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What Would It Look Like To Fall Into a Black Hole?

timothy posted more than 5 years ago | from the phrase-your-answer-in-wine-review-terms dept.

Space 154

CNETNate writes "A new video simulation developed by Andrew Hamilton and Gavin Polhemus of the University of Colorado, Boulder, on New Scientist today, shows what you might see on your way towards a black hole's crushing central singularity. Hamilton and Polhemus built a computer code based on the equations of Einstein's general theory of relativity, and the video produced allows the viewer to follow the fate of an imaginary observer on an orbit that swoops down into a giant black hole weighing 5 million times the mass of the sun, about the same size as the hole in the centre of our galaxy. The research could help physicists understand the apparently paradoxical fate of matter and energy in a black hole."

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154 comments

I thought it was April 2? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27436493)

How did a Goatse story get on the front page?

Huh? (5, Funny)

Jack9 (11421) | more than 5 years ago | (#27436507)

I don't assume you see red grid lines?

Re:Huh? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27436545)

I assume they help mark the event horizon in 3D since black doesn't do a good job of this...

Re:Huh? (4, Funny)

AvitarX (172628) | more than 5 years ago | (#27436601)

Probably while your still pretty far away, you see a white light, and ancestors calling.

Re:Huh? (3, Informative)

FST777 (913657) | more than 5 years ago | (#27436625)

According to the TFA, the red grid marks the event horizon as the "falling" observer would see it. Later on, you see a white grid, which marks the event horizon as distant observers see it.

Re:Huh? (5, Funny)

interkin3tic (1469267) | more than 5 years ago | (#27436835)

I would have assumed you would see a completely black grid on a completely black background.

Re:Huh? (4, Informative)

Jack9 (11421) | more than 5 years ago | (#27437199)

I don't expect you'd see anything, since even light would be pulled into the center. No grid at all, nothing on which to gauge the distortions.

Re:Huh? (5, Funny)

lastchance_000 (847415) | more than 5 years ago | (#27438113)

You'll probably be eaten by a grue.

There is a grue here. (1)

Tetsujin (103070) | more than 5 years ago | (#27438409)

You'll probably be eaten by a grue.

Defy this cruel fate! "Frotz" a Grue today!

Re:Huh? (0, Redundant)

GarryFre (886347) | more than 5 years ago | (#27440287)

I doubt they would see anything the dead don't see. It would suck.

Re:Huh? (2, Funny)

nanospook (521118) | more than 5 years ago | (#27440673)

The very last thing you would see is a Walmart floating by..

hmm, I see (4, Funny)

jollyreaper (513215) | more than 5 years ago | (#27436511)

So falling into a black hole looks and awful lot like a slashdotting. Good to know!

Re:hmm, I see (2, Funny)

mikiN (75494) | more than 5 years ago | (#27437001)

The Slashdot Paradox:

Getting first post on Slashdot while falling into a black hole.
Cynical phycisists might call that an extremely slow news day.
Other physicists might remark that now there are 2 things which can escape from a black hole: Hawking radiation and Slashdot posts.

Re:hmm, I see (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27437265)

Nope. /.ing requires you to do something. Falling in black hole is like religions in general. You just need to die... (not sure wanna be rebord as cow tho)

Re:hmm, I see (4, Funny)

lordofthechia (598872) | more than 5 years ago | (#27437465)

There's an alternate simulation here. [youtube.com]

What does it look like? (4, Funny)

tnk1 (899206) | more than 5 years ago | (#27436553)

It looks like you are seriously fucked.

Re:What does it look like? (3, Funny)

schmidt349 (690948) | more than 5 years ago | (#27437969)

What actually transpires beneath the veil of an event horizon? Decent people shouldn't think too much about that.

