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New ICANN TLDs May Cause Internet Land Rush

timothy posted more than 5 years ago | from the follow-the-monetization dept.

The Internet 443

wiryd writes "A new ICANN proposal would allow applications for almost any TLD. From the article: 'Tourists might find information about the Liberty Bell, for example, at a site ending in .philly. A rapper might apply for a Web address ending in .hiphop. "Whatever is open to the imagination can be applied for," says Paul Levins, ICANN's vice president of corporate affairs. "It could translate into one of the largest marketing and branding opportunities in history."'"

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One I'm SURE no one's thought up... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27507145)

.xxx

Re:One I'm SURE no one's thought up... (4, Funny)

Timothy Brownawell (627747) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507533)

.xxx

That'll probably be one of the first few to go, right after .con, .c0m, .0rg, .etc .

"Whatever is open to the imagination can be applied for," says Paul Levins, ICANN's vice president of corporate affairs.

There is one exception to this: .cheezburger has been reserved for ICANN's exclusive use.

Re:One I'm SURE no one's thought up... (3, Funny)

Philip K Dickhead (906971) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507599)

slashdot.slashdot.slashdot

or

slashdot.dotorg

Re:One I'm SURE no one's thought up... (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27507789)

what about .cum? That'll be a quickie I'm sure... In more than one way.

Alternative viewpoint: (5, Insightful)

ivan256 (17499) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507169)

"Tourists probably won't find information about the Liberty Bell at a site ending in .philly just like they don't, for example, find anything useful at sites ending in .info."

If you see a company snap up a new TLD at the recommendation of their marketing department, it's time to sell their stock. Unless somebody comes up with a novel technical use for an entire TLD, this is going to be a massive flop.

Re:Alternative viewpoint: (4, Insightful)

eldavojohn (898314) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507297)

Unless somebody comes up with a novel technical use for an entire TLD

From the article,

To beat a competitor to the punch, a company might decide it needs to control a new generic domain, such as .cereal or .detergent, but it would be costly. The currently proposed application fee is $185,000, says Levins, plus an annual "continuance" fee of $25,000. If more than one company wants a suffix, there could be a bidding war.

So ICANN has reinvented the .com bidding war and they're the money makers because they missed out on auctioning cereal.com and cereal.org etc. Also, if the company's dropping $185k on the application fee, I think I would sell my stock anyway.

Re:Alternative viewpoint: (5, Funny)

Dancindan84 (1056246) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507853)

Application Fee: $185K
Annual renewal: $25K
Owning the rights to the entire .ass domain....

PRICELESS

Re:Alternative viewpoint: (5, Interesting)

hansamurai (907719) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507307)

The age of the domain name is over in my opinion. People find information by going through search engines, I would guess a very small population still types www.whatiwant.com when surfing. They would have learned their lesson a long time ago that that's not a smart idea.

Just get a domain name that's slightly relevant to your topic or service, and you're fine. Google magic will do the rest.

Re:Alternative viewpoint: (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27507623)

Just get a domain name that's slightly relevant to your topic or service

Why make it even slightly relevant? Amazon didn't. Google didn't. Ebay didn't. I'm sure there must be counter examples of people making a success out of 'relevant' names, but I suspect they're in the minority.

Re:Alternative viewpoint: (1)

hansamurai (907719) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507665)

Yeah, I thought about that after posting this, does twitter make any sense? Nah, but it works. So yeah, just buy whatever is left and is short.

Re:Alternative viewpoint: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27507691)

Micro soft... least they got what they wanted right?

Re:Alternative viewpoint: (1, Insightful)

JCSoRocks (1142053) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507753)

I made a similar decision when I recently purchased a domain name. The one I really wanted was being squatted, but I refuse to support that obnoxious garbage. I just compromised and made something close enough. Everyone uses search and or links from blogs / social networking / link sites (Digg, Reddit, etc). In my case anyone wanting to learn more about what I'm doing is either going to read about it from my material and type in the address or they'll find out about it by googling / from a friend. Slick "cereal.com" names aren't really that important anymore.

