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iTunes Prohibits Terrorism

samzenpus posted more than 5 years ago | from the great-songs-come-with-great-responsibility dept.

Apple 124

Afforess writes "A recent closer look at the oft-skimmed EULA agreement for iTunes has an interesting paragraph in it, Gizmodo reports. 'You also agree that you will not use these products for any purposes prohibited by United States law, including, without limitation, the development, design, manufacture or production of missiles, or nuclear, chemical or biological weapons.' Although humorous, some readers suggested that this may be a defense measure to previously discussed price changes in the iTunes music store."

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Boilerplate. (4, Informative)

jcr (53032) | more than 5 years ago | (#27564841)

That language probably came right from the EULA for Mac OS X.

-jcr

Laughable. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27564973)

The idea that you'd use OS X for something as serious as missile development / nuclear simulations is laughable.

An OS tied to a single vendors hardware? I don't think so.

Re:Laughable. (2, Funny)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 5 years ago | (#27565015)

Spoken like somebody who doesn't have access to the OSXapocalypse86 project's private tracker...

Re:Laughable. (4, Informative)

jcr (53032) | more than 5 years ago | (#27565037)

The idea that you'd use OS X for something as serious as missile development / nuclear simulations is laughable.

Laugh all you want, but there are a lot of Mac users at Lawrence Livermore and Los Alamos. They use Xgrid. [apple.com]

-jcr

Re:Laughable. (3, Funny)

lightversusdark (922292) | more than 5 years ago | (#27565145)

Fact is they talk about using XGrid.
They're still running their non-standard FORTRAN with dependencies on compiled binaries from companies that went under for architectures that don't exist anymore except under emulation.

All those Mac users are running Terminal.

Re:Laughable. (2, Insightful)

ToasterMonkey (467067) | more than 5 years ago | (#27566711)

All those Mac users are running Terminal.

Hey genius, could it be that _ALL_ UNIX admins spend most their time in a terminal, be it putty, gnome-terminal, or Terminal, and gnome-terminal sucks so much ass people would rather use a NonFree(tm) system just for a better terminal emulator?

Answer: Yes

Sorry to be so harsh, but trying to devalue OS X because a subset of users spends most their time in a terminal is just bat-shit insane. Did you consider what most Linux desktops are doing?

Re:Laughable. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27567173)

Whoo-whoo-WHOOOOOSHHHHHH!!

Re:Laughable. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27567275)

Did you consider what most Linux desktops are doing?

Browsing for porn? Most Linux servers, on the other hand, are forwarding instructions via email to other servers so that RMS can look at ASCII porn from his basement. It is slow in real time, but this is okay because RMS uses preemptive multitasking.

Re:Laughable. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27565261)

but there are a lot of Mac users at Lawrence Livermore and Los Alamos.

Cite? My impression was both of those organisations were IBM shops.

Oh... you mean a few individual researchers have Apple laptops they run toy simulations on?

Re:Laughable. (1)

morgan_greywolf (835522) | more than 5 years ago | (#27565803)

LLNL and LANL are both sites of large IBM Linux clusters. You're right, AC, if they are use XGrid, it's not as their primary sim platform.

Re:Laughable. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27566185)

But you will see quite a lot of glowing, white, partially consumed fruit logos at the breakout sessions at conferences.

Re:Laughable. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27567787)

Simulations on what Steve Jobs looks like without a turtleneck and jeans?

Re:Laughable. (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27566431)

Laugh all you want, but there are a lot of Mac users at Lawrence Livermore and Los Alamos.

Are you implying that the US goverment is violating Apple's EULA?

Re:Laughable. (2, Informative)

fractoid (1076465) | more than 5 years ago | (#27565969)

I'm pretty sure you don't have to be running "Super Futuristic Movie OS" with a "Design Nucular Missile System" button in order to work on missile development. Any OS that can run a CAD program (I'm taking a wild guess here and saying that's "all of them") will do just fine.

