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Italy May Hold Its Own Pirate Bay Trial

timothy posted more than 5 years ago | from the keeping-up-with-the-johannsens dept.

The Courts 120

hyanakin writes with an excerpt from TorrentFreak: "Following the Swedish verdict, Italy is now considering starting its own trial against the people involved with The Pirate Bay. This would be the first criminal prosecution against the Pirate Bay 'founders' outside their home country." Funny thing: almost 20 years ago, CD stores in Germany all seemed to be full of bootleg concert CDs pressed in Italy.

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120 comments

Will it be held in Naples? (-1, Troll)

thetoadwarrior (1268702) | more than 5 years ago | (#27801149)

The Neapolitans have a bit of a reputation for taking things that aren't theirs so the Pirate Bay will be safe!

Re:Will it be held in Naples? (4, Funny)

genner (694963) | more than 5 years ago | (#27801317)

The Neapolitans have a bit of a reputation for taking things that aren't theirs

Is that how they got 3 diffrent flavours in their ice cream?

Re:Will it be held in Naples? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27802075)

That was full of win.

Re:Will it be held in Naples? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27802355)

It's a thin line between idiot american and greatest troll ever.

Re:Will it be held in Naples? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27802099)

+1 good sir and/or madame.

Dear Italians (1)

badpazzword (991691) | more than 5 years ago | (#27804347)

Next time you hear Berlusconi going about how he made Italy great in the world, just reread this discussion and see for yourself what the world really thinks of us.

In my hereabouts we'd say "'mbuccalasagne".

Swine... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27801165)

It's just a tactic to distract us from the impending pandemic!

Jurisdiction? (5, Insightful)

rts008 (812749) | more than 5 years ago | (#27801179)

FTFA:

According to Sunde's lawyers, one of the issues still under discussion is whether the evidence collected by the Swedish authorities is legal or not. Thus far, the only binding jurisdiction with regard to The Pirate Bay is that the Italian blocking order was absolutely unlawful under criminal law.

Nevertheless, the entertainment industry is one step ahead and already thinking about how they will divide the booty. Simona Lavagnini, one of the lawyers representing the Italian music industry said that it is not very realistic to expect the defendants to be extradited to Italy, but she believes that fines and a seizure of assets belong to the possibilities.

Are the Italians going to invade other countries to seize these assets? Does TPB even have any assets in Italyto be seized?

This sounds like another 'me too' bullshit stunt to me.

Re:Jurisdiction? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27801525)

This sounds like another 'me too' bullshit stunt to me.

Exactly. You'd think that with the corruption going on in that government they'd have enough to do with in their own country first.

Re:Jurisdiction? (4, Insightful)

Cromac (610264) | more than 5 years ago | (#27801601)

If you were the Italian government wouldn't you rather go after 4 guys running a website than the mafia?

Re:Jurisdiction? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27801625)

There are softer targets than the mafia that are still more justifiable targets than pirate bay.

C'mon, their head of state is in charge of public owned media companies and the top private ones. There's barely a news outlet in Italy that will say a sour word about the man.

Re:Jurisdiction? (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27801687)

If you'd listen to Italian TV for a few minutes you'll hear plenty bad about him. Weel of course not from rai 1, but there they always stay on the winning party side.

rai 3 will always talk bad about him, rete 4 will always be good with him, while canale 5 will avoid the subject if possible.

on newspapers(which are widely read here) there is a very wide panorama, with party backed newspapers from every party in existence(both the ones in the parliament and the ones which could not get seats there due to minimum votes needed.)

Re:Jurisdiction? (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27804471)

This is plain false! ALL the TVs talks good of the premier, except Rai 3. Rete 4 is totally prone. Amongst the major newspapers there are one that is on the opposition side while the others, that need the support of the public money, hence of the government, to survive, are from neutral to completely ass-licking.

Re:Jurisdiction? (2, Interesting)

mirkob (660121) | more than 5 years ago | (#27805115)

the newspapers aren't widely readed in italy.

and the majority are much aligned with a political party.

so even who read something read usually a journal already aligned with his ideas...

rarely berlusca fans read journals not preaching him, and the majority simply see his TV...

a sad situation of 30 milion+ gullible ignorants...

