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292 comments

backlashed? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27836863)

does that mean if I copy and be right but I get backlashed?

In before first. (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27836895)

In before in before first.

lies lies (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27836913)

The USA bully another country? Never..

What will they do if we dont adopt the evil DMCA? Steal our lunch money? With the 10Trillion+ deficit over there you'll need it.

Re:lies lies (4, Insightful)

commodore64_love (1445365) | more than 4 years ago | (#27836943)

>>>The USA bully another country? Never..

New face in the highest office.

Same old shit.

Re:lies lies (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27837005)

You'll get better mods if you also use a cultural reference.
eg: The Who's: Won't Get Fooled Again.
    "Meet the new boss.... same as the old boss."

Re:lies lies (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27837491)

Horton, is that you?

----
Timbits, eh?

The Who sang it best. (3, Funny)

Capt.DrumkenBum (1173011) | more than 4 years ago | (#27837307)

Meet the new boss......... Same as the old boss.

Re:The Who sang it best. (4, Funny)

Dahamma (304068) | more than 4 years ago | (#27838005)

You are stealing the Who's lyrics! You must be from Canada...

Re:The Who sang it best. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27838397)

American woman, stay away from me
American woman, mama let me be
Don't come hangin' around my door
I don't wanna hear your tunes no more
I got more important things to do
Than spend my time in court with you

There. I stole the Guess Who's lyrics. They're Canadian and so am I. So American authorities can't sue me. Only Canadian authorities (nyahh! nyahh!!) ... er ... oops ...

Re:lies lies (4, Insightful)

thetoadwarrior (1268702) | more than 4 years ago | (#27837355)

Obama is proving that there is equality by making sure people realise that politicians of all colours pull the same old shit.

Re:lies lies (3, Insightful)

_KiTA_ (241027) | more than 4 years ago | (#27837477)

>>>The USA bully another country? Never..

New face in the highest office.

Same old shit.

Yes, because he has an innate knowledge of every single thing the government is doing at any given time... ... and there's no possible way this was in the pipe from the chucklehead that just left and just now finally hit the light of day...

Re:lies lies (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27837969)

Even if Obama didn't know about this, Biden did. Joe Biden has been pushing MPAA/RIAA agendas for years now.

Re:lies lies (4, Informative)

PitaBred (632671) | more than 4 years ago | (#27838021)

He's the one who has appointed all the RIAA goons [wired.com] to high office. Even if he may not know exactly what is going on, he would have to be a fucking moron to not have a clue as to what might happen when he did that.

Re:lies lies (5, Informative)

commodore64_love (1445365) | more than 4 years ago | (#27838041)

>>>Yes, because he has an innate knowledge of every single thing the government is doing

Nope he doesn't, but he knew that he appointed 3 of RIAA's top lawyers to the executive branch. And now we're seeing the consequences of that, and yes Obama is responsible.

Re:lies lies (5, Informative)

commodore64_love (1445365) | more than 4 years ago | (#27838583)

Ooops. He's appointing them faster than I can keep up. Apparently there are now 5 RIAA lackeys....er, lawyers on Obama's executive branch. Plus a new copyright czar! Yay.

The content industry, including the Recording Industry Association of America and the Motion Picture Association of America, are applauding President Barack Obama's appointments of at least five RIAA lawyers to the Justice Department. They urged him to continue the trend.

"The hallmarks of your administration's appointees have been competence, substantive expertise, and a commitment to your administration's agenda," the Copyright Alliance, a group of three-plus dozen content owners, wrote the president Monday (.pdf). "We have every confidence these hallmarks will be demonstrated in your future IP policy appointments."

The communication was also in response to a letter the copyleft, represented by about two dozen public interest groups, sent Obama three weeks ago. That missive urged the president to stop tapping RIAA insiders to his administration. That letter by the Electronic Frontier Foundation, Public Knowledge and others fell on deaf ears.

I think we all must be duped. When Obama said he was bringing change, he actually meant collecting spare change to help pay-off his burgeoning deficit, not that he was going to listen to the People.

Aye, it's nothing to do with the previous one (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27837521)

Who would have had this report written up over months or even years, would it.

Re:lies lies (4, Interesting)

vertinox (846076) | more than 4 years ago | (#27837285)

The US Dollar is backed by the world's largest prison system, the IRS, and nuclear weapons.

Think about it before laughing.

Re:lies lies (1)

VeNoM0619 (1058216) | more than 4 years ago | (#27837763)

I have tried searching for deficits by country but to no avail. Does anyone know of a site that lists each country and their deficit? Thanks :)

Re:lies lies (4, Informative)

gbjbaanb (229885) | more than 4 years ago | (#27838035)

You want the IMF website [imf.org].

