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123 comments

First Trout on the Moon! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27882073)

I am a FISH!

We're whalers on the moon? (-1, Offtopic)

Burkin (1534829) | more than 5 years ago | (#27882169)

So there are no whales on the moon just trout?

Re:We're whalers on the moon? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27882427)

Futurama got it right: "We're whalers on the moon, We carry a harpoon. But there ain't no whales. So we tell tall tales. And sing our whaling tune."

!st (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27882085)

Rock on!

rss? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27882105)

Why the fuck is the slashdot home page sending as rss?

Easy (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27882129)

She got on her knees and used her mouth like God intended.

Re:Easy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27883075)

Why are you talking about yourself in third person pronoun form again?

salt not required (5, Informative)

Kartoffel (30238) | more than 5 years ago | (#27882149)

Haven't read TFA yet, but the general story is true. I worked at JSC and knew Shae.

The samples were in a floor safe that they rolled out of the building on a dolly. The sting was set up as if a Belgian rockhound wanted to buy some of the samples, and they agreed to meet in Florida. The 3 other interns crossed state lines for the sting. Shae stayed in TX that weekend to attend scuba classes.

Re:salt not required (5, Funny)

The Grim Reefer2 (1195989) | more than 5 years ago | (#27882273)

I'd suggest taking the whole thing with a little bit of salt.

Isn't that what interns said... Minus the salt part.

Re:salt not required... Rocks.... (3, Funny)

davidsyes (765062) | more than 5 years ago | (#27882527)

"The samples they took were from every Apollo mission, ever. Sometime between the heist and its resolution, Tiffany and Thad arranged the moon rocks on a bed--and had sex amongst them."

Talk about getting your rocks off....

Apply sarcasm filter.... (1)

rts008 (812749) | more than 5 years ago | (#27884101)

...Tiffany and Thad arranged the moon rocks on a bed--and had sex amongst them.

We can abolish this statement as heresy, in accordance with /. traditions.
The Moon Rocks were safe, as there was no 'actual' sex involved...fantasies do not count.

What??
This is /.!

Re:salt not required (4, Insightful)

DerekLyons (302214) | more than 5 years ago | (#27882327)

I was about to say the same thing - this is actually a pretty well known incident. Had the poster taken the minuscule effort required to click on any of the links in the article, he'd have found the news stories supporting the article.

Re:salt not required (3, Informative)

Burkin (1534829) | more than 5 years ago | (#27882355)

The part about taking it with a grain of salt was added by Rob after the fact. Had you taken the minuscule effort required to click on the firehose link below the article, you'd have found this out.

Re:salt not required (1)

_Sprocket_ (42527) | more than 5 years ago | (#27882867)

I was about to say the same thing - this is actually a pretty well known incident

No kidding. And the movie Kelly's Heroes [imdb.com] was true too. I mean, seriously - can't anyone do some research on WWII? It was a pretty well known incident.

Re:salt not required (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27882363)

Sensationalized BZ wouldnt even make a crap movie. After all who could they sell it to, terrorists?? what could they do with it?

It all seems very contrived, mind you did serve as a nice breather from work.

private collectors (1)

dltaylor (7510) | more than 5 years ago | (#27882573)

There are plenty of people with money who would buy moon rocks, if they could get enough provenance to brag about it, 'specially to their friends with stolen art works.

Better written LATimes article (3, Informative)

wanax (46819) | more than 5 years ago | (#27882645)

Can be found here [latimes.com] .

Re:salt not required (1)

schmurry-mooseness (1439247) | more than 5 years ago | (#27884339)

I had a tour of the moonrocks. That guy was the tour leader. I believe that they stole the moonrocks, but anything else I'd have a hard time swallowing. I think he was coked up when he gave the tour or perhaps sincerely deluded like a tele-evangelist. I heard that after stealing they immediately tried to sell the rocks on E-bay or something. The rubber suit thing is so funny, it reminded me of The Pink Panther and I can imagine that guy doing that for theatric's sake. Starting to believe there is something in the air here.

Re:salt not required (1)

BigBuckHunter (722855) | more than 5 years ago | (#27884655)

From TFA:

They also destroyed three decades worth of handwritten research notes by a NASA scientist that had been locked in the safe.

Nasa locked a research scientist in the safe for 30 years?

I can definately understand... (0, Redundant)

keeegan (1526067) | more than 5 years ago | (#27882201)

...why this is front page news. Thanks for keeping us informed!

old news (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27882209)

this is old news

I don't want to RTFA!!! (1)

erroneus (253617) | more than 5 years ago | (#27882213)

I already have this "Indiana Jones" thing playing out in my head when they say "...in a building designed to prevent it" If I read the article, I think that image would be dashed.

Re:I don't want to RTFA!!! (1)

MoonBuggy (611105) | more than 5 years ago | (#27882401)

Having just read it, I can assure you it wouldn't. Well, it might replace Indiana Jones with Mission Impossible, but it still reads more like a film script than anything else.

