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Ten Features To Love About Android 1.5

kdawson posted more than 4 years ago | from the catchup-and-leapfrog dept.

Cellphones 384

An anonymous reader writes "Last month, Google officially announced the Android 1.5 update, dubbed 'cupcake.' The new software is apparently ready to roll out to Android-powered devices beginning tomorrow. Make no mistake, Android 1.5 is a major upgrade — they could have called it 2.0. The software brings a host of new capabilities, some of which can't be found on rival mobile platforms, including video recording and sharing."

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384 comments

Cupcake (5, Funny)

Culture20 (968837) | more than 4 years ago | (#27901347)

And people think admitting that installing "Jaunty Jackalope" is embarrasing. Cupcake.

Re:Cupcake (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27901355)

I installed Ubuntu 9.04, whats Jaunty Jackalope?

Obligatory XKCD (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27901795)

http://xkcd.com/178/

Re:Obligatory XKCD (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27902197)

Please learn basic HTML for us lazy types. Thank you.

This message paid for by Anonymous Cowards Anonymous.

Re:Cupcake (0, Offtopic)

actionbastard (1206160) | more than 4 years ago | (#27901517)

What's not to like about cupcakes [magnoliacupcakes.com]?

Re:Cupcake (5, Funny)

meuhlavache (1101089) | more than 4 years ago | (#27901827)

SUDO buy me some cupcakes...

Re:Cupcake (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27902271)

OMG!!!11 HA ha, that's funny. I never would have thought of that. You took the "SUDO make me a sandwich" line from XKCD, which wasn't funny to begin with, but then you changed it by using the word "Cupcake".

Thanks for putting a little sunshine in my day. God has truly blessed us with your creativity and wit. Amen.

Re:Cupcake (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27902525)

I was going to reply with the whole "SUDO: Command not found" but zsh is too pro and asked if I would like to correct SUDO to sudo instead. Just thought you might like to know that.

Re:Cupcake (1)

syousef (465911) | more than 4 years ago | (#27901667)

And people think admitting that installing "Jaunty Jackalope" is embarrasing. Cupcake.

Not to mention possible confusion with implants. Although sex sells so admit an attractive girl telling us she likes her cupcake might actually work marketing wise. Certainly works better than 'Gimp'.

Re:Cupcake (3, Insightful)

skine (1524819) | more than 4 years ago | (#27901691)

It's not about the name, it's about the content.

Think of it like the Princess Bride.

Re:Cupcake (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27901967)

Think of it like the Princess Bride.

Or, alternately, just grow up and stop being so easily embarrassed.

and a million things to hate about it (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27901367)

I've tried numerous times to program for this platform but I hate it so much.

Re:and a million things to hate about it (5, Informative)

HeronBlademaster (1079477) | more than 4 years ago | (#27901591)

I find it difficult to program for the Android platform, but only because it's a *very* different programming paradigm. Rather than a single entry point, as with a standard computer program, there are half a dozen entry points. This isn't really a bad thing - having a single entry point would just mean you'd have to figure out which task needs to be done at the beginning of the program.

In other words, the OS does the hard part for you.

You might hate that style of programming, but it doesn't make it bad - and it certainly doesn't mean there are a million things to hate about the Android platform.

(There may, in fact, actually be a million things to hate about Android. I don't have an Android-based device, so I wouldn't know; I've only fiddled with the emulator in the SDK. My point is simply that the programming paradigm needed to write software for the Android platform isn't one of the things you should be hating.)

Re:and a million things to hate about it (3, Informative)

moon3 (1530265) | more than 4 years ago | (#27902049)

There is no native code (C/C++) SDK for it last time I've checked, that was about a half year ago. That is a show stopper for lot of people.

Re:and a million things to hate about it (4, Informative)

HeronBlademaster (1079477) | more than 4 years ago | (#27902391)

That is correct, all application development is done in Java. Yes, that is a show-stopper for some people, but that doesn't make Android a "bad" thing.

Re:and a million things to hate about it (5, Interesting)

binarylarry (1338699) | more than 4 years ago | (#27902485)

Actually, nothing prevents you from writing applications with native code.

In fact, parts of the SDK explicitly allow this.

However, it's generally bad idea because Android runs on a variety of hardware platforms, making native code "fun" to deal with in the future. I just hope they add proper JIT at some point, so Android's performance isn't fucking atrocious like it is now.

Re:and a million things to hate about it (2, Insightful)

moon3 (1530265) | more than 4 years ago | (#27902561)

Do not forget that Google's own applications run native, that means your applications is penalized by using inferior interface.

In other words your application will always be a second rate application, serious developers avoids such a scenario. I've never seen a platform that would run smooth without native environment tweaking.

Give me a native support (C/C++) and there is not a problem to port the code to ARM or Atom.

