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Office 2010 Technical Preview Leaked

Soulskill posted more than 4 years ago | from the that-didn't-take-long dept.

Software 341

An anonymous reader writes "Microsoft was planning on giving out the Office 2010 Technical Preview to select testers in July on an invite-only basis. Office 2010 will be available in 32-bit and 64-bit versions, and both flavors have been leaked to torrent sites and the like. Multiple screenshots of each application are available. '... some applications have changed a lot more than others. The ribbon seems to be on every application now, which is great for consistency's sake. ... The biggest change, in my opinion, is that the no file/orb menu is no longer a menu. When you click the colored office button, you get a screen that is shown in the second screenshot for each application.'"

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341 comments

FIRST POST LEAKED (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27986981)

bend over fag, I'm going to stick my cock up your gay-ass ass!!!!

Here's a bedtime story for you too, AC. by JonKatz (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27987081)

And the Bit Shifter hid under the bed as ideas danced in little Robby's sleaping head. Feeding him the thoughts to do for the day that would put news on Slashdot's a better way. When out from the closet sprang the Evil Bit and chased the Bit Shifter out through the door, down the hall, and onto the floor where rang the nightly call of CowboyNeal houling through the Intercom wishing well another day of LINUX.COM and Slashdot's over-extended stay. Wouldn't you know it, out in the yard, a Gnome distracts into the two datagrams a Goatse of Peccard, with vissions of Priceline.com sending Shatner on a ogo-pogo stick, sent up the ass of ol' Kike Thomas the Spick. With a hearty goodbye, the Gnome gave a yodel, back into Kathleen Fent's cunt he climed, saying Merry Christmas and don't ask me why.

Good night Anonymous Coward (*kiss)
The End

PS: NOW GET YOUR ASS OFF SLASHDOT AND GET SOME SLEEP, because deprivation might kill you -- you, the asset of all of Slashdot's inspiration that keeps these forums going!

Re:FIRST POST LEAKED (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27987437)

I am all for a reinvented Holocaust that, rather than killing jews, we round up thugs and put them out of our misery. The number one problem in the US and the world right now are thugs that believe acting like animals is the proper way to function in society. All they do is impregnant/get pregnant, wait for the welfare check, and cause meaningless acts of violence. I say if they really love reenacting 50 cent, lets put them on the receiving end of a bullet and see how much they like it. Thugs cause property damage, are harmful to quality of life, and put an undue burden on the state to support them. They are an eye sore of society and there should be a call to arms to take any and all thugs out. Being a thug transcends race, nationality, or color, it is a choice that needs to be crushed. No one should have to live in fear or be on high alert because a burden of the state decide he wants to have some fun and rob/rape/kill someone. Let's turn the tables on these animals and end them all. All those dead thugs will also be less people to contribute to our carbon foot print and more resources to people who actually need them. Imagine how many students would be able to get an education if there were more money freed up from having to feed, clothe, and house a useless thug. These belligerents of society need a new Holocaust to end their world forever, and only then will the world progress.

Let me be the first to say: (0, Flamebait)

AndGodSed (968378) | more than 4 years ago | (#27986985)

No Thanks.

I have everything I need in OpenOffice, and it is better priced too...

Re:Let me be the first to say: (0, Redundant)

VagaStorm (691999) | more than 4 years ago | (#27987023)

Yes, there might be more bells and wistels in MSOffice, but the fact remain; Everything I need is in OpenOffice, and at a WAY better price!

Re:Let me be the first to say: (5, Insightful)

duiu (1480325) | more than 4 years ago | (#27987087)

Everything I need is in OpenOffice, and at a WAY better price!

That may be the case for you, but the fact is there is nothing along the lines of Microsoft Vizio in OpenOffice, and the OpenOffice Calc is simply not up to par with Microsoft Excel. The word processing is great in OpenOffice, but for some things OpenOffice just doesn't cut it. Go ahead, flame me, mod me down. But I'm sticking with Microsoft Office. I probably won't update to 2010 anytime soon (I just updated to 2007 when I had a chance to pay only $20 for it). Microsoft is pain, .docx is a dick move, but the fact remains that overall, for the advanced user, M$ Office is better. And yes, I do have an Ubuntu computer as well as a Windows computer and I have used OpenOffice and I am not a fanboy of Microsoft.

