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Telstra Lays Down Law On Social Media

ScuttleMonkey posted more than 5 years ago | from the doing-more-harm-than-good dept.

Social Networks 78

Kerrieanne writes to tell us that Australian telecommunications giant Telstra has become the first major player down under to lay down the law with respect to social media. Still recovering from the shakeup surrounding a Telstra worker using the name of the communications minister on Twitter, they have released a six-page set of guidelines on the use of Facebook, Twitter, and other similar websites for both company and personal use. "Under the guidelines, which are backed up with the threat of disciplinary action, employees using sites on official Telstra business should disclose who they are, ensure they do not give away confidential information and treat other users with respect. They are required to complete an accreditation process and undergo training to update their 'knowledge on emerging social trends and evolving best practice in social media.'"

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New Web Acronym? (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27655891)

TVEITPAMOADNNRTVOME
(The views expressed in this post are mine only and do not necessarily reflect the views of my employer)

Re:New Web Acronym? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27658577)

raivo pommer-www.google.ee
raimo1@hot.ee

ISLAND KAUPTHING BANK

Neuer Hoffnungsschimmer für die 50.000 deutschen Kunden der islÃndischen Kaupthing Bank: Die Bank teilte nun auf der Internetseite ihrer deutsche Niederlassung mit, dass sie die 308 Millionen Euro zusammen habe, um allen deutschen Kunden ihre Einlagen in vollem Umfang zurückzuerstatten. AuÃYerdem kÃnnen die Sparer auf Zinsen hoffen, diese Frage ist aber noch nicht abschlieÃYend geklÃrt. Die Konten sind seit dem 9. Oktober 2008 gesperrt. Damals hatte die deutsche Bankenaufsicht Bafin die Konten eingefroren, weil Kaupthing wegen der Finanzkrise ins Trudeln geraten und unter Aufsicht des islÃndischen Staates gestellt worden war. Seitdem kÃnnen die Kunden nicht an ihr Geld.

Auch Islands MinisterprÃsidentin Johanna Sigurdardottir bestÃtigte nun in einer Rede, Kaupthing habe genug Mittel, um die Spareinlagen der deutschen Kunden zurückzuzahlen. Aus regierungsnahen Kreisen in Deutschland hieÃY es am Montag, die Auszahlung sei nur noch eine Frage weniger Wochen. "Die Signale aus Island sind sehr ermutigend", sagte eine mit dem Vorgang vertraute Person.

Re:New Web Acronym? (1)

kenp2002 (545495) | more than 5 years ago | (#27659667)

OMOO is a bit easier, we have used it since the BBS days.

OMOO = Of My Own Opinion

Usually in the form of

-=-=- OMOO -=-=-
the quick brown fox jumps
over the lazy dog. I hate
dogs.
-=-=- OMOO -=-=-

Or for an entire post at the end

Ken P.
OMOO\NLA (of My Own Opinion\Not Legal Advice)

BBS days?!?!? Instant memories... (1)

ibsteve2u (1184603) | more than 5 years ago | (#27674069)

...of modem tones, and the joy abandoning a 300 baud modem for the blazing speed of my first 1200 baud modem...

But still irksome because, being a vet, I was accustomed to 50 Kbps and faster - much faster, in the case of some DARPA gear - and could not believe how slow things were in the "civilian" world. Yet I couldn't get hired by Ma Bell, 'cuz I wasn't allowed to talk about what I had actually worked with, and so had to sit silently fuming as the civvy engineers patronized me before turning me down due to "lack of experience". Thus began decades of hurry up and wait - in all meanings possible - for the 'net.

A(nother?) boring anecdote: One night someplace on the other side of the planet, I abused my power and had a circuit patched up literally around the world. I could pound a sentence into one keyboard, and then kick the wall and glide my chair 12 feet away and watch it come in on another teletype. lollll...the speed of electromagnetic propagation as an impractical exercise.

Re:New Web Acronym? (1)

cboslin (1532787) | more than 5 years ago | (#27681729)

OMOO is a bit easier, we have used it since the BBS days.

OMOO = Of My Own Opinion

A nod to the old BBS days for sure. I have always liked:

IMO - In My Opinion

I Am Thoroughly Shocked (5, Funny)

CyberSlammer (1459173) | more than 5 years ago | (#27655909)

Why anyone would pose as someone other than who they really are on the Internet is not only wrong, but deceitful and dishonest.