Java was never really cross platform, there were quirks and problems that unlike (C++) you were not able to fix. That might have changed, but still, it is a single paradigm language, and that is a major pain, god forbid this becomes a standard of sorts.

Re:and a million things to hate about it (5, Interesting)

Zigurd (3528) | more than 4 years ago | (#27902273)

Not only is the application structure and lifecycle unique and structured around a unique UI flow, Android has unique UI classes in an otherwise mostly standard Java runtime, it uses binder for inter-process communication, it has a unique graphics stack relative to most other Linux systems, and it makes it difficult to put programs other than those written to the Android programming model on the screen, among other differences relative to most Linux-based systems.

But it has already overtaken the Nokia 8xx Web pads, which use Hildon, in user acceptance. Google gambled on establishing an entirely different application layer in the userland for Android and appears to have succeeded.

Android answers the question: "What if Linux had a userland based on a managed language runtime and every application used the same UI classes (and what if a company with sufficient resourced to do it right did it)?"

If Android perplexes you, try this:
http://www.amazon.com/Android-Application-Development-Programming-Google/dp/0596521472

Re:and a million things to hate about it (1)

moon3 (1530265) | more than 4 years ago | (#27902033)

Is there C/C++ (native code) support for it yet? I mean without native code, it might discourage hell lot of developers...

Re:and a million things to hate about it (1)

sketerpot (454020) | more than 4 years ago | (#27902329)

But that also means that it will be easy to port to other devices using different processor types. This way if they port Android to run on (say) ARM and Atom netbooks, the programs people wrote will still work without needing to compile two different versions.

Welcome to Japan circa 2001 (3, Funny)

BadAnalogyGuy (945258) | more than 4 years ago | (#27901377)

Wow! Video recording?!

What's next? Broadcast TV? True SMTP email? Intuitive UIs?

Re:Welcome to Japan circa 2001 (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27901407)

Yawn. If there were a market for 2001 "Japanese" cellphones in the U.S., then some smart Japanese company would have rolled them out by now. Clearly the iPhone has someone on them besides being "Apple".

Re:Welcome to Japan circa 2001 (1)

LordLimecat (1103839) | more than 4 years ago | (#27902389)

True SMTP email? Intuitive UIs?

Because blackberries havent had those features for just about ever...?

Re:Welcome to Japan circa 2001 (5, Insightful)

Achromatic1978 (916097) | more than 4 years ago | (#27902461)

I love how "other mobile platforms" has become a synonym for "what the iPhone has/has not". My Nokia N95 has recorded video since the day it came out, 2 years ago. It allows 1 click publishing to Youtube. Hell, FOUR YEARS AGO, the N90 [wikipedia.org] had a 270 degree swivel screen, and a separately 270 degree swivel lens capable of recording video. For that matter, the screen res was 352x416, the highest at the time, and still higher than most cells...

Just because something has a feature the Jesusphone doesn't, doesn't mean it is mindblowing and revolutionary...

Re:Welcome to Japan circa 2001 (4, Insightful)

10Ghz (453478) | more than 4 years ago | (#27902577)

There's a difference between "having a feature" and "having a feature that's actually usable".

My Nokia E71 has loads of features. And most of them are so crummy and hard to use, that they might as well not exist. It has GPS. Which is so cumbersome to use that I never use it. It has web-browser. But browsing with it is so frustrating and clumsy that I only use it when I desperately need to check something online.

The thing is that when the iPhone was released, people compared it to other phones (like Nokias) and said "my phone has had those features for a long time already, how exactly is the iPhone "revolutioary?". But they fail to understand that it's not about list of checkboxes called "features", it's about features that people can actually use.

Like I said, my E71 has a web-browser. It also has WiFI. But for some reason I never use it for web-browsing at home through my Wifi, I use my iPod touch for that.

You can't compare phones (or any other devices for that matter) by staring at a piece of paper that lists their specs. You need to actually USE the devices to make that judgement. And the thing is that iPhone might not have every single bell and whistle some other phone has, but the bells and whistles it has. are so usable that people actually use them. Nokia has been piling features to their phones for years, but since they are implemented in such a crappy way, they go mostly unused.

If your phone has a feature that no-one uses, is it really a feature?

devices? Since when (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27901379)

android looks great, sounds great, blah blah.
When will there be more than one handheld for sale? How about on a network that actually works?
Everybody and their brother is 'working' on one but none of them ever seem to hit the market...

Re:devices? Since when (4, Informative)

Warbothong (905464) | more than 4 years ago | (#27901671)

I've had Android running quite nicely on my Freerunner for a while now, connected to the O2 account I've had for years. Freerunners are for sale, thus there is more than one Android handheld available to buy.

Android coming to Canada (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27901389)

Android phones are being released in Canada next month [cnet.com]. Unfortunately they are only available through Rogers, puke!