Re:Alternative viewpoint: (2, Informative)

kheldan (1460303) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507811)

I would tend to agree with this, simply because so many bogus "search engines" get whole blocks of common misspellings for popular sites just to try to generate traffic/revenue on people's typos, thus the smart thing to do is use Google. Aside from the fact that everybody uses Google anyway, that is.

Re:Alternative viewpoint: (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27507475)

Well, I could see spammers with a real economic use for dot.corn (look carefully - dot - c - o - r - n, not c - o - m)

~tomhudson (not logged in)

Re:Alternative viewpoint: (1)

berend botje (1401731) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507571)

Sneaky! I like it!

Re:Alternative viewpoint: (2, Funny)

ByOhTek (1181381) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507773)

mmm, corn.

But the spammers are phishers, not pharmers!

Re:Alternative viewpoint: (1)

PRMan (959735) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507823)

I don't have to look carefully! I'm using Lynx you insensitive clod!

check your inbox (2, Interesting)

damn_registrars (1103043) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507501)

a novel technical use for an entire TLD

There already is one, its called spam. Whoever buys a TLD gets to set the rules for selling domains within said TLD, and manage those sales. Just wait till domains like .pillz, .softwarez, and the like are sold. That will be the death of meaningful WHOIS data and spam will go through the roof in volume.

Re:check your inbox (1)

ivan256 (17499) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507777)

a novel technical use for an entire TLD

There already is one

Wouldn't that make it "non-novel" by definition?

Re:Alternative viewpoint: (1)

stun (782073) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507509)

You mean something like this?

Monster.com ==> Monster.jobs
BlowJobs.com ==> Blow.jobs

Oh great. (4, Insightful)

GeekZilla (398185) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507173)

My dad still gets confused when an address ends in something besides, ".com".

Check that quote (1)

dj245 (732906) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507339)

"It could translate into one of the largest money grab opportunities in history."'"

Re:Oh great. (1)

Quirkz (1206400) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507491)

No kidding. It's hard enough getting people to NOT type www when dealing with our intranet.

Me: Type home.domain.com

Them: So that's www dot home ...

Me: No, really, type the words coming out of my mouth, not the words in your head. And by the way, you haven't actually needed to type any of those w's anytime in the last decade, for the most part.

Re:Oh great. (1)

Jurily (900488) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507699)

My dad still gets confused when an address ends in something besides, ".com".

That's what you get for not having one TLD for the US.

so could I finally block TLD's (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27507187)

like www.slashdot.idle?

Epic Security Problem in My Opinion (5, Insightful)

eldavojohn (898314) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507195)

Tourists might find information about the Liberty Bell, for example, at a site ending in .philly.

Or maybe .pa or maybe even .penn or maybe even .hist or maybe even .bells or maybe even .revwar? Or maybe tourists will have to check all of those since they're all valid categories? And maybe the site www.ushistory.org/libertybell/ will have to register in all of those categories?

A rapper might apply for a Web address ending in .hiphop.

Or maybe .music or maybe .ryhme or maybe .lyric or maybe .album or maybe .songs or maybe .r for "Rapper" or maybe .rap? Or maybe I want to target fans of said rapper and register his name dot whatever on one of those and post it all over message boards. On the site would be a link saying "click here for the latest album free!" where they enter their address and name? Then I Google bomb said rappers name on forums and boards with my site so that it shows up as number one in Google. If I get sued for it, just give it up and dream up another TLD that could dupe a fan. Let's not even get started on my vast collection of www.google.cmo, www.google.ocm, www.google.moc, etc.

I'm just going to throw out the idea that TLDs were never intended to be a complete ontology of all things. And you're making a whole lot of problems (security and logistical) for people so that you can make clever domain names. Is this really necessary?

The article makes them sound ridiculously expensive ... what exactly is the point of this again? An ICANN get rich quick scam?

Re:Epic Security Problem in My Opinion (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27507277)

what exactly is the point of this again? An ICANN get rich quick scam?

Yes.

Re:Epic Security Problem in My Opinion (3, Interesting)

Endo13 (1000782) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507371)

Exactly. Wasn't the whole point of DNS to make websites easier to find? With this change, it might just be easier to remember the ip address.