Re:Jurisdiction? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27801717)

If you were the Italian government wouldn't you rather go after 4 guys running a website than the mafia?

Especially so since the Italian government now is [timesonline.co.uk] the [independent.co.uk] Mafia [economist.com] .

Re:Jurisdiction? (4, Insightful)

Shin-LaC (1333529) | more than 5 years ago | (#27802327)

What the hell?

1) The government is constantly going after the mafia. There was a high-profile arrest just four days ago, the head of the Bidognetti clan of the camorra (the mafia of Naples).

2) In Italy, the government runs the police, but it has no control over the judiciary. Zero. Whether there is a Pirate Bay trial in Italy is completely outside the government's control.

3) The judiciary hasn't said that they want to do such a trial, either. All TFA (and its source [cio.com] ) say is that the president of the Italian Music Industry Federation "expects" that the prosecution will seek a trial several months from now. There are no facts, just speculations from the Italian equivalent of the RIAA.

Are you enjoying being a prejudiced jerk?

Re:Jurisdiction? (1)

Brian Gordon (987471) | more than 5 years ago | (#27802379)

Isn't it the prosecutor's office who decides if they're going to pursue the case? It doesn't matter if the judiciary doesn't particularly care to try this or that trial.

Re:Jurisdiction? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27802401)

2) In Italy, the government runs the police, but it has no control over the judiciary. Zero. Whether there is a Pirate Bay trial in Italy is completely outside the government's control.

Yeah, right.

And the political history of Italy is an example of this "independence" (my ass).

Re:Jurisdiction? (1, Offtopic)

darkat (697582) | more than 5 years ago | (#27803575)

What you said is true in theory, only. In practice this government is doing all it can to limit the judiciary power. This power is particularly hated by the premier which had (and still has) many legal problems. Some judges that were investingating about corruptions worth many millions of euros and involving many politicians and possibly the southern italy mafia, were recently removed under the government pressure. Thus, not all the judges are exactly ready to risk their career by running investigations undesired by the government.On the contrary many of them are ready to brown-nose the politicians. If one ADDS to this the fact that mr. Berlusconi is the owner of the bigger MEDIA concentration in Italy (his family owns newspapers and TVs and, being the premier, has a strong control on the state televisions) and has sent his legals against Youtube which is responsible to publish parts of Belusconi's TVs shows, s/he can understand the reasons of this action against Pirate Bay.

Say what you mean (1)

Moryath (553296) | more than 5 years ago | (#27803915)

The MafiAA is running around, jurisdiction-shopping wherever they think they can get a favorable verdict, after the fact that they bought off the judge in the Swedish trial was quickly discovered and there's a dead certainty that it'll get overturned on appeal.

Re:Jurisdiction? (2, Funny)

unauthorized (1531059) | more than 5 years ago | (#27804463)

If you were the Italian government wouldn't you rather go after 4 guys running a website than the mafia?

The Italian government is not the mafia? My view of the world has been shattered!

Re:Jurisdiction? (3, Informative)

nurb432 (527695) | more than 5 years ago | (#27801651)

With the WTO they have some power to reach out of their countries borders.

Extradition has happened in other cases too.

its BS if you ask me, but im not running the show.

Re:Jurisdiction? (1)

martin-boundary (547041) | more than 5 years ago | (#27803713)

Extradition tends to happen in stupid countries like the UK, where the government doesn't properly protect its citizens. Countries which take their duties to their citizens seriously have blanket non-extradition policies for any reason.

Re:Jurisdiction? (1)

rts008 (812749) | more than 5 years ago | (#27803989)

Like the ACTA deal?

You have a point...thanks for the reply.

Re:Jurisdiction? (1)

PieceofLavalamp (1244192) | more than 5 years ago | (#27801739)

I thought they already moved servers to the netherlands anyway. What would they be seizing?

Re:Jurisdiction? (2, Interesting)

samriel (1456543) | more than 5 years ago | (#27802115)

The servers, AFAIK last, were spread around the world, with lots of them in Egypt and the Netherlands. There are surely more... I don't doubt that there is at least one server in every Eastern European country.

