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Record-Breaking Model Rocket Launch Set For April 25

timothy posted more than 5 years ago | from the mx-missile-would-have-been-more-exciting dept.

Toys 156

darkjohnson writes with this impressive excerpt from Rocketry Planet: "On April 25, 2009, history will be made. At Higgs Farm in Price, Maryland, Steve Eves will enter the history books as the person who flew the largest model rocket in history. The rocket will weigh over 1,600 pounds, it will stand over 36 feet tall and it will be powered by a massive array of nine motors: eight 13,000ns N-Class motors and a 77,000ns P-Class motor."

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156 comments

Takes me back (4, Funny)

stoolpigeon (454276) | more than 5 years ago | (#27628589)

Even though it makes this stuff [amazon.com] look pretty simple in comparison, it still makes me want to dig out my old home made launcher and build a rocket.
 
I remember as a teenager saving up for months to buy the Estes designer's kit. I set up a card table in my room where I designed and built quite a few rockets - nothing that used bigger than a D engine. I'll never forget the night I left a bottle of dope open on the table. Very bizarre dreams that night. Learned to keep the window open when I worked on stuff and to shut everything up when I was done.

Top Gear (3, Interesting)

garlicbready (846542) | more than 5 years ago | (#27629847)

I'm reminded of the TopGear episode
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_b4WzWFKQ20 [youtube.com]

where they launch a Reliant Robin (old 3 wheel car) as a re-usable space shuttle on the back of one of these things
I wonder how the size compares?

Re:Top Gear (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27630565)

The Top Gear rocket was both larger and heavier.

So..... (5, Interesting)

cortesoft (1150075) | more than 5 years ago | (#27628607)

When exactly does a model rocket become just a rocket?

Re:So..... (4, Insightful)

SputnikPanic (927985) | more than 5 years ago | (#27628615)

When the FAA and NASA know about it...

Re:So..... (4, Interesting)

644bd346996 (1012333) | more than 5 years ago | (#27628729)

The FAA probably already knows about this rocket. I've been to a few launches with a local rocketry club, and they always get FAA clearance. My understanding is that they have a permanent clearance for their launch site for the first few thousand feet, but when they're launching the high-power rockets, they get unlimited clearance, making the area essentially a no-fly zone for planes. (Although that clearly didn't stop the Predator drone that was hanging out above us one day.)

Re:So..... (5, Interesting)

notthepainter (759494) | more than 5 years ago | (#27628939)

I was talking with a friend about 5-10 years back and the FAA had recently pulled all approvals for model rocket launches. Being the resourceful group that model rocketeers are, they found some connections and got all set to launch from some Navy proving grounds. FAA got wind of that and got all huffy and said "no no no boys."

And then the Navy got all huffy at the FAA, "You talking to me?"

Must have been a fun few meetings!

Re:So..... (3, Interesting)

gringofrijolero (1489395) | more than 5 years ago | (#27628995)

Well, in theory the civilian FAA should have more authority over domestic airspace in peacetime. And until a formal declaration of war is in effect, we are at "peace". The FAA decides what airspace is restricted, not the military.

Re:So..... (3, Informative)

notthepainter (759494) | more than 5 years ago | (#27629073)

I'm not a pilot, nor a military person, but http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Special_use_airspace [wikipedia.org] may give some clues. Basically, as told to me the Navy had some airspace that was "theirs" and didn't take kindly to the FAA trying to tell them what they could do with it.

Re:So..... (1)

gringofrijolero (1489395) | more than 5 years ago | (#27629283)

The FAA can cede authority, but I don't believe it's required to. Maybe I'm only working with theory here, but the government is a civilian one. And it is the the civilians who authorize how the military can act. We can't let them go around claiming it for themselves. Airspace is regulated by a civilian authority(FAA-DOT 14 CFR Part 73) Something the navy might not like, but has to accept. And it is a good idea to stay out of these areas. You have very little recourse if something bad happens.

Re:So..... (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27629577)

You are only working with theory.

The FAA has no authority over MILITARY AIR SPACE.

You also seem to confuse "the parts of the government that regulate civilian activities" with "government representatives elected by civilians".

The only ones that can tell the navy what to do in their airspace are the navy itself, and the President of the United States.

And possibly Space Command.