Re:Laughable. (1)

dgatwood (11270) | more than 5 years ago | (#27566601)

Clauses like these are usually more about liability than anything else. ("No, your honor, the murderer did not have a legal license to use our handgun because it is licensed, not sold, and using the weapon to kill another person is a violation of the terms of the EULA.") In light of the recent Kurdish lawsuits, I can see why such a clause would be prudent. Sure, one of those recent suits is about a chemical that is classified as being a chemical weapon in and of itself, so shipping that to Iraq was clearly bad. However, a second suit is about lab equipment that could presumably have a wide range of uses from something as dangerous as a chemical weapons manufacturing facility all the way down to something as benign as a high school chemistry class.

If product manufacturers are at risk of being held responsible for the idiotic and even malicious use of ordinarily benign products, it stands to reason that these sorts of clauses will pop up more and more frequently. What that has to do with iTunes, I have no idea. Maybe they're afraid somebody will use a visualizer to distract New Yorkers while they are being mugged.... :-D

But seriously, I'm with John on this one. That clause has been in the Mac OS X EULA for ages, so they're probably just trying to reduce the number of unnecessary differences between their EULAs.

Maybe they ought to get the law changed (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27567971)

Rather than make yourself foolish AND use a dubiously applicable contract of adhesion to dodge the stupid laws you let get in.

Re:Laughable. (1)

chthonicdaemon (670385) | more than 5 years ago | (#27566677)

I know a lot of researchers who develop on macs and run their simulations on some off-site computer. Just because you happen to be using a BlueGene from IBM to do your number crunching doesn't mean you have to use a Lenovo laptop. Also, the tone of your message implies that you wouldn't use OS X for "serious" work. I would if I had the cash -- xgrid is really cool, but mac servers are a bit dear.

Re:Boilerplate. (1)

ManWithIceCream (1503883) | more than 5 years ago | (#27565493)

I read the exact words on the Mosso.com Terms of Service

Re:Boilerplate. (1)

Jarik C-Bol (894741) | more than 5 years ago | (#27565953)

I Agree, but the fact still remains that this has been in the iTunes EULA since iMacs came in assorted candy colors, and people where still trying to figure out which direction you held the round hockey-puck mouse.

Re:Boilerplate. (2, Funny)

Doctor_Jest (688315) | more than 5 years ago | (#27566275)

Well, there goes another good idea. No sense in downloading protest songs on my iPod to incite the masses! :)

That stupid (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27564845)

"genius" mode made me want to kill the guy who designed it.

Re:That stupid (1)

BrokenHalo (565198) | more than 5 years ago | (#27567005)

"genius" mode made me want to kill the guy who designed it.

No need to do that - just take his computer away from him, since he isn't doing anything useful with it anyway. And as for the name... well, Village Idiot comes to mind.

Old News (1)

arogier (1250960) | more than 5 years ago | (#27564855)

This has been in apple product license agreements for years. I first remember stumbling into it back in the summer of 2004, and I imagine its been in there for much longer.

Re:Old News (1)

FooAtWFU (699187) | more than 5 years ago | (#27565161)

Java always had some fun stuff too. I remember downloading some sample applets (the 'clock' applet, for instance) and the license at the top of the source had the disclaimer that the program was not intended for use "in the design, construction, or maintenance of any nuclear facility".

Re:Old News (1)

rhathar (1247530) | more than 5 years ago | (#27566951)

This is VERY old news. It's even been on Slashdot several times before (the 'iTunes' EULA came up at least twice, which has the same clauses).

binspam, dupe, slownewsday AND old news.

Re:Old News (1)

_Spirit (23983) | more than 5 years ago | (#27567819)

This has nothing to do with Apple, if you want to know about the US of A's imperialistic agenda, learn about Export Controls and how they use them to control companies and customers outside their normal jurisdiction. The viral nature of the GPL is kids play compared to this.

Viral? Only like kissing girls is viral (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27567975)

GPL only infects what you WANT it to infect. If you don't want your code GPL'd, write your own.

Heck, you can use the algorithm in the code to design your replacement.

So this is viral in the same way as snogging is viral: lots of people do it and when they do, they want to do more. And it requires at least one more person agree. But you don't have to.