Re:Let me be the first to say: (1, Insightful)

AndGodSed (968378) | more than 4 years ago | (#27987159)

Read my post again - everything I need is in OO. Everything you need is not.

Welcome to the world of free software - you get to choose.

And why should you be modded down or flamed? You make valid points - for some things OO doesn't cut it, that is true, but for everything I (and everybody I know who uses it) need OO cuts it very well.

Btw if you do not need MSAccess you can run Office very well on that Ubuntu PC of yours if you have Crossover for Linux (I prefer it to WINE.)

Have a nice day, and here's to you plunking that Windows install very soon!

Unless you are a gamer - the "other" geek ;)

Re:Let me be the first to say: (1)

evilad (87480) | more than 4 years ago | (#27987171)

Psst! You're flaming him/her/it. Gently, but nevertheless. The bolded "you" is the tip-off.

Re:Let me be the first to say: (3, Informative)

snl2587 (1177409) | more than 4 years ago | (#27987193)

Have you tried Dia as an alternative to Visio? I've used Visio myself in the past, but it seems that Dia does just as much as I ever did with Visio.

Re:Let me be the first to say: (2, Insightful)

blincoln (592401) | more than 4 years ago | (#27987343)

Have you tried Dia as an alternative to Visio?

Dia is off to a great start (I use it myself), but it's got a long way to go to catch up with Visio. The interface is not as intuitive (sort of the GIMP syndrome), and it needs a library of shapes designed by good artists.

Re:Let me be the first to say: (0, Redundant)

rackserverdeals (1503561) | more than 4 years ago | (#27987361)

Have you tried Dia as an alternative to Visio? I've used Visio myself in the past, but it seems that Dia does just as much as I ever did with Visio.

It would be nice if there was a visio replacement in openoffice.org.

Dia comes pretty close in functionality but it's biggest drawback is the lack of great looking shapes for different lines of work.

Re:Let me be the first to say: (2, Insightful)

ozmanjusri (601766) | more than 4 years ago | (#27987273)

there is nothing along the lines of Microsoft Vizio in OpenOffice,

Huh?

Vizio isn't part of any of the Office suites. It's effectively a completely separate package.

Anyway, OpenOffice Draw has no equivalent in the MS collection and is arguably much more useful to the average user.

Re:Let me be the first to say: (2, Informative)

Penguin Follower (576525) | more than 4 years ago | (#27987369)

Microsoft had a program in Office 2000 (Premium Edition) called PhotoDraw. Apparently, it was not popular enough as Microsoft discontinued PhotoDraw.

Re:Let me be the first to say: (2, Informative)

jonbryce (703250) | more than 4 years ago | (#27987451)

Expression Design is their equivalent program. I guess it targets Adobe Illustrator more than OpenOffice Draw.

However, their "Mac support" is a copy of Parallels. Sorry, that isn't going to work.

Re:Let me be the first to say: (5, Informative)

duiu (1480325) | more than 4 years ago | (#27987513)

Visio isn't part of any of the Office suites. It's effectively a completely separate package.

Did you even look at the screenshots in the article that clearly show Visio as part of Office 2010 in the Start Menu? There's a difference between "part of the Office suites" and "included in the Office suite that most people have." And the fact that only a few advanced users use Visio just goes to further my point.

Re:Let me be the first to say: (1)

RudeIota (1131331) | more than 4 years ago | (#27987609)

Vizio is not included with any version of Microsoft Office, but Draw is an alternative to MS Publisher (which DOES come with Office Professional). Sure, Draw is substantially different than Publisher IMO, but it's competing for the same mind share.

I love OO -- Writer is a fantastic word processor. There are even certain things it does better IMO (the way it handles containers/tables, built-in PDF support and support for alternative formats among other things...)