/serbian pirates ftw?
//citation needed

Re:Jurisdiction? (1)

Anachragnome (1008495) | more than 5 years ago | (#27803109)

"but she believes that fines and a seizure of assets belong to the possibilities"

I think by "assets" they mean they hope to find logs of up-loaders.

From what I hear, each threatened lawsuit against up-loaders is worth about $3500 in the US, the average dollar amount that people have been "settling" for when threatened with a lawsuit. If the record companies/RIAA don't WANT to settle, then a HELL of a lot more.

Once again folks, it is all about money. And your letting YOUR governments be USED to make it happen.

Re:Jurisdiction? (2, Interesting)

rts008 (812749) | more than 5 years ago | (#27803969)

Okay, I am from the USA, so I know how the RIAA works here...but...

I understand the $3500/suit you mention, but I do not understand how Italy thinks it has a chance at getting any of this money.
This is what I was talking about when I said it was a 'me too' stunt.
All 'fluff, smoke, and mirrors' to further an agenda...I do not know enough about Italian politics to be sure...but I'm just suspicious....

I truly do not understand the connection of how 'each up-loader' is worth *3500 to the Italian Gov't.
Is Italy 'bowing down' that hard to the USA?(not meant as a flame-I am truly ignorant here)

Can 'up-loader' Ip's and logs make a difference if the server is not 'in country'?

What am I missing here?

Re:Jurisdiction? (1)

Arancaytar (966377) | more than 5 years ago | (#27805091)

Of course they can, if the uploader IP is Italian. They simply look through the logs, find the IPs inside their jurisdiction, and crank out settlement offers by the dozen - profit!

Stupidity (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27801181)

The problem with people is stupidity, isn't it?

Watch out Google, you're next!

How... (5, Interesting)

Darkness404 (1287218) | more than 5 years ago | (#27801195)

How can they be tried in Italy? That doesn't make any sense unless the founders A) Lived in Italy B) Had Itallian bank accounts or other finances C) Did (physical) business in Italy with a physical presence.

Really, this doesn't make any sense.

Re:How... (4, Interesting)

TheSpoom (715771) | more than 5 years ago | (#27801219)

Thank you, this is exactly what I was thinking.

My guess is that they believe that because it happens "over the internet" (duh-duh-DUH!) it's an international issue and that they may be able to get them extradited. Which, y'know, is stupid, but then, that's government for you.

Re:How... (1, Informative)

erroneus (253617) | more than 5 years ago | (#27801491)

That logic only works for extraditing people to the U.S. When people are to be extradited to other countries, then it's a crime of all sorts that should never be allowed to happen. (I am referencing the British subject who was sent to the U.S. for hacking into NASA or whatever...)

Re:How... (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27802223)

I think that is a little different. Specifically targeting a U.S. group like nasa is a crime targeting that country. Its not the same as doing general business online. If you don't see the difference, you are either ignorant or dishonest.

Re:How... (1)

TheVelvetFlamebait (986083) | more than 5 years ago | (#27802001)

Wait. Why is that stupid? The internet is an international entity these days. It seems nuts to maintain individual sovereignty over "pieces" of the net, when everyone has access to almost everything.

Not that I'm picking on TPB specifically here (which is what I'd normally do), but in principle, it seems like a good idea to lay down (or update) some treaties here.

Re:How... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27802527)

There should be a world body governing this. My breaking point was when Kentucky figured they owned the internet.

http://www.thedomains.com/2008/09/22/kentucky-seizes-gambling-domains/

Re:How... (1)

Darkness404 (1287218) | more than 5 years ago | (#27802697)

But the net can and will exist in anarchy. You assume that if we take down all regulations regarding the internet, it would become a train wreck. It won't because people are naturally orderly.

Re:How... (1)

TheVelvetFlamebait (986083) | more than 5 years ago | (#27803553)

You assume that if we take down all regulations regarding the internet, it would become a train wreck.

I hate people telling me what I assume. You're assuming that I was worried about the health of the internet.

