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Managing Humans

samzenpus posted about 5 years ago | from the read-all-about-it dept.

The Internet 87

Kylar writes "For those of you who have already discovered Michael 'Rands' Lopp's blog Rands In Repose, I congratulate you, as you are clearly an intelligent audience. For those of you who haven't, or for the less discerning (or, perhaps less blog-oriented), this book provides an excellent entry into the writings of Rands. Containing edited selections from his blog as well as new material, Rands uses many anecdotes and stories to convey a startling amount of deep wisdom into the facets of the Silicon Valley programmer, and a bevy of tools that are helpful in attempting to herd, er, manage them." Read below for Tom's review.I've read most of this book 3 times, the first when I discovered Rands' blog, (and, like few others, captivated me enough to start at the beginning and read his entire oeuvre), Once upon purchase of the book, and again, recently over the course of a few weeks, taking the stories out of order, and enjoying each for it's viewpoint, humor, and insight. The book is broken down into 3 major sections, 34 chapters, and each chapter is a small chunk, easily readable in a few minutes. It really feels like a blog, you can dip into it for a few minutes here and there and pick up a good point or two from each entry.

Know how many people I manage? Over a dozen, on a weekly basis. Know how many people report to me? None. So, why did I read it? Because I sit in a lot of meetings. I have to manage expectations. I have to write specs and reports for other people. Unless you work in almost complete isolation, receiving uber-detailed software specs and churning out code to match those exact specifications, the likelyhood is that you have to deal with other people. A lot. Every time you deal with someone else in a technical workplace, you run into other people. Their motives are not the same as yours, nor do they communicate the same way. In the first section of the book, "The Management Quiver", Lopp recounts 12 anecdotes, and two specific ones stood out. 'Agenda Detection' gives some points on how to figure out who the important people are in a meeting, and 3 tips on when to bail. 'Avoiding The Fez' points the spotlight on the guy who wrote that one system that no-one understands, but also calls out that too many people (and I find myself in this group) let their knowledge stagnate, instead of constantly learning and expanding.

The second section of the book, "The Process Is The Product", is, in my opinion where the book really starts to shine. "1.0" will be a familiar story for anyone who's ever tried to ship a product, as well as Rands' view on the 4 key things that it will take. "Taking Time To Think" and "The Soak" talk about absorbing ideas and planning, and he touches on ways to convey and disseminate information in "Capturing Context". This last one was another that I found informative — by getting a closer understanding of what kind of information the other party was expecting, and in what way they will be receptive to it.

In the third section, "Versions Of You", you'll see the people you work with, and Rands divides them out in lots of different ways (it struck me very much as almost a myers-briggs Nerd Scale). Are they Incrementalists or Completionist? Organic or Mechanic? Inward or Outwards? (For the record, I'm an OIC, An organic inward completionist.) And once you've identified someone, it makes communicating with them and identifying their motivations and reactions much better.

So, who should read this book? Managers. Technical Managers. Technical Peons. Programmers who are managed. Anyone who works with someone technical. Anyone named Fez. Odds are, if you're reading this review, you're in the target audience. Even when you look at a book like this and think "I don't need this, I'm not a manager." Odds are that you're being managed, and managing others, even if they don't report to you.

So, ultimately, why should you read this? I think that this book has a fair amount to offer just about anyone in a role in or dealing with technical talent. Does it answer everything? Of course not — but there are a lot of little nuggets hiding here, and above all, it is entertaining. More entertaining than The Mythical Man Month, and more applicable to my daily job than "SOA Is Dead, An Anthology".

This book has several Pros: I found it very relevant, and I was able to identify ways to improve my own communication, by understanding what the other person was expecting, and how to present it. Cons: Most of it is available free on Rands' blog.

You can purchase Managing Humans from amazon.com. Slashdot welcomes readers' book reviews -- to see your own review here, read the book review guidelines, then visit the submission page.

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87 comments

Managing to get a First Post (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#27391675)

AC writes

"For those of you who have already discovered Anonymous 'AC' Coward's blog AC In Repose, I congratulate you, as you are clearly an intelligent audience. For those of you who haven't, or for the less discerning (or, perhaps less blog-oriented), this frosty provides an excellent entry into the writings of lunatics. Containing edited selections from his goatse site as well as new material, AC uses many anecdotes and stories to convey a startling amount of deep wisdom into the facets of the Silicon Valley trolling effect, and a bevy of tools that are helpful in attempting to herd, er, manage them."