Or take a look at these [cnbc.com] 2 articles. We're all stuffed. - and the 2nd [creditloan.com] uses 2007 figures!

Imagine what happens if #1 in the 1st link defaults on its debts.

Re:lies lies (4, Interesting)

Sj0 (472011) | more than 4 years ago | (#27838317)

Suddenly, Canada's 50% of gdp looks positively cheery.

At rates we were going before the child-like and ignorant Conservatives decided to follow the Americans into the pit of despair and debt, it was going to take only 50 years to pay off the debt at current rates(before accounting for inflation).

Re:lies lies (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27838045)

You have an IRS? WTF do they collect taxes for, I thought you guys didn't even have free healthcare yet?

Re:lies lies (4, Funny)

dwiget001 (1073738) | more than 4 years ago | (#27838545)

No, the IRS doesn't really collect taxes.

They are a mechanism to put the fear of gawd into people "voluntarily" paying their taxes.

If people do not pay their taxes, they get at least two, but maybe up to four involuntary things:

A) Fine(s) (not voluntary)
B) Interest (not voluntary)
C) If adjudicated, jail (also, not voluntary) and possibly
D) Be appointed as U.S. Secretary of the Treasury (since only one person can serve this post at a time, good luck on getting this option).

Re:lies lies (1)

mmaniaci (1200061) | more than 4 years ago | (#27838603)

The US Dollar is backed by the world's largest prison system, the IRS, and nuclear weapons.

HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHhahahahahahaaaaaa.... HAAAAAaahhahahahahhaa.

[wipes eyes] Ha. Well, I thought long and hard and its all still a joke to me. God we (the US) are so far behind...

Re:lies lies (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27837349)

Speaking of deficit... Didn't your country owe our country billions of dollars in debt that we "forgave?"

Steal your lunch money? Nah. Sanction your ass with military quarantines? Sounds good to me. What are you gonna do? Fight us? Bahahahahhahahahaha!

Nothing new (4, Insightful)

gcnaddict (841664) | more than 4 years ago | (#27836917)

Nothing to see here, folks. Move right along.

Seriously, there's nothing here. Countries will always try to vilify other countries in order to satisfy their own interests. The Axis of Evil is a pretty good example.

Re:Nothing new (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27837079)

The Axis of Evil is a pretty good example.

Don't you mean Access of Evil?

SURPRISE!! (4, Insightful)

infalliable (1239578) | more than 4 years ago | (#27836927)

I do not think there is anything surprising about that conclusion that the entire thing is an attempt to force other countries into "compliance"

Re:SURPRISE!! (5, Interesting)

commodore64_love (1445365) | more than 4 years ago | (#27837073)

Just once I'd like to see the European Union Parliament issue a joint resolution to the White House:

"Fuck off."

Just to see what would happen.

Re:SURPRISE!! (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27837753)

Air superiority. That's what would happen.

The concept was developed in WW1 and perfected in WW2/korea/vietnam. If you've never heard of it, open up the history books to the pages where Europe, Russia, and Japan fail miserably.

What's funny to me though, is that I actually WISH Europe would tell the US to fuck off. We fucking hate Europeans and their socialism and communism with a passion that they seem to have forgotten about. I would LOVE the opportunity for our military to teach you about air superiority first hand!

Re:SURPRISE!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27837893)

Go waterboard yourself, you warmonger!

Re:SURPRISE!! (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27837943)

Yes, I hear that air superiority went quite well for you at Pearl Harbour in World War II and in Vietnam where you were sent running with your tail between your legs after suffering thousands of casualties. Very successful in Korea too I notice, I mean, North Korea is a nice friendly nation now thanks to America's success their right? What about Somalia too in the 90s, that went really well right? Or wait, you were sent running their too.

How's that air superiority going in Afghanistan and Iraq by the way where your soldiers get slaughtered by men in cloth dresses with rifles that are about 35 years old and about as accurate as a blind man with a water pistol? I hear your air superiority worked great over New York on 9/11 also!

It's funny, because when it comes to wars, the US hasn't really actually won that many in the last century. About all it's won was the Pacific campaign of World War II but even that was only because the Russians covered it's arse in defeating Germany and because it had vast amounts of allied support to the West of Japan in China and from the South from Australia etc.

In fact, what wars has the US won by itself in the last century? I'm not sure it's actually won any, even in the first Iraq war it needed massive amounts of allied support. That's a stark contrast to European nations like say, Britain that unilaterally sent the Argentinians running back home in the Falklands for example.

The US has far and away the biggest military in the world, but it can't win wars because it doesn't have a single general capable of anything loosely resembling tactics and because it's soldiers can't fight for shit. That's before you even get started on their poor engineering abilities in the field and their inability to win the required hearts and minds of the civilian population which has time and time again left them running from the battlefield with many dead and their tails between their legs.