Re:So..... (1)

rts008 (812749) | more than 5 years ago | (#27629211)

Well, that breaks down when the FAA tries to take over control of one of the Navy's designated area of operations. When that happens, the FAA will lose, and rightfully so.
You can't have civilian flights in weapons testing ranges etc....

Navy Vs FAA Cagematch (3, Funny)

sjbe (173966) | more than 5 years ago | (#27629323)

Well, that breaks down when the FAA tries to take over control of one of the Navy's designated area of operations.

Right, because the Navy has weapons and the FAA doesn't. I'll put my money on the Navy in that fight.

Re:Navy Vs FAA Cagematch (0)

Hurricane78 (562437) | more than 5 years ago | (#27629431)

Well, the navy has a boss. The boss of that boss is the president. If the FAA tells the president "that crazy guy at the navy breaks the law and threatens to kill us". the president can kick their ass with all he has. Like some big red button for example.
I put my money on the FAA.

Re:Navy Vs FAA Cagematch (3, Insightful)

UnknowingFool (672806) | more than 5 years ago | (#27629891)

And so does the guy at the FAA. While the FAA has jurisdiction over the granting of the airspace, I don't see that they will win in a dispute especially if the Navy is still using those proving grounds. The guy at the FAA who insists that they modelers not launch has one option to force the Navy not to let them launch: revoke the Navy's privileges. Now that's going to be a bureaucratic mess with all sorts of paperwork and battles. When their bosses step in and see what the dispute here's what they are going to hear.

Navy guy: The FAA is revoking our license to the proving grounds.
Navy boss: On what grounds?
FAA guy: The Navy is allowing prohibited actions on the grounds. We have the right to revoke. I have initiated the proper paperwork to revoke.
FAA boss: What prohibited actions are being allowed?
FAA guy: They are launching model rockets there.
FAA boss: So let me get this straight. You have initiated a move that involves at least 6 months of meetings and paperwork. And gotten us into a turf war with the Navy because you don't like them launching model rockets from their site. Gentleman, I thank the Navy for its time. This matter will be resolved here very shortly.

Re:So..... (3, Interesting)

gringofrijolero (1489395) | more than 5 years ago | (#27629351)

No sir. The FAA sets those areas at the request of the military. If it came down to a real legal turf war, the FAA must have the ultimate authority. Otherwise we are under military rule. As far as I know the US is not...yet.

Re:So..... (1)

Dantu (840928) | more than 5 years ago | (#27629599)

No sir. The FAA sets those areas at the request of the military. If it came down to a real legal turf war, the FAA must have the ultimate authority. Otherwise we are under military rule. As far as I know the US is not...yet.

Seriously, all getting a bit dramatic isn't it?

It seems pretty clear cut. You're right that the FAA sets those areas at the request of the military - however because they have been set aside the FAA doesn't have much say in the day-to-day goings-on. Sounds like a case of some minor bureaucrat not realizing that he should shut up when the big-boys (aka his boss and the military) already have an agreement in place.

Re:So..... (1)

davester666 (731373) | more than 5 years ago | (#27628863)

Upon first reading of the summary, I thought he was actually planning to fly in the rocket, and not just launch the rocket via remote control.

Now that would be something for a YouTube video...

Re:So..... (1)

Zordak (123132) | more than 5 years ago | (#27630397)

Too bad. We need some new darwin awards.

Re:So..... (3, Insightful)

VonSkippy (892467) | more than 5 years ago | (#27628697)

When it's more then a glorified pop-bottle rocket.

Which means it has to have active stabilization and a guidance package.

Re:So..... (2, Funny)

Anachragnome (1008495) | more than 5 years ago | (#27628781)

Sometime just before the government steps in and shuts down the whole project.

Re:So..... (2, Funny)

antispam_ben (591349) | more than 5 years ago | (#27628819)

When an antagonistic foreign power launches it. I get the feeling this guy is about to be declared an antagonistic foreign power.

Re:So..... (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 5 years ago | (#27628877)

No definite size; but not being built to look exactly like a larger rocket probably helps.

Re:So..... (1)

Jarik C-Bol (894741) | more than 5 years ago | (#27629267)

when is is using active guidance and control. and some would say when is not using "ready made" motors. what he is launching is a glorified bottle rocket with an altimeter to tell it when to eject the chute. (just don't let him hear you or me say that)

Re:So..... (1)

abushga (864910) | more than 5 years ago | (#27629315)

H motor or larger. The vehicle described in parent is a scale model, not a model rocket.

