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H1N1 Appears To Be Transmittable From Human To Pig

timothy posted more than 4 years ago | from the reciprocity-is-just-good-manners dept.

Medicine 132

mpetch writes "In an interesting twist, it appears that H1N1 influenza can be transmitted from humans to swine. Apparently a Canadian pig farmer vacationed in Mexico, returned to Canada and infected about 10% of the swine on an Alberta farm. The swine subsequently developed flu symptoms."

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132 comments

Obligatory (5, Funny)

schmidt349 (690948) | more than 4 years ago | (#27807891)

On top of everything else, now we have to worry about our police being knocked out by influenza!

Great.

Vaccines destroy your health. Go natural, not ADD. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27808141)

(7)Monitor the PH level of your saliva and urine with a digital PH meter, and know that an alkaly level (7.4) renders one's body uninhabitable by cancers and virus.

(1)Doing studies on immune system therapies, the Chinese have learned that the antigens ejected from the body in the urine would yield a stimulant to fortify the immune system by immediate ingestion: try mixing 1 ounce of your immediate urine to 7 ounces of water with a tea-spoon of sodium bicarbonate (Baking Soda). Keep refrigerated and used between 1 month and 3 months is the best results;

(2)Avoid anything thought to be dairy;

(3)Avoid carbonated beverages (these cause oxygen depletion in the body, myoxia, leading symptom X of the buzzward "fibromyalgia" that has built more a livelyhood for drug companies and its whores than a remedy);

(4)Avoid processed (white) sugars, non-sea (white) salts, and (white) "enriched" flour;

(5)Avoid preservatives (citric acid), toxic industrial dopamine manipulators/flavor-enhancers (aspartame), and GMO'd non-foods marketed as organic grains and staples (rice, corn, beans).

(6)Consume natural grown food, the closer to you the better, raw vegetables with "oxalyic acid" and seeds with "nitrilocydes."

Re:Vaccines destroy your health. Go natural, not A (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27808301)

(11)Avoid touching your genitals in an improper way. Conduct regular self-tests for vision loss.

Re:Vaccines destroy your health. Go natural, not A (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27808483)

(8)Enemas, enemas, enemas, enemas, enemas, enemas, enemas !!!!

(9)Use soap and hand cleaners containing natural, organic tea tree oil. A powerful antibacterial without the chemicals. Kills viruses including swine flu, HIV, Avian Flu, Bubonic plague and dummies.

(10)Feces. Urine is great (drink it!!) but feces are pure concentrated nutrition logs. Deep enema then pick out the pieces.

(12)Avoid anything thought to be dairy but eat ice cream. I don't think it's dairy.

(13)Eat lots of Pringles. I don't know if they're any good for you but they now come 100 to the can. It's just good fiscal sense.

(14)Never clean your home and throw old newspapers coated in cat pee everywhere. The natural growth will naturally sanitize everything in the home naturally. Breathe deep, the odor is thrice as good as VapoRub.

(15)Did I mention enemas? Give yourself enemas two at a time. Once to clean out the toxins from your body then another time to clean the toxins from the first enema. In fact, if you can, just shove a garden hose up your butt and turn on the water FULL BLAST! Don't take it out, ever, unless you want to die within 100 years or so.

Re:Vaccines destroy your health. Go natural, not A (2, Insightful)

dgatwood (11270) | more than 4 years ago | (#27811379)

Complete and utter crap. The AC posted the same garbage in another thread. I'll repost my comments on the subject.

Most of what you are saying is flat out wrong.... In the same (very bizarre) order as the parent:

0. The presence of mercury in vaccines is a red herring. We're talking about 62.5 micrograms per dose. You get that much mercury from eating a typical portion of tuna. An average adult gets nearly that much every week from dental fillings alone. This theory for the cause of autism seems pretty implausible. Further, these days, vaccines intended for children are available in a thimerosal-free variant specifically for this purpose, making this argument against vaccines utterly moot.