My immediate reaction was that it must be fake, but it does seem to be reasonably well corroborated. I guess the way the 'facts' were put forward certainly helps set the ambiance, but nonetheless it's a cool story.

Blech (4, Funny)

Red Flayer (890720) | more than 5 years ago | (#27882215)

I particularly like the bit where the interns in question laid the moonrocks down and a mattress and screwed on top of them, thereby making the contamination of the spent samples even worse. Made me wonder who was on the bottom.

Seriously, though, the thing read like a synopsis of a bad TV movie. It may or may not be true, but it's telling that the perp has a book coming out that is an 'augmented' account of the heist, that the author of the linked piece is summarizing what was told him by the perp.

IOW, don't take it with a grain of salt. Kill it with Na fire.

Re:Blech (5, Informative)

Kartoffel (30238) | more than 5 years ago | (#27882311)

Thad was a real type-A personality type. Very self confident and extroverted. I don't know much about how the other students got involved in the heist, but I'd imagine Thad was the ringleader.

Shae was probably allowed in on the plan because she could have supplied the scuba gear for breathing in the nitrogen-purged storage room. There's no reason they would have needed wetsuits, though.

Re:Blech (4, Informative)

Kartoffel (30238) | more than 5 years ago | (#27882351)

Actually come to think of it... I don't think any ROOMS in 31N are purged. If anything, only the samples themselves are stored in gastight purged containers.

The breathing gear stuff is probably completely salt-worthy. All I know is Shae was going for a scuba cert at the time, and that's why she wasn't in Florida with the other 3 when they got busted.

Re:Blech (1)

flyingsquid (813711) | more than 5 years ago | (#27882759)

All that stuff about thermal sensors, nitrogen-filled rooms, making love on a bed surrounded by moon rocks... it sounds like something straight out of a Hollywood heist movie. Probably, in the years behind bars, he's embellished the story in hopes of selling it as a book or a movie script. My guess is that he's a bad combination of highly imaginative and dishonest, and he's just trying to use those qualities as best he can now that he has few other hopes of legitimate employment.

Re:Blech (1)

LifesABeach (234436) | more than 5 years ago | (#27885797)

Just a thought; If these Moon Rocks are so valuable, why doesn't NASA go and get some more? Consider the market for these items, maybe NASA could fund groups of explorer types that want to go and get their own rocks. It's not the miner that makes the fortune, its the shop keeper that sells him the Shovel.

Re:Blech (5, Funny)

flyingsquid (813711) | more than 5 years ago | (#27882549)

particularly like the bit where the interns in question laid the moonrocks down and a mattress and screwed on top of them, thereby making the contamination of the spent samples even worse.

In a related story, NASA announced a groundbreaking discovery today, with some startling implications. The good news is, they have discovered that the Moon supports microbial life. The bad news is, it's chlamydia.

This article is hoplessly wrong pulp fiction (5, Informative)

modemboy (233342) | more than 5 years ago | (#27882221)

Not only is it somewhat painful to read, as far as I can tell it is mostly fiction, no fact checking at all. And it also seems partially plagiarized from this article:
http://www.latimes.com/features/printedition/magazine/la-tm-moonrocks23jun06,1,1392690.story?coll=la-home-magazine [latimes.com]

And that one is by an actual reporter with actual fact checking. Obviously some of it is left up to how the perpetrators described it, but it doesn't have stupid made up stuff like a nitrogen filled lab and thermal suits and such. I would guess the crime played out more like the LA Times article, rather than this embellished piece of pulp fiction

Re:This article is hoplessly wrong pulp fiction (1)

Warlord88 (1065794) | more than 5 years ago | (#27882283)

First thing that came to my mind - how the hell did they put a price tag on the moon rocks? Is there some black market I'm unaware of where they trade that stuff?

Re:This article is hoplessly wrong pulp fiction (5, Funny)

jandrese (485) | more than 5 years ago | (#27882321)

I think they just calculated the replacement cost.

Re:This article is hoplessly wrong pulp fiction (3, Funny)

HTH NE1 (675604) | more than 5 years ago | (#27882791)

I think they just calculated the replacement cost.

So that's why we're going back to the Moon?

Mod parent hilarious (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27883213)

please oh please

Re:This article is hoplessly wrong pulp fiction (4, Interesting)

oman_ (147713) | more than 5 years ago | (#27882415)

Back when I was in high school my father was the chairman of the historical society in town and someone had at one time donated a pretty large moon rock to the museum.

We looked in to selling it because the interest of the money in the bank would pay all the museums bills indefinitely.

Turns out...

NASA is the only place that can verify the authenticity of a moon rock. They would not guarantee that they would give it back. A moon rock is a national treasure. A national treasure can not be owned so it can't be legally sold.

What's funny is I had no idea of the potential value of the small object we had in our house. The rock was almost the size of a small lemon.