Re:Managing to get a First Post (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#27391849)

wow, I M impressed.

Re:Managing to get a First Post (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#27395133)

Also the multiple articles on "how to twitter" are just mind-gasming.

Buy the book, reward good writing. (2, Interesting)

matt4077 (581118) | about 5 years ago | (#27391687)

Buy the book, reward good writing.

Re:Buy the book, reward good writing. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#27411583)

reward writing.

GEORGE OF THE JUNGLE (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#27391699)

oh eh ah oh oh oh uh eh ah

WATCH OUT FOR THAT TREE!

Follow up to: "How to Serve Man" (1)

Smidge207 (1278042) | about 5 years ago | (#27391703)

...it's an http://oreilly.com/ [oreilly.com] cook book.

FUCK YOU, LEAVE ME ALONE, LET ME SURF THE WEB AS THE FLYING SPAGHETTI WEASEL INTENDED

=Smidge=

Filter error: Don't use so many caps. It's like YELLING. Filter error: Don't use so many caps. It's like YELLING. Filter error: Don't use so many caps. It's like YELLING.

Hmmm. (5, Funny)

castorvx (1424163) | about 5 years ago | (#27391767)

Is this anything like that time they tricked us with "To Serve Man"?

Re:Hmmm. (1)

Savage-Rabbit (308260) | about 5 years ago | (#27393483)

Is this anything like that time they tricked us with "To Serve Man"?

Yes and no, it's not a cookbook it's an illustrated guide on how to manage Kanamit slave-camps. It has a particularly good chapter on the employment of slave labour in spice-mining. What you need to read it is glasses with dilithium crystal spectral lenses and adamantium rims. You can buy those from most any online store on the pan galactic subspace inter-web. Just be careful not to stand to close to any sources of high frequency electromagnetic fields, the magnetic eddies in the dilithium lenses can distort the spectral signature of the text.

I Managed to get a Human Female (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#27391775)

I managed to get a human female to suck my dick and now all I want to do is get her to keep doing it.

Anyone got any advice for keeping a girl around for more than a couple months?

Re:I Managed to get a Human Female (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#27392005)

www.realdoll.com

Not human, but human-shaped.

Re:I Managed to get a Human Female (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#27392457)

Ropes have always done the trick for me

This was just a cut-and-paste of "Managing Cattle" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#27391803)

You can tell from the chapters on grass vs. corn feeding and the sections on dealing with downers.

Even if the points may be just as applicable to programmers, it is a cheat.

Completely agree (4, Insightful)

zollman (697) | about 5 years ago | (#27391813)

It's easy as a technical employee -- developer, architect, administrator -- to know your job much better than your boss. Once you've reached that point, it's equally tempting to believe you know *more* than your boss, and to question why they insist on continuing to waste your time.

This book is an excellent first step in explaining what it is managers are supposed to be doing, and what it is that management is supposed to accomplish with the standard management tricks -- meetings, one-on-ones, reviews -- that can seem like such a waste of time when all you want to do is write good code. Even if you never want to go into management yourself, but especially if you do, it's worth reading.

Plus, the book is an easy, engaging read that makes a lot of sense even the first time through.

Highly recommended.

Re:Completely agree (1)

Wellington Grey (942717) | about 5 years ago | (#27392117)

Plus, the book is an easy, engaging read that makes a lot of sense even the first time through. Highly recommended

That sounds astroturf-tastic!

Re:Completely agree (1)

zollman (697) | about 5 years ago | (#27392303)

Isn't though. Hell of an astroturf campaign to sign up for slashdot that many years ago, using my real name, just to pimp a book now.

Sorry bud. I actually like it. A lot. On my desk right now.

Re:Completely agree (1)

Wellington Grey (942717) | about 5 years ago | (#27392659)

Hell of an astroturf campaign to sign up for slashdot that many years ago, using my real name, just to pimp a book now

Whoops.

::tucks tail and looks shamefaced at the 3 digit UID user::

Re:Completely agree (0, Troll)

Smidge207 (1278042) | about 5 years ago | (#27392163)

FUCK YOU, zollman LEAVE ME ALONE, LET ME SURF THE WEB AS THE FLYING SPAGHETTI WEASEL INTENDED

=Smidge=

Filter error: Don't use so many caps. It's like YELLING. Filter error: Don't use so many caps. It's like YELLING. Filter error: Don't use so many caps. It's like YELLING.