Re:Epic Security Problem in My Opinion (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27507513)

might just be easier to remember the ip address.

Ah, my friend, that's where IPv6 comes in.

Joking aside, we're probably not adopting IPv6 fast enough. This TLD thing, however, is crazy.

Re:Epic Security Problem in My Opinion (3, Informative)

rthille (8526) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507805)

No the point of DNS was to replace the unmanageable /etc/hosts issue.

Re:Epic Security Problem in My Opinion (1)

Rude Turnip (49495) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507817)

I guess Joe Biden was ahead of the curve on this one.

Re:Epic Security Problem in My Opinion (5, Funny)

Bromskloss (750445) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507495)

An ICANN get rich quick scam?

ICANN haz money?

Re:Epic Security Problem in My Opinion (1)

JCSoRocks (1142053) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507839)

Honestly, as if accidentally finding yourself at some phising site / ad site when you type "amzon" wasn't annoying enough now, as you suggested, we can look forward to the same thing with the TLD too. Great. :-/ Money grabbing douches. If everyone ignored it maybe they would take it away... Sadly you know that a bunch of MBAtards are going to think this is the greatest idea ever and actually waste money on this crap.

ICANN has a business model. (5, Insightful)

dattaway (3088) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507201)

What a business it is. And you never really can "own" a domain, you simply lease it. Miss a payment and a squatter owns your traffic.

Re:ICANN has a business model. (3, Insightful)

Garridan (597129) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507453)

This will be really great when somebody takes control of the .corn TLD. It looks just enough like .com in certain fonts to phish the fuck out of people. Welcome to paypaI.corn! Please log in to give me all your ca$h!!!

Can you say squatting? (1)

S7urm (126547) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507235)

This would give a whole new level of cyber squatting.

Ima get Slashdot.sex

Re:Can you say squatting? (2, Funny)

bistromath007 (1253428) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507355)

Why would you want a website where your only content is a tumbleweed and a Chinese guy riding a bike with no tires around a broken crate?

Re:Can you say squatting? (1)

S7urm (126547) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507411)

Who said I wanted traffic?

Just hot steamy /. secx

OHHH!
or I could register goat.sex :)

But honestly, I think this kind of enterprise would lead to websites being even LESS valuable, since people wouldn't even have to worry about owning/occupying certain sites, since people can seek out their own individualized TLD and have it be more "marketable" to the product offering they are promoting.

Welcome to the age (4, Informative)

Daimanta (1140543) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507237)

of horrible urls. How will people still be able to understand URLs if the are horribly malformed? Soon, people will not be able to distinguish between a TLD and a domain and people will fall to cleverly constructed scams.

Also, no domain is safe. Everybody can now claim google.philly or google.hiphop and companies can do nothing about it(or start countless lawsuits). This is a bad idea and implementing this will cause the www to be more confusing than it is now.

Re:Welcome to the age (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27507393)

I guess we already welcomed the age of people who mistakenly think that the subject of a message is part of the body, rather than a short summary.

largest marketing and branding opportunities? (5, Informative)

arcmay (253138) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507241)

"It could translate into one of the largest clusterfucks in history."

FTFY

Re:largest marketing and branding opportunities? (1)

joelmax (1445613) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507417)

Amen to this one. Really its just going to make everything more cluttered and confusing. Its really the worst kind of market saturation because it is radically changing a generally accepted norm, and, lets face it, people in general tend to not know much about computers/the internet. I can see it now, some poor helpdesk rep has to take someone to www.ineedhelp.techsupport - The user will probably think they are being a smartass. Although if this goes ahead, my bid is for .virus!

Re:largest marketing and branding opportunities? (1)

memorycardfull (1187485) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507835)

mongolian.clusterfuck

Quick! Run! Try to grab . . . (1)

PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507263)

".slashdot" . . . or "./.", as well . . .

seen this before (5, Funny)

bugi (8479) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507273)

Remember when Pandora opened that cute little box?

Re:seen this before (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27507459)

Pandora's only 8. She better not have opened that cute little box.