But OO just isn't suitable to compete against MSO Professional for people who actually use the extra junk that Professional comes with. There's no Outlook alternative, for example. Using Thunderbird as an IMAP alternative does *email* fine, but you can forget meeting scheduling, calendaring, sharing contacts and tons of other junk. (including a lot of proprietary MS BS) People really do use this stuff though.

While I believe Writer is the most viable alternative to anything in the MSO suite, it too, has its shortcomings. MSO takes the lead in usability and polish with things like grammar checking, being able to hold the Shift + CTRL keys and selecting separate swaths of text or cells at once, commenting is clearer and more visible and so many other 'little things'.

I think the bottom-line is though, OO does everything *most* people (Read: Home users & some businesses) need out of the box... and it's free.

Re:Let me be the first to say: (4, Interesting)

Patch86 (1465427) | more than 4 years ago | (#27987299)

While I agree with you about Excel (I use Excel at work, Calc at home), the difference doesn't tend to be significant. I find life a little smoother with Excel, but there's nothing I fundamentally can't do in Calc relatively easily. Excel has handy features which make day to day jobs easier, but they're all features that exist in a lesser form in Calc. I could live with Calc no problem.

I've never used Vizio, and I prefer OO.o Writer to MS Word. Powerpoint and Impress are near as dammit for what I need, and I rarely have call to use the rest.

Bearing in mind that OpenOffice is free (beer, speech, etc.), I find the comparison very favourable.

Re:Let me be the first to say: (1)

Cousarr (1117563) | more than 4 years ago | (#27987415)

Keep in mind that for the longest time something excel could do that calc couldn't was determine the linear regression for a set of data and display that regression equation on the graph. That's a fundamental difference I've encountered that's forced me to use Excel in the past. Open office can now display the regression equations on the graph but there are bound to be more fundamental differences out there.

Re:Let me be the first to say: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27987561)

Keep in mind that Open Office has had Chi-Squared regression analysis for a long time. Last time I looked, Excel didn't have it. Chi-Squared is essential for what I do. Since Open Office make's it easy and Excel doesn't, MS Office is worthless to me and hence to everyone else. After all, only my needs are important.

Re:Let me be the first to say: (1)

Tubal-Cain (1289912) | more than 4 years ago | (#27987435)

That may be the case for you, but the fact is there is nothing along the lines of Microsoft Vizio in OpenOffice.

On that note, would you mind telling me what it is that Visio does?

Re:Let me be the first to say: (1)

gbjbaanb (229885) | more than 4 years ago | (#27987491)

Looking at the screenshots Visio is not present - only "Visio Viewer". Perhaps it'll be an additional-cost addon?

Same applies to Groove (not that anyone I know uses it). Its not listed in the installer list. Possibly this is a good thing.

As for Excel, fair enough, excel is pretty powerful. However I think that is a problem. If you need all that power with it scripting and macros and so on, you're creating the worst kind of monstrosity spreadsheets that should never, ever have been created in the first place.

Re:Let me be the first to say: (1)

CyDharttha (939997) | more than 4 years ago | (#27987617)

I use OpenOffice Draw [openoffice.org] as an alternative to Visio. I'm able to make good looking flowcharts and network diagrams and save them to PDF. Works great for what I need it for. Colleagues have never had a negative comment regarding the diagrams etc.

It's odd how little need I have for spreadsheet software. I don't know where I'm going wrong that I don't get to use one more often :) As a network engineer and administrator, I still find the only value for me in a spreadsheet is doing my monthly finances (very simple) at home. Once in a while I'll use Calc [openoffice.org] to format some cvs file before importing to a database. I guess I've also built up some service quotes in a spreadsheet, but Calc was good enough for that as well, and the resulting PDF looked great, rather professional even.

Re:Let me be the first to say: (4, Funny)

daveime (1253762) | more than 4 years ago | (#27987163)

Pehaps you could check your bells and wistels in Open Office spellchecker before posting ?

