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First swine flu, now loose-roaming black holes? (5, Funny)

adnonsense (826530) | more than 5 years ago | (#27770203)

Anything else we need to be worrying about?

Re:First swine flu, now loose-roaming black holes? (4, Informative)

miffo.swe (547642) | more than 5 years ago | (#27770239)

Global warming, fundamentalist christian, jews, muslims, poisonous food additives,and a global echonomic collaps can be a good start. :D

Re:First swine flu, now loose-roaming black holes? (0, Redundant)

daniel_newby (1335811) | more than 5 years ago | (#27770409)

How could you forget swine flu?

Re:First swine flu, now loose-roaming black holes? (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27770455)

His parent mentioned it in the post title.

Re:First swine flu, now loose-roaming black holes? (4, Informative)

sgbett (739519) | more than 5 years ago | (#27770543)

How could you forget "Terrorism" more like.

Re:First swine flu, now loose-roaming black holes? (4, Insightful)

doti (966971) | more than 5 years ago | (#27770933)

Because terrorism is nothing to be worried about?

Re:First swine flu, now loose-roaming black holes? (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27770999)

He didn't, 'muslims'

Re:First swine flu, now loose-roaming black holes? (1)

Zumbs (1241138) | more than 5 years ago | (#27771175)

miffo.swe did mention fundamentalist christian-jews-muslims ;-)

Re:First swine flu, now loose-roaming black holes? (1, Flamebait)

noundi (1044080) | more than 5 years ago | (#27770495)

Why would you exclude other christians than fundamentalists? They are just as insane as the rest.

Re:First swine flu, now loose-roaming black holes? (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27770891)

BLASPHEMER!!!!!

Re:First swine flu, now loose-roaming black holes? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27771353)

SUPERSTITIOUS!!!!!

Re:First swine flu, now loose-roaming black holes? (-1, Troll)

davetv (897037) | more than 5 years ago | (#27770565)

bigot

Re:First swine flu, now loose-roaming black holes? (0, Troll)

Rogerborg (306625) | more than 5 years ago | (#27770845)

Cultist. Also, illiterate.

Re:First swine flu, now loose-roaming black holes? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27771297)

Lolled. /. needs an in-build FPS with a scheluding system for solving these face-offs.

Re:First swine flu, now loose-roaming black holes? (1)

sadness203 (1539377) | more than 5 years ago | (#27770701)

All of this, wrapped up in a cute gift box. Ready for 21 December 2012. Cheer, less than 3 years till we unwrap it!

Re:First swine flu, now loose-roaming black holes? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27770729)

you forgot another Bush in the White House

Re:First swine flu, now loose-roaming black holes? (2, Interesting)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 5 years ago | (#27770797)

At least you left out all the conspiracy crap, like alien invasions, mind control probes and terrorism.

Re:First swine flu, now loose-roaming black holes? (2, Funny)

jeffshoaf (611794) | more than 5 years ago | (#27771461)

At least you left out all the conspiracy crap, like alien invasions, mind control probes and terrorism.

That's because the alien conspiracy has already used their mind control probes to make him forget about terrorism.

Re:First swine flu, now loose-roaming black holes? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27770923)

And somebody stole my red stapler. I'm gonna burn down the fucking building.

Re:First swine flu, now loose-roaming black holes? (1)

Capt James McCarthy (860294) | more than 5 years ago | (#27770973)

Global warming, fundamentalist christian, jews, muslims, poisonous food additives,and a global echonomic collaps can be a good start. :D

That list says quite a bit about your views. ;-)

Re:First swine flu, now loose-roaming black holes? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27771125)

Please, tell me what is there to worry about "fundamentalist christian" [sic]?

Re:First swine flu, now loose-roaming black holes? (3, Funny)

kid_oliva (899189) | more than 5 years ago | (#27771203)

Parent should be rated "Funny", not Informative. Didn't you notice the ":D" at the end. It is called sarcasm. Now please rate me Informative as I have explained the previous post. Thank you. :D

Re:First swine flu, now loose-roaming black holes? (5, Interesting)

Nephrite (82592) | more than 5 years ago | (#27770573)

Looks like everyone has already forgot the LHC...

Re:First swine flu, now loose-roaming black holes? (2, Funny)

sadness203 (1539377) | more than 5 years ago | (#27770665)

These roaming black holes are the legacy of old civilization from other planet... testing their own LHC, before being sucked into oblivion.