Re:So..... (2, Insightful)

deander2 (26173) | more than 5 years ago | (#27629629)

it's a model rocket because it's a 1/10th scale replica of the saturn V.

Re:So..... (1)

ozbird (127571) | more than 5 years ago | (#27630667)

When exactly does a model rocket become just a rocket?

When in becomes airborne.

TopGear's SpaceShuttle/Car Rocket is Cooler (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27628619)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pJdrlWR-yFM

I think this dude has crossed a line (3, Insightful)

netruner (588721) | more than 5 years ago | (#27628631)

The German V2 rockets were only 46 feet in length - although they were much heavier.

What I'm trying to say is this dude's rocket ain't no model - he's launching a real rocket.

Re:I think this dude has crossed a line (-1, Offtopic)

scooter.higher (874622) | more than 5 years ago | (#27629713)

And maybe you crossed a line invoking Godwin's Law...

broken summary (3, Informative)

mjensen (118105) | more than 5 years ago | (#27628659)

"On April 25, 2009, history will be made. At Higgs Farm in Price, Maryland, Steve Eves will enter the history books as the person who flew the largest model rocket in history. The rocket will weigh over 1,600 pounds, it will stand over 36 feet tall and it will be powered by a massive array of nine motors: eight 13,000ns N-Class motors and a 77,000ns P-Class motor."

Re:broken summary (4, Informative)

the_other_chewey (1119125) | more than 5 years ago | (#27628839)

eight 13,000ns N-Class motors and a 77,000ns P-Class motor

So that's a 90-microsecond array?
(They mean Ns - yes, case matters with physical units...)

Re:broken summary (1)

the_other_chewey (1119125) | more than 5 years ago | (#27628859)

Meh, make that 181 microseconds. Forgot the "eight".

Re:broken summary (0)

SECProto (790283) | more than 5 years ago | (#27629771)

just being a bit pedantic, but the abbreviation "ns" is actually correct for nanosecond. see for reference http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nano- [wikipedia.org]

Re:broken summary (1)

Deltaspectre (796409) | more than 5 years ago | (#27630047)

Being a bit pedantic here myself, but the abbreviation "ns" is NOT correct for newton-seconds

Surprised they let him (4, Insightful)

nurb432 (527695) | more than 5 years ago | (#27628665)

Not joking here, i'm surprised the government has not stepped in and stopped him.

Re:Surprised they let him (2, Funny)

yodleboy (982200) | more than 5 years ago | (#27628713)

"they can have my rocket when they pry it from my cold, dead hands"
"when rockets are outlawed, only outlaws will have rockets"
weak, i know. it's a boring rainy day...

Re:Surprised they let him (4, Informative)

John Hasler (414242) | more than 5 years ago | (#27628803)

The BATF tried to stop all amateur rocketry beyond the toy size but they lost the lawsuit. A Federal judge ruled that solid rocket fuel of the type used by these rockets is not an explosive.

Re:Surprised they let him (1)

nurb432 (527695) | more than 5 years ago | (#27629325)

Right, but if you get TOO big i bet it would not qualify as amateur anymore and would step in.

Re:Surprised they let him (1)

JaredOfEuropa (526365) | more than 5 years ago | (#27629333)

The BATF tried to stop all amateur rocketry beyond the toy size but they lost the lawsuit.

Why did they? Although with a name like that... Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms, they sound like a unpleasant group of killjoys. Or is it a suggestion for a shopping list?

Re:Surprised they let him (2, Insightful)

John Hasler (414242) | more than 5 years ago | (#27630495)

> Why did they?

Because it is in their nature to grab for power and "terrorism" provided an excuse.

Re:Surprised they let him (4, Insightful)

sjames (1099) | more than 5 years ago | (#27630683)

In order to justify it's existance and grow, a government bureau must continuously find new excuses to add layers of regulatory bureaucracy and new things to regulate. They were far far more interested in throwing their weight around and making people kiss their ass than they were in any sort of safety or public well-being.

The fact that the rocket engine cores cannot be made to explode even intentionally was irrelevant to them. A regulatory agency saw a group of people who they weren't directly regulating. The group was small enough to not create an inconveniently noisy public protest but large enough to stroke their collective ego.

Re:Surprised they let him (1)

nametaken (610866) | more than 5 years ago | (#27629341)

Really?!?