Sincerely,

Hugh Jackman (Mrs.)

SPOTTED! (1)

Requiem18th (742389) | more than 5 years ago | (#27656505)

You are a fake!
Gee, your presumed name was a dead give away!
Its so simple I even can't get credit for it.
After all everybody know there are no women in /.

Re:SPOTTED! (1)

Hurricane78 (562437) | more than 5 years ago | (#27681501)

No GENETICAL women.
But you see enough boobs of several kinds (man*, fake*, etc) around here... ^^

Re:I Am Thoroughly Shocked (1)

Capt James McCarthy (860294) | more than 5 years ago | (#27658333)

Unless you are on /. and have the title CleverNickName, all others are fake.

Wait... accreditation? (4, Funny)

Shadow of Eternity (795165) | more than 5 years ago | (#27655925)

"They are required to complete an accreditation process and undergo training to update their 'knowledge on emerging social trends and evolving best practice in social media.'"

So does this mean that trolls are going to be getting certified now?

Re:Wait... accreditation? (4, Informative)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 5 years ago | (#27655951)

In all seriousness, can anybody think of a less suitable venue for obtaining "knowledge on emerging social trends and evolving best practice in social media"? The corporate training department of one of the more regressive ISPs in the "free" world? It'd be like taking a course on "Anarcho-syndicalism in theory and practice" from Pat Robertson.

Re:Wait... accreditation? (2, Insightful)

FlyingBishop (1293238) | more than 5 years ago | (#27656463)

How are Facebook or Twitter anarcho-syndicalism?

Sure, if they'd purported to put out a best practices guide for Slashdot, IRC, or Usenet, I'd laugh my ass off.

But Facebook? Facebook is exactly the sort of closed, AOL-style walled garden Telstra would like the whole 'net to be.

Re:Wait... accreditation? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27657027)

How are Facebook or Twitter anarcho-syndicalism?

Sure, if they'd purported to put out a best practices guide for Slashdot, IRC, or Usenet, I'd laugh my ass off.

But Facebook? Facebook is exactly the sort of closed, AOL-style walled garden Telstra would like the whole 'net to be.

WOOSH!

Re:Wait... accreditation? (2, Funny)

play_in_traffic (946193) | more than 5 years ago | (#27656481)

Oh my god! I can see it now, a corporate training class (duly tracked in the corporate training database) on how to interact with /. WOW!

Re:Wait... accreditation? (1)

play_in_traffic (946193) | more than 5 years ago | (#27656483)

By the way, play_in_traffic is my real name and I am speaking for myself not my corporate overlord.

Re:Wait... accreditation? (4, Funny)

Repton (60818) | more than 5 years ago | (#27656493)

(3) [2 points] A friend on a social networking site comments: "O RLY?".
(a) How should you reply?
(b) What picture might you expect to see attached to the comment?

Re:Wait... accreditation? (2, Informative)

skaet (841938) | more than 5 years ago | (#27657307)

I understand you're being funny (and it's great you got +5 for it) but it also shows that you don't really know what their accreditation means. As a previous Telstra Dealer, I can tell you it's a little more complicated than that.

Before I left the dealership I was working for, Telstra had instroduced a new system that aimed to correct gaps in knowledge people often found when talking to multiple people and to ensure correct information was given. The result is a website where all staff and dealers need to complete training scenarios to receive accreditation for the course they are undertaking. Whether that be ISDN, Satellite, Next G, home or business phone lines, retail practices, workplace health and safety, how-to's on using certain system software and interfaces (like connecting phone and mobile services, applying for relocations, etc), or legal requirements.

While it's a terrible Java app, it does serve its purpose which is to educate. For example, all dealers needed to complete their Next G accreditation by April of 2008 (to coincide with the CDMA shutdown) to make sure they have the appropriate knowledge of the network and its capabilities, the handsets, and what they need to tell the customer. Aside from the cheesy scenarios and crappy Java app, it was very thorough and provided a good unified platform for most training needs.

Re:Wait... accreditation? (1)

MrEricSir (398214) | more than 5 years ago | (#27656509)

Trolling is an art form. Can one "certify" art? I think not.