7. This is a clear case of correlation being confused with causation.... A pH level of 7.4 is considered normal in humans. So basically you are saying that most humans cannot get viruses or cancer. This is clearly not correct.... The normal range is 7.35 to 7.45. If you are outside that range, it is likely indicative of illness. Bringing your pH into that range doesn't kill viruses. Killing viruses brings it into that range.

1. That is just freaking disgusting.

2. Avoiding dairy is unnecessary unless you are lactose intolerant. I can certainly understand trying to avoid BGH, but there are BGH-free dairies that you can get your milk from. And in the grand scheme of things, it's really not that big a risk.

3. No thoughts about the safety of drinking carbonated beverages (at least as far as the CO2 is concerned). I would note that fibromyalgia, as far as I can tell, is similar to dementia in that it is basically a catch-all diagnosis that means "We don't know what's wrong." Thus attributing it to any single cause seems dubious to me, but....

4. Bleaching flour does reduce the health benefits, but not all white flour is bleached. Ultragrain(R), for example, is a white flour that is not bleached.

Salt (at least salt that is safe for human consumption) is naturally clearish-white, including the sea salt you promote. Be afraid of any salt that is not white. As far as health goes, you should to be really careful using sea salt to ensure that you get enough iodine. It is not recommended as a substitute for table salt unless you either consume lots of citrus fruit or just enjoy goiter. :-)

White sugar is just brown sugar with the molasses separated out. I'm not convinced that avoiding white sugar is a very good idea. AFAICT, the alternatives are all much worse for you. The things you need to avoid are high fructose corn syrup and any sugar substitutes (not just aspartane). Artificial sweeteners cause the human body to crave the calories that it is expecting, and when those calories don't follow, this causes you to consume more food than you otherwise would. This is why studies have shown diet drinks tend to cause weight gain in the long term, not weight loss. HFCS does the same thing, just to a lesser degree. You're much better off with cane sugar.

5. I think my comments on #4 mostly covered this. Avoiding citric acid probably isn't necessary. It is relatively harmless. Avoiding other preservatives, though, yes. In particular, avoid sodium benzoate. When combined with citric acid, it releases benzene, which is really nasty stuff.

6. I assume you mean oxalic acid. If so, you should not increase your consumption of those foods---at least not without cooking them to destroy the oxalic acid. In the long term, excessive consumption of oxalic acid can cause a number of nutritional deficiencies including osteoporosis.

I also assume you mean nitrilosides, e.g. amygdalin. I would caution again that excessive consumption of these substances (particularly in the form of oral supplements) is toxic. Specifically, it releases cyanide when ingested....

Also, the whole locavore thing has some advantages in terms of reducing greenhouse gas emissions, but it really isn't doing your body any favors health-wise. There are lots of areas where little or no food can be grown usefully, and most parts of the world can't feasibly produce foods with a wide enough range of nutrients to be healthy. For example, citrus fruits are pretty important for your health (particularly if you only consume sea salt), but cannot be grown in most of the U.S. because of cold temperatures.

Also, getting food from around the world allows you to maintain a balanced diet on an ongoing basis without freezing the foods. Freezing isn't a show-stopper, but it does make many foods much less appealing.... We've gotten healthier as a species since the invention of the refrigerator and the airplane....

Re:Obligatory (3, Informative)

FriendlyLurker (50431) | more than 4 years ago | (#27808427)

From WHO: "There is no indication of virus adaptation through transfer from human to pigs at this time."
http://www.who.int/csr/don/2009_05_03a/en/index.html [who.int]

US exports $5 billion+ pork each year. Mexico imports most of its pork from US/Canada. Other countries such as China know that the swine flu was much more likely to have incubated in the massive pig farms of US and Canada before transferring to humans, rather than the other way round as so called "news" like this try to make us believe.