Are there more than 20 apps for it? (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27901403)

The IPhone has a lot of limitations, but the amount of apps for it makes it the killer device. The iphone has more quality apps than all other platforms have total apps combined. and the new hardware/software combo coming out in the next 2 months will make it even better.

until Android, winmo and BB get more and better apps and the ability to install over 10-20 apps on the device i'll probably buy a new iphone come july to complement my wife's iphone. even with all it's limitations.

this is almost exactly like the story with Windows in the 1990's. it was far from the best OS, but the amount of apps for it clinched it's success.

Re:Are there more than 20 apps for it? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27901467)

And of course:

"...ready to roll out to Android-powered devices beginning tomorrow"

Yep... to *both* people who own Android devices!

If you're going to develop mobile apps, you're going to do it where the market is. And that's the iPhone.

Re:Are there more than 20 apps for it? (1)

binarylarry (1338699) | more than 4 years ago | (#27902489)

This is some FUD for sure.

When I bought my G1, I had to chose the "bronze" one because the white and black phones were sold out.

Re:Are there more than 20 apps for it? (5, Insightful)

Nerdfest (867930) | more than 4 years ago | (#27901469)

There were (and still are) plenty of apps for the Palm devices, but ultimately its limitations did it in. In many ways it had fewer limitations that the current iPhone does as well. The iPhone has better marketing though.

Re:Are there more than 20 apps for it? (4, Informative)

ornil (33732) | more than 4 years ago | (#27901471)

You must be joking. There's lots of apps for Android. Probably fewer than for iPhone, but not dramatically so. I was able to find an app for any task I needed.

Re:Are there more than 20 apps for it? (2, Interesting)

alen (225700) | more than 4 years ago | (#27901561)

I looked at the android market website since I have an open mind until the new iPhone comes out next month. App store beats it. My wife's iphone has kids games on it along with flash cards for our son to play with. And come this summer you will be able to USe the iPhone to measure blood pressure and cholesterol.
I like listening to slacker and reading a book at the same time on my bb curve, but for a new personal cell I'll probably take the iPhone. New version will have nice 3d graphics almost as good as a console. Games suck on all the other phones

Re:Are there more than 20 apps for it? (5, Informative)

cduffy (652) | more than 4 years ago | (#27901613)

New version will have nice 3d graphics almost as good as a console. Games suck on all the other phones

Funny you mention that -- Android includes an embedded OpenGL implementation.

I upgraded from a first-gen iPhone to an Android dev unit, and am generally quite pleased. It's unfortunate that support for the Bluetooth RFCOMM profile isn't exposed to application level yet -- but one of the things about Android is that it's reasonably straightforward to build a custom version of the firmware with the "hidden" flag turned off for those classes; on the iPhone, I'd just be waiting for 3.0, and then hoping they wouldn't require any device I want to make a serial connection to from my phone to be licensed as an iPhone accessory.

Re:Are there more than 20 apps for it? (1)

Qwavel (733416) | more than 4 years ago | (#27902147)

I agree with you that the lack of RFCOMM (and bluetooth in general) support for applications is too bad, and pretty wierd actually. All Nokia, SE, and Blackberry phones have supported this for years now. Even the iPhone will be getting this soon.

All I can do is wait and hope they add this to Android 2.0. The fact that I can rebuild the OS to fix that doesn't really help me.

Re:Are there more than 20 apps for it? (1)

s73v3r (963317) | more than 4 years ago | (#27902351)

Really? I would think that being able to rebuild the OS and fix it would help. Because you'd actually be able to enable it and use it on your phone.

Re:Are there more than 20 apps for it? (2, Insightful)

lostmongoose (1094523) | more than 4 years ago | (#27901641)

You do realize you're not limited to just the apps on the android market right?

Re:Are there more than 20 apps for it? (1)

sarathmenon (751376) | more than 4 years ago | (#27901625)

You must be joking. There's lots of apps for Android. Probably fewer than for iPhone, but not dramatically so. I was able to find an app for any task I needed.

On all major mobile platforms I've used, I've been able to get apps for all the tasks I've needed. I don't have an iphone due to all the restrictions on the device, but whenever I see brilliantly made apps like this [theisnort.com], I really want to go out and get one.

The success on the platform is due to the fact that there is a lot of choices in apps, and only very few of them suck. It's become the marketleader, and as much as I hate it, I have better success browsing the net using the Iphone user agent on my N810. The N810 has a good browser, that can render content better than the Iphone browser, but market share is why most sites choose to cater only to the iphone while making non-wap mobile sites.

Yes, I hate to say it as the next guy out here, but iphone is the unrivalled smartphone. Google and MS has to do a lot of catchup before they'll get to an iphone level of success.