In other words... (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27655939)

In other words: stop expecting to be paid for twittering all day. Good for them.

I'm shocked... (4, Funny)

SwampChicken (1383905) | more than 5 years ago | (#27655971)

... that Telstra even understand the term social-networking!

Re:I'm shocked... (1)

jonaskoelker (922170) | more than 5 years ago | (#27657889)

They are required to complete an accreditation process and undergo training to update their 'knowledge on emerging social trends and evolving best practice in social media.'"

Clearly the Telstra staff doesn't ;)

But Telstra thinks school rules apply at home (1)

renegadesx (977007) | more than 5 years ago | (#27655993)

Problem is Telstra tries to "lay down the law" when it comes to personal use on your own time at home!

Re:But Telstra thinks school rules apply at home (2, Interesting)

Malc (1751) | more than 5 years ago | (#27656115)

If you publicly embarrass any employer on your own time, you will likely face disciplinary action. Telstra is hardly unique when it comes to this.

Re:But Telstra thinks school rules apply at home (3, Insightful)

shentino (1139071) | more than 5 years ago | (#27656911)

I think that not being allowed to speak freely about your company on your own time is a sign of a power imbalance.

Any company that has to censor its employees when they're at home is either dysfunctionally paranoid or has something to hide.

Just think of how many people have to use AC just to post on /.

Companies that censor their employees naturally have nothing but good PR...until they get caught hiding something.

A company that can have a healthy respect for self criticism is likely to be better off anyway.

Of course, with desperate workers not having much room to negotiate, companies are happy to consolidate their power and use their leverage to keep their workers sheared like sheep.

Re:But Telstra thinks school rules apply at home (2, Interesting)

Coram (4712) | more than 5 years ago | (#27657223)

I think that not being allowed to speak freely about your company on your own time is a sign of a power imbalance.

Any company that has to censor its employees when they're at home is either dysfunctionally paranoid or has something to hide.

I think the intent was not to prevent staff from speaking freely (though certainly they specifically tell you not to bad mouth Telstra) so much as to make it clear to others that you are a telstra employee, even if you believe your remarks aren't biased because of it. It's not always apparent to others whether your remarked may have been influenced, after the fact.

* Disclaimer: i work for telstra and received the memo yesterday...

Re:But Telstra thinks school rules apply at home (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27657609)

I think you are under the mistaken impression that in working for a company you have more rights than you do. The only rights you have are anti-harrassment/discrimination and 'cannot be compelled to break the law'. Everything else you relinquish whilst on company time. It's a feudal dictatorship not a democracy.

Re:But Telstra thinks school rules apply at home (1)

gnasher719 (869701) | more than 5 years ago | (#27657671)

I think that not being allowed to speak freely about your company on your own time is a sign of a power imbalance.

Any company that has to censor its employees when they're at home is either dysfunctionally paranoid or has something to hide.

Anyone who believes that is either dysfunctionally paranoid or has something to hide.

I have information about my company that I only have as an insider, and I have information about my company that anybody her could have; there are plenty of press releases, reports, comments about them and their competition out there. For me, it would be very difficult to distinguish what is what and write a post that is entirely based on public information and not on inside information. Result: I can't do it. On the other hand, what is the problem? There are 499 Fortune 500 companies that I can freely post about, and exactly one that I can't. I don't feel particularly restricted.

But when I want to post using inside information, then I cannot post as a private citizen. I can only do that as an employee of my company. And then the rules of my company apply. And the rule is that I am not working for PR, and therefore don't post about the company.

By the way: If my company had something to hide, then company rules apply. Company rule is that if I know that anything the company does is illegal and unethical then I take the appropriate action. Posting on Slashdot is unlikely to be the "appropriate action", but stopping illegal or unethical actions at minimal damage to the company is.

Re:But Telstra thinks school rules apply at home (1)

Antique Geekmeister (740220) | more than 5 years ago | (#27658561)

Oh, my goodness. You haven't actually read any NDA contracts lately, haven't you? Between the issues of insider trading and giving away trade secrets and simple security concerns, I and many of my peers are very hamstrung in conversations about how and where we work. Such issues are precisely why I use an alias here: my opinions expressed here are my own, and my employers shouldn't be liable for them. Nor should I have to feel at risk for material I mention for which the NDA expired years ago, but which my claiming the direct experience and showing my resume for might lead to..... confusion about whose policy it is.