Managing Humans??? (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#27391815)

We don't have that problem in my office.

*insert sound of typing monkeys*

Re:Managing Humans??? (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#27392261)

Code Monkey get up get coffee

Code Monkey go to job

Code Monkey have boring meeting

With boring manager Rob

Re:Managing Humans??? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#27394667)

Rob say code monkey very diligent

But his output stink

His code not functional or elegant

What does code monkey think?

Code monkey think maybe manager wanna write goddamn log-in page himself

Code monkey not say it, out loud

Code monkey not crazy, just proud

Code monkey likes you...

what? (5, Insightful)

Lord Ender (156273) | about 5 years ago | (#27391905)

For those of you who ... I congratulate you, as you are clearly an intelligent audience.

This reads like a really sleazy sales pitch, along the lines of "Did you know that top billionaires take my supplement to boost their brain power?"

I stopped reading right there. I think I'll apply this review directly to my forehead.

Re:what? (5, Insightful)

ByOhTek (1181381) | about 5 years ago | (#27392327)

Aye. I would like to thank Kylar and his spectacularly incompetent/offensive introduction in encouraging me not to read this potentially good book.

Re:what? (3, Insightful)

MagusSlurpy (592575) | about 5 years ago | (#27392579)

Definitely. I read the first sentence, and thought, "Who is this Rands guy, and why should I care?" Then the next two sentences didn't tell me who he was or why I should care. So guess what?

I don't care.

Re:what? (2, Informative)

Azarael (896715) | about 5 years ago | (#27392711)

For those of you who find the wording of the review slimy, keep in mind that almost all of the material in the book is on rand's website. Also, the book is over a year old by now, so it seems odd that it would be advertised now. Anyway, the book is a decent read if books are your thing.

Re:what? (1)

syousef (465911) | about 5 years ago | (#27392715)

Mod parent up further!

First thing I thought was "So you're calling me an idiot if I haven't heard of or don't agree with this Rand dude. Way to make your review sound impartial". I don't much like being told how to think either. I stopped reading too. Who knows. It might be an interesting book, but I've just been put off it.

Re:what? (1)

cjfs (1253208) | about 5 years ago | (#27393767)

This reads like a really sleazy sales pitch, along the lines of "Did you know that top billionaires take my supplement to boost their brain power?"

I stopped reading right there.

I too, stopped reading there. I then went to post a comment mocking the tone of the first line. Seeing that had already been done thoroughly, I went back and read one more line.

For those of you who haven't, or for the less discerning (or, perhaps less blog-oriented), this book provides an excellent entry into the writings of Rands.

... and stopped there due to the use of "blog-oriented" and "entry into the writings of _____" in the same sentence.

Re:what? (3, Insightful)

LateArthurDent (1403947) | about 5 years ago | (#27394005)

For those of you who ... I congratulate you, as you are clearly an intelligent audience.

This reads like a really sleazy sales pitch, along the lines of "Did you know that top billionaires take my supplement to boost their brain power?"

Not only that, but I actually went to Rands' blog and read the latest post just to see what could be so amazing about it. In there, I found more stupid marketing / management terminology:

In a good bridge, I see the defiant end result of how some of my favorite engineering stories begin:

  • âoeIâ(TM)m sure you can arrange an impressive line of people who say itâ(TM)s impossible. I take personal joy in ignoring those who say no.â
  • âoeYes, halfway through this project weâ(TM)ll discover the impossible, but we know how to build through the impossible. Impossible is when we do our best work.â

Nobody "discovers the impossible" but "knows how to build through the impossible." That's not what impossible [answers.com] means. But it sure as hell sounds impressive, and it excites people!

The ability to deal with obstacles, even very difficult obstacles is a very marketable skill. However, when you start talking about overcoming challenges as "doing the impossible" you stop sounding like someone who is actually capable of dealing with problems and starts sounding like a moron salesman. Especially when you later say something stupid like, "Impossible is when we do our best work." It might sound great when your favorite Hollywood hero says that he "laughs in the face of danger," but in real life, when you're managing people, if you dismiss a current challenge by saying, "that's when we do our best work" you'll piss your employees off. They know it's bullshit, they know they'd do better if it was easy and they had more time. You can tell them that you have confidence they can handle the problem, but don't dismiss the problem with levity.