Re:seen this before (5, Funny)

Aladrin (926209) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507503)

Dude, I know your ID is 4 digits, but... How old ARE you that you remember that event?

Re:seen this before (2, Funny)

bugi (8479) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507759)

The event itself shocked me into a coma. I revived just in time to get an early spot at /. It's unclear how long the coma lasted though, so I can't really answer your question.

Re:seen this before (5, Funny)

derGoldstein (1494129) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507775)

4-digits? That's around the industrial revolution.
3-digits means they've witnessed the crucifixion.

Stupidity (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27507287)

Typical plebeianism of our modern era...ignore technical conventions for some shitty attempt at aesthetic appeal at the expense of both.

More like (4, Insightful)

future assassin (639396) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507299)

The biggest cash grab ever.

Impossible to overstate the SPAM opportunity ... (5, Insightful)

damn_registrars (1103043) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507303)

ICANN is now going to allow people to purchase their own gTLDs (for a price, of course). And when you own the TLD, you are the one who gets to set the rules for registration of domains underneath said TLD. As if WHOIS records aren't already bad enough; now companies can buy up their own TLDs and set their own rules for contact information for customers who purchase domains under said TLD.

Currently, if you receive a spam email selling you (insert favorite spamming product here), you can look up the domain name that is being spamvertised, and generally figure out who is responsible for the operation. With that information you can contact the registrar and the hosting company regarding the activity that is going on. And currently, if the registrar does not react accordingly, you have some (though very limited) choice of action through ICANN if the registrar is blatantly in violation of their obligations to maintain accurate records.

However, ICANN's obligations end with the most common TLDs (.com, .net, .org, and a few others). If they sell a domain like ".pillz" to your favorite spammer, he can setup an unlimited number of second level domains under that for his spamming enterprise, and will have no obligation to have any contact information (valid or not) for those domains. From which will rise the eternally-registered spamvertising domains, over which nobody will have jurisdiction because there will be no record of where the owner (or his business) resides.

This will open the floodgates in a way we have not seen before. I discussed this a while ago [slashdot.org] when they first brought up this horrendous idea. But they will keep with it, because it will make some fast money. The rest of us can all go to hell with our email.

Forget the land rush. This will cause a spam rush that could potentially make sub-prime mortgages look like a good idea.

Also phishing (1)

derGoldstein (1494129) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507729)

paypal.comm
gmail.mial
amazon.buuy

Without at least some stable TLDs, the ones you can check "under" (see if it really ends with "ebay.com"), spam will will be augmented with new and novel phishing schemes to boggle the mind.

If you use the right font, "conn" will look alsmot like "com", and that's a very *primitive* method.

Re:Also phishing (1)

Raistlin77 (754120) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507837)

So block/firewall everything that is .conn. Problem solved.

Re:Impossible to overstate the SPAM opportunity .. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27507761)

2 problems. First, it will cost $185,000 or more to apply for your own gTLD. Second, a spammer would be stupid to get their own gTLD, because the easiest way to then block said spammer is to block the entire domain.

Re:Impossible to overstate the SPAM opportunity .. (1)

mattdm (1931) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507809)

You kidding? That's like a spam-filtering dream. If I can automatically know that anything related to your spammer friend's .pillz domain is untrustworthy, I can very happily have my e-mail client completely disregard it. And since setting up a new tld is apparently going to be non-trivial, it's not like the guy can just go and get a different one tomorrow.

Re:Impossible to overstate the SPAM opportunity .. (1)

maxume (22995) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507833)

As long as DNS providers are not obligated to honor every TLD, it will only be truly awful, not terribly, terribly, shitty.

Worthless idea .... (3, Insightful)

King_TJ (85913) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507313)

One of the biggest reasons to have a specific domain name is because it's memorable enough and relevant enough so people will use it in lieu of a search engine.

(EG. If I don't know the URL for McDonalds restaurants, am I going to Google for it, or would I just try www.mcdonalds.com first?)