Re:Are there more than 20 apps for it? (1)

pudro (983817) | more than 4 years ago | (#27902403)

I don't have an iphone due to all the restrictions on the device, but whenever I see brilliantly made apps like this [theisnort.com], I really want to go out and get one.

The lame part is that it requires a prop. As you may or may not know, you can't just do that with any rolled up dollar bill, as the touch-screen uses conductivity instead of pressure. You have to stick something in the end of the dollar bill for it to register the touching. (Look closely in the video and you can see it.) The site makes no mention of this. I wonder how many people buy that app then get pissed off when their "snorting" doesn't register. (Also, as they are clearly British (even beyond charging in pounds instead of dollars), why are they using American money for their snorting?)

Re:Are there more than 20 apps for it? (1)

fractoid (1076465) | more than 4 years ago | (#27901759)

You must be joking. There's lots of apps for Android. Probably fewer than for iPhone, but not dramatically so. I was able to find an app for any task I needed.

And about gaming, I have plenty of games! Myst, Marathon... photoshop... :/

Re:Are there more than 20 apps for it? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27901493)

You do realize you are quoting Microsoft PC marketing from the 1990, right? Like the 1990's, a monopolist can claim the most applications. Like the 1990's, people with discerning tastes will look elsewhere. BB is already leading in new hardware sales. Enjoy the Apple hegemony while you can. One app at a time.

The IPhone has a lot of limitations, but the amount of apps for it makes it the killer device.

this is almost exactly like the story with Windows in the 1990's. it was far from the best OS, but the amount of apps for it clinched it's success.

Re:Are there more than 20 apps for it? (4, Interesting)

salesgeek (263995) | more than 4 years ago | (#27901549)

Insightful? LOL. There was a time when there were more applications for Macintosh. From 1986 until 1990, Windows was irrelevant. Mac was the future.... Then Windows 3.x happened. History is repeating itself in front of our very eyes.

Flash forward to now. Apple has met it's match. And unlike with windows where Apple faced an cheaper, inferior product that was just barely good enough (Windows 3.x), Apple is facing a product that is it's equal in Android (yes, it's that good). As Samsung, Motorola, HTC, and others bring more Android hardware to market and Verizon, Sprint and other carriers offer Android to theri customers, the tide will turn quickly on software development as well.

Re:Are there more than 20 apps for it? (-1, Troll)

alen (225700) | more than 4 years ago | (#27901593)

Except the iPhone is the same price or cheaper than other similar phones. Every carrier charges the same for data

Re:Are there more than 20 apps for it? (2, Informative)

salesgeek (263995) | more than 4 years ago | (#27901635)

I call BS. That's because At&t doesn't sock it to you for data, they get you on the special voice plans for iPhone. On iPhone you will pay a premium for voice service, where with a G-1 device you pay regular rates for voice service. The iPhone generally costs $600 over two years more than devices priced at standard At&t voice rates. That $200 iPhone is actually $800.

Also, the G-1 sells for $99 at Wal-Mart, so it is $100 less out of the box.

Re:Are there more than 20 apps for it? (1)

Professor_UNIX (867045) | more than 4 years ago | (#27902063)

What on earth are you talking about? The voice plans for the iPhone are exactly the same as for any other AT&T phone. When I bought my iPhone the only extra charge was the $20 data plan. My voice plan stayed exactly the same.

Re:Are there more than 20 apps for it? (1)

UnknowingFool (672806) | more than 4 years ago | (#27902095)

The iPhone generally costs $600 over two years more than devices priced at standard At&t voice rates.

I call BS. Apple has no special voice plans for the iPhone [att.com] that are "a premium". It's the same rate as every other phone [att.com] on AT&T. The minimum you will pay for a new plan on AT&T is $39.99 for 450 minutes.

Re:Are there more than 20 apps for it? (1)

pudro (983817) | more than 4 years ago | (#27902507)

iPhones (at least when bought through AT&T for a lower subsidized price) require that you also get an unlimited data plan for $30 (labeled as "DATA PLAN IPHONE" - implying to me that it is different than their other data plans) - so the minimum is actually about $70. (The data plan used to be $20, but was raised to $30 when the iPhone with 3G was rolled out.)

Do other carriers require similar things for Android phones? To be clear, this is a serious question, as I don't know. I'm not knocking the iPhone - I own one. My last bill was just under $84. That is the minimum plan plus the lowest (200 texts) $5 texting plan (again, labeled as "IPHONE TXT MSG 200" - implying to me that it is different than their other texting plans) plus all taxes and other regular monthly charges. How does that compare to Android phones minimums, even with unlimited data on other carriers?

Re:Are there more than 20 apps for it? (1)

pudro (983817) | more than 4 years ago | (#27902513)

To be clear, those plan labels I mentioned are how they are labeled on my bill.