The problem is, the only thing Americans ever manage to actually shoot are each other or their allies.

Re:SURPRISE!! (1)

pwfffff (1517213) | more than 4 years ago | (#27838223)

10/10, most inciteful thing I've ever read; had me raging.

Someone send this to Limbaugh or the like, their head might just explode.

Re:SURPRISE!! (2, Interesting)

PitaBred (632671) | more than 4 years ago | (#27838087)

We fucking hate Europeans and their socialism and communism with a passion that they seem to have forgotten about

You seem to live in a very different America than I do. Everyone I can see here in the US wants jack and shit to do with the personal responsibility that comes with not being socialist. All the current lawsuits because the slide wasn't labeled as "slippery" and other such bullshit, people wanting to be on unemployment rather than actually working, welfare providing a wonderful work-free existence... we already ARE socialists. You must have blinked.

Re:SURPRISE!! (1)

should_be_linear (779431) | more than 4 years ago | (#27837951)

Or perhaps: "stop producing fake imitation of Budweiser beer before putting anyone else on the blacklist".

Re:SURPRISE!! (1)

Sique (173459) | more than 4 years ago | (#27838261)

The main problem with that: Anheuser-Busch started 30 years earlier than Budvar. So Anheuser-Busch has the original, and Budvar is the impostor.

Re:SURPRISE!! (1)

chimpo13 (471212) | more than 4 years ago | (#27838589)

You're a bit backwards. From the wiki page:

The original Budweiser Bier or Budweiser BürgerbrÃu, had been founded in 1785 in Budweis, Bohemia, Holy Roman Empire and had started exports to the US in 1871 resp. 1875. In the U.S., Anheuser-Busch started using the Budweiser brand in 1876 and registered it two years later.

In Budweis, a new company (now named Budvar) was established in 1895 by mainly Czech brewers, which also started exporting beer with the adjective Budweiser ("BudÄjovický" in Czech). This led to the Budweiser trademark dispute. Negotiations between the three companies, the two from the original town and the American Anheuser-Busch, about using "Budweiser" reached an agreement in 1911 that allowed Anheuser-Busch to use the brand "Budweiser" only in North America.

Re:SURPRISE!! (1)

digitig (1056110) | more than 4 years ago | (#27838033)

Politicians would never be so direct -- the best you can hope for is "We refer you to the reply given in the case of Arkell v. Pressdram".

Re:SURPRISE!! (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27838297)

And while we're at it, I'd like Canada to issue the same statement to the EU for their attempt to deprive our indigenous people of their traditional seal hunt and what little economy they have.

Seriously, EU, fuck you.

Re:SURPRISE!! (2, Insightful)

davester666 (731373) | more than 4 years ago | (#27837303)

This is just a leapfrogging game the multinational copyright holders are playing. They get one country to increase copyright law from X to Y, then scream that other countries are lagging behind, so those countries look at revising their copyright laws, initially just to Y, but since they're look at it, the multinational copyright holders push for increasing the law to Z. Now they behind screaming that the first country is 'behind' in protecting their 'rights'. Repeat until they have all the money.

Hm, wonder why (5, Insightful)

Darkness404 (1287218) | more than 4 years ago | (#27836939)

Hm, I wonder why other countries don't want a DMCA style law, could it be that the DMCA is effectively killing the US software/hardware market? Why do we see so many (innovative and clone) products from China? Because they don't have the stupidities of US patent and copyright laws. Imagine the marketplace being flooded with choices, of phones that can do as much as the iPhone, yet cost hundreds less (unlocked of course) and including features not currently found in most phones (open hardware*, dual-sim slots, etc). The USA could easily be first in the technology market, if our lawmakers weren't in the pocketbooks of the RIAA, MPAA and other backwards lobby groups.

*Well, perhaps open hardware is the wrong word, but basically hardware that if off-the-shelf, contains very little proprietary components and can be easily studied/modified.

Re:Hm, wonder why (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27837175)

Because it's all about taking POS and marketing it as not POS and taking the consumer for all they got.

Re:Hm, wonder why (1)

thetoadwarrior (1268702) | more than 4 years ago | (#27837403)

There is a fine balance imo. China is like Geocities. There is a lot of shit coming out China for every geniune innovation.

While we do need the freedom to improve upon things we also need protection from companies making shoddy knock-offs

Re:Hm, wonder why (4, Interesting)

Darkness404 (1287218) | more than 4 years ago | (#27837587)

There is a fine balance imo. China is like Geocities. There is a lot of shit coming out China for every geniune innovation.