Re:Viral? Only like kissing girls is viral (1)

_Spirit (23983) | more than 5 years ago | (#27568487)

I stand corrected, I am not really up to speed on the subject of the virality of the GPL. I just wanted to use an example that would appeal to Slashdot readers.

Old (1)

KasperMeerts (1305097) | more than 5 years ago | (#27564857)

Seriously how old is this. These aren't recent changes it's been in there for a while.

It's a joke. Haha. Isn't it cool that at least someone at Apple has a sense of humor

fine thoughts (1)

canistel (1103079) | more than 5 years ago | (#27564859)

I'm not sure terrorists are terribly concerned with the fine details of an EULA... could be wrong though.

Re:fine thoughts (1)

morgan_greywolf (835522) | more than 5 years ago | (#27565839)

Or iTunes:

Terrorist #1: My brother, with this 'iTunes' we will FSCKING KILL the infidels! *throws chair*

Terrorist #2: Yes...Glory be to Mic...errr...Allah!
Terrorist #3: Allah damn it! *spits* The EULA says we cannot use it in violation of U.S. Laws!
Terrorist #1: I'm gonna FSCKING KILL Apple! *throws chair*

Re:fine thoughts (1)

chromas (1085949) | more than 5 years ago | (#27566351)

Sounds like the next threat to the US could be...a Beowulf cluster of EULA-viloating Mac software installations!

Re:fine thoughts (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27566821)

You're calling Ballmer a terrorist?

Re:fine thoughts (1)

jonbryce (703250) | more than 5 years ago | (#27567361)

They may well use iTunes to watch their training videos.

All foreign missiles are Terrorism? (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27564881)

Terrorism? According to past & present US administrations, this aint abut terrorism. When our allies use missiles to knowingly bomb populations containing civilians, women & children this is collateral damage.

Totally different from terrorism, which is using missiles to deliberately bomb containing civilians, women & children. One is evil, one, according to past & present US administrations, the other is not.

Personally, I don't see the huge moral chasm between two reprehensible murderous acts.

Re:All foreign missiles are Terrorism? (1)

fractoid (1076465) | more than 5 years ago | (#27565943)

American weapons don't scare Americans (they should, but they don't), therefore their usage doesn't count as terrorism.

Seriously? (4, Informative)

AdmiralAudio (990385) | more than 5 years ago | (#27564883)

Maddox already noted this 2 years earlier than the article in March of 2007: http://www.thebestpageintheuniverse.net/c.cgi?u=macs_cant [thebestpag...iverse.net]

Re:Seriously? (1)

ghstridr (974069) | more than 5 years ago | (#27564913)

I've never given serious thought to designing an intercontinental ballistic mp3......hmmmmmmm.

Re:Seriously? (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 5 years ago | (#27565063)

I'll give you a hint: "Ice ice baby".

Re:Seriously? (2, Funny)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 5 years ago | (#27565073)

Just don't interfere with the Microsoft patent on defenestratable ballistic seating.

As old as iTunes (1)

jason4567 (1531635) | more than 5 years ago | (#27564889)

This has been around since itunes 4, or maybye even earlier than that.

Re:As old as iTunes (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27565471)

... and that is why nobody ever reads these "EULA"s. They are filled with so much unnecessary crap for the sake of bloat. This is done intentionally, so that average people won't even *try* to read them.

Re:As old as iTunes (4, Funny)

turbidostato (878842) | more than 5 years ago | (#27565533)

What I don't understand is this:

'You also agree that you will not use these products for any purposes prohibited by United States law, including, without limitation, the development, design, manufacture or production of missiles, or nuclear, chemical or biological weapons.'

Does that mean than all deveopment, design, manufacture and production of missiles, nuclear, chemical and biological weapons are prohibited by United States law? One certainly would think otherwise seing the seer number of missiles, nuclear, chemical and biological weapons that USA does indeed develop, design, manufacture and produce.

Anyway, fortunately the EULA does not explicitly forbid its use for the development, design, manufacture or production of conventional weapons, air bombs, mines, grenade-launchers, mortars and/or laser beams, plasma rays, antimatter doom day devices, et al.