And someone, somewhere, must be watching and laughing.

Re:First swine flu, now loose-roaming black holes? (1)

NotBornYesterday (1093817) | more than 5 years ago | (#27770929)

It has to work before it's considered dangerous.

Re:First swine flu, now loose-roaming black holes? (5, Insightful)

mrsquid0 (1335303) | more than 5 years ago | (#27770703)

And the biggest risk that most of us face, getting hit by a car on the way to work.

Re:First swine flu, now loose-roaming black holes? (5, Insightful)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 5 years ago | (#27770829)

That's what has puzzled me to no end since the onset of various hypes. SARS? Your chance to catch it? Play the lottery if you do, your chance for a jackpot is higher. Mad cow? Ditto. Terrorism? 3000 affected of roughly 200 million (directly, not due to the political fallout). Swine/bird flu?

And now compare that to the chance of a heart attack. Lung cancer. Getting run over by a car. Getting mugged. And various freak accidents that happen all the time.

It's a miracle that you're still alive! And it's not because of black holes, not because of terrorism, not because of pandemics. It's because you're living.

Your alternative is to spend your life under your bed. But then again, where's the difference to being dead already?

Re:First swine flu, now loose-roaming black holes? (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27771193)

It's not that. The government and it's agencies MUST overreact to these things, or at least hype the media up to let them know they are doing "everything they can" in light of the unfortunate turn of events Katrina caused. Because we didn't overreact at that time, a sh**load of angry black people came out of the woodwork looking for a FEMA handout because Kanye announced Bush hates black people. Now don't flame the comment as racist, it's not, but it was a very dynamic situation that people capitalized on to scam the government for handouts after the fact. If one kid, Asian, Black, Latino, White, (whatever) dies from this, there will be some lawyer telling those parents "Go get the government, they don't like you anyway, let's get rich" he takes a percentage and we keep paying taxes.

Re:First swine flu, now loose-roaming black holes? (4, Funny)

mrsquid0 (1335303) | more than 5 years ago | (#27771367)

> Your alternative is to spend your life under your bed. But then
> again, where's the difference to being dead already?

I am not going to spend my life under my bed. That's where the monsters live.

Re:First swine flu, now loose-roaming black holes? (3, Funny)

PhxBlue (562201) | more than 5 years ago | (#27771381)

Your alternative is to spend your life under your bed. But then again, where's the difference to being dead already?

About six feet. *Rimshot!*

Re:First swine flu, now loose-roaming black holes? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27771527)

I agree with you about terrorism, etc but...

> SARS? Your chance to catch it? Play the lottery if you do, your chance for a jackpot is higher. Mad cow? Ditto

You're using some hindsight there and really missing the history of the events.

* SARS -- brand new virus, very high fatality rate initially (higher than spanish flu, for example) and seemed likely to be very spreadable: went from unknown to thousands of cases VERY quickly. In many respects looked like a probably pandemic.

What spared us: most people turned out to not be all that contagious, but for some reason a few people were REALLY contagious ("superspreaders") This meant that public health measures were very effective: once people stopped circulating and speading it all over it burned itself out pretty quickly.

* Mad cow: England had been having BSE infections among cattle for awhile... and when they got a downed cow they'd just kill it and use its offal to make more cow food. This unwittingly caused BSE to spread all throughout the island. By the time it was done the whole herd needed to be destroyed.

When it first started causing disease in humans there was VERY good reason to be concerned: millions had been exposed to the tainted beef, the gestation period for the disease was years long, and there was no real hope of developing a treatment. At first there was a distinct possibility that the human fatalities would be enormous. Luckily, this did not pan out.. within a few years of eliminating the tainted beef from the food supply the human cases slowed to a trickle.

I'd definitely agree that anyone worried about mad cow TODAY isn't being rational. There will probably always be the occasional cow that randomly comes down with BSE but as long as you don't feed cows to other cows and don't let sick cows into the human food supply, the chances of it ever spreading to another human are low.