The same could be said for any market, thats why we have reviews, if every game was as good as *insert favorite game here, as to not start a flamewar* then there wouldn't be a need for game reviews. Same thing for books, etc.

The nice thing about China though is, everything is cheap and unhampered by corporations. For example, if they manage to get Bluetooth in there, they aren't going to disable tethering, etc. like what the phone monopolies in the USA make vendors do. You similarly are going to get cheap, unlocked phones. Most people's phones (especially 20-somes and teenagers) don't have a long life. For example, a phone accidentally dropped in a cup of coffee is probably going to be dead no matter if it was a top of the line phone from Nokia or Samsung or if it was a generic Chinese crap phone. So quality really doesn't matter, and the cloned phones have enough features that people need in a dumbphone (SMS, calls, sometimes a touchscreen or full keyboard, camera, etc) while not costing $300 unlocked.

While we do need the freedom to improve upon things we also need protection from companies making shoddy knock-offs

Sure, but that already happens in America, if we simply enforce trademark and weak copyright you don't get deceived that the cheap phone you bought was an iPhone, but there will be cheap iPhone-like phones available. Everyone wins. (And if you don't think that the iPhone is already cloned, it already is by most cell phone vendors here in the USA, the difference is you pay $400 for the rip off rather then $100)

Was it Pauli Dirac? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27837597)

Who said "the best way to have lots of good ideas is to have lots of ideas"?

If China have 10x the output of ideas but only 3x the number of crap ones, you can say "they have more crap ideas". But then again, they have many more good ideas.

Heck, if the US have only one idea and that one is a good one, it's 100% hit rate.

If china have 0.1% hit rate but 10,000 ideas (because they don't have to worry about someone having patented something that can be argued as being infringed by it) that is still 10x the number of ideas the US has.

Re:Hm, wonder why (1)

Dahamma (304068) | more than 4 years ago | (#27837923)

There is a fine balance imo. China is like Geocities.

Does this mean Yahoo is going to shut down China now??

Re:Hm, wonder why (1)

gringofrijolero (1489395) | more than 4 years ago | (#27837507)

There are many ways to describe "protecting your interests". Backwards isn't one of them. To these interests, the USA does not exist, except as a location to register their corporation, and proof of residence when collecting their welfare check..er, I mean subsidy, no wait, I mean bailout cash, stimulus freebie? They are like Liberian ships. So it is of no concern to them if it is "number one" in anything, except for low to no taxes, or the best strip joints.

Re:Hm, wonder why (5, Interesting)

Plekto (1018050) | more than 4 years ago | (#27837635)

Why do we see so many (innovative and clone) products from China? Because they don't have the stupidities of US patent and copyright laws.

It's interesting to note that we did the exact same thing in the 1800s with any and all technology that we could manage to get our hands on during our industrial revolution phase.

Re:Hm, wonder why (1, Interesting)

BlueKitties (1541613) | more than 4 years ago | (#27837637)

We have copywrite for a reason. Companies are able to make cheap-knockoffs because they don't have to spend millions creating something from scratch. If I disassemble Excel, make a few changes, and then resell it, I'm going to make a lot of cash off of Microsoft's development work. Copywrite goes too far when it begins to force itself onto the ~consumer~ or tries to steal concepts and ideas. I agree copywriting concepts like multi-touch is silly, but we do need to keep people from stealing ideas. China is a very, very bad example. They're an example of why we have copywrite.

Re:Hm, wonder why (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27838195)

1) It's "copyright", not "copywrite".

2) Multi-touch patented by Apple, not copyrighted.

Re:Hm, wonder why (4, Interesting)

lorenlal (164133) | more than 4 years ago | (#27837729)

China has a system of blatantly stealing known technology too (see the Redberry, and Chery motors). They have no rules regarding foreign products, and in fact are encouraged to rip off what happens overseas by the govt. So I don't think that using China as an example of "innovation" is appropriate.

Simple rules to allow artists and creators to make a living off of being artists aren't bad things. I'm perfectly fine with a musician being ticked that someone's jacking their music, writings, or whatever.

In fact, if the RIAA and MPAA actually operated within those confines, I'm sure we'd have nowhere near the issue that we have now. The problem I have with the copyright lobby is that they've become a lobby. They don't value add, and they employ methods of enforcement that should be illegal. If they understood that their business model needs changing, and were willing to work *with* the markets instead of *against* the people, I'd see them as quite good and helpful.

Sadly, their impression of embracing technology involves wiretapping, and not using the wire to sell and distribute.