Academician Prokhor Zakharov
"For I Have Tasted The Fruit"

Re:What does it look like? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27438911)

SMAC for the win, of course. I was just playing that. :P

Re:What does it look like? (1)

fractoid (1076465) | more than 5 years ago | (#27440599)

It sounded (from TFA) like the event horizon is actually subjective; that you'd never "hit" it from the point of view of an observer falling into the black hole.

Of course, what the Academician probably meant was "the pixels go a funny shape and then the world goes blue with big grey letters on it".

What it's like (5, Funny)

BobGregg (89162) | more than 5 years ago | (#27436555)

I grew up in Birmingham, Alabama.

I think it's a lot like that.

Re:What it's like (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27437447)

I grew up in Birmingham, Alabama.

I think it's a lot like that.

Racist!

Re:What it's like (4, Funny)

orangesquid (79734) | more than 5 years ago | (#27437837)

$ /usr/games/bsd/nethole

** You are in a maze of twisty little distorted images, all alike.

** You have been eaten by an event horizon.

$ # dammit

I already saw it (2, Funny)

OglinTatas (710589) | more than 5 years ago | (#27436559)

back in 1979.
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0078869/ [imdb.com]
man, that V.I.N.CENT. was such a character!

Re:I already saw it (1)

ShadowBlasko (597519) | more than 5 years ago | (#27436585)

B.O.B was always my fav. Well, Maximillion of course though .. For the evil ending win.

What it looks like (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27436569)

Falling into a black hole looks like...

Goatse

Hmmm... (-1, Offtopic)

CannonballHead (842625) | more than 5 years ago | (#27436615)

Hamilton and Polhemus built a computer code based on the equations

"Built a computer code" ... can you build "a" computer code?

I mean, I know you can.
int x = 0;
Look, ma, I built a computer code! ... or something...

At first I thought it said "a computer code base" ... that'd make sense. But it's "a computer code based on..."

Re:Hmmm... (1)

momerath2003 (606823) | more than 5 years ago | (#27436957)

"A code" in the lingo of the scientific programming community means "a computer program that simulates these equations in an expedient manner," i.e. there is more than one way to discretize and program the solution of the equations, but they have done it in one specific way. It is therefore "a computer code."

Re:Hmmm... (1)

CannonballHead (842625) | more than 5 years ago | (#27437455)

Citation? Not that I necessarily doubt you but this is news to me, I wouldn't mind reading a bit on it. It seems to me to be a very odd usage of the word "code."

Re:Hmmm... (1)

fractoid (1076465) | more than 5 years ago | (#27440613)

Well, if they want to mutilate the language of my profession like that, I shall build a research based on an algorithm.

Black holes have an infinite radius (4, Interesting)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 5 years ago | (#27436667)

...and a finite circumference. An observer falling towards the singularity would feel the local gradient in the gravitational field increase as they fall, probably to the point where staying in one piece becomes a challenge. This would go on for a long time from their POV.

Re:Black holes have an infinite radius (4, Informative)

Creepy Crawler (680178) | more than 5 years ago | (#27436713)

Infinite radius would assume that time and position in space is NOT granular.

If even time is granular, Tipler's Omega Point theory could not work.

Re:Black holes have an infinite radius (4, Informative)

ceoyoyo (59147) | more than 5 years ago | (#27437127)

It would take a long time from your point of view, on the outside. It would happen pretty fast for the sap who fell in.

Re:Black holes have an infinite radius (5, Interesting)

garlicbready (846542) | more than 5 years ago | (#27437855)

This might be completely wrong

I always thought that if you could see the outside universe as you were falling in the outside would appear to be moving faster and faster (from an inside perspective) the closer you got towards the center of the singularity. (effectively skipping ahead into the future faster and faster)

since quite a lot of junk falls into a black hole especially over the period of the universe's lifetime, you'd probably see all sorts of large amounts of crap following in behind you at a tremendous speed (stars etc) until it got close enough to be affected by the same space time distortion, but never quite catching up to your point

from an outside perspective if you could see what was happening beyond the event horizon, the stuff falling in would appear to move slower and slower the closer it got towards the center never quite reaching the center point
which makes me wonder if someone falling into one of these things would actually reach the end of time itself a lot more quickly than everyone else on the outside (assuming there is such a thing)

Re:Black holes have an infinite radius (1)

Mozk (844858) | more than 5 years ago | (#27438953)

I think you're right. I remember reading that there is no indication that you've crossed the event horizon and nothing appears to have happened, while to an observer, you'll slowly descend to the center yet never reach it, just like you said. The things happening in the video don't really make sense from what I've learned.