Re:Are there more than 20 apps for it? (5, Informative)

ScrewMaster (602015) | more than 4 years ago | (#27901647)

Except the iPhone is the same price or cheaper than other similar phones. Every carrier charges the same for data

Really? I paid $179.00 for my G1, and my unlimited data plan is $24.95. So I don't know where you're getting your pricing information.

Re:Are there more than 20 apps for it? (5, Insightful)

cyn1c77 (928549) | more than 4 years ago | (#27901801)

Apple has met it's match... As Samsung, Motorola, HTC, and others bring more Android hardware to market and Verizon, Sprint and other carriers offer Android to their customers, the tide will turn quickly on software development as well.

People have been saying this since before the G1 came out, but the market numbers just aren't meeting these predictions yet. When are all these amazing phones going to arrive at my carrier (Verizon)? And how open is this Android thing really going to be? Google has already demonstrated that it is willing to pull certain apps that T-mobile doesn't like.

Verizon is one of the big players in the industry and last I heard, it was backing away from Android. But think of the carnage Verizon would wreak on an open-source platform. (We both know they would lock it down so hard you couldn't do anything useful with it anyway.)

AT&T is the other big player and they have a conflict of interest with their iPhone, for now at least.

Currently, Android seems a lot like Linux. It's theoretically open source, but it has limited industry support and is only available on (extremely) limited hardware. But the key difference is that the cell phone industry is dominated by the carriers, who don't seem fully sold on it yet and it's not like we can just go ahead and replace our phone's OS without voiding all sorts of warranties and support.

I do hope this changes with time though. And for what it's worth, I have emailed Verizon and urged them to adopt the OS, but I am not holding my breath.

Re:Are there more than 20 apps for it? (2, Interesting)

salesgeek (263995) | more than 4 years ago | (#27901981)

We'll see in the next eight weeks as Samsung and Motorola roll out their products. Android is not what a lot of people think, so far as openness - it can be as open or closed as any other phone. The value prop on Android is more to hardware manufacturers who no longer want to manager their own OS or pay tons of royalties to for an OS.

Just wanted to hit one of these points (4, Insightful)

xant (99438) | more than 4 years ago | (#27902085)

> Google has already demonstrated that it is willing to pull certain apps that T-mobile doesn't like.

Except it doesn't matter, because on an Android phone you can install an apk package from anywhere on the web without rooting your phone. (There is a single checkbox in the settings you need to check first.) The Market actually has a strong incentive to be less fascist than the app store, because if it is perceived as hampering developers, developers will simply go elsewhere. I have no doubt that Google knew this when they designed the OS, and that they intend to be more egalitarian in the future. They're also still getting used to this thing, so I'm cutting a little slack. Have no doubt that if, in the future, Google decides to be dicks about the Market, I will put the apps I develop for Android online somewhere else.

Re:Are there more than 20 apps for it? (0, Flamebait)

Achromatic1978 (916097) | more than 4 years ago | (#27902483)

And how open is this Android thing really going to be? Google has already demonstrated that it is willing to pull certain apps that T-mobile doesn't like.

Odd. I mean it's not like Apple would do exactly the same thing [slashdot.org] over apps AT&T don't like...

Re:Are there more than 20 apps for it? (1)

RiotingPacifist (1228016) | more than 4 years ago | (#27901577)

yup, shitloads of pointless apps, while there is in fact nothing (short of playin games) that you can't do on the competitors

Re:Are there more than 20 apps for it? (1)

carterhawk001 (681941) | more than 4 years ago | (#27901581)

For now, sure, but there are numerous android devices coming out and in development. When android devices outnumber iphones 5 to 1, we'll see which platform gets more love.

Re:Are there more than 20 apps for it? (0, Troll)

Culture20 (968837) | more than 4 years ago | (#27901655)

The IPhone has a lot of limitations, but the amount of apps for it makes it the killer device.

Free or pay apps? I recently started playing the free lemonade stand game until it started asking me marketing survey questions. Delete, 1 star. Want your OS/platform to sell well in the future? Allow people to make free (beer/speech) apps! And yes, requiring someone to spend money on the dev kit, and requiring their app to be approved is a significant barrier. Granted, I potentially like the vetting of something like the app store, but the process turns lots of things that could easily be free (rdesktop, SSH, games, etc) into pay or ad-supported apps.

The iphone has more quality apps than all other platforms have total apps combined.

Windows mobile/CE apps have been around for evers and evers. Add Java VM, and suddenly java apps are added to the mix. Not that I like Windows mobile, but it's got a lot more freedom.

Re:Are there more than 20 apps for it? (3, Insightful)

shmlco (594907) | more than 4 years ago | (#27902443)

I don't think that spending $99 is going to force someone to produce a paid application instead of a free one.