Hell, even in his own example of the Brooklyn Bridge, he says that when they hit the challenges during the building process, the manager got the bends, two employees died, and they decided to let one of the towers rest on compacted sand instead of bedrock. Then he says how amazing it is that it was a good decision, because it "hasn't moved" since. Might have been a good decision, but "the best" outcome obviously would have been no injuries, no deaths, and a foundation that was built exactly according to plan. Clearly, they don't do their best work under "impossible" conditions.

You want some tips on managing programmers and engineers? I don't have all the answers, but I do have one for certain: that type of marketing pitch might work when you're meeting to sell the product, but programmers and engineers aren't like most people in that regard. Exaggerations like that are just likely to piss us off, not impress or motivate us. So you post a summary like that on slashdot, and you get a bunch of angry geeks; you try to manage people like that, and you get a bunch of employees labeling you as a PHB.

Re:what? (1)

bensch128 (563853) | about 5 years ago | (#27396325)

I congratulate you, as you are clearly an intelligent audience

So did i, but that didn't prevent me from reading the book. Actually, It's my current bed-side reading. And so far, so good.
The author is funny and really seems to know his stuff. He writes from the heart.

Cheers
Ben

Clearly (4, Funny)

jalefkowit (101585) | about 5 years ago | (#27391907)

For those of you who have already discovered Michael 'Rands' Lopp's blog Rands In Repose, I congratulate you, as you are clearly an intelligent audience.

And humble! Don't forget humble!

Re:Clearly (1)

forgottenusername (1495209) | about 5 years ago | (#27392197)

Yeah, the arrogant, condescending and elitist nature of the summary pretty much made me want to cockpunch the reviewer.

There are hundreds of millions of blogs in the world. Not reading some random dotcom shmoe's blog means what again?

Re:Clearly (1)

v1 (525388) | about 5 years ago | (#27392411)

Reminds me of "anger management" classes. I don't need anger management.... I'm managing my anger just fine thank you very much. Now quit squirming, you're making for a difficult target.

"People", not "humans" (3, Interesting)

meatmanek (1062562) | about 5 years ago | (#27391969)

I'm put off by the summary and the title - it makes it seem as if it's going to encourage managers to consider everyone underneath him just another part of the "herd".

Re:"People", not "humans" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#27392031)

Actually, it's not. If you want to get a flavor of it, hit his blog first. It pretty much dresses down the PHB's.....

Re:"People", not "humans" (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#27392043)

It's called "managing humans" because it's written by an ex-software developer who, like other software developers, was good at managing code, bits, and other impersonal things, but needed to find out how to manage humans, which was totally out of his comfort zone.

It's full of humility and is about as far from your interpretation as you can get. But then again, the author is also one of the mob behind jerkcity [jerkcity.com], so LOL DONGS.

Re:"People", not "humans" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#27393677)

Foolish Humans, ahahahahaha...

Okay, stop. (5, Insightful)

girlintraining (1395911) | about 5 years ago | (#27392053)

First, labeling people and sorting them into categories is a problem. Not because it isn't useful, but because the audience here is much more likely to view those as absolutes than guidelines. Whenever people start arbitrarily dividing other people into groups, they are certain to be mislead to a degree. A person's demeanor and work habits are not necessarily a reflection on their inner nature. Assuming that one is the other is a bad plan. Use labels, prejudices, stereotypes, and categories as a starting point. But don't stay there. Just because someone is an "organic inward completionist" this week doesn't mean you might not find out later while they're on break talking about a problem they're working on that the approach they are using is radically different.

Secondly, managing people (and working with management) is a skillset that is very individualized. There is no right or wrong approach. There is only what succeeds, and what still needs work. This book is useful because it condenses experience in a format that other people can benefit from. But remember when you read the book to keep your critical thinking skill "shield" up. Take frequent breaks. Don't zombie on it for fourty pages. Especially not anything that mixes technology and people. Because it's too easy to internalize all this stuff without stopping to think: "Hey, that doesn't make sense..." And a lot of personal experience doesn't make sense. There are lessons to be learned here and there, but what your takeaway is will be different than mine, even if we are in the same situation, and have the same experiences.