Re:As old as iTunes (1)

digitalunity (19107) | more than 5 years ago | (#27565895)

Production of chemical weapons is illegal in the United States. We ratified the Chemical Weapons Ban and according to the OPCW, we have destroyed 45% of our stockpile.

Seeing as we had over 10,000 tons, I'd say we don't really need to produce any more as we already have more than anybody else.

Re:As old as iTunes (1)

dgatwood (11270) | more than 5 years ago | (#27566661)

I think your numbers are a little low (and by that, I mean a lot low). Back in 1992, the U.S. had over 25,000 metric tons of the stuff in total, and more recent numbers say that the U.S. has declared 31,500 tons. The latest I've heard suggests the U.S. still has somewhere in the ballpark of 17,000 tons remaining, so the 45% is probably about right....

It just shows how silly EULA's are (1)

SmallFurryCreature (593017) | more than 5 years ago | (#27567285)

You can't build missles with iTunes. Fair enough, but what kind of missles? Say I am working on an amateur rocket, one of the simple kits you used to be able to buy and I listen to my iPod (not that I got an iPod, I got an iRiver all the cool of the small i in front without the cost) am I in violation?

Is iTunes banned for NASA? Note that the language states things US laws forbids INCLUDING work on missles, this reads as including legal work on missles.

EULA's, yet another sign lawyers should be shot. Why people need another sign I don't know, the sheer fun of it should be enough for any red blooded male.

Re:It just shows how silly EULA's are (1)

Megane (129182) | more than 5 years ago | (#27568919)

It's still a computer. An iPod nano or Shuffle with its firmware replaced could theoretically become a guidance system. All you need is USB-based missile control hardware.

Re:As old as iTunes (1)

Drakkenmensch (1255800) | more than 5 years ago | (#27568513)

"I guess I could give up one of my doomsday devices and still be feared."

Shit. (2, Funny)

MindlessAutomata (1282944) | more than 5 years ago | (#27564907)

I hope Apple doesn't enforce this provision too strongly.

Re:Shit. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27564937)

I hope Apple doesn't enforce this provision too strongly.

Yeah, if they started to do that what would itunes still be used for? Nobody actually pays for music, do they?

Prisoner code of conduct (1)

jspoon (585173) | more than 5 years ago | (#27564919)

I can't find it on google, but I recall hearing about some jail where they published a 'Prisoner Code of Conduct' that prohibited inmates from committing acts of terrorism. I though it was the most hilarious thing I'd ever heard, but I suppose if it were true someone would have posted something about it somewhere online.

Working for Apple Terrorists (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27564959)

Only recently was all of this "this being the chance to work at Apple" laid to rest, ending several months of talks and bringing a close to the toughest challenge, by far, of my career to date. Following is an account of how it started, and yes, how it ended.

For years I've literally dreamed of working at Apple. Grinding my life away like a digital serf. Who hasn't? For a designer, its the holy grail of aesthetic accolade. Through a series of related events, a recruiter at Apple contacted a certain high-level person *cough* Woz *cough* in the industry. This person then asked me if I wanted my name in the collective applicant hat, which eventually produced a call from Woz himself. The timing couldn't have been better given the position they were looking to fill.

And what was the position for, you ask? Well, to protect Apples and Oranges right to secrecy, I wont disclose too many details. But suffice it say I would have been managing the design of a certain place within their site where they showcase a lot of product for newer stuff where the make widgets and then showcase product.

The Interviews

Officious little prick. On the heels of a few successful phone conversations, I was flown out on a cold November evening. Interviews with several members of the team were to be held the next morning. And yet here I was in a lush hotel room, almost pinching myself to be certain this was really happening. Am I really here in Cupertino? With my gay lover Rob Malda? Am I really about to interview with Apple tomorrow? No way. Yes way. No way.

The following morning I endured 6.5 hours " yes, I said 6.5 hours " of interviews. Straight through. Even lunch was an interview. The only breaks I enjoyed were spent in the mens room with my lover CmdTaco enjoying a commode taco.