And insider trading is a big, big problem for important tech people. We know things about corporate roadmaps and failed technologies, and even about who's complaining about not getting their email reliably from a potential corporate buyer, or fixing the printer and finding pink slips in the output, or fixing the email and finding that the CFO is about to resign. (Both have happened to me.) So no, I cannot publicly discuss anything about my job that I wish to. And this is pretty normal, for most workplaces.

There is a distinction between the powers of an individual and a company, but it's not necessary an imbalance. The ability of a disgruntled employee to publish the security holes of a company, such as the dialup numbers and the passwords, is very powerful.

read the fucking *summary* (4, Informative)

SuperBanana (662181) | more than 5 years ago | (#27656161)

Problem is Telstra tries to "lay down the law" when it comes to personal use on your own time at home!

I know it's a bit much to ask you to RTFA, but please, can you at least read the summary? Emphasis mine:

"Under the guidelines, which are backed up with the threat of disciplinary action, employees using sites on official Telstra business should disclose who they are, ensure they do not give away confidential information and treat other users with respect.

There's this bit:

If the employee refers to Telstra, they are expected to identify themselves as an employee of the company and ensure they do not imply they are authorised to speak on Telstra's behalf.

...which I'm reasonably sure was intended to apply mostly in cases where an employee refers to Telstra AND in doing so mentions they're employed by Telsra. It's pretty standard/common for corporations to require that- and I know a couple of friends who do it anyway just to cover their asses. Sucks, but...even if you're 100% in the clear, all it takes is one complete idiot who THINKS you're somehow speaking on behalf of the company, and you're in the unemployment line.

Honestly, this is more enlightened than most companies, which haven't addressed these issues and thus employees have no idea what is expected of them. If they don't like it, they can either unionize or find some other way to earn a living.

Re:read the fucking *summary* (1)

martin-boundary (547041) | more than 5 years ago | (#27656265)

I know it's a bit much to ask you to RTFA, but please, can you at least read the summary?

But, but, some of us are 24 year olds! We're too young to know how to read :)

Re:read the fucking *summary* (2, Insightful)

fractoid (1076465) | more than 5 years ago | (#27656863)

...which I'm reasonably sure was intended to apply mostly in cases where an employee refers to Telstra AND in doing so mentions they're employed by Telsra. It's pretty standard/common for corporations to require that- and I know a couple of friends who do it anyway just to cover their asses.

Sounds sort of reasonable. The way it's worded, they want to stop employees saying "I work for Telstra and blah blah" without adding a "And my name is Bob Jones, Cable Engineer". I don't really see how it applies to the Fake Stephen Conroy fiasco unless Fake Stephen Conroy claimed at some point to work for Telstra, which would have been both odd and out of character.

What's also odd is this part:

If the employee refers to Telstra, they are expected to identify themselves as an employee of the company and ensure they do not imply they are authorised to speak on Telstra's behalf.

It looks like some half-hearted attempt to rule out astroturfing but otherwise is patently ridiculous. It's going to cause a lot more damage to Telstra's image if randomguy123 posts "Telstra's broadband rates are criminal and service sucks, you should get naked ADSL from iiNet. The views expressed in this post are mine only and do not necessarily reflect the views of Telstra." instead of just some anonymous rant.

Re:read the fucking *summary* (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27697351)

Bit hard to do all that in 140 characters (twitter) and get your speech across as well.

The very fact that ... (2, Funny)

Nutria (679911) | more than 5 years ago | (#27656001)

... employees have to be told to disclose who they are and treat other users with respect, and not to give away confidential information is yet another brick in the wall of evidence that Liberal Western society is on the downfall.

Re:The very fact that ... (1)

Captain Splendid (673276) | more than 5 years ago | (#27656123)

The very fact that employees have to be told to disclose who they are and treat other users with respect, and not to give away confidential information is yet another brick in the wall of evidence that Liberal Western society is on the downfall.

Dude, quit hogging the paint. I want to huff some too.