Finally, pandemics are REAL: less than a century ago a single flu pandemic killed 2-3% of EVERYONE ON THE PLANET. Based on the history of the last few centuries I'd guess you probably have a ~1% chance of meeting your end to one. Sure, this isn't as high on the list as heart disease or cancer but it's not negligible either. (Plus a pandemic event would have massive societal effects for the survivors)

In short, don't be cocky just because we've dodged the last couple bullets. The wrong virus is still capable of ruining everybody's year.

Solar Flares, Asteroids. (1)

wiredog (43288) | more than 5 years ago | (#27770723)

Space Invaders. Giant monkeys throwing barrels.

Re:First swine flu, now loose-roaming black holes? (1)

Nocturnal Deviant (974688) | more than 5 years ago | (#27770859)

Did anybody expect anything else, last i checked the universe was considered at least partially infinite, black holes have been known about for YEARS, so anybody want to explain how this is news exactly?

  also they are black holes...they eat everything around them in a sense, i doubt they are "roaming" however it may seem that way being that it takes X amount of years because of distance for us to see whatever they "eat"

Re:First swine flu, now loose-roaming black holes? (2, Interesting)

cpartrid (1537727) | more than 5 years ago | (#27771433)

I'm curious as to what exactly Partially Infinite means?
Just another way of saying: Not infite?
Or its not quite inifite yet, but it will be?
Or does it mean that some of it is infinte but other bits aren't?

Black holes can certainly roam. They are no different from other interstellar bodies in that respect.

Re:First swine flu, now loose-roaming black holes? (1)

chadplusplus (1432889) | more than 5 years ago | (#27771511)

Not that I RTFA, but I think the idea is that because these blackholes are apparently the former center of galaxies which merged with the Milky Way, these blackholes are traveling around/through/across the galaxy in strange ways. During the merging process, I would suspect most of these blackholes would be expelled from the universe, but a few would probably be captured by the milky way's gravity. They would probably travel is an irregular way compared with the average angular momentum of the galaxy making them appear to us as "roaming".

Re:First swine flu, now loose-roaming black holes? (1)

clickety6 (141178) | more than 5 years ago | (#27771123)

The Spanish Inquisition?

(Bet you didn't expect that!)

Re:First swine flu, now loose-roaming black holes? (1)

hesaigo999ca (786966) | more than 5 years ago | (#27771503)

Well, I would like to know, if a black hole comes by, does it actually pull a whole planet into its hole, do we know if this is possible...I mean at the core a small start implodes and turns into a black hole, but does it have enough strength to suck in another star, or even a whole solar system...and what happens if you put 2 black holes side by side, do they cancel each other out...sort of like putting a bag of holding inside a bag of holding...?

It's the economy! (3, Funny)

Dutchmaan (442553) | more than 5 years ago | (#27770225)

Perhaps all our money really WAS disappearing through a black hole!

Re:It's the economy! (1)

noundi (1044080) | more than 5 years ago | (#27770521)

Inflation means that the currency has been devalued, thus we have too much money. I realise it's a joke, but even jokes need to make sense.

Re:It's the economy! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27771007)

If you have too much money I will be glad to take some off your hands...

Re:It's the economy! (1)

TerribleNews (1195393) | more than 5 years ago | (#27770853)

I think what we were actually seeing was virtual money. [wikipedia.org] The uncertainty principle says that we can either know how much money we have or how fast we're spending it, but not both, and since we choose to measure GDP...

Maybe we'll get lucky and one of those rogue black holes will sweep through Wall St.

Re:It's the economy! (1)

batquux (323697) | more than 5 years ago | (#27771463)

That sucks.

Gamma ray bursts and high energy cosmic rays (5, Interesting)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 5 years ago | (#27770233)

I wonder if black holes could account for either of these things? Gamma rays would be released if a large mass hits a black hole. A cosmic ray could be accelerated if it passes too close to a black hole.

Re:Gamma ray bursts and high energy cosmic rays (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27770261)

Gamma-ray bursts = an advanced civilization switching on its own LHC.

Re:Gamma ray bursts and high energy cosmic rays (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27770911)

A cosmic ray is accelerated when it passes close to a black hole, but then it decelerates back to its original speed as it moves away. What, did you think that black holes could be used to break the laws of thermodynamics? Tsk tsk.

FTFS: The Milky Way Swallows (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27770237)

My kind of galaxy!

Remembers me of this prank (0, Offtopic)

superFoieGras (1423701) | more than 5 years ago | (#27770259)

Anyone remember this prank with the British red devil ? He planted hundreds of dog craps across a walking bridge so you had no way to avoid them...