Good lord, just another example of the terrified, pushover nation we've turned in to.

I was just talking to a friend about how I got a slap on the wrist as a kid for making a draino "bomb". At the time we thought it was out of control that anyone even cared, where kids used to blow off far more explosive fireworks and never get in trouble.

Nowadays it seems like I got away with murder. Today the so-called department of homeland security or the bureau of alcohol, tobacco and firearms would ship my ass off to Guantanamo.

Re:Surprised they let him (1)

John Hasler (414242) | more than 5 years ago | (#27630517)

> Good lord, just another example of the terrified, pushover nation we've turned in to.

Um, I thought I wrote that they lost the lawsuit. Of *course* they made a try at a power grab. Why would you expect anything else?

Re:Surprised they let him (1)

Sperbels (1008585) | more than 5 years ago | (#27629457)

It's because there are still some who recognize that innovation doesn't necessarily come from the belly of gigantic corporations...that it used to come from hobbyists in their garage before the US government started regulating everything to death.

The Astronaut Farmer... (1)

deft (253558) | more than 5 years ago | (#27628679)

Reminds me of this not amazing, but fun for kids movie about a guy that built the full size thing in his backyard.

Funny, the alarmist guy here sounds like some of the government types int he movie :)
http://entertainment.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=1203785&cid=27628631 [slashdot.org]

Kind of like being... (4, Funny)

StarManta.Mini (860897) | more than 5 years ago | (#27628689)

.....the world's tallest midget?

strap in (1)

mikey177 (1426171) | more than 5 years ago | (#27628701)

I think he should take it further and build a seat in the thing so when he hits the top he can skydive the rest of the way and if the rocket fails will be a huge mistake on his part

This is amazing (4, Funny)

ZERO1ZERO (948669) | more than 5 years ago | (#27628707)

It's great that regular folk can do these things One thing though - I wonder just how bi

Re:This is amazing (0, Redundant)

4D6963 (933028) | more than 5 years ago | (#27628743)

It's great that regular folk can do these things One thing though - I wonder just how bi

Something about your comment se

Re:This is amazing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27628983)

wtf?? You guys didn't even say candlejack, what happenened to y...

Re:This is amazing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27629111)

Look out!
It's Candleja

Uh-oh! (2, Funny)

Ironchew (1069966) | more than 5 years ago | (#27628709)

it will stand over 36 fe*END OF CARRIER*

Little did Timothy know the true purpose of the rocket and its payload. ::evil laughter in the distance::

communications (3, Insightful)

wjh31 (1372867) | more than 5 years ago | (#27628725)

honest, its just a communications satellite

Re:communications (4, Funny)

PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) | more than 5 years ago | (#27629155)

It would be ironic, if this thing performed better than North Korea's "communications" rocket. Of course, then North Korean agents would start scrounging the US for model rocket engines, for their next attempt:

"Hello, Estes http://www.estesrockets.com/rocketengines.php [estesrockets.com] ? We would like to buy a lot of engines. Yes, it will be a VERY big model rocket."

going, going, going... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27628735)

it's slashdotted!

Model? (1)

iateyourcookies (1522473) | more than 5 years ago | (#27628741)

At 1600 pounds and 36 feet when does a model rocket become just a rocket?

Re:Model? (1)

tomhudson (43916) | more than 5 years ago | (#27628911)

At 1600 pounds and 36 feet when does a model rocket become just a rocket?

When it achieves orbit around Uranus?

Picture of the model, since the site is slow http://www.rocketryplanet.com/images/content/2829/1.jpg [rocketryplanet.com]

Re:Model? (1)

gringofrijolero (1489395) | more than 5 years ago | (#27629041)

These guys always scale things down. When are we going to see them scale up? I wanna see a 720 foot tall rocket.

Re:Model? (1)

Tacvek (948259) | more than 5 years ago | (#27628951)

The only reason I can think of that this is being called a model rocket, is that it is using engines of the same basic design as modern model rockets. If this was being launched by more traditional rocket fuels then due it the size and weight it would surely be a full fledged rocket.

Re:Model? (1)

Ragzouken (943900) | more than 5 years ago | (#27630127)

When it has a non-aesthetic purpose?