"China was also selective, banning only pork from Texas, California and Kansas, while the Philippines, South Korea, Thailand, Kazakhstan, Serbia, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates and Ecuador said theyâ(TM)re stopping all U.S. pork imports, according to Nefeterius Akeli McPherson of the U.S. trade representativeâ(TM)s office."
China ban US pork [google.com]

Re:Obligatory (5, Funny)

PCM2 (4486) | more than 4 years ago | (#27808733)

Even if your theory about the origin of this form of the virus is correct, you cannot get the flu from eating pork. These bans are simply sowing more ignorance.

Re:Obligatory (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27808933)

This ban is not entirely useless. If you can transmit h1n1 in both directions (so swine to human and human to swine), then there are two species that can serve as pathways between two countries. Someone can be in the US, contract h1n1 from either swine or a human, then go to say china and infect more humans (or also infect pigs who then infect humans, but I'm assuming one is in more intimate contact with humans then pigs, generally).

Another pathway is to have someone in the US catch h1n1 and that person happens to be a farmer. (This is what happened in Canada.) Then, say, China imports infected pigs (live ones) from the US. These pigs infect farmers who infect other humans and so on.

So banning the importation of live swine stocks from affected areas makes sense. I agree with you that banning the import of dead meat makes little sense.

So why did my bacon have to be cured!? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27811883)

> Even if your theory about the origin of this form of the virus is correct, you cannot get the flu from eating pork. These bans are simply sowing more ignorance.

Yeah, so tell me this smart guy: why did all my bacon have to be cured [wikipedia.org]? What do you have to say to THAT!?

Serious Matter: Close the Border with Mexico (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27809507)

Trade and other forms of interaction with Mexico should be halted immediately. Mexico, with its backward society (and awful sanitation), is a health hazard to Americans.

You, the reader of this forum, are well advised to be careful when you are interacting with large communities of (legal or illegal) immigrants from Mexico, China, and other 3rd-world countries. China has been a major source of viral diseases (e. g., avian flu and SARS) for the same reason that Mexico is now a source of swine flu.

This comment is not an indictment of all emerging markets. Look at Eastern Europe. It does not have these problems. Why? Look at the culture. It is Western.

Re:Serious Matter: Close the Border with Mexico (1)

dgatwood (11270) | more than 4 years ago | (#27811521)

The parent post does seem to be a troll, and I don't agree at all with the conclusion---halting trade is absolutely backwards---but ironically there is a kernel of truth in there. The health conditions in Mexico did play a significant role in creating this mess, and we have only ourselves to blame for that.

The health of the poorest, most third-world country affects the health of everyone in the world. This is why we should have more trade with these countries and do everything we can to bring up the standards of living among the poor, homeless, etc. to tolerable levels. Allowing people to live in unsanitary conditions, allowing people to remain destitute, etc. is the best possible way to guarantee these sorts of outbreaks in the future. At least in the long run, our best hope of survival is in opening the borders more, not less. NAFTA was a start, but it really isn't enough.

We as a society have to learn that our planet is not a bunch of countries. No man is an island. We are all connected in a giant worldwide ecosystem, and what happens to the poorest and the lowliest among us happens in part to all of us. The closed nature of the U.S./Mexico border is a significant cause of this crisis, not a solution, and instead of paranoid protectionist policies, we should be asking how we can help.

Peachy (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27807893)

Just great.

Another instance of americans covering up infections and canadains being forthcoming and getting screwed over.

We need a new name, now (5, Funny)

gyrogeerloose (849181) | more than 4 years ago | (#27807917)

9 out of 10 pigs suggest calling it "Human Flu."

Re:We need a new name, now (2, Funny)

Rakshasa Taisab (244699) | more than 4 years ago | (#27808007)

Poor young pig... Not only did he give her the human flu, the number he left was to some dry-cleaner's place. And I think they forgot to use protection. ;(

Re:We need a new name, now (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27809509)

portektion

Re:We need a new name, now (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27808071)

I wonder how Muslims feel about swine flu. I mean, dune coons really hate pigs. They really, really hate it when you throw ham at them, or leave a piece of it under the handle of their car door so they don't realize what it is until after they touch it. Priceless.