Now, onto your iPhone example - I think that you should concentrate elsewhere. In Japan, the iPhone is nothing special. They have excellent cutting edge phones, but from what I've gathered they do tend to be a little less reliable software wise. The features they have make the iPhone rather pedestrian (http://www.wired.com/gadgetlab/2009/02/why-the-iphone/). In the case of the US, we do have a massive phone market, with a lot of competition, and decent product lines. It's not amazing by any stretch, but we have very solid phones, and they're engineered for reliability since that seems to be more important to the market here. Make no mistake, there's a lot of choice in the US.

Re:Hm, wonder why (5, Informative)

Sique (173459) | more than 4 years ago | (#27838373)

China has a system of blatantly stealing known technology too (see the Redberry, and Chery motors). They have no rules regarding foreign products, and in fact are encouraged to rip off what happens overseas by the govt. So I don't think that using China as an example of "innovation" is appropriate.

So this is different from Germany or the U.S. in the 19th century, or Japan in the 1950ies, or Taiwan in the 1980ies exactly how?
Every country that has managed to close up to the technology leaders of its time has used the same tactics.

Re:Hm, wonder why (1)

Dahamma (304068) | more than 4 years ago | (#27837907)

I'm not really arguing against your point, I'm just honestly curious... what would be some examples of truly innovative products coming out of China? (and adding dual sim slots to a counterfeit iPhone does not count as innovative... :)

Does the US Get It Yet? (5, Insightful)

Dripdry (1062282) | more than 4 years ago | (#27836951)

We seem to continue operating under the false assumption that we are still the biggest dog on the block.
After effectively skewering the financial system, starting a couple wars, and heaven knows what else we still expect to be taken so seriously.

I recognize we still have the most bombs, but when or country acts like a petulant child it's still tough to be serious about it. It isn't leading the world, it isn't change. It's thinly veiled fascism.

Re:Does the US Get It Yet? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27837083)

The US is a corporation states. We, the people, simply put, no longer fscking matter.

Re:Does the US Get It Yet? (5, Interesting)

Darkness404 (1287218) | more than 4 years ago | (#27837263)

Yes, the USA as a whole, seems to be living in a time where WWII just got over. We seem to think that in WWII we singlehandedly A) Rebuilt Europe B) Rebuilt Japan (which, does have some merit to that, but only after we managed to commit some of the most terrible crimes against humanity via the atomic bombs) C) Defeated both Nazi Germany and Imperial Japan. When history tells a different story. Then we also brag about our "win" in the Cold War against Soviet Russia *insert some joke here* and how by our superior diplomacy ended up saving humanity, no thanks to Russia, the other nations affected or the Russian people who opposed the Kremlin. Really, the USA thinks that they are the only thing holding humanity back from utter destruction and because of that the USA must be the country you model your countries after, including our draconian copyright laws, lack of free speech or other constitutional guarantees, the encroachment of government into business, the general failure of our economy, etc.

Re:Does the US Get It Yet? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27837659)

Really, the USA thinks that they are the only thing holding humanity back from utter destruction and because of that the USA must be the country you model your countries after, including our draconian copyright laws, lack of free speech or other constitutional guarantees, the encroachment of government into business, the general failure of our economy, etc.

Or even show nipples on national tv.

Re:Does the US Get It Yet? (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27837705)

the encroachment of government into business

No, you have that backwards. It's the encroachment of business into government that's the problem.

Re:Does the US Get It Yet? (5, Informative)

jcnnghm (538570) | more than 4 years ago | (#27838019)

we managed to commit some of the most terrible crimes against humanity via the atomic bombs

Which is nothing compared to the war crimes the Japanese themselves managed to commit. The Japanese engaged in mass killings of civilians, numbering between 3-10 million during the war. In addition, the Japanese conducted experiments not unlike those performed by Mendle under Unit 731, which was accused of both vivisection and cannibalism. They also used banned toxic gasses on the Chinese, tortured and executed prisoners, cannibalized allied prisoners, employed sex slaves and serial rape, and ran forced labor camps which killed hundreds of thousands of civilians.

The atomic weapons used on Japan saved millions and millions of lives, and prevented even greater Japanese atrocities. Indeed, we still have purple hearts left over today from the supply ordered before the invasion of Japan, as the estimated casualties approached 1 million Americans, and nearly all the Japanese.

Re:Does the US Get It Yet? (3, Informative)

gbjbaanb (229885) | more than 4 years ago | (#27838423)

Its easy to look back in hindsight and say how it is, but back then things were different. The fire bombing raids on Japan already killed hundreds of thousands, and General Groves opposed the nuke [nuclearfiles.org] because he felt that "the effect would not be sufficiently distinct from our regular air force [bombing] program."

Estimates of damage were approximated at 1/10 to 1/2 of the actual damage, not counting subsequent radiation damage.