And actually, I suspect instead that the real motivation is the somewhat heretical idea (stay with me here) that you can make MONEY writing applications for the iPhone. Get enough people to give you a buck an app, and in some cases you can make a LOT of money doing so.

Writing iPhone applications is a difficult, skilled process that can take a lot of time. Supporting and improving said application can also burn the hours. So if someone wants a buck or two in compensation, I, for one, am not going to cry over it. Especially if it means a steady supply of cheap and useful applications, games, and utilities.

But if YOU want to spend a week or month or more writing an iPhone application and then give it away for free, more power to you.

Re:Are there more than 20 apps for it? (2, Insightful)

s73v3r (963317) | more than 4 years ago | (#27902523)

Developers can make free (beer/speech) apps. Developers can also choose to make an app where they ask marketing questions. Many people decide to make an app, give it away for free, and support development with ads. Is it so bad that someone wants to make money?

Re:Are there more than 20 apps for it? (1)

Blakey Rat (99501) | more than 4 years ago | (#27901661)

I like how the "killer feature" (according to T-Mobile's flash site on the phone) is that it tracks your carbon impact and you can buy carbon credits right from the phone! That's going to get me off my iPhone? That's seriously the best you got?

Re:Are there more than 20 apps for it? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27901775)

I love the typical apple users thinking... "their are more quality apps for the iphone than all other os. Total apps combined" and I've had winmo and android,. The average android user downloads 41 apps, that's per google.... get your facts straight or get off

Re:Are there more than 20 apps for it? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27901805)

You stole my post. Dead on.

Re:Are there more than 20 apps for it? (4, Informative)

Buelldozer (713671) | more than 4 years ago | (#27901835)

"The iphone has more quality apps than all other platforms have total apps combined."

No. Not even close. In your utterance of that hyperbole you've given away your fanboi status.

The numbers on this are a bit difficult to track down but it's very clear that the IPhone is nowhere near WinMo and you can absolutely forget about it if you combine Palm and Symbian application numbers.

Here's a quick rundown.

In late July of LAST year WinMo _alone_ had 18K applications.

http://www.informationweek.com/blog/main/archives/2008/07/windows_mobile_7.html [informationweek.com]

Some estimates put Palm at 80,000 back in ***2005***.

http://www.pocketprof.org/running_palm_os_software.htm [pocketprof.org]

Symbian numbers are very difficult to come up with but a low ballpark would be 10,000 of them.

The IPhone currently has about 15,000 applications listed in the app store ( http://pogue.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/02/05/so-many-iphone-apps-so-little-time/ [nytimes.com] ).

It's clear that your statement isn't anywhere near true.

Please leave some of Mr. Jobs AHEM for his wife, sir.

WiMo a distant second. (-1, Flamebait)

shmlco (594907) | more than 4 years ago | (#27902499)

First, go to the iPhone page of the Apple web site and see if you can read the big number in the middle of the page.

Never mind, I'll save you the trouble, it's 35,000. And that number was not hard to track down at all. http://www.apple.com/iphone/ [apple.com]

Further, a CURRENT Microsoft press release (March '09), states, "Current Windows® phone users already have access to more than 20,000 applications through multiple distribution partners." http://www.microsoft.com/presspass/press/2009/mar09/03-30CTIA09PR.mspx [microsoft.com]

35,000. 20,000. 35,000. 20,000. 35,000. 20,000. Hmmmmm. Which number is larger?

Sorry, but in your utterance of your rabid denial you've given away your anti-Apple-fanboi status.

Re:Are there more than 20 apps for it? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27901875)

On the contrary, I wish the iPhone had a lot of apps that you'll only find on Windows Mobile.

You're not limited to 10-20 apps. ...I have 30-40.

Re:Are there more than 20 apps for it? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27901961)

For the tech savvy users who have root access on their Android device, one can create an ext2 partition on their SD card to expand the phones perceived memory (where apps are stored). I have a 16GB microSD (Class 6) card in my G1, 512MB of which is dedicated to "phone" memory for storing applications and their settings/configurations.

Re:Are there more than 20 apps for it? (1)

tuna_wasabi (792557) | more than 4 years ago | (#27902219)

The iphone [sic] has more quality apps than all other platforms have total apps combined.

[Citation Needed]

android sucks (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27901511)

android and everything google does, sucks.

i hate google, gmail, youtube, etc. fuck'em

Re:android sucks (5, Funny)

4D6963 (933028) | more than 4 years ago | (#27901569)

android and everything google does, sucks.

i hate google, gmail, youtube, etc. fuck'em

A most compelling argument, I am convinced!!

Re:android sucks (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27902381)

This is slashdot, less compeling arguments have been sufficient with other companies products.

Re:android sucks (5, Funny)

koutbo6 (1134545) | more than 4 years ago | (#27901589)

Balmer .. is that you?