I know that the internet will survive without regulation (at least, with regards to content). I'm talking about impact of the internet on societies (not vice-versa). It makes sense to consider the internet as an international entity for the sake of individual countries trying to uphold their laws within their own countries. Otherwise, it's a simple matter for people to move off-shore and continue what they're doing in a country that allows it.

Re:How... (1)

KDR_11k (778916) | more than 5 years ago | (#27804911)

There are hundreds of different jurisdictions on Earth, many having laws that conflict with those of others. If you could be tried in all of those for anything you did on the internet you'd easily end up pronounced guilty (and if just by default) in several every time you do anything on the internet, no matter how legal it is in your country. It makes sense to restrict the ability to sue someone to at least the jurisdictions he acted in. Sony once filed tons of nonsensical lawsuits against an exporter in many different jurisdictions, relying on the inability of the defendant to bring that many lawyers to the battle and getting default judgements in most of the jurisdictions involved (the exporter then shut down completely). Situations like that should not be permitted.

Re:How... (1)

TheoMurpse (729043) | more than 5 years ago | (#27802731)

Just out of curiosity, suppose I live in country X where murder is legal. If I stand on the border and shoot someone in neighboring country Y, what are the consequences for me?

Re:How... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27803433)

A mob from the other country would come over and kill you, with pitchforks and torches and everything.

Re:How... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27803687)

Your government will refuse to extradite you. Which is really bad because if you don't get prosecuted, the victim's family and friends will feel justice hasn't been done and hire mercenaries in your murder-allowed country to do something that's perfectly legal there.

Re:How... (1)

ProfanityHead (198878) | more than 5 years ago | (#27802905)

Next up: "Kentucky to Hold It's Own Pirate Bay Trial"

Re:How... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27801231)

Well, Berlusconi is a man of the media, owner of a couple of TV channels and business on this particular area. Also, he is mostly above the law in Italy, if he or his government decides to do it, nothing can stop him.

That said, I didn't read the article, so take my opinion with a pocketful of salt.

Re:How... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27801365)

A sniper bullet to the brain will stop him.

Re:How... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27802571)

Just a note... the parent AC wasn't me. So, Feds/Johnny Law/etc, don't come after me plz.

Thanks!
-AC

Re:How... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27804533)

-1 internet tough guy.

Re:How... (1)

Swizec (978239) | more than 5 years ago | (#27801255)

Both Italy and Sweden are part of the EU, so maybe there's a way because of that?

Re:How... (4, Interesting)

Darkness404 (1287218) | more than 5 years ago | (#27801289)

But that doesn't make any sense either, because then you could get sued for a situation like this:

A) Create a website that violates some law in one country that is part of the EU, such as distributing Nazi texts which (as far as I know) is illegal in Germany, but legal in some EU nations such as the UK (where they actually have some shell of freedom of speech)

B) The website is hosted in a legal country such as the UK and all maintainers of it live, work, and have all financial ties in the UK

C) Germany brings charges against you

That just doesn't make any sense (not that most governments do), and seems contrary to having independent nation's laws rather then general EU laws.

Re:How... (1)

powerspike (729889) | more than 5 years ago | (#27803313)

The way i have always seen it, is if there is a crime, there are two parties involved (in "copyright infringement" anyway).

TPB is in Sweden, so they done the offence there, the only thing Italy can do IMO is charge the people that copied the "artwork".

Anything else wouldn't be legal?

Re:How... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27804637)

Create a website that violates some law in one country that is part of the EU, such as distributing Nazi texts which (as far as I know) is illegal in Germany

and France [theregister.co.uk] , just ask Yahoo.

Re:How... (1)

fastest fascist (1086001) | more than 5 years ago | (#27801273)

Of course they can be tried in Italy, if there's a law in Italy saying they can be tried. Whether they'll be there for the trial is another matter, but if convicted while absent, I guess these people would do well to avoid traveling to Italy.

Re:How... (2, Insightful)

ElectricRook (264648) | more than 5 years ago | (#27801415)

I guess these people would do well to avoid traveling to Italy

and avoid traveling to anywhere with an extradition treaty with Italy.