When you make the TLD an "anything goes" deal, vs. a distinct few possibilities - you make it MUCH harder for people to find you that way. (Initially, people will keep trying .com, knowing that's the "standard" ... and as time goes on, all the people registering random, new TLDs will cause those .com based searches to be increasingly worthless. They'll go back to doing searches for you, vs. taking random stabs as to what TLD you might be under.)

Should have been done differently from the start (4, Interesting)

darpo (5213) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507321)

I really wish that instead of arbitrary TLDs, that from the beginning, domain names would have been a free form string. Say, 64 characters, barring special characters like spaces and so forth. It's not like people use the existing TLDs consistently. Cool things about such an approach: really creative, fun names would crop up. No more domain squatting nonsense; you'd have much more freedom in naming your site.

Re:Should have been done differently from the star (1)

querist (97166) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507619)

and who will be the first to try to register the proverbial "clownpenis.fart" ? (I think that machine name was from a Dave Barry joke.)

Re:Should have been done differently from the star (1)

fred fleenblat (463628) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507693)

thought it was an SNL skit, a brokerage that didn't get a website until after all the good names had been taken.

Sure. Anybody... (3, Informative)

Jane Q. Public (1010737) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507323)

... anybody who has $185,000 for the fee, that is.

Re:Sure. Anybody... (1)

hansamurai (907719) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507525)

Maybe the porn industry will all chip in for the .xxx TLD so that anyone can easily do site:.xxx in their Google search to... narrow things down.

Re:Sure. Anybody... (3, Insightful)

geekoid (135745) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507717)

I ahve said for a long time now, the best PR move the porn industry could do was all use an .xxx domain.

People who want it, can find it, people who want to block it can do so easier.
It won'[t stop teens from getting to it, but it will be the next important step into mainstream acceptance a a legitimate business.

Re:Sure. Anybody... (1)

damn_registrars (1103043) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507783)

... anybody who has $185,000 for the fee, that is.

Which one unscrupulous registrar could make up very quickly selling domains (with bogus registration data) to his favorite spammers under that new TLD.

Considering the way spammers (or their customers who own the spamvertised domains) register domains in bulk, they'd probably be willing to put down 5-10k for a single domain that they know will never be invalidated. Making up $185,000 would be pretty trivial if you are the first to put up $185k for something like ".pillz".

SUCK MY THROBBING COCK (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27507325)

Suck my big, black, throbbing cockkk, Shitdot.

8==C=O=C=K==S=L=A=P==D

$185,000 (1)

PMuse (320639) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507329)

Before everyone loses their minds, note that squatting will not be a viable business model with these domains. From TFA:

The currently proposed application fee is $185,000, says Levins, plus an annual "continuance" fee of $25,000. If more than one company wants a suffix, there could be a bidding war.

Re:$185,000 (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507743)

All that means is now ICANN is the cyber squatter, and all that implies.

Suggested tag: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27507357)

andnothingofvaluewasmade

Great idea (1)

murderswitch101 (701516) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507359)

Who will be the first to register rick.roll?

Huh? I still use IP addresses (3, Funny)

thomasdz (178114) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507389)

What's this all about? I surf the internet using IP addresses.
My favorite site is 216.34.181.48

Re:Huh? I still use IP addresses (1)

geminidomino (614729) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507607)

star.slashdot.org

Thank you for not being a dick :) Not taking chances, I looked to my old friends "whois -a" and "dig -x" ;)

Must...resist... (0, Redundant)

oodaloop (1229816) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507401)

ICANN cheezburger joke. Gah!

added value (1)

spectrokid (660550) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507407)

The only thing which might work are value added TLDs, where the registrar does more then run a website. A TLD which you can only get hold of if you are a government recognised charity for example. And even then... Somebody is just going to buy ".corn" and use it to do some phishing. This is the worst idea ever.

USPS Releases New Addressing Plan (5, Funny)

VoxMagis (1036530) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507413)

Forget about those old blah street names and numbers! Now you can request a NEW EXCITING address that would really mean something to your friends and family!

Instead of:
1122 A St.
North Somewhere, NY 99999

You can now purchase:
Hey, I'm here and you can find me at the end of the road on the left side right past the dog that always barks at you and only has three legs unless his owner has him chained up in the back so in that case you'd have to look for the broken tricycle that I left by the front door. Oh and I'm somewhere on the top of the map in a really heavy population state!