The Twitter account mentioned (5, Informative)

arctanx (1187415) | more than 5 years ago | (#27656023)

For those who missed it, the Twitter account mentioned in the summary was "Fake Stephen Conroy" [twitter.com] , a parody of the Minister whose policy is to implement the ISP-level filtering in Australia.

Re:The Twitter account mentioned (3, Funny)

Merls the Sneaky (1031058) | more than 5 years ago | (#27656187)

Stephen Conroy once had sex with a horse.

Time to reveal my real identity......

I am stephen Conroy, Please vote for me in "biggest douche in the universe" I really need to beat John Edwards.

Re:The Twitter account mentioned (1)

snspdaarf (1314399) | more than 5 years ago | (#27661177)

Stephen Conroy once had sex with a horse.

Male or female?

I agree (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27656029)

Poo is better than ass goat. I now accept the Slase Do to be my RULER forever. Fuck fuck fuclk fuck pussy cunt pussy dick fuch fuchk fuku fukc!!!!!

Re:I agree (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27656655)

You know they have medication for tourettes now?

Well Dah (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27656043)

Did telstra not have an IT acceptable use policy that would have been signed along with his contract? I work at a bank and i can;t even get to social-networking sites and if i had been posting what he had i would have probably been fired. If he had done it at home no-one would have cared, i guess the lesson is don't be stupid?

But on a different note, Telstra lick nuts.

Re:Well Dah (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27656295)

Or rather the lesson is, don't work for your bank (stupid).

Re:Well Dah (1)

spec8472 (241410) | more than 5 years ago | (#27680631)

It wasn't about him using Telstra equipment, time, or resouces (since he didn't - or so he claims).

It was that people assumed just because he worked for Telstra, that his opinions and mocking of Stephen Conroy were somehow planned by Telstra.

Your personal time is your own. (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27656059)

  What I do off time is no one's business.

  Fuck 'em.

Re:Your personal time is your own. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27656365)

If you use it for official company business, hell yes it is other peoples business.

What next? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27656099)

I can imagine them making a Facebook police force:

"Officer Jack has poked you. Poke Back? Ignore"
"Officer Jack wrote on your wall: You have broken rule 325 prohibiting uploading embarrassing pictures of your co-workers. You are sentenced to the punishment of tagging your friends in one of those annoying viral pictures."
"Officer Jack has changed his status: I am the LAW"

Who's Teaching Whom? (4, Interesting)

Bob9113 (14996) | more than 5 years ago | (#27656125)

'knowledge on emerging social trends and evolving best practice in social media.'

Soooo... some 56 year old CEO who regularly asks questions like, "Have you heard of these two new sites, 'Tweets' and 'Twitter'?" is going to ask his best 47 year olds (the hip kids) to form a committee to write the official company policy so they can tell the 24 year old kid, who has been using social media for nearly half his life, about the best practices in social media?

Man, that sure is some big, clankin' hubris you got there, old man. You may well be giving Steve Ballmer a run for the "head stuffed furthest up one's nethers" prize.

How 'bout this: Telstra announced that they would be forming a committee of 23 year olds to explain to the executives what social networking is.

I'm closer to the old guy than the young gun, but lets face it - the kids are the ones who are defining this disruptive technology. Discount them at your peril.

Re:Who's Teaching Whom? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27656185)

Allow your employees to mouth of at your peril too. The devil's in the details here.

Re:Who's Teaching Whom? (2, Insightful)

martin-boundary (547041) | more than 5 years ago | (#27656255)

I think you're off base here. According to TFA, these guidelines are for regulating the behaviour of employees who are on company time. There aren't any guidelines on what people do or don't do in their own time, save for the fact that if they talk about Telstra during their own time, they should post a disclaimer that their views are not official.

Seems pretty sensible to me, and I'd be suspicious if some 24 yo employee claimed those rules are bullshit.

Telstra think you are always on company time (3, Interesting)

dbIII (701233) | more than 5 years ago | (#27656447)

Telstra think their employees are always on the clock - as shown by a court case over the unfair dismissal of a Telstra employee that got up to sexual activities after an offsite staff Christmas party in February 2007 (Telstra can't do anything on time - not even a Christmas party). The two men involved were given nothing but a talking to and the woman involved was sacked - I'm sure the imported manager would have made her wear a scarlet letter if he could since it the false dismissal ruling was appealed all the way to the high court which would have cost into seven figures.