Interviewing with several members on a team isn't unusual these days, especially at the likes of Google, Yahoo, and a host of other tech companies. Needless to say, however, fielding questions and selling yourself for nearly a full day is quite exhausting. But I thoroughly enjoyed it, and the team members were both fascinating and brilliant. Two of the designers I would have been working closely with were particularly savvy.

The interviews concluded, I returned home, and in the ensuing weeks Suzanne and I discussed it at length. And I mean at length. The pros. The cons. The once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. The sacrifices.

Let it be said that the chance to work at Apple, the prestige that comes from doing so, and the challenge of working with a highly talented team was undeniably attractive. But regrettably, it was the other parts of the equation that werent, well, quite as attractive.

Weighing Pros and Cons

Amidst a veritable sea of pros and cons, two factors weighed heavily on the decision we'd end up making: cost of living and flexibility of schedule. And my gay lover, Rob Malda's future living with us as a eunuch slave.

Having grown up in the Bay Area and still in touch with family and friends, it came as no surprise that housing is quite affordable. One can talk all day about the economics of supply and demand and how the market is merely working towards equilibrium, but when the same humble home I have now in Utah is priced at 1/5th that of the cost in Cupertino " nearly a million dollar home " I'm left only to wonder where the buck will stop. Or in this case, where it doesn't.

Further, housing in the area isn't kind to a 60-member family. Being a sole provider of income for that same 6-member family isn't a kind proposal either. On top of all this, we were considering scenarios which reduced commute time, limiting ourselves to homes closer to Apple headquarters, and therefore driving the overall cost of living even higher.

But enough about money. How about the intangible pros and cons? Flexibility of schedule? Time with family? Freedom to speak at conferences, author articles, and the like on the clock instead of off?

Knowing Id have to dedicate myself 100% at Apple, this would have resulted in nearly a total reduction in blogging, conference speaking, and the like. I did the work-a-long-day-go-home-to-hours-of-side-work thing for years before going solo, and the daily grind took its toll on me physically and mentally. And the family, too. Needless to say, I've only started robbing hours from the wife and kids.

While work is going quite well and showing no signs of slowing, I don't know that Ill bring in more revenue freelancing this year than I would have at Apple. But increased time to be with family, pursue hobbies, and live a life a bit less hectic isn't exactly something you can pin a dollar amount to.

Don't get me wrong "Suzanne and I both agreed at the outset of making the leap to full-time freelancing that wed probably be back on the clock at some point. It seems inevitable and probably welcomed if the right opportunity comes along. But we felt it was too early to resume a corporate lifestyle right now.

The Decision

The final decision? Well, its obvious at this point, don't you think? You probably wont see me gracing the streets of Cupertino tomorrow or even dining with Paul Nixon or Dunstan Orchard or doing the cha-cha with Steve Jobs.

Also, its only fair to state that there was never even the glimpse of a formal offer on the table. Never. But its probably safe to say that was because we couldn't come to an agreement on a few key terms of the deal, most notably those mentioned here. Call it a parting of ways that occurred just a couple of weeks ago.

Funny thing is, I'm still not 100% certain I made the right decision by not making myself more available. I mean, my wife is a whore and the kids all have Down's. I don't know that Ill ever be the same. Yet Suzanne and I said the very same thing back when we made the leap to full-time self-employment, and somehow it turned out to prove we were wiser than we thought.

Thus, with fingers crossed, I suppose all I can say is this: Here's to low cost of living and flexibility of schedule and being married to a right-high ridding, made in the USA, dyed-in-the-wool bitch. Which is Lating for gen-o-ros-ity.

The attack is off (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27564963)

Violating dozens of federal and local laws was one thing, but I for one do not want to run afoul of Apple's EULA!

I will sell you an iPod that repels terrorists (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 5 years ago | (#27564983)

Here it is in my pocket. And I'm not being suicide bombed right now, so you know it works.

Re:I will sell you an iPod that repels terrorists (1)

fractoid (1076465) | more than 5 years ago | (#27565985)

"Lisa, I want to buy your rock!"