Re:We need a new name, now (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27808187)

but I'm not afraid of the flu. I think we should name it what Fox News suggested. The Black Plague 2.

Re:We need a new name, now (3, Insightful)

causality (777677) | more than 4 years ago | (#27808257)

but I'm not afraid of the flu. I think we should name it what Fox News suggested. The Black Plague 2.

Yeah I love the way the major news networks hype this up. "This is what we want you to be afraid of today!" Anyone remember hoof-and-mouth disease? Mad cow? How about SARS? Bird flu? There's probably a few I'm forgetting. All terrible horrible epidemic plagues that were going to kill us all, or so you'd think from listening to the news. You want a population that's easy to control, you first have to make them afraid of something. Of course you could also choose to think that all of these things are accidents or coincidences...

Re:We need a new name, now (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27808341)

I'm afraid of large news organizations. Where to do I turn so I can indulge in my fears?

Re:We need a new name, now (0)

plover (150551) | more than 4 years ago | (#27810399)

I'm afraid of large news organizations. Where to do I turn so I can indulge in my fears?

Faux News, of course, aka the Fox Noise Channel. You'll get no better source of fear anywhere.

Re:We need a new name, now (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27811407)

The fine line is the point at which freedoms are given up in order to appease collective fears. But one can take a lot of actions that might be construed as either fearful or proactive, depending on who you talk to. Upon hearing of a potentially deadly virus (that may or may not spread quickly), is it best to:

1. sit idle and do absolutely nothing out of the ordinary

2. take some basic precaution, such as increasing intake of Vitamin D (which incidentally is extremely low in modern urban society, due to lack of sunlight exposure), making sure to wash your hands before eating or touching yourself, and perhaps stocking up on a bit more non-perishable food than usual

3. wear masks everywhere you go (if you even dare leave the house), tune in to the news channel every hour, and hope/demand/pray that the fed or state governements do something about the situation

Re:We need a new name, now (0)

Chabil Ha' (875116) | more than 4 years ago | (#27808687)

Reminds me of the closing line of Animal Farm, by Orwell:

The creatures outside looked from pig to man, and from man to pig, and from pig to man again; but already it was impossible to say which was which.

Re:We need a new name, now (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27808691)

How about human-swine flu?

Surprised? (1, Insightful)

RoFLKOPTr (1294290) | more than 4 years ago | (#27807919)

If H1N1 is able to infect humans... and it's able to infect swine... and it's transferable from swine to humans... why wouldn't it be transferable from human to swine? How is this news?

Re:Surprised? (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27808155)

It's news because it hasn't been seen in swine until now!

Re:Surprised? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27811169)

...it hasn't been seen in swine until now!

And neither was the farmer, until someone filmed him performing Animal Husbandry!

Re:Surprised? (5, Interesting)

princessproton (1362559) | more than 4 years ago | (#27808277)

My understanding was that there was some amount of genetic reassortment that allowed the swine flu to be infectious to humans, and to transmit human to human. This altered virus is then somewhat different than the swine flu that typically infects swine, so I think that (in addition to not previously being documented) it is seen as interesting that the virus would jump back to the swine population after mutation. Of course, I may be completely wrong about this, and I encourage anyone better versed in virology to correct me.

Re:Surprised? (5, Informative)

PCM2 (4486) | more than 4 years ago | (#27808445)

Current reports indicate that this strain of H1N1 influenza contains genetic material from swine, avian, and human forms of the disease. That's probably why it can spread easily from humans to pigs; normally, a virus does not cross species unless there is frequent or prolonged close contact between the two, because making the leap depends on genetic mutation. In this case, the virus is already adapted to both hosts.