Nah, I call BS (3, Interesting)

DavidRawling (864446) | more than 5 years ago | (#27770269)

Scenario. The Milky Way swallows a galaxy, and by extension, all the stars around the central black hole. Yet, the same gravity that causes the stars to amalgamate completely misses the biggest mass in that swallowed galaxy? Why would that make sense?

Re:Nah, I call BS (4, Interesting)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 5 years ago | (#27770327)

Scenario. The Milky Way swallows a galaxy, and by extension, all the stars around the central black hole. Yet, the same gravity that causes the stars to amalgamate completely misses the biggest mass in that swallowed galaxy? Why would that make sense?

The only bit which I think is strange is that the black hole from the swallowed galaxy hangs around in our galaxy. It should have enough velocity to pass right through our galaxy and never come back. Most likely the captured stars would die of old age before they passed though our galaxy. Only red dwarfs would keep going because of their long life. Gas clouds in the captured galaxy would interact with our gas clouds. I think that is the only component which would really get captured.

Re:Nah, I call BS (1)

4D6963 (933028) | more than 5 years ago | (#27770347)

What makes you think the black hole would have a trajectory any different from any of the stars from the captured galaxy? Because it's marginally heavier than the other stars?

Re:Nah, I call BS (1)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 5 years ago | (#27770405)

What makes you think the black hole would have a trajectory any different from any of the stars from the captured galaxy? Because it's marginally heavier than the other stars?

I think the black hole and stars from the captured galaxy will not change their trajectory when they enter our galaxy. Gas clouds will change their trajectory because they are big and diffuse. The galaxy will appear to be captured because the bright stars inside it will burn out and no more will be born with the original trajectory because the gas clouds have gone.

Re:Nah, I call BS (2, Informative)

markusre (1521371) | more than 5 years ago | (#27770397)

since the gravitation force is ~M_blackhole*M_milkyway and F_bh=m_bh*a i dont think the trajectorie is dependent on the mass of the particle in the first order as long as m_bhm_milkyway

Re:Nah, I call BS (1)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 5 years ago | (#27770435)

since the gravitation force is ~M_blackhole*M_milkyway and F_bh=m_bh*a i dont think the trajectorie is dependent on the mass of the particle in the first order as long as m_bhm_milkyway

No but the velocity change caused by drag depends on the density of the object. Stars and black holes won't experience significant drag. Gas cloud molecules will. When they hit another cloud gas will be compressed in a shock wave and new stars will form.

Re:Nah, I call BS (3, Interesting)

Brown (36659) | more than 5 years ago | (#27770333)

The Milky Way swallows a galaxy, and the swallowed galaxy's stars get added to the milky way, orbiting the galactic centre in the usual way. Presumably the same happens to the black hole - there's no reason why it should be sucked into the middle. Black holes will happily orbit around each other, as long as they're outside each other's event horizons.

Re:Nah, I call BS (1)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 5 years ago | (#27770425)

The Milky Way swallows a galaxy, and the swallowed galaxy's stars get added to the milky way, orbiting the galactic centre in the usual way. Presumably the same happens to the black hole - there's no reason why it should be sucked into the middle. Black holes will happily orbit around each other, as long as they're outside each other's event horizons.

Why would the stars and black hole change their trajectory significantly? They are passing through a near perfect vacuum. I could believe that a galaxy from the halo of our galaxy could pass through our galactic disc and lose all its gas clouds, but the black hole would keep right on going.

Re:Nah, I call BS (1)

KDR_11k (778916) | more than 5 years ago | (#27770459)

Why would the stars and black hole change their trajectory significantly?

Gravity?

Re:Nah, I call BS (2, Interesting)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 5 years ago | (#27770497)

Why would the stars and black hole change their trajectory significantly?

Gravity?

Gravity can change the direction of travel of a black hole or star. It can't significantly change momentum unless the object passes very close to a large mass. Our space probes do that at Jupiter, etc, but that requires guidance or an extreme amount of luck. To be captured by gravitational slingshot a black hole would have to pass very close to our own central black hole. Thats not very likely.

Re:Nah, I call BS (1)

CrashandDie (1114135) | more than 5 years ago | (#27770965)

To be captured by gravitational slingshot a black hole would have to pass very close to our own central black hole. Thats not very likely.