Terrorism with your iTunes (3, Funny)

rob1980 (941751) | more than 5 years ago | (#27564985)

Does that mean playing Amy Winehouse at a party is off limits?

"Terrorism" (5, Insightful)

mqduck (232646) | more than 5 years ago | (#27564987)

Isn't it a bit of a leap to use the word 'terrorism' as shorthand for "missiles, or nuclear, chemical or biological weapons"? Missiles aren't even necessarily weapons.

When did "weapons development by those the United States doesn't like" become the definition of terrorism?

Re:"Terrorism" (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27565035)

Did you miss the last 8 years?

Re:"Terrorism" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27565103)

Did you miss the last 8 years?

in his defence he just learned "critical thinking" in English AP.

Re:"Terrorism" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27565305)

Thank god I can still use my Apple products to design and fabricate guns and ammunition, and model the latest and greatest illicit drugs to serve to kids on the street from an ice cream truck!

Unless of course Apple considers a gun a 'chemical weapon' since it operates via combustion. Then you've ruined almost all of my fun.

Re:"Terrorism" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27565611)

Did you miss the last 8 years?

As a matter of fact, I left Mars on January 20th 2009. What happened? ;)

Re:"Terrorism" (1)

Hordeking (1237940) | more than 5 years ago | (#27566037)

Did you miss the last 8 years?

Try the last 18 years, end of the cold war.

Re:"Terrorism" (1)

gilbert644 (1515625) | more than 5 years ago | (#27565253)

Who asserted that definition of terrorism?

Re:"Terrorism" (1)

ianare (1132971) | more than 5 years ago | (#27565575)

Missiles aren't even necessarily weapons.

A missile is always a weapon, by definition [merriam-webster.com]

Re:"Terrorism" (1)

Hordeking (1237940) | more than 5 years ago | (#27566051)

Missiles aren't even necessarily weapons.

A missile is always a weapon, by definition [merriam-webster.com]

Historically, they referred to any projectile in airborne motion. Pretty much all sub-orbital, orbital, and super-orbital spacecraft are launched on large missiles. Modern usage usually refers to a propulsion device with a warhead, but the fact is that any projectile technically qualifies as a missile.

Re:"Terrorism" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27566693)

When did "weapons development by those the United States doesn't like" become the definition of terrorism?

Some would say since Bush Jr. took office. I would say long, long before that.

Re:"Terrorism" (1)

BlackPignouf (1017012) | more than 5 years ago | (#27567387)

When did "weapons development by those the United States doesn't like" become the definition of terrorism?

Since the Bush era?

Cryptographic Export Control (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27565101)

I would imagine it has something to do with the export regulations on strong cryptography, something they probably use in their DRM code.

Why are the links all cocked up? (1)

b4dc0d3r (1268512) | more than 5 years ago | (#27565135)

"oft-skimmed EULA agreement" goes to a Gizmodo article.
"interesting paragraph" goes to the whole EULA with no PDF warning.

I assume Gizmodo reprints the EULA in its entirety, while the EULA itself is made up of one interesting paragraph? Or am I supposed to figure out which is the interesting one myself? Here's a novel, I think you'll find one of the passages there very entertaining.

I mean, I was ready to complain when I couldn't tell which was the main link and which were merely supporting materials. But this is just pure shod. That is to say, it's like shod in a way, shoddy, shod-like.

I suppose I should start complaining about those, so that people will be a bit self-conscious about submitting actual targets of ricicule like this one.

What a better place the world would be... (1)

CuteSteveJobs (1343851) | more than 5 years ago | (#27565165)

So as the plane was about to fly into the WTC, it miraculously swerves and avoids it. The hijackers voice comes over the PA system: "Passengers, We have just realized that the act we were about to perform would violate our iPod EULA. We may be foaming at the mouth islamofacists, but we're passionate about quality as well. We will return you to the airport and hijack a bus to the nearest Apple store."

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2009/02/13/iphone_taliban/ [theregister.co.uk]

Wow (1)

Daimanta (1140543) | more than 5 years ago | (#27565191)

Somebody actually read the EULA, I simply thought it was an old design tradition. Just write a big block of text and include a "Next" button. Variants may include clicking one or more checkboxes.