Re:android sucks (3, Funny)

ScrewMaster (602015) | more than 4 years ago | (#27901649)

Balmer .. is that you?

Nah ... he just said he hates Google. Now, if he'd said he was going to (and I quote) "fuckin' KILL Google", well, yes, that would probably be Ballmer.

And the #1 feature to love in Cupcake... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27901553)

is not on the list. It's JesusFreke's super-special version [andblogs.net] (this version based on the HTC build). If you've rooted your phone or have the developer root-enabled "ADP" version, you'll definitely want it.

Features include:

* Everything in regular HTC cupcake, plus [odiness.com]...
* Netfilter support in the kernel
* multitouch "pinching" support in the browser
* A superuser app for "blessing" other apps to access root stuff
* Support for the apps-to-SD hack
* busybox in the shell (included)
* none of the crappy space-stealing applications bundled by your phone company you never use

Sure you could add all this stuff yourself, but why?

Install at your own risk.

Exciting but still unappealing & limited hardw (5, Insightful)

blahbooboo (839709) | more than 4 years ago | (#27901557)

I really like Android as concept. Unfortunately, in the USA the number of devices are not very appealing (the ones that are available). My carrier doesn't even have android phones. Strange, because the whole point of Android I figured was to allow manufacturers to focus on innovative cell phone designs. Maybe manufacturers will eventually make more phones with Android, but right now they are kinda lousy IMHO.

Until better hardware, the future is Palm Pre or iPhone

Re:Exciting but still unappealing & limited ha (2, Informative)

CyDharttha (939997) | more than 4 years ago | (#27902243)

Patience, young Padawan. They're coming; Motorola's been all abuzz about it for a few months now, they're hoping it will save their skin. Samsung and Sony are among others that have announced phones arriving in 2009.

Besides, there's only one Android phone in the US market now, and it just came out 6 months ago.

http://www.informationweek.com/news/personal_tech/smartphones/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=212501692 [informationweek.com]

Re:Exciting but still unappealing & limited ha (1)

Hohlraum (135212) | more than 4 years ago | (#27902283)

I think I can wait until tmobile gets better 3g coverage or more carriers get android phones. If you want an open platform for your next phone you'll be getting an android phone, cuz afaik there are really no other options.

Missing Enterprise Feature (1)

PaisteUser (810863) | more than 4 years ago | (#27901587)

The OS is still missing native MS Exchange support. Our company currently utilizes T-Mobile as a wireless provider and this is the single biggest hangup from us deploying the G1 handsets. I do realize that there are 3rd party apps that provide this functionality, but that gets expensive when you roll out 100+ devices.

Re:Missing Enterprise Feature (4, Insightful)

salesgeek (263995) | more than 4 years ago | (#27901619)

Actually, you have the issue backwards. Your selection of MS-Exchange as a messaging platform has limited the financially viable choices available to your firm to basically, Windows Mobile. Don't blame your vendor lock in on anyone other than your messaging vendor and the person who decided to buy MS-Exchange. You didn't HAVE TO do it.

Double-Dog-Damn-Ditto! (1)

rickb928 (945187) | more than 4 years ago | (#27902177)

About time someone pointed out the real problem with Exchange interoperability. The only way you get it is if M$ lets you.

And of course, the inscrutible API, poor programming support, and the general fun of making a Windows anything work on a non-Windows anything. You almost have to go back to ASP to get a break.

Of course, they coulda chosen Notes. Or GroupWise. And scrap the rest of their Windows investment. Lock-in sucks, man.

Re:Missing Enterprise Feature (1)

jcnnghm (538570) | more than 4 years ago | (#27902307)

Actually, you have the issue backwards. Your selection of MS-Exchange as a messaging platform has limited the financially viable choices available to your firm to basically, Windows Mobile. Don't blame your vendor lock in on anyone other than your messaging vendor and the person who decided to buy MS-Exchange. You didn't HAVE TO do it.

Exchange != Sendmail. Which free groupware package do you recommend?

Re:Missing Enterprise Feature (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27902353)

Might find some alternatives here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_collaborative_software [wikipedia.org]

Re:Missing Enterprise Feature (1)

SaDan (81097) | more than 4 years ago | (#27902423)

Good list, and I highly recommend Zimbra. I've had the distinct pleasure of implementing Zimbra for an ISP that had a few decent sized corporate customers. Once a few of them saw what we were providing for all of our subscribers, they asked about setting up corporate accounts with us (switching their corporate domain MX records to point at our servers, etc), and dumped their Exchange systems.

Re:Missing Enterprise Feature (1)

jcnnghm (538570) | more than 4 years ago | (#27902527)

Zimbra actually costs more than Exchange for the same feature set. Why pay more for less.

i just got off the toilet (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27901713)

i shit out an obama.

plop!