To further clarify, the name "H1N1" refers only to a particular configuration of two proteins on the surface of the virus (H is hemagglutinin and N is neuraminidase). The configuration of these proteins determines how the immune system will react to a given strain of influenza (i.e. which antibodies will be able to recognize and attack it), which is the most useful information to have when it comes to treating the disease, but there are other factors that determine a given strain's properties.

So the news here is not that H1N1 flu can jump from humans to pigs -- it can't, not necessarily -- the news is that this variety appears to be able to. And it's not that we didn't know this could be possible -- we've seen this kind of thing countless times, and in fact it's believed that all forms of influenza ultimately come from birds -- it's just that calling it "H1N1 flu" doesn't give us enough information to make those kinds of predictions about its virulence.

Re:Surprised? (3, Insightful)

nospam007 (722110) | more than 4 years ago | (#27808321)

How is any of this news?

The normal, unswinely Influenza killed 190,000 people this year, just as every year and nobody gives a shit.

The Swine one killed 1.

Serious answer to your question (4, Insightful)

PCM2 (4486) | more than 4 years ago | (#27808615)

The H1N1 strain of type A influenza is the strain associated with the global influenza pandemic of 1918. In that year, not 190,000 but tens of millions of people died.

Normally, the people who die from influenza are the very young or the very old. The shocking characteristic of the 1918 variety was that a great many of the people who succumbed to the disease were young and fit. They went from being healthy and happy to being dead in an alarmingly short period. Immunology had not advanced far enough at that time to for doctors to understand why this was happening, but today it is believed to have been the result of a phenomenon known as cytokine storm, which is a severe autoimmune reaction. In other words, the patients died because they were so fit and had healthy -- their immune systems, reacting to the sudden threat, went nuts and attacked their own bodies.

Modern medicine could reduce the body count of such a flu dramatically, but if such a strain appeared again it would still be catastrophic. Treating viruses is still very difficult. There is still no cure for the common cold -- and, under normal circumstances, most people who get the flu just sit it out. Providing medicine for every patient in a true pandemic would be very costly and it's likely that there simply wouldn't be enough for everybody. It is also difficult to treat an autoimmune reaction in a patient that is already known to be suffering from a serious infection -- suppress the immune system and the virus wins. So don't assume that it would be easy to keep a new pandemic under control just because it's almost a century later.

So the reason for all the hubbub is clear. Scientists want to be the Paul Reveres of a future pandemic: The British are coming, they're not already here. So to arms now -- not when they're in our homes. Governments can be very slow-moving when confronted with unforeseen things and they often need this kind of uproar from the medical community before prevention protocols can kick in.

Re:Serious answer to your question (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27809185)

The H1N1 strain of type A influenza is the strain associated with the global influenza pandemic of 1918.

No, this strain of Influenza A is not associated with the 1918 pandemic.

As others have pointed out, the H and N designations refer to the specific variants of two specific proteins that are exposed on the virus's surface. As such, they determine how the body's immune system will react to the whole virus itself.

The proteins and genes which determine how virulent and how deadly the strain of virus is are the ones inside the virus. The strain of virus in the news these days does not contain the gene believed to have made the 1918 so deadly.

Re:Serious answer to your question (1)

PCM2 (4486) | more than 4 years ago | (#27810491)

As others have pointed out, the H and N designations refer to the specific variants of two specific proteins that are exposed on the virus's surface.

Actually, it was I who pointed that out.

The strain of virus in the news these days does not contain the gene believed to have made the 1918 so deadly.

I hadn't read that scientists knew which gene(s) were responsible. As far my understanding, any knowledge we have about that strain is very limited, since virtually all known patients are dead. It is true, however, that the 1918 strain was also a variant of H1N1.