In other words (-1, Flamebait)

LordKaT (619540) | more than 5 years ago | (#27436711)

Once you came near the event horizon (given current technology) you would more than likely be dead, so this is a pretty pointless video, but we were able to use up most of our grant money renting out the SGI rendering farm to produce this. Isn't it cool? Can we have more grant money to do more cool things like this?

Re:In other words (3, Insightful)

R3d M3rcury (871886) | more than 5 years ago | (#27436799)

True. On the other hand, if I stuck you on the surface of Titan, you'd be dead, too. So it's pretty pointless to envision the surface of Titan or send probes there or anything like that.

Re:In other words (-1, Flamebait)

LordKaT (619540) | more than 5 years ago | (#27436831)

Making cute videos and sending probes are two entirely different things. I'd rather see research money spent on research and not cutesy little videos of "what would you see?"

If you're going to go down that route, at least make it an HD production and pitch to the discovery Channel. That way your money would at least go to entertaining people and getting more of them interested in science.

Re:In other words (5, Insightful)

linzeal (197905) | more than 5 years ago | (#27437109)

Figuring out the Riemann geometry [google.com] for this was non-trivial and should be lauded not dismissed as some trivial "cutesy video".

Re:In other words (0, Troll)

kv9 (697238) | more than 5 years ago | (#27437781)

Making cute videos and sending probes are two entirely different things.

youre a fucking idiot. you think they chuck those things into space from a big slingshot without making cutesy simulations based on hard math first?

Re:In other words (2, Interesting)

khellendros1984 (792761) | more than 5 years ago | (#27438539)

You're quite correct that making a video and sending a probe are two entirely different things. I somehow doubt that the video took a few hundred million to make, while still providing a potentially useful visualization of something that I somehow doubt we'll witness first hand.

Re:In other words (4, Insightful)

AKAImBatman (238306) | more than 5 years ago | (#27436857)

1. Reaching a black hole is not impossible with current technology, but it is beside the point.

2. This is a research tool intended to help physicists understand what happens to matter as it enters a black hole.

3. Using all your grant money to run on an SGI cluster is so... 1990s. This was probably rendered on a modern laptop. If the calculations really did turn out to be too computationally intensive for a modern personal computer (I wouldn't count on it), they would have bought time on one of the more modern Linux or Mac computing clusters.

4. "Cool" is not the purpose. If it was, there wouldn't be fun guide-lines left in the film. This is a research tool that happened to get passed on to NewScientist to share with anyone who might be interested.

Re:In other words (4, Interesting)

rts008 (812749) | more than 5 years ago | (#27437389)

This was probably rendered on a modern laptop.

After finding this website [spacetimetravel.org] , I would say you are correct.

There is also a "Step by Step into a Black Hole" [spacetimetravel.org] of similar images as the video in TFA. Worth looking at if this is an interest.

I also found a cool animation of a simulated "Flight through a Wormhole" [spacetimetravel.org] .

It all just seems basic animation. Cool, but nothing really ground breaking.

I imagine that the models used to base the animation on could have taken some resources.

P.S. I would hope the comment you replied to was a failed attempt at humour. Surely he was jesting!

Re:In other words (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27437397)

Reaching a black hole is not impossible with current technology, but it is beside the point.