Act Now!

Re: USPS Releases New Addressing Plan (1)

rs232 (849320) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507615)

"Now you can request a NEW EXCITING address", VoxMagis@Hey.I'm.here_and_you.can.find.me.at_the_end.of_the_road.on_the_left.side.right.past_the_dog.that.always.barks.at.you_and_only.has.three.legs.unless.his.owner.has.him.chained.up.in_the_back.so.in.that.case.you'd.have.to.look.for_the_broken.tricycle.that.I.left.by_the_front.door.Oh_and_I'm.somewhere.on_the_top.of_the_map.in.a.really.heavy.population.state

Can we stop it? (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27507437)

Where do we sign up to have this not happen?

Re:Can we stop it? (4, Informative)

damn_registrars (1103043) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507695)

Where do we sign up to have this not happen?

You must be new here. You had a chance. ICANN took comments on this [icann.org] last year. Apparently not enough people spoke up about the problems, because they are going forward with it anyways.

Re:Can we stop it? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27507815)

You should add "Liberty" to that list in your sig.

not new (1)

myVarNamesAreTooLon (1474005) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507465)

If some of these comments look familiar, it's because this is not new, it was just delayed [slashdot.org]

clownpenis.fart (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27507489)

Dibs on clownpenis.fart!

sound good to me -- but the bar is too high (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27507493)

I mean, I know we all like to have things appropriately-nerdily categorized and sub-categorized, but the current situation is that everything gets stuffed into .com (or your country's equivalent) unless that's not available, and then they might get some .net or .org domain instead -- regardless of whether that's appropriate in any way.

It's effectively like we *have no TLDs*. There's a competition to stuff everything into the .com namespace, and the others act as backups. That's silly -- clearly the original intent is long gone in the real world.

So why not just allow whatever people like? If anything, the upcoming plan sets the bar way too high. You should be able to go to pairnic or godaddy or wherever and register "[anything].[anything]", and if the tld isn't in use yet it'd be created on the fly.

The scaling problem is no worse than whatever currently piles-on .com. The trademark worries are likewise ridiculous -- if Microsoft wants to register microsoft-[everywordinthedictionary].com, okay, fine, it's their money. If they want to do the same with microsoft.[everywordinthedictionary], equally fine.

Re:sound good to me -- but the bar is too high (1)

mattdm (1931) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507507)

(Weird; the parent post got posted anonymously. I'm pretty sure I didn't check that box. Reposting with my name.)

I mean, I know we all like to have things appropriately-nerdily categorized and sub-categorized, but the current situation is that everything gets stuffed into .com (or your country's equivalent) unless that's not available, and then they might get some .net or .org domain instead -- regardless of whether that's appropriate in any way.

It's effectively like we *have no TLDs*. There's a competition to stuff everything into the .com namespace, and the others act as backups. That's silly -- clearly the original intent is long gone in the real world.

So why not just allow whatever people like? If anything, the upcoming plan sets the bar way too high. You should be able to go to pairnic or godaddy or wherever and register "[anything].[anything]", and if the tld isn't in use yet it'd be created on the fly.

The scaling problem is no worse than whatever currently piles-on .com. The trademark worries are likewise ridiculous -- if Microsoft wants to register microsoft-[everywordinthedictionary].com, okay, fine, it's their money. If they want to do the same with microsoft.[everywordinthedictionary], equally fine.

Re:sound good to me -- but the bar is too high (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27507737)

who is getting this money they are paying now?
and how can I get a cut of the money grab?
why not just get rid of .whatever entirely effectively that's what would happen.
who needs google.com
when I can just google

Time for a new Internet? (3, Insightful)

kenp2002 (545495) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507499)

Perhaps it's time we revolt and set up a new Internet with a non-commerical clause so we can get back to using the Internet for what it was intended for, making us smarter rather then selling us shit...

Rule of thumb: (5, Insightful)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507511)

Anybody who says "It could translate into one of the largest marketing and branding opportunities in history." as though it is a good thing needs to have their face introduced to the cluebat. Followed by the truthbat and the justicebat. Then the cluebat again, just to be safe.