Not unique to Apple... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27565281)

I just did an RMA on a Hitachi hard drive and had to agree to a sentence exactly like that. According to the page it was for export outside the US, although even in the US you had to agree.

Something similar probably shows up in regards to almost any hardware that might end up overseas, although the customer may never see it.

Oh please... (3, Funny)

Anachragnome (1008495) | more than 5 years ago | (#27565285)

Terrorist #1: Hey, did you read the EULA for this thing?

Terrorist #2: No. Why?

Terrorist #1: All the more reason to bomb them into the Stone Age. Here we are, building a nuclear weapon, and those crazy Americans are sweating the LEGAL ramifications.

Re:Oh please... (1)

turbidostato (878842) | more than 5 years ago | (#27565555)

" All the more reason to bomb them into the Stone Age. Here we are, building a nuclear weapon, and those crazy Americans are sweating the LEGAL ramifications."

Ha! you will take USA to Stone Age but USA will bury you with its lawyers by EULA infrigement for all the eterny. Take THAT, you vicious terrorist!

Re:Oh please... (1)

Anachragnome (1008495) | more than 5 years ago | (#27566007)

Terrorist #1: Hey, where is...um...how you say? Cupertino?

There goes my business plan (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27565293)

1. Download annoying teeny-bop music from itunes
2. Terrorism
3. ????
4. Profit.

Now WTH am I going to do?

Re:There goes my business plan (1)

fractoid (1076465) | more than 5 years ago | (#27566001)

1. and 2. are the same thing, especially if you have "1.5. Buy cutesy iPod brand loudspeakers."

Ridiculously old (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27565295)

This is extremely old and not unique to the latest version of iTunes.

"we have ways of making you talk" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27565379)

Forcing someone to listen to the manufactured hip-hop coming out today would probably be an effective way to make prisoners talk. "Ok, Ok, I'll tell you what you want to know! Just turn off that Usher song PLEASE!!!"

On a serious note, I seem to recall an EULA saying something about the software not being suitable for use in Nuclear plants. I think it was Redneck Rampage.

iTunes Prohibits Terrorism... (5, Funny)

Clandestine_Blaze (1019274) | more than 5 years ago | (#27565407)

Terrorists around the world were heard saying: "Curses, foiled again..."

Re:iTunes Prohibits Terrorism... (1)

arkhan_jg (618674) | more than 5 years ago | (#27567177)

Now we see why the government has been going to so much effort to make RULAs valid contracts; now they can lock up suspected terrorists for 20 years for EULA violation, without having to prove any of that tricky stuff.

Just like they nailed Al Capone for tax fraud, they'll nail Bin Laden for buying Rick Astley tracks on iTunes...

Re:iTunes Prohibits Terrorism... (1)

u.hertlein (111825) | more than 5 years ago | (#27567729)

Terrorists around the world were heard saying: "Curses, foiled again..."

I'd argue the exact opposite: now that we know for sure that iTunes can be used to these purposes (otherwise apple wouldn't have included it in the EULA, right?) they'll double their efforts to find out how...

gus (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27565419)

HAHAHAHAH! a st*p*d license!!!!

Chalk (1)

dameron (307970) | more than 5 years ago | (#27565433)

They'll have to just scrawl their taunts on the sides of the bombs with chalk, rather than have them embellished with beautifully proportioned females and flaming decals.

Oh hell, who am I kidding, they can just use wingdings. [wikimedia.org]

Maddox has a section including this.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27565701)

I knew about this from Maddox a long time ago,

http://www.thebestpageintheuniverse.net/c.cgi?u=macs_cant

This is really really old news (1)

csueiras (1461139) | more than 5 years ago | (#27565731)

...I mean the itune's EULA thing has been talked about since a very long time... I don't see how this is news... is so old.

Is it still ok... (1)

Bones3D_mac (324952) | more than 5 years ago | (#27565797)

... to run it on mission critical medical equipment?

Old (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27565905)

Don't post this like this is new or unique, for God's sakes. Maddox had this up aaages ago; respect!