Yes it is. It would take millennia if not millions of years to reach the closest black hole with current technology. We can't build anything that would be able to power itself for that long, nevermind that humanity would most likely be extinct by the time we reached it.

Re:In other words (1)

HTH NE1 (675604) | more than 5 years ago | (#27438563)

Reaching a black hole is not impossible with current technology, but it is beside the point.

Yes it is. It would take millennia if not millions of years to reach the closest black hole with current technology. We can't build anything that would be able to power itself for that long, nevermind that humanity would most likely be extinct by the time we reached it.

Well, good thing then that we're working on building our own locally. Anyone care for spaghetti?

Re:In other words (1)

fractoid (1076465) | more than 5 years ago | (#27440649)

Spaghettification. Let me guess. I can see only two options: one -- due to the bizarre effects of the intense gravitational pull, and because we're entering a region of time and space where the laws of physics no longer apply, we all of us inexplicably develop an irresistible urge to consume vast amounts of a certain wheat-based Italian noodle conventionally served with Parmesan cheese; or two -- we, the crew, get turned into spaghetti. I have a feeling we can eliminate option one.

Mmmm, nearly lunchtime.

Re:In other words (4, Insightful)

DRJlaw (946416) | more than 5 years ago | (#27437085)

Once you came near the event horizon (given current technology) you would more than likely be dead, so this is a pretty pointless video...

Pointless unless you've studied relativistic physics, in which case the video is a modernized version of the classic thought experiment "Einstein's Train." [syr.edu] . Everyone involved would be pretty dead if the train was moving at speeds fast enough to introduce relativistic effects perceptable by the ordinary senses, yet the illustration aids in an understanding of the physics.

The article is quite clear:

That's where visualisations like this might just help. "Close to the singularity, it appears that the entire three-dimensional universe is being crushed into a two-dimensional surface," says Hamilton (see Our world may be a giant hologram). But whether it hints that a 2D view is more fundamental is not yet clear. "Does it have any profound significance? I don't know..."

The death of the hypothetical observer is irrelevant to the usefulness of the video.

Re:In other words (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27439379)

I thought with a supermassive black hole, the tidal forces at the event horizon are not that great, so that a person might pass through and not even know it if there was not much matter nearby (granted, unlikely for a supermassive black hole)

Re:In other words (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27438105)

Once you came near the event horizon (given current technology) you would more than likely be dead...

Not necessarily. Supermassive black holes' radii are so large that gravitational shear is something you probably wouldn't even notice as you passed through the event horizon. Entire human generations on a planet or spaceship could potentially be born, live out their lives, and die naturally, all while within one of these monsters, before the effects of gravity were to tear them apart.

Re:In other words (2, Interesting)

amRadioHed (463061) | more than 5 years ago | (#27438345)

Depends on the size of the black hole. For a large black hole you would make it past the event horizon before the gravitational gradient is strong enough to tear you apart.

Simpsons Did It (3, Funny)

rackserverdeals (1503561) | more than 5 years ago | (#27436719)

Simpsons did it [wikipedia.org]

Re:Simpsons Did It (2, Funny)

buchner.johannes (1139593) | more than 5 years ago | (#27437377)

Don't say "Simpsons did it", Southpark already did that [wikipedia.org] .

Re:Simpsons Did It (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 5 years ago | (#27438401)

The Simpsons parodied the Simpsons well before southpark did.

Just sayin'

Re:Simpsons Did It (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27440295)

WHOOOOOOOOOSH!!

nuff said

Re:Simpsons Did It (2, Insightful)

fractoid (1076465) | more than 5 years ago | (#27440661)

I'm gonna have to whoosh a whoosh here.

Whooosh! :)

Black hole = K hole? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27436739)

I've seen that before: whenever I take ketamine on an acid comedown. It looks just like that!