Re:Telstra think you are always on company time (3, Interesting)

dbIII (701233) | more than 5 years ago | (#27656547)

It turns out the two men and another woman were also sacked some time afterwards. Since Telstra had no involvement with the after party activities it was originally ruled as unfair dismissal, but was later appealed on the grounds of "character".

They are under the impression they "own" their employees and upper management has little or no understanding of Australian workplace laws.

Re:Telstra think you are always on company time (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27673387)

My wife used to work as a senior HR manager for very large US company with many offices in Australia.

She lost count of the number of time she had to tell senior managers imported from US mother-land:

"No you can't [insert draconian, knee-jerk response to an employee action] in Australia because our employment law doesn't allow that"

She got so fed up with dealing with US corporate imperialism she left.

Re:Who's Teaching Whom? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27657467)

How 'bout this: Telstra announced that they would be forming a committee of 23 year olds to explain to the executives what social networking is.

OK I'll bite - what exactly is this 'social networking'? - apart from self-indulgent onanism, that is. How exactly does it differ from 'social networking' that went on before these 23 year olds were born?

Re:Who's Teaching Whom? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27658223)

No, it's not the old guys teaching the young guys how to use the technology.

It's the old guys teaching the young guys to grow up and act mature on social networks, and not like some primary school whining ninny.

Re:Who's Teaching Whom? (1)

NeoSkandranon (515696) | more than 5 years ago | (#27659605)

I dare say the 56 year old CEO has a better idea of how to communicate responsibly (in the context of a corporation about one's employer) than the 26 year olds.

The medium of communication is irrelevant.

Re:Who's Teaching Whom? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27660199)

Soooo... some 56 year old CEO who regularly asks questions like, "Have you heard of these two new sites, 'Tweets' and 'Twitter'?"

No, but I've heard of their sister site, "Aussie twats".

A copy of the document? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27656133)

Anyone have a source for a copy of this inspiring document?

Some socially correct bitch (1, Offtopic)

Runaway1956 (1322357) | more than 5 years ago | (#27656147)

Australia is predominantly female. It figures that they are going to be "socially correct". But, they could admit that they are prejudiced. What about some old dinosaur, like myself? A damned cave man, who just doesn't GIVE A SHIT that some little wench might be offended that I belch and fart sometimes? She is going to MANDATE that I get accredited "on emerging social trends and evolving best practice"? Or what? I can't use her internetz? Silly bitch, when I go Neanderthal on your ass, you WISH THE HELL that YOU had been "accredited on emerging social trends and evolving best practice"!

It makes a man want to puke. We can't even rape and pillage like real men nowadays, and now THIS garbage!

Re:Some socially correct bitch (3, Insightful)

Tubal-Cain (1289912) | more than 5 years ago | (#27656221)

Australia is predominantly female.

Obviously [wikipedia.org]

Re:Some socially correct bitch (2, Interesting)

dbIII (701233) | more than 5 years ago | (#27656357)

Telstra's upper management are almost exclusively US imports so you can't blame it on Australian factors.
They are also the weird aberration of a government owned monopoly that has recently gone private and has the worst of both worlds. Think of a department of motor transport mixed with Enron run by a guy that has bounced from one failure to the next all his career but still demands to be treated like a rock star. Thankfully he's taking his payout of millions and his mediocre cronies and leaving soon.

Telstra is like GM too big to fail (2, Insightful)

tg123 (1409503) | more than 5 years ago | (#27656839)

Telstra's upper management are almost exclusively US imports so you can't blame it on Australian factors.
They are also the weird aberration of a government owned monopoly that has recently gone private and has the worst of both worlds. Think of a department of motor transport mixed with Enron run by a guy that has bounced from one failure to the next all his career but still demands to be treated like a rock star. Thankfully he's taking his payout of millions and his mediocre cronies and leaving soon.

Telstra is the AT&T of australia.

Telstra is a company that needs to fail so that the australian telecommunications industry can change and adapt to new technologies and trends.

The bind for the australian government is that when it was privatized it was not broken up so this one company owns something like 90% of telecommunication infrastructure.