Re:Okay, stop. (2, Insightful)

digitalhermit (113459) | about 5 years ago | (#27392291)

For those of you who have already discovered Michael 'Rands' Lopp's blog Rands In Repose, I congratulate you, as you are clearly an intelligent audience.

hehe.. +1 if I could...

So does this mean that I am intelligent because I've read it? What if I hated it??

I'm going to do the same and categorize anyone who agrees with me as intelligent. Anyone who does not is evil.

Re:Okay, stop. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#27392501)

All right stop, collaborate and listen
Ice is back with my brand new invention

Re:Okay, stop. (1)

troll8901 (1397145) | about 5 years ago | (#27393757)

... the audience here is much more likely to view those as absolutes than guidelines.

Maybe we read too many RFCs.

Re:Okay, stop. (1)

Mobius Ring (1346871) | about 5 years ago | (#27405391)

Huh. Much of what you say is true... but not all.

For instance, "the audience here" isn't much more likely to view these as absolutes... too many of us run into the "standards aren't" in our day-to-day lives to really have any faith in "absolutes".

Second, some "descriptives" actually are correct. My MBTI is INTJ and the description/explanation given by Dr. Keirsey in his book 'Please Understand Me' is exceedingly accurate for me.

Now if you were trying to make the point that assumptions based on description of a person by a third party can not only be inaccurate but harmful... sure. However... as an INTJ that is not how I interpreted what you wrote. ;)

Choose a wise leader, or rather, a leader wisely (5, Insightful)

barocco (1168573) | about 5 years ago | (#27392089)

"The major problem -- one of the major problems, for there are several -- one of the many major problems with governing people is that of whom you get to do it; or rather of who manages to get people to let them do it to them.

To summarize: it is a well-known fact that thoes people who must want to rule people are, ipso facto, those least suited to do it. To summarize the summary: anyone who is capable of getting themeslves made President should on no account be allowed to do the job. To summarize the summary of the summary: people are a problem."

---- Douglas Adams

Re:Choose a wise leader, or rather, a leader wisel (1)

djdavetrouble (442175) | about 5 years ago | (#27392259)

Thanks for the Douglas Adams quote. I always thought that was one of his most genius realizations.

I also liked the idea that the leader is actually there to distract people from realizing who is really in charge (big business).

Re:Choose a wise leader, or rather, a leader wisel (2, Interesting)

v1 (525388) | about 5 years ago | (#27392461)

anyone who is capable of getting themeslves made President should on no account be allowed to do the job.

There's a very old observation that doing well at your current job gets you promoted into a different job, but doing poorly does not, and therefore people tend to get promoted repeatedly until they land in a position they are ill-suited for, where they are kept. Sad, so very sad, but so very true.

(short version, "most systems tend to promote people into positions of incompetence")

It's sort of an applied Murphy's Law.

Re:Choose a wise leader, or rather, a leader wisel (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#27423853)

There is a large difference between the skills needed to acquire power and the skills needed to excercize it

Hmmm... I just .... (4, Insightful)

johnlcallaway (165670) | about 5 years ago | (#27392235)

  • Treat everyone with respect in public, and don't talk shit about them behind their backs
  • Find out what people are good at and don't expect them to be good at things they are not.
  • Give people things they are not good at to see if they can grow, but don't get upset if they can't.
  • Set, manage, and understand expectations, in all directions
  • Get rid of mean people, information hoarders, and selfish people, they are always poison and can't be changed
  • Give others the credit, and always take the blame. Sort out the rest out in private.
  • Suggestions are better than directives, use directives sparingly.

That will be $14.95 please.....

Re:Hmmm... I just .... (2, Funny)

tnk1 (899206) | about 5 years ago | (#27392455)

That all takes good intentions, work, and integrity.

Clearly, you have never managed anyone.

Re:Hmmm... I just .... (1)

splat-boing (1406119) | about 5 years ago | (#27392557)

Au contraire mon frer... Those are the 7 commandments of 'Treating People Right in the Workplace'...ignore them and you're gonna burn in manager hell...either that or your team will burn you on the spot...

Re:Hmmm... I just .... (2, Insightful)

rednip (186217) | about 5 years ago | (#27392829)

Those are the 7 commandments of 'Treating People Right in the Workplace'...

So, he knows the real first rule of management; Present the ideas of others as if they were your own.