How does it feel? (3, Funny)

Locke2005 (849178) | more than 5 years ago | (#27436765)

About the same as it feels to be a bug hitting an Audi windscreen on the Autobahn... when you've been stretched to several hundred times your original length, you're most likely no longer capable of observing anything, so it looks pretty much like nothingness. Can a soul escape from the event horizon of a black hole, or is it doomed to spend forever in purgatory inside the black hole? And is that better or worse than being stuck in New Jersey?

Re:How does it feel? (1)

the_humeister (922869) | more than 5 years ago | (#27436803)

Well, at least with New Jersey, there's still the theoretical possibility of escape.

Re:How does it feel? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27436903)

There's always Hawking Radiation.

Re:How does it feel? (2, Funny)

HTH NE1 (675604) | more than 5 years ago | (#27438495)

There's always Hawking Radiation.

So that's the source of that Jersey smell?

Re:How does it feel? (5, Funny)

An ominous Cow art (320322) | more than 5 years ago | (#27436919)

Yeah, but you have to get out while you're young, if you're a tramp who was born to run.

Re:How does it feel? (1)

M-RES (653754) | more than 5 years ago | (#27437403)

I thought New Jersey was a point of ARRIVAL not departure. Or was Being John Malkovich NOT a documentary!?!?!?

Same Guy, Cooler Graphics (5, Informative)

lacoronus (1418813) | more than 5 years ago | (#27436783)

The same person (Andrew Hamilton) is behind this website:

Inside Black Holes [colorado.edu]

Which has a lot cooler CG.

Re:Same Guy, Cooler Graphics (1)

coryking (104614) | more than 5 years ago | (#27438489)

Very cool! Too bad they don't transcode it to flash and use a free flash player [flowplayer.org] on top. I hate downloading large video...

(I'm just complaining in hopes the maintainer reads this and does exactly that)

Re:Same Guy, Cooler Graphics (1)

bughunter (10093) | more than 5 years ago | (#27439257)

Considering the title, I'm glad you linked to the Andrew Hamilton version and not the Seymour Butts version.

That animation IS NOT new (4, Informative)

Cyberax (705495) | more than 5 years ago | (#27436793)

There's a nice site about black holes: http://casa.colorado.edu/~ajsh/schw.shtml [colorado.edu]

It contains simple videos of what happens when you fall into a black hole. They are just animated GIFs, because this site existed long before YouTube and Flash movies.

Re:That animation IS NOT new (1)

jd (1658) | more than 5 years ago | (#27438343)

Besides which, APNGs cannot escape a black hole. They degrade into animated GIFs when converted to Hawking Radiation.

This isn't news... (0, Flamebait)

Quantos (1327889) | more than 5 years ago | (#27436801)

It doesn't tell us anything about what they actually did, or how the resultant program functions.
It simply regurgitates things that we think we already know, with a video.

Re:This isn't news... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27438263)

Yeah, but they're almost up to 1500 links to newpseudoscientist!

http://www.google.com/search?q=link%3Awww.newscientist.com+site%3Aslashdot.org [google.com]

I'd prefer just ads for the site instead of the never ending pseudo-science spam articles.

Goatse? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27436887)

Was I the only one thinking it?

Not as fun as Disney's version (1)

mugnyte (203225) | more than 5 years ago | (#27436923)

Supposedly, it looks like a cheap graphic. I think it looks more like this [youtube.com] :P

Re:Not as fun as Disney's version (1)

buchner.johannes (1139593) | more than 5 years ago | (#27437435)

Very realistic, except at 1:00 his thoughts are "that girl naked" ... even funnier with the "whaaa" :-)

Uh oh... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27436971)

Somebody divided by zero,
Oh shhhhhhiiiiii------------

erm... (3, Funny)

M-RES (653754) | more than 5 years ago | (#27437227)

...dark?

Re:erm... (1)

jd (1658) | more than 5 years ago | (#27438379)

Olber's Paradox says that the sky should be infinitely bright in all directions. In a black hole, this might actually be the case, as there's nothing to obstruct the view and nowhere else for the photons to go.