I suppose if they knew the actual damage that could have been caused, they could have dropped the bomb on somewhere unpopulated after warning the Japanese that they'd use it on their cities if they didn't surrender. The Japanese already were wanting an end to the war as seen by the resignation of Prime Minister Koiso and his cabinet. If the US hadn't demanded unconditional surrender, the war may well have ended earlier and without the use of nukes at all.

Estimates of casualties due to the bombs were 200,000 people. During the fighting, that's about 2 months worth of lives lost. However, the firebombing of Tokyo cost roughly 100,000 lives, so the nuke was effectively more a psychological weapon than one used to kill (otherwise the conventional bombing raids would have had the same effect)

Re:Does the US Get It Yet? (1)

alexo (9335) | more than 4 years ago | (#27838085)

Really, the USA thinks that they are the only thing holding humanity back from utter destruction and because of that the USA must be the country you model your countries after, including our draconian copyright laws, lack of free speech or other constitutional guarantees, the encroachment of government into business, the general failure of our economy, etc.

My understanding is that the first part of your statement is internal propaganda used to distract the US citizenry from realizing the second part.

Re:Does the US Get It Yet? (1)

steelfood (895457) | more than 4 years ago | (#27838305)

That's the feel-good, moral superiority reason that politicians like to trot out every so often, and that the public falls for time and again. If anyone here ever wonders why people call Americans arrogant, parent pretty much sums it all up right there.

Realists know that it's just another form of imperialism.

Re:Does the US Get It Yet? (0, Troll)

commodore64_love (1445365) | more than 4 years ago | (#27838355)

>>>we managed to commit some of the most terrible crimes against humanity via the atomic bombs)

Riiiight because the Japanese were completely innocent. Not. They started a war against a peaceful nation killing hundreds of Hawaiian civilians, invaded mainland China, killed thousands of villagers even after they surrendered, raped children for their sexual perversions, repeated the same thing in Vietnam and the Philippines, forced the prisoners to march dozens of miles without food or water until they died, threw them into camps and left them to die, and on and on and on.

You're right. Instead of trying to win the war, we should have given the Japanese a great big hug. And then sent them American children, so they could rape them they same way the raped the Chinese children. (rolls eyes) It's a war. They started it. We finished it. It's a horrible mess, but we didn't start the fire.

THEY could have avoided being bombed in 1945
by not bombing us in 1941. Simple as that.
They brought it upon themselves, just as surely as
touching a hot stove will burn your hand.

Re:Does the US Get It Yet? (2, Funny)

Capt.DrumkenBum (1173011) | more than 4 years ago | (#27837367)

If we could just make them stand in the corner for a decade or two, until they learn to play nice with others.
It worked on my 7 year old nephew.

Re:Does the US Get It Yet? (1)

chimpo13 (471212) | more than 4 years ago | (#27837679)

You didn't let him out of his corner until he was 17 or 27? I'd think after a decade or two he'd either play nice with others or he'd be a psycho killer.

Quest que ces.

Re:Does the US Get It Yet? (1)

chimpo13 (471212) | more than 4 years ago | (#27838621)

Argh, that's what I get for hitting respond and then answering the phone before submitting.

Re:Does the US Get It Yet? (1)

mazarin5 (309432) | more than 4 years ago | (#27837701)

If we could just make them stand in the corner for a decade or two, until they learn to play nice with others.

It worked on my 7 year old nephew.

I take it he was 7 when he started?

Wait for it (2, Interesting)

Tgeigs (1497313) | more than 4 years ago | (#27837213)

I'm waiting for the first ground war based solely on copyright. And if you don't think that's going to happen someday, then you have no idea how corporate America rules the politicians...

Warez scene raids (4, Informative)

tepples (727027) | more than 4 years ago | (#27837297)

I'm waiting for the first ground war based solely on copyright.

You mean like Operation Fastlink [wikipedia.org] and other raids on the warez scene?

Re:Warez scene raids (1)

Tgeigs (1497313) | more than 4 years ago | (#27837361)

No, those were carried about by nat'l and international POLICE agencies. I'm talking about a relatively unilateral attack by the US Armed Forces. It WILL happen.

Re:Wait for it (3, Interesting)

RsG (809189) | more than 4 years ago | (#27837533)

Not going to happen. What might happen instead is the usual mix of embargoes, paper resolutions, backroom deals and "diplomacy", but outright war? You're kidding yourself.

Pretty much the only times a modern nation will go to war is when it thinks it can win. Meaning against an opponent who hasn't the economic or military wherewithal to stand up and make the invader hurt. Hell, even in Iraq, the actual hurt being done to the US forces is being done by civilian insurgents, not an actual military.