Re:This article is hoplessly wrong pulp fiction (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27882701)

Where did the donor get it? At a NASA garage sale?

Re:This article is hoplessly wrong pulp fiction (4, Informative)

HTH NE1 (675604) | more than 5 years ago | (#27882921)

IIRC there was some confusion on the issue awhile back in that some small moon rocks were sealed inside paperweights and given as gifts very early on. This caused some brouhaha when someone who found themselves in possession of one wanted it authenticated and NASA hadn't known about it.

Re:This article is hoplessly wrong pulp fiction (4, Informative)

VAXcat (674775) | more than 5 years ago | (#27882719)

"NASA is the only place that can verify the authenticity of a moon rock. They would not guarantee that they would give it back. A moon rock is a national treasure. A national treasure can not be owned so it can't be legally sold." Not so - not all moon rocks came from the US Apollo missions. The USSR brought moon rocks back via automated sample return missions.

Re:This article is hoplessly wrong pulp fiction (4, Informative)

dumuzi (1497471) | more than 5 years ago | (#27882801)

I had to do a lab analyzing the estrous cycle of rats. I can assure you they do fart, and they don't seem the least bit embarrassed by their public flatulence.

Others have studied the rats gaseous emissions directly.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/845703 [nih.gov]

Re:This article is hoplessly wrong pulp fiction (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27883859)

You were looking in the wrong direction. Mushrooms in large quantities produce far worse flatulence than beans.

There's so much gas coming out that your entire intestine is opened up and playing a note like a 20 foot organ pipe. Truly a horrifying experience.

Re:This article is hoplessly wrong pulp fiction (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27882853)

Moon rocks are a national treasure which cannot be owned? How very quaint.

Re:This article is hoplessly wrong pulp fiction (5, Informative)

femtobyte (710429) | more than 5 years ago | (#27882715)

I did a summer internship with NASA a few years after this incident, and of course the interns all got a nice tour of the moonrock facility.

As modemboy points out, the "nitrogen filled lab" and such is pure bunk. The moonrocks are kept in nitrogen-purged safes (and in a separate room with nitrogen-filled gloveboxes used for preparing samples to send out to researchers), but the room containing the safes isn't itself filled with nitrogen. There is an "air-lock," but it's the usual type of clean-room airlock, used to keep out dust between the changing room where you suit up in disposable clean-room clothes and the lab itself.

Re:This article is hoplessly wrong pulp fiction (5, Funny)

Mursk (928595) | more than 5 years ago | (#27883025)

Well, presumably the rooms are at least 78% or so nitrogen filled. Maybe they just rounded up?

Re:This article is hoplessly wrong pulp fiction (2, Interesting)

Infoport (935541) | more than 5 years ago | (#27883049)

I too call BS on the thermal wetsuit trick.
Mythbusters [mythbustersresults.com] had a 2006 episode in which they tested tricks done in movies to defeat security measures. In particular, they tested trying to defeat thermal sensors, including the method of wearing a wetsuit. They even tried spraying down the suited person with a fire extinguisher to cool them.
The result? The person regained heat fairly quickly, and showed up easily on the thermal sensors.

Re:This article is hoplessly wrong pulp fiction (3, Funny)

catmistake (814204) | more than 5 years ago | (#27883109)

... that one is by an actual reporter with actual fact checking.

but... it makes no sense... just what business would such an individual have at the LA Times?

Re:This article is hoplessly wrong pulp fiction (1)

DNS-and-BIND (461968) | more than 5 years ago | (#27883151)

Fact checking? No, there is no call to assume that a journalist's article has been fact-checked, or if the fact-checking done was adequate or negligent. It's best to assume unreliable until proven otherwise, especially at an openly partisan publication like the one you mention.

Re:This article is hoplessly wrong pulp fiction (1)

Vu1turEMaN (1270774) | more than 5 years ago | (#27884953)

The LA Times reporter got it all from wikipedia.

this FP for GN)AA (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27882301)

lead developersB of HIV and other OUTER SPACE THE HAVE LEFT IN

from TFA (1)

curtix7 (1429475) | more than 5 years ago | (#27882375)

Sometime between the heist and its resolution, Tiffany and Thad arranged the moon rocks on a bedâ"and had sex amongst them.

lol...

Why would you take the moon rocks with salt? (1, Funny)

DickBreath (207180) | more than 5 years ago | (#27882385)

Why would you take the moon rocks with "a little bit of salt"? The salt just adds to what you have to smuggle out of the building.

Re:Why would you take the moon rocks with salt? (1)

x78 (1099371) | more than 5 years ago | (#27882891)

No it's a common saying, you're not meant to take it liter.... oh

It says I can disable ads (-1, Offtopic)

Gizzmonic (412910) | more than 5 years ago | (#27882395)

There's a box on my Slashdot user page that says I can disable ads thanks to my excellent contributions. WTF? I'm fucking retarded! I don't make excellent contributions to anything except the toilet!