They've had billions of years to practise. One of them is bound to get lucky at some point.

Re:Nah, I call BS (5, Interesting)

AlecC (512609) | more than 5 years ago | (#27770539)

Because the galaxy is not a point mass. Most ordinary star/planet modelling is based on viewing each object as a sphere, which behaves as a point mass at the centre. But when you penetrate inside another body, as two galaxies do when they collide, this simplification no longer applies. Some of the mass of the "other" galaxy moves behind the penetrating galaxy, slowing it down rather than, as the point mass model would suggest, continuing to accelerate into the centre. In the simplest model, of inter-penetrating spheres, gravity no longer has an inverse square law but an inverse linear law. Of course, galaxies are not uniform spheres, and the modelling is much harder. However, it is widely accepted that when two galaxies collide, they merge and the vast majority of the mass forms a single galaxy - though clusters may be flung out. If the galaxies are of broadly similar masses, the distinctive spiral structure is wiped out and the merged result becomes an elliptical galaxy for a few hundred million years before the spiral structure re-establishes.

Google "andromeda collisions" for simulations of the collision between our galaxy and the Andromeda galaxy in about 3 billion years.

Re:Nah, I call BS (1)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 5 years ago | (#27770851)

Yes I can see that your argument might work as a gravitational slingshot. The way I visualise it is that the time you spend on certain trajectories in a gravitational field can determine the amount of energy you transfer through the field. A helicopter hovering above the ground will use an infinite amount of energy in an infinite time. A satellite can orbit the Earth for an infinite time for zero energy cost. If I fall towards jupiter and fire an engine at accelerate at closest approach I will spend less time in Jupiters gravitational field on the way out. Jupiter will have tugged me more one way than the other during the encounter so kinetic energy and momentum have been transferred through the gravitational field.

Now looking at your scenario of passing through a galaxy, I could think of it as passing 10 stars. Once I pass the first star its gravitational field will start to reduce my acceleration. Once in the middle my velocity will be lower than it would have been if I had been passing a point source. This gives more time for me to interact with the remaining five stars on the way out, so more of my momentum will be transferred to them than was transferred to me on the way in.

So yes, I see your point.

Re:Nah, I call BS (1)

Brown (36659) | more than 5 years ago | (#27770591)

There is clearly enough gravitational pull from the galactic centre to keep the milky way together, despite its spin - so presumably this would have a considerable effect on other smaller galaxies passing through it, especially if their relative velocities were low in relation to their size.

Re:Nah, I call BS (4, Interesting)

stonewallred (1465497) | more than 5 years ago | (#27770699)

What happens when two black holes actually intersect at their event horizons? Inquiring non-astrophysicists would like to know.

Re:Nah, I call BS (5, Informative)

beanyk (230597) | more than 5 years ago | (#27770983)

What happens when two black holes actually intersect at their event horizons? Inquiring non-astrophysicists would like to know.

They merge into one bigger hole. The final hole mass will be (almost) the sum of the two masses, and will likely have a significant spin, even if the pre-merger holes don't.

Disclaimer: this is actually my area of research.

Re:Nah, I call BS (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27771159)

How is it possible for the two holes to merge with each other? It was my understanding that nothing could reach the event horizon of a black hole because, as you approach it, time moves increasingly slowly, until ultimately, at the exact point of the event horizon, time moves infinitely slowly.

Wouldn't this mean that the two black holes would never be able to touch each other and merge?

Re:Nah, I call BS (3, Interesting)

beanyk (230597) | more than 5 years ago | (#27771229)

Well for one thing, the "time moving slowly" thing is an observer-dependent effect. If you were the one falling into the hole, you wouldn't notice any real time lag at all [depending on the size of the hole -- and your personal oxygen supply, etc -- you might even survive crossing the horizon].

But to a distant observer, your progress would look more and more gradual. Signals leaving you would also get more and more red-shifted, and eventually pass out of the visible spectrum. So a distant observer would never see you cross the horizon.

Re:Nah, I call BS (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27771241)

Can I assume that the difference between the mass of the product hole and the sum of the masses of the two predecessor holes is released as energy?