Re:Rule of thumb: (1)

geminidomino (614729) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507625)

Followed by the application of the "Forthegoodofhumanity bat".

Applied from orbit, just to be sure.

Bad idea (1)

bluefoxlucid (723572) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507515)

Google.com -> google.search -> google.cmo -> pwned

Great possibilities! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27507523)

I can't wait to register .con - and I can have great sites like .con, mail.google.con, etc. Or maybe it would look better .c0m, .cem, .COM? The possibilities on my keyboard alone are vast, let alone if there ends up being unicode look-a-likes.

April fools? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27507551)

Calendar check... 8 April... WTF ICANN...

Re:April fools? (1)

IMarvinTPA (104941) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507675)

I agree, this looks like it is a week late...

IMarv

Crap. Total Crap. (1)

rickb928 (945187) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507569)

So will I be able to register .blake? And can I sue to get control if some other doofus registers it before I do?

ICANN might see this as a way to satisfy the demand for intuitive, unique names, but it is also their model to sell registrations, and they will sell millions.

I expect the .blake domain to sell in minutes. Your last name will go quicker. You will deal with squatters/enterprising individuals/scammers to get into it, and they will mark it up, as is their goal and right...

Pus. A pox on all their houses. Just a money grab by ICANN.

Time to ditch DNS (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27507579)

When you give people power, and they abuse you in response, it's time for a new approach. All DNS does is key/value mapping. The look-ups are distributed among the nodes in a hierarchy which puts control at the top, managed by ICANN.

What we need is a completely decentralized key/value lookup system that scales and is trustworthy. No entity should be vested with so much control over essential infrastructure services.

MOD PARENT UP (1)

VeNoM0619 (1058216) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507845)

Yes please, and this should hopefully make surfing more secure and anonymous. Let's setup an "encryption always on" internet to help with that, just so we can bring back the reason the internet was made: any information from anywhere. No censorship. If the site cannot be accessed, then try a peer node/proxy node that will help forward this encrypted information...

In MY ICANN... (1)

tjstork (137384) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507617)

Here's what I'll do. I'll just get the O'Reilly book and set up DNS on my trusty dual opteron and that can be the ultimate root of all the internet. If anyone wants to register a domain, its $15. No bulk registrations, but, every transfer has a tax of 10%, payable, to well me...

seriously... I think the more ICANN becomes a bunch of tools, the more likely it is that we will wind up with more than one ultimate top level domain administrator.

For that reason, having a gold rush for TLDs is just a bad idea, because, you could in the future use the TLD to distinguish between ICANN and .com, .net, .org, etc... versus, another party's .net2, .org2, and so on.

well (0)

syrinx (106469) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507635)

Michael Bolton: That's the worst idea I've ever heard in my life, Tom.
Samir: Yes, this is horrible, this idea.

This will make DNS completely useless, but I suppose Google has pretty much made DNS irrelevant anyway.

Why even have Top Level Domains? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27507719)

Honest question. I have always wondered why we even have top level domains. Why require .com, .net, .info, etc? It's just a name. If my name happens to have .'s in it then great, if not so what. Surely databases can easily handle all the variants that people can throw at it.

Why not just:
    http://joe/ [joe]
    http://linux/ [linux]
    http://mysite.whatever/ [mysite.whatever]

Or is it just a matter of control? Someone feels that they need to be in charge of their segment of the name space.

a new ICANN proposal (1)

rs232 (849320) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507723)

How about fixing the DNS/Email system so as to defeat the virus/spam/phishing epidemic?

Excellent! (1)

GypC (7592) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507813)

Now CmdrTaco can get that .dot TLD he's been longing for all these years.

So marked for Corporations. (2, Interesting)

neo (4625) | more than 5 years ago | (#27507847)

Why would I use:

www.microsoft.com
www.coke.com
www.amazon.com

when you *could* just type in:

microsoft
coke
amazon

Yes! You can actually visit top level domains! Shocking but true!!

Stand back and watch the fireworks.

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