So now do we have to stand trial in each of 190 countries for violating someone's sensibilities on the internet?

Re:How... (1)

mrsteveman1 (1010381) | more than 5 years ago | (#27801299)

Really, this doesn't make any sense.

That's why they will be allowed to use the Chewbacca defense at trial.

Re:How... (1)

PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) | more than 5 years ago | (#27801497)

How can they be tried in Italy? .

Tried? Wrong verb. It's called a "shakedown."

Re:How... (1)

orzetto (545509) | more than 5 years ago | (#27801773)

It does make a certain sense. Remember who is in charge in Italy [wikipedia.org] . The guy owns a^Hthe media conglomerate in the country. His company (or was that the government?) has sued Youtube already, and his government becomes hyperactive every time his private interests are in question.

On the other hand, remember that trials in Italy last for insane amounts of time: it can take decades on average for some kind of trials to reach the end, and at the same time the statutory terms are relatively short and keep running during trial: it's a system engineered to keep MPs out of jail. Therefore, TPB runs quite a low risk.

I am not even surprised anymore by the priorities of our judiciary system. We have mafia, we have rampant corruption, and here is what we focus on. Ahi serva Italia...

Re:How... (1)

stephanruby (542433) | more than 5 years ago | (#27803867)

Therefore, TPB runs quite a low risk.

Assuming TPB even wants to bother. If a defendant is absent, the trial might actually be quite fast.

Re:How... (1)

Dan541 (1032000) | more than 5 years ago | (#27802041)

They can still hold a trial, just because they have no jurisdiction doesn't mean they can't waste money. This is just like the Spamhaus vs Spammer lawsuit.

Re:How... (1)

stephanruby (542433) | more than 5 years ago | (#27803821)

Tell that to Ebay after France blocked it in its DNS for allowing Nazi objects to be sold.

Re:How... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27805129)

Really, this doesn't make any sense.

welcome in Italy dude!

Anyone else see a plot for a new action film.... (5, Funny)

syousef (465911) | more than 5 years ago | (#27801211)

He was a pirate...his father was a Swedish pirate, his mother an Italian beauty...now he faces his greatest challenge.

*queue music*

*fade in* RIAA *fade out*

*fade in* MPAA *fade out*

*queue fast drum music*

*flash quickly in time ot music to lots of scenes of kids downloading crap from their bedrooms and basements*

Okay maybe not an action film...

Re:Anyone else see a plot for a new action film... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27801575)

Dear Syousef,

Unfortunately this style of movie ad is under copyright of the MPAA, we will be sending lawyers shortly.

Signed,
MPAA

Re:Anyone else see a plot for a new action film... (1)

KDR_11k (778916) | more than 5 years ago | (#27804929)

I've always thought that that would make for an interesting scenario in a tower defense game... "kill the lawyers before they can get to your door"

Re:Anyone else see a plot for a new action film... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27802203)

*queue music*

I sure hope it's RIAA licensed music!

Re:Anyone else see a plot for a new action film... (1)

Meneth (872868) | more than 5 years ago | (#27802425)

Quick, to the Bat-fax!

Re:Anyone else see a plot for a new action film... (1)

martin-boundary (547041) | more than 5 years ago | (#27803733)

Make sure the film has a dog in it. Every movie should have a dog in it for comic relief.

jurisdiction (1)

trancemission (823050) | more than 5 years ago | (#27801215)

This trial got quite a bit of attention when the verdict was given here in the UK and I found myself wondering why so much attention for a verdict in another country. Even if it is in the EU

Obviously I didn't wonder for long.......

This world sucks.

Good news! (1)

palindrome (34830) | more than 5 years ago | (#27801247)

As it's Italy half way through the prosecution the government will change sides and support the defendants. This is good news for the PB folks.

Mafia vs Pirates (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27801265)

Who'll win?

Re:Mafia vs Pirates (1)

shentino (1139071) | more than 5 years ago | (#27801925)

Tyranny...from a government who will have the enviable position of being permitted to suspend civil rights to stop the first two groups from getting out of hand.

funny thing? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27801275)

That funny thing you mentioned has absolutely no relevance to the story. Congrats.