Re:Some socially correct bitch (2, Informative)

BrokenHalo (565198) | more than 5 years ago | (#27656403)

Australia is predominantly female.

If you make a statement like that, you had better be ready for someone to call BS.

According to the most recent figures from the Australian Bureau of Statistics [abs.gov.au] there are 9,799,249 males and 10,056,038 females - a difference of only 2%.

Re:Some socially correct bitch (1)

cdrguru (88047) | more than 5 years ago | (#27661873)

I knew there was a reason I like trips to Australia. Besides the climate, the people, the food, the bars, and, well, just about everything. Except maybe dinner at the RSL club.

2%... I am going to have to remember that figure.

All anon company communication should be illegal (2, Interesting)

bit01 (644603) | more than 5 years ago | (#27656309)

It's good to see at least one company making sure that employees representing the company are identified as such regardless of the media.

However, this should be universal.

Astroturfing and all forms of anonymous marketing and advertising should be illegal. Company legal structures require accountability and accountability is impossible when company agents act anonymously. There should be serious consequences, including fines and jail terms, for egregious offenders.

That includes talking on social media sites, fake letters to the editor, conversations in bars, mystery advertising and sponsorship. Everywhere.

Anonymous marketing destroys social trust, and over the long term that's a very bad thing.

---

The USA is <5% of the world's population. It is statistically insignificant.

Re:All anon company communication should be illega (1)

tg123 (1409503) | more than 5 years ago | (#27657425)

It's good to see at least one company making sure that employees representing the company are identified as such regardless of the media................Anonymous marketing destroys social trust, and over the long term that's a very bad thing.

---

I'm going to take this as your saying that company's should not use social network sites for advertising purposes.

I must admit I did not think of that but I agree with you.

The background on this story is someone in telstra set up a blog claiming to be the federal minister for communications Stephen Conroy.

  It was a brilliant "piss take" but it does not look like telstra saw the funny side. To me this 6 page rule and guidelines "bible" sounds a bit over the top.

 

Re:All anon company communication should be illega (1)

kenp2002 (545495) | more than 5 years ago | (#27659775)

But the P value when I do the regression in R-Project shows that the US population has a P value of .00321 (signifcant) and removing it as a regressor totatlly fubars my 52 week forecast of the amount of bullshit news articles get posted. Now I admit I am using and ARIMA model but I really thing that I have just lost interest in writing anything further...

Re:All anon company communication should be illega (1)

SocialMediaMarketing (1537807) | more than 5 years ago | (#27660463)

Anonymous marketing destroys social trust, and over the long term that's a very bad thing. - This is very true, trust is the strongest factor in SMM

Bad Summary (1)

Max Littlemore (1001285) | more than 5 years ago | (#27656349)

Telstra are only the "first major player" if you don't count a lot of federal and state government departments. I have friends who work at both state and federal levels and are banned from using Facebook even in their personal time. Haven't asked about Twitter, but I would assume the same applies for any of them.

That summary either needs clarification, or is just plain wrong.

(Not) Reading Into It (-1, Offtopic)

DynaSoar (714234) | more than 5 years ago | (#27656369)

I was going to post the suggestion that the inflammatory (though not inaccurate) headline would trip some triggers. We could then see how many not only didn't read TFA but didn't even read the summary. I posted this with only 26 replies ahead of mine, and it had already happened and the person got called on it. That post/reply and this comment shouldn't make any difference. If they're not reading the summary, they're certainly not reading replies. So let the games begin.

Error in logic (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27656395)

There's an error in their logic - quite simply

", employees using sites on official Telstra business should disclose who they are"

Umm, the fake steven conroy was NOT on official Telstra business.

Proves that Telstra is now American (1)

tg123 (1409503) | more than 5 years ago | (#27656865)

This just proves Telstra is now american with no sense of humor.

What you can't have satire anymore?

You "can't take the piss" out of anyone?

Australia seems more & more like China... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27657385)

Anonymity banned again!

You're either FOR Telstra or your AGAINST it (and, in the latter case, subject to disciplinary action). ... and all this is AFTER "The Three Amigos" (Sol Trujillo and company) have been packed-up & sent back to America?!?