In light of this misplaced honor, I'll take this opportunity to say, enjoy your Friday, and fuck the Los Angeles Lakers.

        * Note: NBA Rule 12A Section 5 Exceptions do not apply to players Stu Jackson deems to be "superstars," as evidenced by the 2009 NBA Western Conference Semifinals Game 2 between The Los Angeles Lakers and Houston Rockets when Kobe Bryant clearly threw an elbow into Ron Artest's throat. Though exception I. (3) states that the player must be ejected, Bryant was allowed to remain in the game without even a foul called. After further review, Jackson did not suspend Bryant for this obvious rule violation, instead slapping him on the wrist with a flagrant 1 foul, proving yet again that "superstars" play by a different set of rules than other NBA players.

Re:It says I can disable ads (2, Insightful)

stoolpigeon (454276) | more than 5 years ago | (#27882835)

This is true in all sports - and makes sense when you think about it. The primary function of the league is to generate income. Anything that gets in the way of that is counter to the reason they exist.

Re:It says I can disable ads (1)

Gizzmonic (412910) | more than 5 years ago | (#27885627)

If the game isn't perceived as fair, the sport will suffer. And the NBA has definitely suffered in the last decade or so. What does it tell you when the line in Vegas changes after certain referees (Joey Crawford, in this instance) are announced for a game?

Moon rocks (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27882459)

One vice leads to another, then you end up like me, so jaded the only thing that gets you off is freebasing ground up moon rocks. And this just gets me to normal!

Steve Martin did it! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27882479)

He needed a new needle for his googlephonic stereo...

Looking for better interns? (2, Insightful)

penguinchris (1020961) | more than 5 years ago | (#27882487)

I'm not sure why they choose people like this for cool internships. It sounds like the kind of guy that had good grades in college and all kinds of extracurricular activities, but not the kind of guy you'd actually choose as an intern!

Obviously I don't know anything besides the ridiculous, surely augmented account of TFA, which I did read. But I simply don't understand how people like that get internships, while people like me and others I know have a hard time. We don't have 4.0s and tons of extracurricular activities, but as any science nerd will tell you (and which I hope scientists and researchers at NASA know as well - maybe the blame for selecting people like that lies with HR), that's not what you should look for when you need a science/nerd intern!

Re:Looking for better interns? (1)

Kartoffel (30238) | more than 5 years ago | (#27882535)

You don't have to be into extreme sports or anything, but extracurricular activities *are* important. If you're a nerd, what sort of nerd activities do you do? What are you most awesome at? List that stuff on your resume.

Re:Looking for better interns? (1, Informative)

Burkin (1534829) | more than 5 years ago | (#27883243)

Actually having extracurricular activities is very much what you want to see a person engage in. It usually shows that they might have a modicum of social skills.

I'll ask the same question I always ask (1)

Locke2005 (849178) | more than 5 years ago | (#27882507)

If these interns were so smart, then how come they got caught?

Re:I'll ask the same question I always ask (1)

Garbad Ropedink (1542973) | more than 5 years ago | (#27882621)

They got caught up on a common criminal snag of the self incriminating ebay ad.

'Genuine stolen moon rocks: $1 000 000 per rock.
NASA employees need not apply.'

Re:I'll ask the same question I always ask (4, Interesting)

Locke2005 (849178) | more than 5 years ago | (#27882815)

My point exactly. "I just stolen several million dollars worth of moon rocks... what do I do with them now? I know! I'll sell them on eBay! They'll never think to look for them there!" Not exactly the thought processes of a genius. More like something out of a Three Stooges movie. And yes, most of the Mission Impossible stuff is bullshit, although I do believe they got an ex-employee to give them access codes.

I once worked at a USAF AWACS station, where the regulations said I was not allowed in the radome without an escort, since my security clearance was still pending. My first day there, one of my coworkers said "Here's the keycode to the door. Behave yourself." At other jobs, I've been able to access computer accounts I was not supposed to be in because the administrators made the passwords so complicated that their subordinates simply wrote them down and stuck them in their desk drawers. The point is, anybody who has dealt with bureaucratic bullshit long enough is perfectly willing to bend the rules to help their coworkers actually do their job. These interns got help from lots of people who assumed they were just doing their job. Needless to say, none of them is going to volunteer a "Oh yeah, I helped these kids get in" after the fact.

I worked as a NASA contractor ... (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27884583)

I worked as a NASA-JSC contractor for about 8 years on a number of different projects with different security requirements. These were all "man-rated" flight and control systems, not some research project with 3-D glasses and a fancy chair that moved.

I'm happy to report that not all security related work is this faulty in access control. We took our security VERY SERIOUSLY unlike the parent's team.