Bad summary (1)

yellowstone (62484) | more than 5 years ago | (#27801277)

Pirate Bay is not the same as dimeadozen, zomb, traders den, etc.

Those Bootlegs Were Legal (5, Interesting)

Telephone Sanitizer (989116) | more than 5 years ago | (#27801297)

> Funny thing: almost 20 years ago, CD stores in Germany all
> seemed to be full of bootleg concert CDs pressed in Italy.

In fact, it was perfectly legal to record a live concert and sell the recording from Italy if the bootlegger opened a bank account and deposited a royalty for the artist.

There was even an official stamp issued to those bootleggers who registered with the Italian Authors Society.

Re:Those Bootlegs Were Legal (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27801377)

Well the Italian bootlegs I bought here in the U.S. were not live recordings, but studio albums. As for their legality they were stamped, but were certainly cheap reproductions of the originals and could easily be confused with something manufactured in someones bedroom.

For when they enter Italy...? (2, Informative)

Kidbro (80868) | more than 5 years ago | (#27801325)

While it is wholly ridiculous to believe that this would have any real effect on the TBP people while they resided in Sweden, it may or may not give Italian authorities cause to intervene if any of them ever visited Italy.

If they did, they would not be the first country [wikipedia.org] to do so.

Re:For when they enter Italy...? (1)

trancemission (823050) | more than 5 years ago | (#27801367)

We are getting there:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_government [wikipedia.org]

Quote from American Library Association:

"The freedom to read is essential to our democracy. It is continuously under attack... These actions apparently arise from a view that our national tradition of free expression is no longer valid; that censorship and suppression are needed to avoid the subversion of politics and the corruption of morals."

Re:For when they enter Italy...? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27801853)

Except that both Italy and Sweden are part of the European Union. Being part of the EU means you have to comply with the regulations of the EU. Which more or less implies that when you from country A are found guilty in country B you will have to serve the time/penalty. But, you could serve the time in your own country.
However, Italy is now allowed to try TPB for the same illegal facts are they were tried for in Sweden.

Wops (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27801351)

Wops, spaghetti eaters, macaronis, dagoes, greaseballs, pasta master, wops, dagoes, oily garlic munchers, boot-coons [youtube.com] , olive-monkeys. And wops.

LOL @ .it domains (4, Funny)

wulfmans (794904) | more than 5 years ago | (#27801355)

I admin an IRC server and the country that is always using the !List command the most is Italy (95% of the time). I am sure you all know that !list is how you trigger a fserv on IRC. What are they looking for you ask? WAREZ !!! It's gotta be a joke they would consider having a trial.

Re:LOL @ .it domains (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27801621)

Sorry but... they who?
Do you really think this trial is being started out of popular demand?

An Italian.

Re:LOL @ .it domains (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27804479)

Now now, we all know Italians are sensible netizens, especially on IRC.

Proof. [carnagecorp.com]

In Italy... (1, Troll)

JAlexoi (1085785) | more than 5 years ago | (#27801387)

In Italy pirated software and video CDs and DVDs are still common place. I mean, there are people that are charged with preventing IP piracy, who are actively involved with it. And there are people making money off infringing copyright - the actual pirates.
The last place you get your copyright infringing items is the pirate bay.

Italy: country of shit (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27801401)

Italy is just a country of shit, full of corruption and against everything doesn't bring money to who have powers (let's google about the telecom package, hopefully rejected from the eu). As an italian i just hope that this system will collapse or some other country colonize us... :(

Mod this. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27801457)

Fuck you try censor me now bitch.

Dear Italy (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27801513)

Dear Italy,
Blow it out of your bum.

Sincerely,
The rest of the world.

Re:Dear Italy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27801807)

It's time to kick ass and chew gum, and I'm all out of gum.

- Italy

Re:Dear Italy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27805125)

...and all out of kick, for that matter.