Re:i just got off the toilet (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27901925)

ugh. this is old. It's not funny, or clever. It's not even a good troll. For the love of trolls everywhere, FIND A NEW SCHTICK.

i would, but data plan is risky & incomprehens (1, Troll)

mkcmkc (197982) | more than 4 years ago | (#27901733)

I would love to have and develop for one of these, but the various service plans required to use them seem murky, incomprehensible, and extremely risky.

  • Murky and Incomprehensible: Can anyone surf one of the Android sites and figure out WTF plans you actually need to run these phones and what it will cost per year? It's worse than buying a house. I'd rather try to figure out the federal deficit.
  • Risky: I keep reading these stories about people who traveled and came home to discover a phone bill larger than my annual salary. Sorry, but I am not going to risk my financial well-being to own a whizzy phone.

Until they can fix these problems, I'm sitting on the sidelines.

Re:i would, but data plan is risky & incompreh (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27901819)

Why in the world are you looking at Android sites to find information on pricing plans? The only confirmed carrier is T-Mobile and all their information is on their site.

geeesh.

Re:i would, but data plan is risky & incompreh (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27902247)

The world is not american, idiot.

!Troll (4, Interesting)

Max Littlemore (1001285) | more than 4 years ago | (#27902201)

The parent makes some good points

I own an HTC Dream (called TMobile G1 in the US). My first phone bill after I bought the phone was $200 more than usual. It is now dropped because I changed my plan to allow for more mobile data, but buying the phone to start with, I had no idea that when I first turned it on it would start downloading a crap load of my gmail. It took me a little bit to figure out how to get the data usage down.

I really like the phone, but I wish there was clearer pre-sales on how much data it was going to use and how to make it cheaper to operate. I also would like a "turn data off - just be a phone" mode. Also the fact that it's advertised as having bluetooth but still - even with cupcake - can't do bluetooth file transfer is just stupid.

works for me (5, Informative)

soundguy (415780) | more than 4 years ago | (#27901911)

The G-1 has all the "killer apps" I need at the moment - Accuweather, Google Maps with GPS, an IP Cam viewer so I can monitor my security cams at home and at my datacenter, SSH client, voice recorder, handy tools like data conversions, a level, a ruler and of course the Magic 8-ball. The browser works for the kind of things I need every day - my MRTG graphs, logging into my switches, routers, and remote-reboot controllers. It doesn't do SlashDot for shit though...someone needs to work on that.

Seriously, anyone judging a smart phone based solely on the camera, eye-candy, and "gaming experience" is probably 12 years old. Mine is a tool to help me earn a living first, and a toy second.

Re:works for me (2, Interesting)

MrCrassic (994046) | more than 4 years ago | (#27902053)

Unfortunately, several thousand iPhone owners would probably disagree with your ideology. Most people use their cell phones as tools too, except not in the same light as you use yours. To some, having a cameraphone or gaming capability is of utmost importance; that doesn't make them any more of an immature customer.

I owned an iPhone for a while, and while I was mostly pleased with it, I found it to be very premature as a smart-phone. It met the general requirements for everything except internet browsing, where it exceeded them in spades, but only barely. If iPhone 3.0 changes that, then I might go back. I am, however, getting more interested in the Android platform.

For those that have used an iPhone previously, what differences should I keep in mind while making the transition? Does the G1 play music as good as the iPhone/iPod Touch does? How is its e-mail client? How does internet browsing compare?

apt-get install (1)

Doc Ruby (173196) | more than 4 years ago | (#27902107)

If I could apt-get install any Debian or Ubuntu package that runs on the Android phone's HW, perhaps from my desktop cross-compiling it to the phone, I'd be really psyched.

Re:apt-get install (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27902279)

you can. Look for the debian port. It takes a little work to get in place, but it runs well enough once you've done it.

Cupcakes anyone? (0, Troll)

DownWithMedia1.0 (1547249) | more than 4 years ago | (#27902229)

Im just curious, dont people realize that Google records everything you do on Android and stores it for as long as they wish, while claiming complete ownership rights over it?? This is the same with all of their products. If the open tech community cant even see through Google's game plan, the world is truly helpless from them.

Video recording can't be found on rival platforms? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27902365)

The software brings a host of new capabilities, some of which can't be found on rival mobile platforms, including video recording and sharing.

Why is it that I can record video with even my crappy Nokia 2600 classic? Even more than that, I don't know any Nokia with a camera that can't record video.

And about the sharing. I can even send videos attached to multimedia messages. As far as I know, that feature has been in Nokias like forever.

linux.slashdot.org/ok.txt (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27902567)

Can anyone explain to me why I'm getting:
"GET http://linux.slashdot.org/ok.txt [slashdot.org] HTTP/1.0" 404"

In my Apache logs? Is this some kind of test to stop spam bots? or something potentially more sinister?

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