To my knowledge there wasn't a single mishandled classified item. Nobody shared access codes who wasn't authorized to perform that sharing. I never was authorized to share, therefore I never shared even with coworkers who I knew needed and were authorized access. They had to contact the security admin for the location to gain access. There wasn't any time when passwords were shared. Anyone who asked was reported to data security immediately.

Every time I met foreign nationals from "select countries", I was debriefed by our security officer. When a coworker started dating a Persian (Iranian), that person was moved to a different position with less sensitive access requirements. They were later married and stopped working for the government. The cold war was still on for part of this time.

Most of the folks I've worked with at and around NASA-JSC were unbelievably honest, hardworking and smart. They felt honored to have their positions and do something important for themselves and our country. That includes some interns. A few interns had an air of "privilege" and I hope they weren't hired. That type of attitude is always a concern for any position at any age.

Re:I'll ask the same question I always ask (3, Insightful)

rossifer (581396) | more than 5 years ago | (#27882821)

If these interns were so smart, then how come they got caught?

Because smart and dumb are not always or never qualities. In this case, the thrill-seeking aspect of his personality meant that the smarts were dedicated to achieving difficult but spectacularly stupid accomplishments.

Re:I'll ask the same question I always ask (1)

LaskoVortex (1153471) | more than 5 years ago | (#27884437)

In this case, the thrill-seeking aspect of his personality meant that the smarts were dedicated to achieving difficult but spectacularly stupid accomplishments.

Depends on what you call stupid. What have you done with your life? Louis and Clark probably trespassed across someone's property while they were exploring. So did Henry Hudson, and Amerigo Vespucci ;-). Galileo did something real stupid: he pissed off the Pope. Jesus got his ass nailed to a cross. Not very smart by your standards.

Re:I'll ask the same question I always ask (1)

rossifer (581396) | more than 5 years ago | (#27884725)

You're projecting some serious assumptions about how I value accomplishments. Luckily for my argument, your assumptions and my argument have very little in common and were never properly introduced anyway.

What's-his-name's accomplishments were stupid because they were simultaneously low value and high risk. The accomplishments that you assume I would scorn by Galileo, Louis and Clark, Hudson (presumably Kepler, Copernicus, Newton, et.al. were skipped for brevity) have had their claims and achievements validated time and again as high value, even if they most definitely were also high risk.

As for fictional accomplishments, the Jesus story posits a supernatural valuation of that sacrifice. Sacrifice can also be valuable, and that retelling of the age old hero myth doesn't disappoint in that regard. After all, Jesus saved the whole world...

Re:I'll ask the same question I always ask (1)

LaskoVortex (1153471) | more than 5 years ago | (#27885781)

You're projecting some serious assumptions about how I value accomplishments.

What's-his-name's accomplishments were stupid because they were simultaneously low value by how I define value and high risk.

Fixed that for you. You probably also meant "stupid by my [as in your] subjective and highly moral(istic) standards".

I touched a NASA space suit covered in moon dust (4, Interesting)

JoshDM (741866) | more than 5 years ago | (#27882661)

My father used to work for ILC-DDC, a chip manufacturer out on Long Island. Some of their chips went to use with NASA. As I recall it, years ago, we children were given a tour on a "factory open to families" day, and they had a NASA space suit on display in the hallway. Well, it turns out that (1) this suit had been on the moon, (2) this suit hadn't been cleaned properly, and (3) NASA eventually recalled the suit to have any errant moon dust sucked out of it, and never let them have the suit again. At least, that's the story I was told.

The part about the neoprene suits (4, Insightful)

Jane Q. Public (1010737) | more than 5 years ago | (#27882831)

is probably completely bogus. As was clearly shown on Mythbusters, neoprene (even thicker than the mentioned 2mm) simply does not work against thermal sensors.

Also: "... and by paying careful attention to the absorption of the powder it is possible to tell which finger came down first and so forth."

Maybe... if you are talking about a key that was pressed twice. Otherwise, forget it.

Yeah. About a teaspoon of salt. One grain for each embellishment.

Mythbusters? Bleah. (5, Insightful)

cusco (717999) | more than 5 years ago | (#27883363)

I have yet to see Mythbusters adequately "disprove" any damn thing. Their normal method of operation is "Well urban legend says someone did something this way, but since we only have an hour show and a low budget we're going to try to do it this other way. Didn't work? Well then it couldn't have happened and it's a myth!"

What BS. The other night they "proved" that Robin Hood couldn't have split an arrow with another arrow by using cheap factory-made lathe-turned arrows with grain running every-which-way. Since every arrow hit broke following the irregular grain near the nock they decided that NO ONE EVER could have split an arrow. I've actually seen a hand-made straight-grained arrow that had been split from nock to head, with the other arrow still embedded, so I know for a fact that their show was BS.