Also, a wilder question: when the two event horizons come into contact, is it possible for a "bubble" to form for a short time between them which is cut off from the rest of space-time by the two event horizons, but is not technically within either - sort of a Chandrasekharian Kaliningrad? I have no idea what the effect of something like that would be (obviously whatever was inside would eventually end up inside the event horizon of the combined object), but it seems like an interesting situation.

Re:Nah, I call BS (1)

evanbd (210358) | more than 5 years ago | (#27770995)

They merge into a single black hole, spherical except for the deformations resulting from spin. If they're in close orbit, they'll lose energy to gravity waves and other forms of radiation (both Hawking and synchrotron) and spiral into each other. The gravity waves should be quite strong -- one of the sources that LIGO etc ought to be able to detect.

Of course, IANAA either, so I might be off base here, but that's my recollection as to what happens.

Re:Nah, I call BS (1)

Sockatume (732728) | more than 5 years ago | (#27771071)

A massive energy release. Much of the energy is released as EM, but a great deal of it comes in the form of gravity waves. Observatories like LIGO are hoping for black hole collisions, because they're some of the strongest gravity wave sources we'd expect to see.

Re:Nah, I call BS (1)

anandsr (148302) | more than 5 years ago | (#27770959)

I wouldn't have much faith in this, precisely because it would have been done based on Newtonian gravity. It does not take care of the MOND phenomenology. With MOND in the picture things may be totally different.

MOND is an empirical equation which predicts the rotation curves based on the visible mass in Galaxies. It works beautifully at Galactic scales but does not work well at cluster scales.

We know that General Relativity (GR) and Quantum Mechanics (QM) both are mutually incompatible, which indicates that something is wrong in both of them. In addition GR does not work well when we get very high gravitational fields like a black hole. The equations lead to a singularity. It works beautifully when gravity is somewhat lower but doesn't seem to work well below a threshold, which leads us to the prediction of Dark Matter, with really weird properties to account for the lack of observation.

Also GR takes into account only one special constant speed of light or the maximum signal speed. It does not take into account the Planck's Length or the minimal wavelength of the signal. This is probably why it does not work well with QM. The modification due to taking into account the Planck's length may cause MOND we don't know.

-anand

Milky Way? (4, Funny)

krou (1027572) | more than 5 years ago | (#27770313)

If I found hundreds of "black holes" in my "Milky Way", surely that would mean it's an Aero?

I'll grab my coat ...

Re:Milky Way? (4, Funny)

L4t3r4lu5 (1216702) | more than 5 years ago | (#27770525)

Well, if the universe is expanding in a uniform fashion, the perimeter in all directions must be equidistant from the centre.

I think you mean a Malteser.

Re:Milky Way? (1)

Canazza (1428553) | more than 5 years ago | (#27770563)

I always thought the universe was a hyperbolic paraboloid... hence it's actually a Pringle

I have a couple right here. (1)

Jane Q. Public (1010737) | more than 5 years ago | (#27770315)

Anybody want to bid?

Re:I have a couple right here. (1)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 5 years ago | (#27770523)

Anybody want to bid?

For gods sake don't let them go. You could feed Osama Bin Laden into them a bit at a time and power a small city.

Re:I have a couple right here. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27770635)

Sure, but not if they're too loose.

I read this headline (1)

Presto Vivace (882157) | more than 5 years ago | (#27770335)

and it sounded like a cartoon.

Not News (1)

Dan541 (1032000) | more than 5 years ago | (#27770777)

This shouldn't even be news,

"Coming up next: The earth is in orbit around the sun, Liquid Nitrogen is cold; and why sleeping inside an active rock tumbler may be damaging to your health."

Yes but how does this relate to Swine Flu? (5, Insightful)

VShael (62735) | more than 5 years ago | (#27770441)

And how can the news networks use it to induce fear?
And more importantly, how we can we use it to sell stuff?

"Black hole protective face-masks" just don't seem like a seller, to me.

Re:Yes but how does this relate to Swine Flu? (5, Funny)

PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) | more than 5 years ago | (#27770575)

The Black Holes were created by the Large Hadron Collider during the short time that it was online, before the radioactive liquid helium leaked out and freeze-burned its way down toward the center of the earth (China Syndrome), where it was reflected back up and surfaced in a pig patch in Mexico, and irradiated sick pigs with Swine Flu, which mutated into the Mexico Flu, and hopped a ride on some poor little kid, who passed it on to Mexico city.