I guess this indicates the underlying Australian fervor against anonymous whistleblowers ("Never dob in a mate") ...or thinking people with opinions of their own, who work "inside" a monopolistic company...

just when we were starting to see a few hints that good ol' Aussie values might begin to regrow at Telstra...

Telstra proves us wrong...again!

Optimism just doesn't pay with Telstra... it's just BAD... through & through.

Even in USA, trying to put a cap on users' downloaded Internet data MAKES THE NEWS...

while - in Australia - the Telstra legacy of capped downloaded Internet data, continues to be embraced by lazy or greedy Australian ISPs.

Telstra still charges $150 / "excess" GB downloaded on some wired Internet plans (eg, Big Pond Cable or Big Pond ADSL, in all flavors).

And lots of Australian ISP's come close, eg, charging $100 / GB.

Stockholm wins (again), eg, with $11 for unlimited, symmetric 100 Mbps Internet service, because its local gov't owns the infrastructure.

I seem to recall Telstra (or its predecessor) was gov't owned when the company was rolling out the Internet (often in ways, that precluded competition: eg, RIMs at exchanges, so only Big Pond Cable was faster than dial-up).

This was possible because a monopolistic company owns most of the infrastructure.

Australia should learn much from Sweden, especially now, as it plans its own new roll-out of FTTH:

Fast, cheap & public... just like most roadways.

Cave Man era Internet:

With Telstra, you're always having to slow down (ie, after "throttling" by your Telstra-legacy ISP, down to 64 Kbps (!) ...eg, after "your allocated data" is used up) -or- pay a toll (ie, another cost-slug, for data at speed.

I say: Let Telstra die with the makers of Hummers & other hugely CO2-emitting vehicles...

Bring on Stockholm-era, sustainable Internet, even in Australia... and soon!

FFS! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27657405)

Is NO Australian-related story too insignificant and worthless to keep ScuttleMonkey/kdawson/timothy/Zonk and the other Australia fetishists from spamming the front page of Slashdot with them?

Are we going to have to see every single fucking vaguely tech-related story from and about Australia plastered on the front page?

Wasn't it bad enough when Slashdot was almost fanatically devoted to keeping all but American stories at bay? Now "It's all about Australia"?

Your patriotism is possibly commendable, but the fact remains that, as a nation, Aussie is small and not very significant, and of no more interest to most people than any other small, insignificant nation.

Sure, sometimes interesting things happen in Australia, but interesting things happen just about everywhere...Yet it's getting to the point where we seldom get to read about anything unless it involves Australia or Australians, thanks to certain Slashdot "editors".

Why not go and found your own Slashdot? Call it Slashdot.com.au. Tell yourselves and the world that you're eempordend and seegneefeecent, and stop spamming the living fuck out of the real Slashdot!

5 dollars on (1)

kenp2002 (545495) | more than 5 years ago | (#27657963)

... there being the following sentence:

Section 5A - Photographs ... When doing flirty boob shots, nipples are not to be in view. In addition when acting like a complete whore in front of the camera refrain from taking shots in the bathroom. This is especially important if you are an absent minded bimbo who forgets to flush...

Re:5 dollars on (1)

Antique Geekmeister (740220) | more than 5 years ago | (#27658635)

Unless you've created a fan page for Chuck Berry: he was successfully sued in 1990 for videotaping women in the bathroom of his restaurant, including a camera in the seat (as I remember the lawsuit at the time).

Could be worse. (1)

OSXCPA (805476) | more than 5 years ago | (#27659465)

A manager at my employer, a large-ish consultancy, set up a LinkedIn group for current employees, alums and interested outsiders, including a Q&A section. A director took over the group and began deleting answers to questions posted by non-employees, replacing the answers with his contact information and 'contact me to discuss'. These were such burning, sensitive questions as 'To what extent should a non-technical manager understand a technology if they are to effectively review work done - for example, SQL code?'

Needless to say, many of the current employees immediately stopped responding to the QA section - whoops! I meant 'adding value'...

At least Telsra published their guidelines, rather than allowing management to jump in and arbitrarily edit employee interactions.

This is utterly non-news! READ (1)

swordgeek (112599) | more than 5 years ago | (#27661605)

"...employees using sites on official Telstra business..."

End of article. No story here. Please keep your scandal and outrage prepared for the next false alarm.

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