Even worse was the show where they tried to debunk the story of someone mounting a RATO (Rocket Assisted Take Off) bottle to their old Chevy Impala back in the 60s (when you could buy them surplus from the Air Force). Not having access to an actual JATO bottle, and too lazy and cheap to examine the actual plans and make a replica, the bozos cobbled together some POS rocket that probably didn't have enough thrust to get itself off the ground and put it on a car instead. Not surprisingly it failed, and now thousands of people believe that the story has been debunked.

I certainly don't object to the IDEA of their program, in fact I think it's a great idea. I just wish that they had hired someone who could actually do it RIGHT.

Re:Mythbusters? Bleah. (1)

RajivSLK (398494) | more than 5 years ago | (#27883521)

I completely agree. They too often come to the conclusion that "we couldn't do it therefore nobody can!". Especially when dealing with 1 in a million odds...

Re:Mythbusters? Bleah. (2, Informative)

Jane Q. Public (1010737) | more than 5 years ago | (#27883869)

I do not disagree with you in general; I have often had the same feeling about their shows. And I did not use the words "prove" or "disprove".

However, the section they did about heat sensors was pretty definitive. They had automatic heat sensors as well as infrared cameras. When they put on heavy wetsuits (thicker than the 2mm mentioned in TFA), and quickly entered the room (so the suits would not have time to heat up), their heat signatures were still clearly visible on the infrared camera, and they were unable to fool the automatic infrared detectors. However, later they did find at least 2 ways to fool the sensors that were surprisingly simple. But the wetsuits were a very obvious failure.

I also agree about the rocket-assisted car. They mounted the rockets on the roof, rather than at the rear, and angled them upward in a way that would prevent the car from getting airborne... what kind of test of the myth is that? (It should be noted, however, that the local police and State Patrol in the area the actual incident was supposed to have taken place, deny it completely and have no records of the event. If it really had happened, and I were a local, I would turn it into a museum dedicated to stupidity.)

I question the methodologies used by Mythbusters a lot of the time. And I happen to agree about the Robin Hood bit too. I have split arrows myself. Not the full length, and never on purpose, but it does happen. Maybe carbon fiber arrows split more readily than wood... but it just goes to show how many variables there are. And I think they could have done a great many others better, too. But this particular section (about fooling heat sensors) was well-done and very convincing. And somewhat surprising.

Re:Mythbusters? Bleah. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27884651)

I question the methodologies used by Mythbusters a lot of the time. And I happen to agree about the Robin Hood bit too. I have split arrows myself. Not the full length, and never on purpose, but it does happen. Maybe carbon fiber arrows split more readily than wood... but it just goes to show how many variables there are.

Others did too, where they can, they re-test it. Using reeds as arrows, they got someone to split it repeatedly. It just didn't seem plausible with "regular" wooden ones.

Re:Mythbusters? Bleah. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27884265)

Robin Hood couldn't have split an arrow with another arrow

'Robin Hood' is generally considered to be a fictional character. There's about as much proof of his physical existence as there is of Jesus Christ's.

Re:Mythbusters? Bleah. (2, Informative)

photozz (168291) | more than 5 years ago | (#27884735)

OK.. for starters, the arrow thing. You never said you saw the arrow being split, just that you saw a "split" arrow. I could go in my shop and make one for you in about 5 minutes. They did test with cheap arrows at first, then went and found straight grain arrows to test with again. They proved that its nearly impossible to split an arrow unless it's made of bamboo. You probably missed that part while you were getting a beer.. again. This was debunked strictly because they were unable to replicate the myth, and were unable to find any evidence that this had actually happened, anywhere.

The rocket car.. The air force has never sold working RATO/JATO engines to anyone. Ever. They confirmed this. The FIRST time they tried it, the rockets they used were 3 hobby engines chained to produce the same thrust as a RATO engine. They brought in rocket experts to do the math. Now, if your talking about the SECOND time they tried it, they did have a single engine custom made for them to JATO specs by a rocket manufacturer. It was not cobbled together. It exploded on launch due to some defect in the fuel pack. They debunked the car myth because no one has any evidence the original event ever happened. No police reports, no death or missing person reports, no missing RATOs.. nothing. not a singed hair or crushed tire to be found besides the text on your computer screen.

Now, yes, I will say that occasional I do yell at the TV when they are doing something plainly wrong, but I do think that most of their effort is reasonable. Next time try watching more than ten minutes of an episode before you launch into bald faced inaccuracies, you twit. penis.

Re:Mythbusters? Bleah. (0, Troll)

gyrogeerloose (849181) | more than 5 years ago | (#27886039)

How is this a troll?

Re:Mythbusters? Bleah. (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27885849)

I have yet to see Mythbusters adequately "disprove" any damn thing.

Who cares, Kari Byron is hot.

Re:Mythbusters? Bleah. (1)

Ma8thew (861741) | more than 5 years ago | (#27886885)

On the rocket car show, they concluded that it was busted, not based on their experiment, but on the fact that all the local officials in the area deny that it happened. I think they do a good job on the smaller, cheaper to perform myths (the double dipping one they did recently was very well done), and provide great entertainment value on the more expensive myths.