Seems all pretty plausible to me.

Re:Yes but how does this relate to Swine Flu? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27770603)

How about "black hole toilet seat covers"? Or portable black holes that make your money disappear - oh wait - we already have these - they are called "taxes"...

Re:Yes but how does this relate to Swine Flu? (1)

Dan541 (1032000) | more than 5 years ago | (#27770815)

Does your home insurance cover "Black hole damage"

Re:Yes but how does this relate to Swine Flu? (1)

CrashandDie (1114135) | more than 5 years ago | (#27770927)

Nope, but with the amount I'm paying it feels like one.

Re:Yes but how does this relate to Swine Flu? (1)

antic (29198) | more than 5 years ago | (#27771277)

Does insurance cover anything these days?

Re:Yes but how does this relate to Swine Flu? (1)

hitnrunrambler (1401521) | more than 5 years ago | (#27771539)

Does your home insurance cover "Black hole damage"

Insurance IS a black hole (and is on a much faster path toward destroying civilization)

Bad timing - media on a sugar rush! (1)

Knutsi (959723) | more than 5 years ago | (#27770449)

The media is currently in doomsday-mode, so please Slashdot, be careful with these juicy stories suggesting impending doom ;p

Oblig (1)

Smivs (1197859) | more than 5 years ago | (#27770491)

Obligatory Goatze link. On second thoughts, let's not!

Re:Oblig (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27770529)

If you think that Goatze is bad you haven't done much surfing on the Internet!

Re:Oblig (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27770689)

Goatse.cx. Pronounced "goat sex". It's bad enough when people forget about the .cx, but "goatze" is just plain wrong.

Don't hate (1)

oldhack (1037484) | more than 5 years ago | (#27770515)

Live and let live. Black holes are people, too.

Black Hole Ranch (1)

AlterRNow (1215236) | more than 5 years ago | (#27770605)

Those space cowboys aren't doing their job.

Get to work, Spike.

Are they absolutely sure? (4, Funny)

hack slash (1064002) | more than 5 years ago | (#27770611)

Take this wise lesson from Red Dwarf:

"Well, the thing about a Black Hole, its main distinguishing feature, is it's black. And the thing about space, your basic space colour is black. So how are you supposed to see them?"

*later on*

"They weren't Black Holes."
"What were they?"
"Grit. Five specks of grit on the scanner-scope. See, the thing about grit is, it's black, and the thing about scanner-scopes..."
"Oh shut up!"

Re:Are they absolutely sure? (1)

ledow (319597) | more than 5 years ago | (#27770757)

Swirly Thing Alert!

What About Black Holes from Common Massive Stars? (2, Interesting)

Fleetie (603229) | more than 5 years ago | (#27770647)

What about black holes NOT from the centre of galaxies? Fairly normal large (massive) stars end up as black holes too, so I'd expect a lot of black holes in this galaxy anyway, even if it hadn't interacted with any other galaxies.

Oblig S.L.Jackson (1)

nbharatvarma (784546) | more than 5 years ago | (#27770651)

I want these m*f*ng black holes off the m*f*ng galaxy!

Re:Oblig S.L.Jackson (0, Redundant)

Warlord88 (1065794) | more than 5 years ago | (#27770887)

Are you the actor in the movie "Blackholes in a Glaxy"?

The Republicans are at it again ... (2, Funny)

MasterRat (1223392) | more than 5 years ago | (#27770707)

Its obvious, that in order to be more eco-friendly and healthy, the central-black holes in democratically controlled galaxies have gone free-range to avoid contributing to universal warming. Its the damn republican black hole at the center of the Milky Way, sitting there, denying universal climate change that needs to be shown the error the of its ways. I say, lets raise taxes on republican black holes so that we can share the wealth and help the black holes in poorer, predominantly democratic galaxies become empowered, thus giving them the opportunity to become free-range black holes.

Patently Untrue! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27770839)

She told me, I mean, my friend, that she spits, not swallows.

I think I found one (2, Funny)

hyades1 (1149581) | more than 5 years ago | (#27770961)

I'm reasonably sure there's one in my ex's purse. Money goes there to die.

Just remember ... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27771501)

Space is big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-bogglingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the road to the drug store, but that's just peanuts to space.

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