Re:Hmmm... I just .... (2, Interesting)

johnlcallaway (165670) | about 5 years ago | (#27393073)

I just made that list up. If they mimic someone's work, it is unintentional. I don't read the 'fad of the month' books like the one reviewed above.

Re:Hmmm... I just .... (1)

aralin (107264) | about 5 years ago | (#27393809)

So you are just trying to increase the authority of your statement by making it sound like it was a good idea of some other person of authority or a common knowledge in the field.

Re:Hmmm... I just .... (1)

johnlcallaway (165670) | about 5 years ago | (#27401945)

I took Rednip's post to mean that I had stolen the list from somewhere else and didn't give the proper credit.

Re:Hmmm... I just .... (1)

cjalmeida (1148679) | about 5 years ago | (#27394643)

Cleary you work in a f*cked up company. If your believe employees wake up every morning thinking "how can I make things worse at work" please shoot yourself. Trust is an integral part of managing people - else you're bound to suffocate yourself with micromanagement.

Re:Hmmm... I just .... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#27392909)

I just read the current top post on his blog. Impressive as these construction projects may be, the America 2.0 analogy is empty. I'll not be buying the bridge. [museumofhoaxes.com]

Re:Hmmm... I just .... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#27392913)

You voted for Obama??? Want some more Koolaid???

Why would you put that racist drivel in your sig? It just so happens that watermelon and grape Kool-aid are delicious for people of all races.

Oh, and Jim Jones was white smart guy.

Re:Hmmm... I just .... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#27393023)

You assumed he was racist because he mentioned Obama and Koolaid in the same sentence?? Only a racist would assume such things have a racist intention. Clearly his sig was inferring that those that follow Obama are cultists and don't think for themselves, since that is what Jim Jones followers were doing. If only he had noted Flavoraid instead of Koolaid, he would have gotten the reference correct.

Re:Hmmm... I just .... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#27393411)

Clearly his sig was inferring...

His sig infers nothing. It implies.

I think you responded to a weird AC joke or troll.

Re:Hmmm... I just .... (2, Interesting)

troll8901 (1397145) | about 5 years ago | (#27393801)

Give others the credit, and always take the blame.

Do it too often, and management may just start believing you...

I understand the value of this action, but I fear some management types may be too blind to see the truth. How would you counter this?

Re:Hmmm... I just .... (1)

johnlcallaway (165670) | about 5 years ago | (#27402153)

Give others the credit, and always take the blame.

Do it too often, and management may just start believing you...

I understand the value of this action, but I fear some management types may be too blind to see the truth. How would you counter this?

Find a new job.

I've never seen this to be a problem. People are smart enough to know who does the real work, and who has oversight over that work. Taking credit for someone's work makes you look bad by the people you work for, and blaming someone that you were responsible for makes you look bad to the people you report to. The opposite makes you look good, you recognize others for their efforts and you take responsibility for what you are responsible for.

Re:Hmmm... I just .... (1)

troll8901 (1397145) | about 5 years ago | (#27402613)

... makes you look good, you recognize others for their efforts and you take responsibility for what you are responsible for.

There was a discussion on Slashdot:
Do Nice Engineers Finish Last In Tough Times? [slashdot.org] (Jan 20, 2009)

In the linked TFA, the humane manager got canned, and the backstabbing manager got retained.

Re:Hmmm... I just .... (1)

johnlcallaway (165670) | about 5 years ago | (#27405757)

First, one example does not a rule make. Just as my anecdotal evidence does not.

But in this case, finding a new job was probably a good thing to do. I never understood why people want to stay at jobs that suck. I was stuck at a job as a COBOL developer for 7 years for a company with a terrible manager. I got laid off one Monday (with 9 weeks severance pay) and two weeks later had a much better job with a better boss and more opportunity. In fact, getting laid off was the best thing to happen to me as my salary had been very flat for many years before that (the old "you make too much, if we gave you a raise then other people wouldn't get one"), and became a hockey stick for many years after that.

I've had this attitude now for many years and it has served me very well, both in workplace environment and salary. It may not be for everyone, but I have a lot less stress than the schemers and screamers out there.