Which is odd, for a country that shape.

monkey-see, monkey-sue (0, Troll)

DewDude (537374) | more than 5 years ago | (#27801619)

This has GOT to be a case of Italy just doing something to make itself seem..ahem...more badass than they are. It makes no sense. Countless numbers of bootleg CD's come out in Italy. I happen to know of a studio album of a "classic" band that not only was the Italian imported CD a bootleg (despite saying it was used with permission), but was also sourced off vinyl and not "complete" What's next? The Chinese suing TPB for cutting in on thier piracy business?

Lesson Learned (2, Interesting)

nurb432 (527695) | more than 5 years ago | (#27801653)

While you may be right, its time to take all this back underground.

What you cant see you cant sue/stop/fight.

Engineered Propaganda Play.. (1)

plasmacutter (901737) | more than 5 years ago | (#27801825)

The verdict is a scandal and destined to be overturned, in addition it's currently non-binding.

The judge has obvious and close-knit ties to the **AA through intimate lobby groups (composed of small numbers of powerful people), and has committed obvious breaches of swedish judicial procedure allowing "surprise witnesses" by the prosecution.

The verdict was "leaked" to the media before results were delivered to the defendants, and within minutes these **AA organizations were in the halls of legislation world-wide trying to leverage this preliminary, suspicious, and non-binding verdict as if it was a finalized, indelible damnation chiseled by god himself into stone tablets.

This entire affair is nothing more than a massive, corrupt propaganda play whose dirtiness approaches the underhanded tactics used to pass the DMCA and currently being used to circumvent the WTO and WIPO via the ACTA negotiations.

Satan is soliciting bids for the addition of a new, 10th level of hell specifically to house the disgusting individuals driving these endeavors.

Double Jeopardy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27801901)

The EU's double jeopardy laws state "No one shall be liable to be tried or punished again in criminal proceedings under the jurisdiction of the same State for an offence for which he has already been finally acquitted or convicted in accordance with the law and penal procedure of that State."

Does the EU count as a state for this purpose? If so then wasn't being convicted in Sweden the end of the line? If not doesn't that mean that anyone convicted in the future could be hauled before the courts of any nation where the owner of the copyrighted work lives?

Imagine doing multiple consecutive 1 year sentences for hosting a variety of Europop mp3s?

Re:Double Jeopardy (1)

mdmkolbe (944892) | more than 5 years ago | (#27803597)

Well you see in Sweden they were only prosecuted for the copyright infringements in Sweden. There's still all that copyright infringement they committed in Italy to prosecute them for.

</sarcasm>

All is but in vain. (1)

TrueRecord (1101681) | more than 5 years ago | (#27803035)

All is but in vain.
The trend is clear. More trials, more laws, more victims, more prisons, less privacy, hello, 1984.
What can you do against well-organized global copyright advocates?
All countries have fallen under their logic, those who are still free will obtain their "intellectual property" laws shortly.
You lose! I don't see how any one can beat advocates of copyright on their field.

Not so strange (1)

darkat (697582) | more than 5 years ago | (#27803637)

If one knows that the government in Italy is "owned" by the richest Italy man and owner of the biggest MEDIA concentration. He's only protecting his business (which is the very reason that led him into politics).

something must be drying up (1)

Dr.Ruud (98254) | more than 5 years ago | (#27804217)

That is just to protect their source.

Newest fashion (1)

Nephrite (82592) | more than 5 years ago | (#27804505)

It's the newest fashion now to have the Pirate Bay trials. After half a year you (if you are a nation leader, that is) will not be able to look your peers in the eye if you haven't had a Pirate bay trial. "Bah, what country are you anyway? You even didn't have a Pirate Bay trial! Ridiculous!"

Media hype (1)

Xarvh (1244438) | more than 5 years ago | (#27804655)

I'm Italian and I'm quite confident that the Government wants just a slice of the media hype.
When the whole thing will disappear into its own nothingness, it will have been already long forgotten and the media will not even cover it.
That's how it works.

Re:Media hype (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27804737)

Considering that the Italian government also controls the media, I don't think they really need another slice of the media hype. They usually create the hypes themselves.

huh (1)

GregNorc (801858) | more than 5 years ago | (#27805019)

Doesn't the EU have the concept of double jeopardy [wikipedia.org] ?

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