In other news... (3, Funny)

Anachragnome (1008495) | more than 5 years ago | (#27628757)

"On April 25, 2009, history will be made. At Higgs Farm in Price, Maryland, Steve Eves will enter the history books as the person who flew the smallest full-scale rocket in history. The rocket will weigh over 1,600 pounds, it will stand over 36 feet..."

Re:In other news... (1)

Arthur Grumbine (1086397) | more than 5 years ago | (#27629681)

"On April 25, 2009, history will be made. At Higgs Farm in Price, Maryland, Steve Eves will enter the history books as the person who flew the smallest full-scale rocket in history. The rocket will weigh less than 1,700 pounds, it will stand under 37 feet..."

As described by a reporter worth his salt...

Model rocket? Riiiight.... (0, Offtopic)

PPH (736903) | more than 5 years ago | (#27628769)

...Kim Jong-il.

this is still a model? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27628817)

I don't really think this is a model anymore...

The first model rocket with enough energy... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27628823)

...need to prove the existence of the Higgs Farm. Some have theorized that all vegetables gain their mass from the Higgs field. Now we may finally know.

Model Rocket (2, Interesting)

Jared555 (874152) | more than 5 years ago | (#27628845)

I thought model rockets were just when you were following a kit and/or exact instructions..... I would think this would just fall under amateur rocketry....

From wikipedia:

A model rocket is a small rocket capable of being launched by anybody, to generally low altitudes (usually to around 100-500 m (300-1500 ft) for a 30 g (1 oz.) model) and recovered by a variety of means.

According to the National Association of Rocketry, (NAR) Safety Code[1], model rockets are constructed of paper, wood, plastic and other lightweight materials.

Site Slashdotted (1)

antispam_ben (591349) | more than 5 years ago | (#27628861)

How does one add tags, or is that for ubergurus only? This site has crashed and burned. I got database errors, the first page for a moment, and then:
This site is temporarily unavailable.
Please notify the System Administrator

Re:Site Slashdotted (1)

PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) | more than 5 years ago | (#27629087)

This site has crashed and burned.

A bad Omen before a launch.

Implications? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27628875)

I am overjoyed that this man will enter the record books. Just out of curi

A "model" rocket? (2, Interesting)

sphealey (2855) | more than 5 years ago | (#27628909)

I have a hard time seeing how something larger and more powerful than most of Goddard's devices can be called a "model". Amateur-built, sure. But not a "model".

sPh

Re:A "model" rocket? (2, Informative)

stoolpigeon (454276) | more than 5 years ago | (#27629085)

The only thing I would say that goes against your point is that this is a 1/10th scale model of a Saturn V. That's enough in my mind to call it a model.

Re:A "model" rocket? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27629277)

Amateur model-scale rocket?

Re:A "model" rocket? (3, Informative)

pz (113803) | more than 5 years ago | (#27629439)

I have a hard time seeing how something larger and more powerful than most of Goddard's devices can be called a "model". Amateur-built, sure. But not a "model".

sPh

Did you bother to click to the article? It's a model of a Saturn V. A real Saturn V is ten times taller. So, yes, it's a 1:10 scale model of a frelling HUGE rocket, and is therefore quite large on an absolute scale, but it is still a model.

Re:A "model" rocket? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27629555)

I'd like to see an "amateur" build a 2:1 scale model. ;)

Not a model rocket (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27628943)

FYI, the definition of a "model rocket" is pretty clear, and this isn't one.

Otherwise, this is just a rocket built by a private party. Nothing wrong with that as long as the appropriate rules and regulations are followed.

You guys haven't seen anything (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27629095)

Honestly, check out http://www.balls18.com. The biggest HPR launch in the world with a FAA waiver to fly to 100k feet.

Unfortunately, that thing won't go super high. It's a heavy rocket. I wouldn't want it to land anywhere near me.

Re:You guys haven't seen anything (1)

FlyingGuy (989135) | more than 5 years ago | (#27630717)

The Balls rocket shoots are quite an event.

High Powered Model Rocketry (3, Interesting)

wdhowellsr (530924) | more than 5 years ago | (#27629131)

This is not a new process just the biggest yet. There have been FAA clearance to 50k feet out west. The difference between a NASA or Military Rocket and a Model Rocket is one costs billions of dollars and has fail rate of thirty percent. A model rocket cost less than fifty thousand and has a fail rate of fifty percent.

William D Howell Sr.