Re:Serious answer to your question (2, Interesting)

dgatwood (11270) | more than 4 years ago | (#27811907)

There have been a couple of breaks in that area. IIRC, there were some preserved tissue samples, and about two years ago, they dug up someone who was buried in permafrost who died from it, so they have a pretty good idea what the 1918 flu looked like at this point. They also tested it on macaque monkeys and got a cytokine storm. (Source: BBC [bbc.co.uk]) Also, a few months ago, they took some antibodies from still-living survivors and injected the antibodies into mice. Scientists were surprised to find that the antibodies were still effective even after nearly a century. (Source: bio-medicine.org [bio-medicine.org]) The scientist described them as some of the most potent antibodies ever isolated.

So yeah, they have a pretty good idea what the 1918 flu was, and the CDC says that this strain doesn't have the genes that made the 1918 strain particularly potent, at least for now. There's always a risk that it could acquire that gene from people or animals infected with H5N1, as that's presumably still running around somewhere, but I'd imagine the odds of that are about the same as the odds of the seasonal flu doing so. In short, this is probably a Shakespearean pandemic---full of sound and fury, signifying nothing. That said, I sure would like to know why there were so many fatalities in Mexico (and among young, presumably healthy adults at that). That's more than just a little disconcerting.

Re:Surprised? (1)

John Hasler (414242) | more than 4 years ago | (#27808925)

> If H1N1 is able to infect humans... and it's able to infect swine... and it's
> transferable from swine to humans... why wouldn't it be transferable from human to
> swine? How is this news?

a) It was not known for sure before this that it could infect swine (and be transferred among them).

b) It has never been known to be transmitted from swine to humans.

Send him to washington DC (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27807971)

And have him infect all the swine misleading our country. I'm tired of hearing about swine flu (the swine running this country are sick but not of the flu) or 11 Trillion dollars being given to other swine.

What was he doing with those pigs? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27807981)

Must be cold and lonely in Alberta this time of year....

is this how it started? (1)

wjh31 (1372867) | more than 4 years ago | (#27807989)

is there any chance that this is how it started, a sick mexican passed it on to his/her pigs, then we assumed it was some horrible new thing that had managed the pig-human jump? I am quite possibly talking out my arse since i am not a viroligist or whatever the appropriate field would be

Re:is this how it started? (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27808029)

Influenza viruses go back and forth between humans, pigs, and birds, and they also mutate regularly. So, this didn't really "start" anywhere, it's a normal part of how the influenza virus lives.

Re:is this how it started? (1)

RDW (41497) | more than 4 years ago | (#27808683)

The reason it's thought to be swine influenza is that when its genome was examined and compared with other flu genomes:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/genomes/FLU/SwineFlu.html [nih.gov]

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/genomes/FLU/Database/select.cgi [nih.gov]

the various segments were most closely related to sequences previously (and recently) detected in pig viruses, though the particular strain had not been found before in any animal:

http://www.cidrap.umn.edu/cidrap/content/influenza/swineflu/biofacts/swinefluoverview.html [umn.edu]

It's actually quite possible, however, that pigs originally picked up a distant ancestor of the current strain from humans. Pig flu was first described in 1918, coinciding with the last human H1N1 pandemic, and when the virus was isolated from pigs in the 1930s, it was also found to have the H1N1 serotype.

Well... you know what they say... (5, Funny)

thomasdz (178114) | more than 4 years ago | (#27808017)

They always said there was no way that this could happen. They said that pigs would fly before this happened.
Well... Swine Flew

Thanks...I'll be here all week

Flamebait really mods? Flamebait? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27808143)

Who what where when why would someone mod the parent comment as flamebait? It's funny. It's a pun.

Re:Flamebait really mods? Flamebait? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27808419)

Thank god for meta-moderation.