Re:erm... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27439545)

As light accelerates towards the black hole, it takes the opposite of a doppler red shift as it is bent in by gravity.
As this blue shift happens, the wavelengths move from, say, low-energy red colors to violet, to other lethal sorts of invisible radiation like X rays and Gamma rays.

Wouldn't wanna be there.

The other view (5, Interesting)

t3sser4ct (1522605) | more than 5 years ago | (#27437351)

If you were falling into a black hole, I think it would be far more interesting to do so while facing away from the hole, as this would theoretically (according to relativity) allow you to witness the remaining life of the universe played out at a greatly accelerated rate.

Re:The other view (1)

shutdown -p now (807394) | more than 5 years ago | (#27439013)

the remaining life of the universe played out at a greatly accelerated rate.

Well, it would seem that they have some problems producing a realistic animation for that case... I wonder what they are? ~

Well (1)

rob1980 (941751) | more than 5 years ago | (#27437383)

I'm sure it would suck.

Wrong URL (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27437409)

Wrong URL.
Try this one and you'll REALLY see what it's like to fall into a black hole.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/03/31/AR2009033103684.html

youw voiwce dowes fuwny thiwngs (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27437429)

narrator has a really annoying speech impediment.

Article summary... (1)

Zapotek (1032314) | more than 5 years ago | (#27437495)

..."what happens there is still a mystery."

Seen it (1)

Repton (60818) | more than 5 years ago | (#27437531)

I remember seeing a couple [wikipedia.org] of documentaries on this a while ago...

Not all that paradoxical (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27437653)

Really, black holes emit energy in the form of gamma rays and who knows what else that we don't know about. They don't just absorb everything while never releasing any energy. So when you think about it they aren't all that different from other stuff in space except for the fact that they absorb light and other weird things.

I call it... (1)

samriel (1456543) | more than 5 years ago | (#27437723)

I call it a Hawking Hole.

I fell into a black hole once (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27437741)

Her name was Shoshonda, and she was a big girl.

It looks just like this (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27437839)

Like this ----> . Just a whole lot bigger.

Re:It looks just like this (1)

HTH NE1 (675604) | more than 5 years ago | (#27438527)

So just like a piece of grit?

Kudos to the programmers... (1)

YourMotherCalled (888364) | more than 5 years ago | (#27437937)

...for doing it with a single code!

Duh (0)

geekoid (135745) | more than 5 years ago | (#27438323)

It would look black~

I expected a different ending (1)

aarku (151823) | more than 5 years ago | (#27438419)

Did anyone else expect the video to lead into this at the end? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wRhPM2wMzH8 [youtube.com] Just checking.

Singularity? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27438687)

I don't get this, why do astrophysicists only use general relativity for their calculations. I thought a singularity was an infinitely dense point, something quantum physics rules out as impossible.

Hope it is faster than real time (1)

flyingfsck (986395) | more than 5 years ago | (#27438921)

Considering that a black hole is more massive than the sun, then it will take longer to fall into the black hole than for the earth to fall into the sun and the sun will go nova before the simulation ends...

Re:Hope it is faster than real time (1)

cowscows (103644) | more than 5 years ago | (#27439971)

If there's some sort of sarcasm implied in your comment, then I don't get it. If you're making a serious comment, then you're making even less sense.

Missing tag (1)

pklinken (773410) | more than 5 years ago | (#27439323)

yourmom

Obligatory troll (0, Offtopic)

PPH (736903) | more than 5 years ago | (#27440109)

The Microsoft R&D division.

Cliffhanger (1)

tsa (15680) | more than 5 years ago | (#27440405)

What a cliffhanger. Just when it gets interesting it stops! I hope "Falling into a Black Hole II - The Sequel" comes out soon.

Its just like Vegas (1)

CrazyJim1 (809850) | more than 5 years ago | (#27440437)

What happens in a black hole stays in the black hole.
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