Millions of dollars? (1)

stonedcat (80201) | more than 5 years ago | (#27882837)

How exactly does one put a price on moon rocks? And how exactly does this figure come into the millions?
Is there a big market for moon rocks outside of ebay?

Re:Millions of dollars? (3, Insightful)

tlhIngan (30335) | more than 5 years ago | (#27883097)

How exactly does one put a price on moon rocks? And how exactly does this figure come into the millions?
Is there a big market for moon rocks outside of ebay?

Well, you could easily put a price on the cost of getting moon rocks, I mean, the whole trip to the moon, landing and taking off and getting back on earth thing isn't cheap. Sure they brought a lot of it back, but if you priced it out, it would've been quite expensive per unit of mass. If we just consider Apollo, and how much the entire program cost, and divide by the amount of moon rocks, it won't take much rock to reach millions.

After all, it's not like you can find real lunar regolith on Earth. And it's not like a common person with an interest in space can easily go and buy some from NASA.

Re:Millions of dollars? (4, Insightful)

ComputerSlicer23 (516509) | more than 5 years ago | (#27883453)

I don't know, it's probably literally closer to "priceless", which isn't infinitely valuable, but a market can't be established, therefore a value/price cannot be determined (see the description of "Neoclassical Value" on the Wikipedia link, lots of artwork is priceless in this sense, even though it sells for a specific value) [wikipedia.org] .

What you're describing is the cost, not the price or value. If I blew $100K on rebuilding a fully restored mint condition Ford Fiesta from 1994, doesn't mean that I could sell it for that, or that it represented the value. It means I blew $100K, and now had a car that is probably worth 1/10th at best. That's just a guess.

Even if you were going to present it that way, it's not like the rocks are the only thing that came out of that money. So if you want to determine if it was "worth it", or "profitable" to go to the moon, the rocks aren't the only thing of value to come out of all that money being spent.

Kirby

Re:Millions of dollars? (1)

pavon (30274) | more than 5 years ago | (#27884013)

We choose to go to the moon. We choose to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard, because that goal will serve to provide us with rocks. Rocks which we can store in nitrogen purged safes, because that challenge is one that we are willing to accept, one we are unwilling to postpone, and one which we intend to win, and the others, too.

Re:Millions of dollars? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27884387)

Pavon, I served with Jack Kennedy: I knew Jack Kennedy; Jack Kennedy was a friend of mine. Pavon, you're no Jack Kennedy.

Re:Millions of dollars? (1)

petermgreen (876956) | more than 5 years ago | (#27884031)

How exactly does one put a price on moon rocks?
With great difficulty since afaict none has ever been sold openly so you can't really put a market value on it.

If you price it at the cost of getting more the value would be very high indeed. According to wikipedia Apollo cost "between $20 and $25.4 billion in 1969 dollars (or approximately $135 billion in 2005 dollars).". and returned "381.7 kg (841.5 lb) of rocks and other material from the Moon" If we use the 2005 dollars (which should be reasonablly close to 2009 dollars) that works out to $354 million dollers a kilo!

Of course apollo did other stuff and plain sample return missions would be cheaper but still returning stuff from the moon is not cheap.

Re:Millions of dollars? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27886077)

According to wikipedia Apollo cost "between $20 and $25.4 billion in 1969 dollars (or approximately $135 billion in 2005 dollars)."

Considering the latest national budget, that's chicken feed.

Re:Millions of dollars? (1)

The_Steel_General (196801) | more than 5 years ago | (#27885911)

Bits and pieces of the moon come up for sale every once in a while. Sometimes legitimate, usually less so. A couple of links on the subject

http://www.geotimes.org/sept02/NN_moon.html [geotimes.org]
http://www.csmonitor.com/2004/0617/p14s02-stss.html [csmonitor.com]

mention a Sotheby's auction of (very small) Russian rocks; the "Goodwill Rocks" which the United States gave to each country in the world which have sometimes ended up "for sale;" and a short length of adhesive tape with moondust stuck to it. I also recall reading of a bag used to carry some Apollo mission's moon rocks from some point A to point B - the bag was sold as surplus, and the owner realized that the black dirt inside it was legally acquired moon dust.

Taken together, there's some ability to determine the going price. A million dollars a gram (as the CS Monitor article suggests) seems a bit high to me, but it is in line with these other sales and attempted sales.

TSG

Literary License (1)

Un pobre guey (593801) | more than 5 years ago | (#27883065)

Here's a good one:

The mix of the three glows under blacklight, and by paying careful attention to the absorption of the powder it is possible to tell which finger came down first and so forth. It doesn't quite make sense that Thad could use this trick to figure out the exact sequence for all the codes, based off such rudimentary information. But once Thad had eventually thrown his whole weight against the vault door, the two were inside.