Re:Well... you know what they say... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27809479)

Would an ultra high IQ alien being laugh at this?
I did, but do they really laugh in first place?
I hope so (just in case we'll ever get there:)

No Quack (1)

AlpineR (32307) | more than 4 years ago | (#27811931)

Well... Swine Flew

No, the pig go. The dove fly:

The pig go. Go is to the fountain. The pig put foot. Grunt. Foot in what? ketchup. The dove fly. Fly is in sky. The dove drop something. The something on the pig. The pig disgusting. The pig rattle. Rattle with dove. The dove angry. The pig leave. The dove produce. Produce is chicken wing. With wing bark. No Quack.

I believe the above passage is a prediction of this epidemic by the nascent brain [thedailywtf.com] of Skynet.

Name (5, Funny)

AlastairLynn (1366585) | more than 4 years ago | (#27808051)

I *still* think that Bacon Fever is a superior name. Just sayin'.

Parmageddon or Aporkalypse (5, Funny)

rja4 (1478371) | more than 4 years ago | (#27808159)

The best I've heard so far is Parmageddon. Aporkalypse isn't too bad either.

Re:Parmageddon or Aporkalypse (3, Funny)

Kandenshi (832555) | more than 4 years ago | (#27808425)

My vote goes to hamthrax.

Just wait until you get that pink powder through the mail...

Re:Parmageddon or Aporkalypse (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27809259)

It's a real hamdemic, a snoutbreak of epig proporktions..

Re:Parmageddon or Aporkalypse (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27809487)

Hamageddon

Take THAT! (4, Funny)

oldhack (1037484) | more than 4 years ago | (#27808057)

You oinky vermins! You oinky, wonderous animal, you, delicious... ZOMG, what have we done?!

Oblig. Simpsons... (1)

G-Man (79561) | more than 4 years ago | (#27811223)

Upon finding out Lisa is going vegetarian-

Homer: Wait a minute, wait a minute, wait a minute. Lisa honey, are you saying you're *never* going to eat any animal again? What about bacon?
Lisa: No.
Homer: Ham?
Lisa: No.
Homer: Pork chops?
Lisa: Dad! Those all come from the same animal!
Homer: Yeah, right Lisa. A wonderful, *magical* animal!

You hear that, George Orwell? (1)

wooden pickle (1006975) | more than 4 years ago | (#27808097)

Time for a sequel to Animal Farm. At some point in the story, the paranoid pigs will order a culling of all humans.

i hope they don't cull us (5, Funny)

LiquidCoooled (634315) | more than 4 years ago | (#27808115)

i hope they don't cull us to save the pig population.

Re:i hope they don't cull us (1)

Anonymous Monkey (795756) | more than 4 years ago | (#27808327)

Look at it this way. If you survive the cull bacon prices will be waaayyyyy down. And ham will be cheep enough for every meal.

Re:i hope they don't cull us (1)

tftp (111690) | more than 4 years ago | (#27811115)

If you survive the cull bacon prices will be waaayyyyy down

Yes, as long as bacon comes from a long pig ...

This is what you want to see. (1)

westlake (615356) | more than 4 years ago | (#27808203)

I don't know why anyone would find this at all surprising.

The pigs are in confinement. The farmer has daily contact. It's an airborne disease.

I'd be far more worried if the swine hadn't been infected.

That implies a mutation. That the disease has taken root in the human population.

Re:This is what you want to see. (1)

John Hasler (414242) | more than 4 years ago | (#27808981)

> I'd be far more worried if the swine hadn't been infected.

While it is not too surprising that it can infect swine, it also would not have been too surprising if it couldn't. It's a human inluenza.

> That implies a mutation.

Flu mutates all the time.

> That the disease has taken root in the human population.

Flu took root in the human population a long, long, long time ago.

in soviet russia... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27808243)

I wish it happend in russia, that would have matched :(

propagation of influenza (2, Informative)

viralMeme (1461143) | more than 4 years ago | (#27808375)

It appears to be different strains of flu virus crossing species and undergoing genetic reassortment [birdflubook.com]. Where their is no direct infection route between species 'an intermediate host may be needed for genetic reassortment of human and avian viruses. Pigs are considered a logical candidate for this role because they can be infected by either avian or human viruses'.