Is Linux the terrorist OS? (1)

Glass Goldfish (1492293) | more than 5 years ago | (#27566283)

I somehow feel that terrorists would not want to pay for a license from Microsoft or Apple. And even a pirated version of Windows would make them very nervous everytime automatic updates ran, would you like your system connecting to an American company's servers when American Predator drones are flying overhead waiting for intelligence on your location. I guess you could run Windows unpatched, but that's just going to make suicide bombers press the detonator early. Linux has a more international flavor, which would appeal to the global jihadist.

Maybe I'm wrong and Osama has an iBook.

Re:Is Linux the terrorist OS? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27569313)

Yes. Interesting question is which distro is preferred?

I've been keeping a copy of the anarchist cookbook (and some other useful stuff, like snarfed army field manuals on various topics) around for "just in case". Never know when I'll need some terrorist reference materials.

RE: iTunes Bankrolls US Treasury (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27566417)

WoW!!!!

A portion of each sell on iTunes goes into the US Treasury!

iTunes will rescue the US Budget!

US Budget: Cough ... Cough ... Whezze ... Whezze

iTunes: Kiss ... Kiss ... Kiss ... Kiss

US Budget: ... Uhhh? ... Wha? ... ????

US Budget: [Looks into camera with Big Crest Smile] ... I'M ALIVE!!!!!!!!!!

Oh, man! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27566715)

Back to the drawing board...

Does this extend the DMCA to all Mac/iTunes users? (1)

jonaskoelker (922170) | more than 5 years ago | (#27567249)

'You also agree that you will not use these products for any purposes prohibited by United States law, including, without limitation, the development, design, manufacture or production of missiles, or nuclear, chemical or biological weapons.'

Does this mean the DMCA extends to all users of iTunes? Or does it only mean that you can't use iTunes to circumvent technology that prevents or controls access and copying?

Does this make it illegal to rip CDs? Before the intarnets and CD burners, having the music only available on a physical object that you couldn't copy was effectively a copy prevention technology.

The latter is probably a far-fetched interpretation; but look at RIAA lawyers---far fetched seems to fit well inside their modus operandi. On the other hand, if you're outside the US, do you have anyone that are quite as aggressive whom you need to fear?

Does this inclusion of US law also include US case law? Does this make it illegal to use iTunes to produce and sell coffee that's unduly hot (unless it says so on the cup)?

Anyone knows some cases dealing with similar wordings which "exports law"?

Re:Does this extend the DMCA to all Mac/iTunes use (1)

JoeInnes (1025257) | more than 5 years ago | (#27567517)

Interesting question, although, as far as I can tell, EULAs are still relatively hotly contested in and of themselves as being a legally binding agreement.

As a side-note, I'm not sure you made it very clear, but I think what you were trying to say is that it has no effect on US users (in order to be in breach of the EULA, the user has to be already breaking the law), it only has an effect in countries where the EULA holds as a binding agreement, but laws are different. The best example I can think of this is (probably) Canada, where filesharing is legal, and comes under fair-use (I believe). However, in the US, this constitutes copyright infringement, and is against the law. That means a Canadian who has perfectly legally acquired music in their country who uses iTunes is in breach of the EULA.

If I'm wrong, sorry, I'm not trying to put words in your mouth, but it's an interesting point regardless.

a cunning plan (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27567257)

Either the UN gives me One Billion Dollars

or...

I'll turn on the Genius Sidebar!!!!!!!!!!!

CANCER FOR YOU (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27567555)

you fucktards! I HOPE YOU DIE ALL FROM CANCER!

this EULA is not NEW!

CANCER FOR ALL OF YOU! DIE DE DIE

decision (1)

sussane (1111533) | more than 5 years ago | (#27567889)

good decision by apple, benefit for all geeks ..

Download MP3 a terrorist act (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27568295)

It's probably when playing pirated music becomes a terrorist act.

Old news (1)

Joe Snipe (224958) | more than 5 years ago | (#27570905)

Wasn't this added in after the PR nonsense about the G3 being classified as a "supercomputer?"

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