Name me one ground war since WWII that was fought between two developed nations that were anywhere near on equal footing. You can't. Even stuff like the Falklands war hardly qualifies as a "ground war", while 'Nam and Korea were the US against tiny nations that had bigger powers backing them by proxy. Do you really think that will change? Or that copyright will be the motive if it does?

All the countries that the US opposes on the copyright issue are either first world nations or military powers in their own right. The little backwaters that it could actually clobber haven't the economic or political capital to make a copyright war worthwhile for the corporations that would promote such a measure. You really think the US is prepared for a ground war with Russia? How about Sweden? China? Canada? Please.

Not happening any time soon (3, Insightful)

ShanxT (1280784) | more than 4 years ago | (#27837369)

One of the reasons these countries are developing a good IT infrastructure is due to software piracy. Any student with the slightest interest can pick up any software whatsoever, be it Tally, Photoshop or MS Excel, and learn by themselves. And businesses obviously have cost benefits in using something for free. Why would a developing economy hamper it's businesses by forcing them to use original software? It might help the bigger companies, the ones who make the software, but will affect the small and medium sized businesses negatively. And in the end, the software companies that do get the benefit are American, and not local businesses.

We know this isn't true (-1, Troll)

Trailer Trash (60756) | more than 4 years ago | (#27837381)

With the Obamessiah as President, the rest of the world loves us, and we're going to be a respected part of the world community again.

Excuse me, my starry eyes are watering again, as if there's wool over them or something....

Re:We know this isn't true (1)

oldhack (1037484) | more than 4 years ago | (#27837887)

That's no wool over your eyes, you trailer trash, it's the blinding flash of The One's halo.

Blacklist? (4, Insightful)

dwm (151474) | more than 4 years ago | (#27837423)

According to the original article [ustr.gov], this is a routine annual report listing who we are happy with or unhappy with concerning copyright and such. There's also no mention of DMCA. Evidently, countries come and go off these lists all the time. It's just a way for the USA to communicate what it does and doesn't like about other countries behavior. It's called diplomacy. How does anyone get "blacklist" out of this?

By the way, it mentions that North Korea was taken off the bad-boy list. Does anyone really think North Korea instituted a DMCA-like law?

Re:Blacklist? (1)

Delkster (820935) | more than 4 years ago | (#27838097)

There's also no mention of DMCA.

As far as I know, it's not only about copyright but about the ah-so-lovely "intellectual property" in general. Some of the elevations on the list probably have to do with copyright laws, others might have to do with patent protection or whatever.

How does anyone get "blacklist" out of this?

I've heard it being called a blacklist in media before. I'm not really sure what the possible implications of being included on a specific watch level in the report would have, but generally, the difference between a listing used as a diplomatic pressure device and a blacklist doesn't have to be great. It all depends on how much pressure it's being used to create.

Re:Blacklist? (1)

FrankDrebin (238464) | more than 4 years ago | (#27838205)

By the way, it mentions that North Korea was taken off the bad-boy list. Does anyone really think North Korea instituted a DMCA-like law?

Of course North Korea is in the good books. A totalitarian regime like North Korea is exactly what the copyright lobby wants for our internet.

Re:Blacklist? (2, Interesting)

shma (863063) | more than 4 years ago | (#27838229)

By the way, it mentions that North Korea was taken off the bad-boy list. Does anyone really think North Korea instituted a DMCA-like law?

Do you really think Korea is a worse copyright violator than Canada? As far as Canada is concerned, this is obviously a pressure tacit to get them to write their own DMCA. Hell, even their own biased numbers show that we have the LOWEST piracy rate of anyone on the list [michaelgeist.ca], and yet we've been put in a category with the worst violators, all of which have, according to THEM, more than twice our piracy rate.

Re:Blacklist? (1)

shma (863063) | more than 4 years ago | (#27838267)

Do you really think Korea is a worse copyright violator than Canada?

Edit: that should have been "Do you really think Canada is a worse copyright violator than Korea?", obviously.

Special 301s are unremarkable (1)

langelgjm (860756) | more than 4 years ago | (#27838367)

You're right. Special 301 reports are not "copyright blacklists." They deal with IP in general, and in past years have focused heavily on pharmaceutical patents (eyes on Thailand, Brazil, India, etc.). This one is a bit toned down in that respect, actually.

Anyone who is familiar with the USTR's reports will find this somewhat unremarkable - well, except with the elevation of Canada.

I speak for all of Slashdot when I say... (-1, Troll)

bonch (38532) | more than 4 years ago | (#27837509)

FUCK artists, and FUCK their rights. I deserve someone else's work for free, just because.

But don't you dare violate the GPL! When that happens, copyright suddenly matters.

Re:I speak for all of Slashdot when I say... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27837709)

You are under NO obligation to publish stuff. If you want to keep your precious work and not have anyone else have a copy, don't fucking release it, doucheweenie.