Re:High Powered Model Rocketry (1)

im_thatoneguy (819432) | more than 5 years ago | (#27629475)

There's also that other distinguishing factor where one goes into outer space and one reaches an altitude achieved by cessnas.

Re:High Powered Model Rocketry (1)

nerph (686592) | more than 5 years ago | (#27629701)

Hmmm, NASA should save billions of dollars and just buy 2 model rockets - drop their fail rate down to 25%.

Re:High Powered Model Rocketry (1)

JavaBear (9872) | more than 5 years ago | (#27630143)

If I recall, the major defining difference is that amateur/model rockets can not have a guidance system.

Rocketry Planet: site temporarily offline (0)

mtinman (1430341) | more than 5 years ago | (#27629263)

Rocketry Planet, the originating site of this story, appears to be temporarily offline due to a database problem. Me thinks this may be a perfect example of the "Slashdot Effect"...

Re:Rocketry Planet: site temporarily offline (1)

Arthur Grumbine (1086397) | more than 5 years ago | (#27629715)

I am intrigued by your ideas and would like to subscribe to your newsletter. Tell me more of this so-called "Slashdot Effect".

Don't count your chickens (2, Funny)

svnt (697929) | more than 5 years ago | (#27629275)

I was waiting for an editorial comment to the effect of "knock on wood."

He could very easily become the person who exploded the largest model rocket before it left the launch pad.

Re:Don't count your chickens (1)

PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) | more than 5 years ago | (#27629743)

Steve Eves will enter the history books as the person who flew the largest model rocket in history.

. . . or . . .

He could very easily become the person who exploded the largest model rocket before it left the launch pad.

Sounds like a win/win to me . . . how does he lose?

The Top Gear Reliant Shuttle was bigger (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27629411)

At launch:

11.2 Meters tall (36 feet)
Lift off mass: over 1400kg

Translation: 37.4 feet tall, 3075lb

The Biggest, most powerful none commercial rocket ever.

Steve, excerrent job opportunities in North Korea! (2, Funny)

James Skarzinskas (518966) | more than 5 years ago | (#27629569)

Great stuff for the resume if you're looking to explore the burgeoning rocketry market in North Korea.

Top Gear Space Shuttle (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27629843)

Maybe the biggest in the US, but Top Gear launched a model space shuttle with a car on it a few years ago....

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_b4WzWFKQ20

Re:Top Gear Space Shuttle (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27630443)

Hey, silly person, don't you know that it only counts as the biggest if the USAians do it? Nothing outside the USA matters, after all.

Inquiring minds want to know... (1)

ZarathustraDK (1291688) | more than 5 years ago | (#27629907)

You say it's a model rocket. But can you tell me what it really is?

Regards Kim Jong Il

you inse8s1tive clod! (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27630109)

from one fo7der ons deeper into the codebase became

North Korea? (1)

SnarfQuest (469614) | more than 5 years ago | (#27630173)

Is this a copy of the North Korea rocket, or is it even more powerful?

Which one made it the highest? (not what was reported by N Korea, but actual height reached)

Short lived motors (1)

rrohbeck (944847) | more than 5 years ago | (#27630211)

13 and 77 microseconds? Talk about quick.

How can this be a model rocket? (1)

FranTaylor (164577) | more than 5 years ago | (#27630637)

http://www.nar.org/NARmrsc.html

Extrapolating from their table of engine sizes, the "site dimensions" would need to be 68 miles across.

The "escape" clause for rockets of more than one pound seems like a recent addition. Was that there when I was a kid?

It's a good thing... (1)

TooMad (967091) | more than 5 years ago | (#27630675)

Steve Eves sounds like a nice wholesome 'American' name. If that much bomb making material were purchased by someone with the last name of say Ali or, I don't know, Megahed then they wouldn't have made it out the door of the hobbyshop before being arrested for being a terrorist. But, we would possibly be PC about it and never used the T word in the actual arrest.

Google for "MudRock" (2, Interesting)

FlyingGuy (989135) | more than 5 years ago | (#27630703)

Every year they launch from BLM land on the Blackrock dessert. On two days the have FAA clearance to 100,000' MSL

Last year the highest rocket hit 31,000' MSL and hit just pver mach 3. The motor had a burn time of just a little under 4 seconds.

And yes the FAA issues NOTAM's ( Notice to airman ) with the appropriate lat and long for the launch area.

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