As to how it jumps species in the first place, one way is to drink raw avian blood as in Tit Canh [ehow.com]. Then infect some tourist who gets on a plane and who coughs infected droplets into air that is recycled for a number of hours.

G'dang our VP is a moron. (2, Informative)

zippthorne (748122) | more than 4 years ago | (#27810847)

As to how it jumps species in the first place, one way is to drink raw avian blood as in Tit Canh [ehow.com]. Then infect some tourist who gets on a plane and who coughs infected droplets into air that is recycled for a number of hours.

Ok, we need to put a stop to this myth like thirty years ago.

THE AIR ON PLANES ISN'T RECYCLED.

Bottled oxygen and CO2 scrubbers are heavy and expensive, and completely unnecessary.* The plane is surrounded by a breathing medium that is perfectly adequate in every way except temperature and density. A problem which is solved by the same step: Compressed air is diverted from the engines before the fuel is mixed in. The compression is mostly adiabatic, so that raises the temperature, too.

*A small amount of bottled oxygen is carried. But nowhere near enough for a whole trip. Just enough to descend to a breathable altitude and maybe land.

The air cycles out pretty quickly, too. Since there are a lot of fat people on board, you need to handle more than one cubic foot per person per minute.

And it leaks out through all the seams, not just the control valves. There's a good chance most of the air you exhale exits the plane mere inches from your face.

And the air from the overhead blower is directly off the engine tap. It's 100% fresh outside air. If you're worried about mixing, just turn that sucker on and point it at your nose. (but wear a wet rag over your nose so you don't dry out.)

Re:propagation of influenza (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27811397)

[quote]... raw avian blood as in Tit Canh [ehow.com]. Then infect ...[/quote]

Finally... after some time, someone refered to breasts (tits) on slashdot

pity (2, Interesting)

boxlight (928484) | more than 4 years ago | (#27808415)

why do i feel more sorry for the pigs who catch it than the people?

Re:pity (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27808537)

Because pigs tastes better.

Re:pity (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27811649)

Possibly because they are doomed creatures that were bred in unnatural environments and destined to be painfully killed before their natural lifespan?

not surprising (1)

ifeelswine (1546221) | more than 4 years ago | (#27808507)

Pigs are unusual as they can be infected with influenza strains that usually infect three different species: pigs, birds and humans. pigs are like influenza adapters.

fakin farmer (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27808603)

I bet he was careless enough not wear mask when visited his swines. Ignorant pig.

Fortunately,... (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27808663)

The pigs are fully covered under Canada's national health care, and are receiving medical attention at a Calgary hospital. Attorneys for the patients would not comment on their plans for a possible lawsuit against the farmer. Provincial authorities also remained tight-lipped over reports of bringing possible charges of bio-terrorism. "When you have an attack that leaves over 200 victims in it's wake, most of them unable to speak for themselves, then we've got a responsibility to act", said one official who wished to remain anonymous.

Stay tuned to CBC News for further updates on this developing situation.

That's it (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27808875)

Absolute last time I bang a pig.

What's in a name? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27809041)

As a vocal minority, i'm offended by the name H1N1 because it looks like it's pronounced hynie (the word for a little girl's private parts).

Just thought i'd jump on the bandwagon :)

Re:What's in a name? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27810687)

hynie (the word for a little girl's private parts).

You perverted, idiotic pædophile. If that's too harsh, substitute the word 'uninformed.'

[NSFW]
That isn't what the word [wikipedia.org] means [wikipedia.org]. Hindquarter [wiktionary.org] is a very relevant term.
[/NSFW]

Please, get psychiatric help before another young girl turns up missing.

Baconnaise (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27810809)

I still have to go with my theory that the increase of publicity that John Stewart gives Baconnaise has a direct correlation with the increase of the Swine Flu.

10% more attractive, (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27811275)

but the other 90% just weren't purty enough...

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