Re:Hmmm... I just .... (1)

cerberusss (660701) | about 5 years ago | (#27400009)

  • Treat managers with respect, and talk shit about everyone else behind their backs
  • Find out what people are good at, then force them to extremes, saying: "Buddy, your best just isn't good enough"
  • Scream at people for things they are not good at, demand they do better if they like their job
  • Undermine expectations and gloat when the shit hits the fan
  • Promote mean people, information hoarders and selfish people, because I like to surround myself with equal-minded people
  • Take credit for everything and pass the blame
  • Rule with an iron fist, but drive people into the ground with evil suggestions like "Maybe that project would just be overreaching for you"

In case you're wondering, my name is Catbert [wikipedia.org].

If you're wondering who Rands is... (1)

falloutgib (585732) | about 5 years ago | (#27392855)

If you're wondering who Rands is, he's also one of the "writers" of Jerkcity, probably the best nihilistic/deep/nerd/software webcomic out there, which you can find at http://www.jerkcity.com/ [jerkcity.com] Jerkcity also spawned http://www.leisuretown.com/ [leisuretown.com] which is the ultimate examination of life expressed in a webcomic.

Stopped reading (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#27393337)

I stopped reading Rands when he said he was twittering while in meetings. Sorry, that's not appropriate and not someone I want to immitate.

Rands is a Grade A Douche (0, Flamebait)

sympathy (1492055) | about 5 years ago | (#27396707)

I have never heard of this turd burglar before but I just went and checked out his blog thanks to this article. Let's take a look:

1. Something about bridges and nerds? Looks like someone is jacking off. Later in the article, "Someone, sometime soon is going to start describing the climb out of this impressive hole we've dug for ourselves, and they're going to call it 'America 2.0'. Clever, yes." Yes, you're so clever. Great job. Maybe he was being sarcastic here but any way you slice it that sentence was unnecessary, coming from the guy who talks about "writing less." Also it's all well and good to fellate Obama for telling Americans to work hard, but when he turns around and stabs the whole country in the back with more of the same failed policies that benefit only the rich and penalize the hard-working folks you're talking about, I really don't think any quote from him should be taken seriously.

2 & 3. Two separate and extremely pompous articles about Twitter, labled "The Art of the Tweet" and "A Twitter Decision." What? Hey "Rands" (great nick btw, very generic and unassuming, just like you) guess what: it's Twitter. Even if you're 100% right about what you're saying, I guarantee 100% of everyone doesn't give a shit about any of that. Rands says, "For me, a tweet is still a note I tie to a balloon, which I let go and think, "Who is going to read that one?" Sometimes I look and see where it ended up, sometimes I don't." Wow you mean you tweet so you other people can read it? Thanks for the poetry Shakespeare, but you're still full of shit.

This is where the front page ends, but I check out some other articles. I like this one ( http://www.randsinrepose.com/archives/2003/07/10/nadd.html [randsinrepose.com] ) where he talks about "NADD." Here's a description: "You enjoy the content fire hose. Give me tabbed browsing, tabbed instant messaging, music all the time, and TIVO TIVO TIVO. Welcome to NADD." I guess he just means being... uhmm... I don't know, alive? Wow people sure are different aren't they? *points out a bunch of obvious shit* Hey look at me I'm a friggin genius over here. Honestly I don't get this article at all. So you look at shit constantly and can't stand to be without. Great. Who cares? What's your point? "Third, and lastly, you're not going to have much patience with those who have not chosen a NADD-like life." Wow that's funny because I'm almost exactly like the NADD person you described except I don't have this problem because I'm not a self-absorbed asswipe. Grow up you piece of shit.

This post is just spam (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#27399259)

This is just spam, besides the author/poster seems too full of himself.

Can Slashdot just remove this whole advertising please?

Free alternative (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#27400677)

Not as anecdotal, but a free alternative here:

http://managementforengineers.com/

$19.48 + Free Shipping at BetterWorldBooks.com (1)

misterjava66 (1265146) | about 5 years ago | (#27406983)

You can get it for $19.48 + Free Shipping at BetterWorldBooks.com

http://www.betterworldbooks.com/detail.aspx?ItemId=159059844X [betterworldbooks.com]

Oodles of other used books in this category from ~$5-7

http://www.betterworldbooks.com/List.aspx?Category_ID=2637&&UserId=16025974&SessionId=1rSiPr61zs1dNNqPVpG8&z=4081929 [betterworldbooks.com]

and save the planet/$6M global literacy/good jobs

http://www.betterworldbooks.com/Info-Our-Impact-m-51.aspx [betterworldbooks.com] :-)

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