost effective to roll out an entire new infrastructure in Japan than it is in the US because of population densities and total area.

Re:Don't hold your breath in the US... (3, Informative)

compro01 (777531) | more than 5 years ago | (#27226031)

Not so spread out. Examine a map of population distribution [wikipedia.org] . Note all the white and yellow around the middle and all the blue along the coasts and readjust your math.

It's not as dense as Japan by any means, but upgrading infrastructure is plenty feasible, provided you can dislodge the incumbent interests.

Re:Don't hold your breath in the US... (2, Insightful)

BlueParrot (965239) | more than 5 years ago | (#27226095)

Oh please, I live in Sweden. We have a population of a few million spread over a country that ranges from north of the arctic circle all the way down to Denmark and our connections are decent. Heck, my uncle lives in a tiny town with maybe 10.000 people in it, far enough north that some days during the winter the sun will never rise, and yet he has fiber running into his living room.

Population density is the most rubbish excuse I've heard for why US internet is crap. Reality is that your ISPs are ripping you off because your government has failed at addressing abusive cartels and monopolies, even promoting them in some cases.

Re:Don't hold your breath in the US... (1)

CompMD (522020) | more than 5 years ago | (#27229627)

Allow me to introduce you to the contiguous states of Kansas, Nebraska, and South Dakota. Just those three states combined are larger than Sweden with a dramatically lower population density.

I live in Kansas. Population density in the US *is* a problem for broadband. Most Europeans I know had trouble grasping the midwest until they actually came here.

Re:Don't hold your breath in the US... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27232415)

Calling a population of 10k a "tiny town" already reveals a disconnect.

Re:Don't hold your breath in the US... (0, Redundant)

pleappleappleap (1182301) | more than 5 years ago | (#27226103)

Oy.

You gotta compare similar statistics. You're comparing one measure of urban population with a completely different measure of urban population. It's worse than comparing apples to oranges. More like comparing apples to lumber.

Bonding? Boring. (4, Interesting)

GiMP (10923) | more than 5 years ago | (#27225749)

VDSLv2 gives you 100mbps. Technically, they would only need 5 lines to reach 500mbps, but I imagine ther "500mbps" is actual throughput, thus the requirement of a 6th line to reach this figure. However, this is with bonding. They could have just as easily claimed 10gbps speeds, by bonding 20 lines. VDSL2 bridges are readily available and bonding isn't anything special. The summary, the article, and the whole press release is just bull.

As for if this is good idea or not, it depends on the distance. This only makes sense for distances between 100m and 300m. Otherwise, there are better options. If your distance is shorter, run Ethernet. If your distance is longer, you're either going to lose performance or consider running fiber.

Re:Bonding? Boring. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27228021)

I think you missed the point of the article, its not about the speed they are getting, its the fact they are using DSM level 3 (vectorized dsl) to achieve those speeds. VDSL2 30A gives ~100mbit/sec symmetric @ 300m on a single pair, a situation you will never see unless you have a dslam in your basement. At 500m you are more likely to get ~70mbit/sec down, ~30mbit/sec up on a single pair. Simply bonding x times as many DSL lines doesn't give a linear increase in speed as you are increasing FEXT in the binder, the more lines you light up, the more FEXT you get. DSM uses optimal PSD masks and vectoring for each line, as a means to eliminate (or minimize) crosstalk. Basically a converse of Shannon's law, in the absence of noise, channel capacity can be greatly increased.

Great for everyone that is 1,500ft from a CO. (1)

insomniac8400 (590226) | more than 5 years ago | (#27225979)

For the rest of us, we still are OOL.

Sweet! (2, Funny)

shadedream (1225698) | more than 5 years ago | (#27225993)

Now I can exceed my "realistic" 20gb cap in ~40 seconds...

Bandwidth Caps Hinder Progress Anyway (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27226061)

What does it matter? Some ISP will cap you anyway. Look out for the tax or the charging of going over your monthly cap.

Going to play out just like the cell phone business.
Pay for text, pay for bits.

Mandatory porn reference? (1)

headqtrs (467875) | more than 5 years ago | (#27226495)

But then I could download my daily dose of porn in two minutes!

fp 3iCk (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27227249)

TiGred arguments to be about doing raadt's stubborn Endless conflict

Fraud! (1)

Nom du Keyboard (633989) | more than 5 years ago | (#27229087)

This is fraud because they bonded multiple pairs. Yeah I can run a hundred pairs of wire in parallel and get amazing transfer rates, but I can do that with current technology and transmission rates and it means nothing except that I can spell "parallel data transfer". Speeds should be measured by the single wire-pair circuit only! This used more wire pairs than most customers have coming into their houses.

Memo: (2, Insightful)

Jawn98685 (687784) | more than 5 years ago | (#27229245)

From: VP of Marketing, MegaTelco
To: VP of Operations, MegaTelco
CC: VP of Research and Development, MegaTelco

Gentlemen,
Congratulations to the R&D boys who have come up with this wonderful new technology.

Now, please make certain that this is kept under wraps for as long as possible so that we can squeeze as much money as possible out of our current customers who are paying for "special" data circuits. We'd like to continue to keep them bent over and taking it deep for as long as possible. We don't want to cannibalize our revenue stream until the competition forces us too and we are positioned to then squash that competition through a combination of lax regulation and our monopoly status. It's our wire, god dammit, and we're not going to let "innovation" give our customers anything better until we're good and ready to let them have it.

Re:Memo: (1)

DavidRawling (864446) | more than 5 years ago | (#27234485)

Dammit, where's the "+1, Despondently Truthful" option when you need it ...

I just have to ask (1)

DaMattster (977781) | more than 5 years ago | (#27231413)

Why are we spending money to attempt to squeeze more life out of an obsolete technology? Twisted pair copper is an absolete technology and it makes no sense to continue to use it as the infrastructure is aging and not very reliable in some areas. No wonder we are behind the curve of Japan when it comes to broadband and communications. They have already laid fibre that is capable of similar data transmission rates. I never liked DSL anyway, it is slower than cable. A much better investment, and our sitting president would agree, is upgrading our infrastructure nationwide to fibre optics.
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