Re:I speak for all of Slashdot when I say... (0, Troll)

bonch (38532) | more than 4 years ago | (#27838185)

Sounds fantastic! Culture should stagnate and die just because leeches don't compensate the artists for their work!

Re:I speak for all of Slashdot when I say... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27838277)

You should read Atlas Shrugged. It's about how the creators and inventors of the world do as you suggest and collectively decide to stop contributing their work to the ungrateful world they live in due to the lack of compensation they receive.

By the way, "doucheweenie" is a really corny insult.

Re:I speak for all of Slashdot when I say... (5, Insightful)

Piata (927858) | more than 4 years ago | (#27837733)

Artists definitely deserve their dues when it comes to creative artwork... but when their work generates revenue for 70+ years after it's creation for a corporation and not the artist, there's something seriously wrong.

Re:I speak for all of Slashdot when I say... (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27838081)

Even if the artist was still benefiting, 70+ years is absurd. The whole reason copyright and patents were originally conceived was to encourage new works and promote innovation.

Now, thanks to companies like Disney (the absolute worst when it comes to this issue) lobbying to protect their archives, we have the exact opposite happening... copyright and patents are now stifling innovation and preventing new works and inventions.

I'm all for being rewarded for your intellectual creations, but if you wrote one song 30 years ago, is it in the best interest of society for the government to continue to protect that for you? No. The interest of society is better served if you are encouraged to create new works and let others build upon your foundation. That was the whole idea.

It's all been horribly perverted, and is only going to get worse because ultimately, the people that benefit have more money and are more highly motivated than the general public.

I'd say the ideal target should be in the neighborhood of 10-20 years (tops) and then either create something new or find a different job.

tiresome, misdirected country (1, Flamebait)

harvey the nerd (582806) | more than 4 years ago | (#27837623)

The world is obviously growing tired of a noisy, broke, bullying USSA as it vacilates choosing between a Nazi America and a Soviet America, hellbent on "decarbonizing" an already cooling planet and charging for every thought or memory.

Copyright issue is a scam (5, Informative)

NickyGotz22 (1427691) | more than 4 years ago | (#27837759)

Finally an article on Slashdot where a librarian can weigh in with professional knowledge. I don't think enough people realize the mini-war going on in the publishing industry and how those vulture are trying to bleed everyone dry. I am a college librarian at a major university in Manhattan. Today I had to attend a meeting about copyright compliance. It seems that publishers are no longer satisfied with overcharging for every textbook and then overcharging again when a "new" edition (almost identical version except for a new graph or intro) comes out the very next year. Now they would like us to purchase a new copyright compliance software that will allow them to monitor (through the middlemen in the software company) how many times we upload any part of any published material and how many times the students access each pdf or document, and then charge us for every use even thought we have already purchased the book and been using that same material for years. Its nuts. Fair use and common long standing practices by many academic libraries used to mean to us that we could put up 10% of any published document and not have to worry. And i know the diligent followers of Slashdot are not surprised but this type of thuggish shake down. But its almost criminal the nerve these jackals have to try to penny pinch and financially gouge the very universities that are their life blood in this struggling market. Very rarely does a librarian threaten to burn books, but it would be a better use of em that paying those publishing bastards another cent.

Breaking news! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27838157)

Other countries are just like regular people!

You tell somebody, anybody they're wrong, no matter how much evidence you have, no matter how right you are, they're far more likely to protest than do anything to respond to your concerns.

Yeah, that's right, the accusations of bullying? Are just the same kind of thing you'd expect whether the concerns in the report are justified or not.

Sorry, but this sort of bickering isn't going to change minds, it's just going to lead to further entrenchment.

Really? (1)

purpleraison (1042004) | more than 4 years ago | (#27838265)

So it really took this long for other countries to rise up against DCMA/ RIAA/ MPAA organizations trying to essentially rule the world via their crappy media?

Well, I think it's only appropriate to reserve judgement to see if they actually follow-through on their 'backlash'.

If so, I applaud those countries. No stupid movie, song, or video game is worth violating another countries sovereignty over. In fact, I would go as far as to say the suggestion of that is absurd.... and yet that is the model of this century thus far.

Let's see if Sweden gets its head out of its subservient ass, since it is currently in the midst of giving the American lead DCMA a virtual hand-job.

reporting akin to inside edition (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27838597)

did anyone actually read the links? i'd hardly characterize the first linked article as "backlash"...and i'd hardly call the complaints in the second link "european", unless mr. geist has abandoned the great white north in favor of the continent...

but i guess it makes for a better read when the whole thing sounds scandalous.

after reading the cited articles, it sounds more like no one is particularly surprised, nor concerned that they made the list...

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