This is the kind of stuff crappy TV and movie writers have to put in to get through the hard parts or when they can't think of anything else. Sort of like when the main character throws a pointless tantrum and throws all the pots and pans on the floor to "emote" and kill a few seconds until the next commercial. This is not believable at all.

Re:Blech (0, Troll)

clint999 (1277046) | more than 5 years ago | (#27883115)

I'm not sure why they choose people like this for cool internships. It sounds like the kind of guy that had good grades in college and all kinds of extracurricular activities, but not the kind of guy you'd actually choose as an intern!Obviously I don't know anything besides the ridiculous, surely augmented account of TFA, which I did read. But I simply don't understand how people like that get internships, while people like me and others I know have a hard time. We don't have 4.0s and tons of extracurricula

Posted on the Internet?? (2, Insightful)

pak9rabid (1011935) | more than 5 years ago | (#27883137)

There really is a big difference between being 'book smart' and 'street smart'. I mean seriously. What did they think was going to happen when they put an ad online claiming that they have moon rocks for sale right after NASA's supply went missing?

The proper thing to have done (outside of not pulling this stupid heist in the first place, or course) would have been to flee to another country in the eastern hemisphere and sold them there, making enough money in the process to never have to come back to the US again.

Another good one (2, Insightful)

Un pobre guey (593801) | more than 5 years ago | (#27883145)

...Thad and Tiffany had only 3 minutes to crack the safe, or they wouldn't have enough air to get back outside.
As the seconds crept onward, Thad continued to struggle with the code, so he quickly moved to plan B, which involved unbolting the heavy safe from the ground, loading it on to a small dolly and carting it back out to the car. It wasn't easy, but within the remaining time allotted to them, the two managed to slip out of the vault,

In less than three minutes they unbolted a heavy safe from the floor and hoisted it onto a small dolly. No doubt they had a couple of big wrenches, plenty of WD-40, and maybe even some paint stripper, in case there was an annoying coat of enamel on the bolts. Bad TV yet again.

Re:Another good one (1)

TheCabal (215908) | more than 5 years ago | (#27884943)

Not to mention, Mr. He-man was able to lift a heavy safe all by himself and load it onto said dolly. Because he's cool like that.

Picture of Tiffany - You know you're curious (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27883223)

yeah yeah this isn't fark, but how often do we get cute female cat burglars to ogle at?

http://www.baylor.edu/biology/index.php?id=32089 /would hit it

Re:Picture of Tiffany - You know you're curious (1)

Shin-LaC (1333529) | more than 5 years ago | (#27886697)

Frankly, when I read she was a former cheerleader I expected better. Her looks are just average.
But then, the entire Gizmodo story was embellished bullshit. I regret wasting time reading it.

Impossible (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27883257)

Look, these guys cannot figure out, for the life of them, how to get "back" to the moon. Keep pushing. If they could do it in 1969, it shouldn't need 30 more years.

Unless, of course, they never went. In which case, let the interns have the "moon rocks."

This explains everything. (1)

cyn1c77 (928549) | more than 5 years ago | (#27883467)

That story is hilarious.

I hope these retards enjoy their felony convictions. If you're going to steal some rocks, make them easy ones to move on the street, like diamonds. Or better yet, steal cash.

If NASA's hiring people like these, it's pretty clear why the US space program hasn't done anything interesting since the 1970's.

Stupid sentencing (1)

vix86 (592763) | more than 5 years ago | (#27884521)

According TFA, the girls involved in the heist got off with freaking probation while the guys got 100 years.

Talk about bullshit justice system.

Re:Stupid sentencing (1)

kostmo (1136101) | more than 5 years ago | (#27885239)

The LA Times article says that the "mastermind" Thad Roberts received a sentence of eight years and four months [latimes.com] in federal prison. Gordon McWhorter was sentenced to 5 years and 10 months. The others received no jail time.

I'm suprised noone has mentioned... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27885069)

Odyssey 5.

Damned Synthetics!

I'm personally acquainted with the (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#27885113)

Belgian Rockhound who was approached by the thieves, he's very well known in the mineral collecting world. V-President of a European mineralogical group, details of which I won't share to protect his privacy.

He contacted the FBI, and together with them set up the "buy" in FL. I've seen the letters of thanks he received from NASA and the FBI Director of the time.

So I can vouch for that part of the story. I don't think the theft was particularly hi-tech... my impression is more of a pink panther of crime, really. After all, they stole the rocks without rounding up customers willing to keep quiet first.

 

Not only at NASA... (1)

mutu310 (1546975) | more than 5 years ago | (#27886959)

In 2004, thieves did the same thing in Malta, and stole a $5M Moon Rock [space.com]

"The problem the thieves have is what to do with it," Joseph Richard Gutheinz, a retired NASA agent who helped recover the Honduras rock, wrote in an e-mail to The Associated Press. "They can try to sell it to private collectors or if they're sufficiently dumb, at an auction house."

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