Re:Let me be the first to say: (1)

snl2587 (1177409) | more than 4 years ago | (#27987199)

He could have. But I don't know of many people who type into their Office application of choice rather than just their browser or a lightweight pad when posting.

Re:Let me be the first to say: (4, Insightful)

rackserverdeals (1503561) | more than 4 years ago | (#27987453)

He could have. But I don't know of many people who type into their Office application of choice rather than just their browser or a lightweight pad when posting.

Ugh. That just reminded me of all the times I'd open up a word document that was sent as an email attachment that just said something like "Project meeting today at 2:00."

Re:Let me be the first to say: (2, Funny)

VagaStorm (691999) | more than 4 years ago | (#27987313)

Sry, just installed windows7 rc, and I don't have everything in yet :/ lol, including my bootloader :p

Re:Let me be the first to say: (1)

pommiekiwifruit (570416) | more than 4 years ago | (#27987045)

Outline mode? I know they want to add it to Write but I didn't think it was there yet. Until then, OO is useless for anything longer than a page or two.

Re:Let me be the first to say: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27987563)

"useless for anything longer than a page or two"

Good Lord, talk about spoiled. I remember writing 100+ page documents on GEOS on the Commodore 128 back in the mid 80's, and before that on Paperback Writer on the C64 (no WYSIWYG! Imagine that!) They didn't have any outline mode and it was just fine.

It's amazing how many companies have people just absolutely convinced that they NEED certain features that really aren't all the critical.

Marketing...

Re:Let me be the first to say: (4, Funny)

sopssa (1498795) | more than 4 years ago | (#27987065)

No thanks.

Notepad has always been all I've needed. If I need something else, I code it.

Re:Let me be the first to say: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27987549)

really. guess you never wanted to actually produce anything worthwhile.

Re:Let me be the first to say: (1, Insightful)

Jamie's Nightmare (1410247) | more than 4 years ago | (#27987079)

And you get what you pay for. Like bugs guaranteed to put you at risk for losing saved data, discovered in beta [openoffice.org] , but released anyway without being fixed. The mother fuckers responsible should have lost their job... oh wait, it's open source. Who cares. If you value your time and work you're probably better off buying Sun's Star Office. For typing notes to grandma, OO is great.

Re:Let me be the first to say: (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27987221)

or you can just, you know, save your changes regularly. ctrl+s isnt that hard to do

Re:Let me be the first to say: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27987487)

Beta software looses your data. What else is new?
And by the way, if you would read microsofts EULA you'dd know you can sue them for up to 5 USD, this is so much better than open source *cough*.

Re:Let me be the first to say: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27987493)

OpenOffice is the most overappreciated open source software. Annoying to use buggy bloatware. If that's the best open source can produce, it's no wonder people don't want open source products.

Re:Let me be the first to say: (1)

darkmeridian (119044) | more than 4 years ago | (#27987545)

I guess you don't need calendaring functionality that works with your Blackberry. Business users need that capability, especially to interoperate with our business systems.

I can see how OpenOffice is useful for the average college student, though.

Oops? Or clever ploy? (1)

Evardsson (959228) | more than 4 years ago | (#27986987)

Is this really a mistake or is it a clever marketing ploy to get this into the hands of everyone who is running the Windows 7 Release Candidate (which is the Ultimate version, btw). Get 'em hooked now, and then when the preview version expires hope that turns into sales ...

Re:Oops? Or clever ploy? (1)

Z00L00K (682162) | more than 4 years ago | (#27987099)

Of course it's marketing. Get it posted on Slashdot and you will get a lot of people to talk about it.

And in the name of "user friendliness" - they have changed the UI again. And since there are few competing products they can do just whatever they like these days and people have to accept it. It doesn't have to be good anymore, it will sell anyway.

Right now there is a lot of time lost to figure out how the **** you do things that you did in earlier versions like 2003...

If we really need a 64-bit version of office - that's a good question. Most applications like Word and Excel aren't really going to benefit from it. But on the other hand - there won't be a disadvantage either.

Not the biggest fan (3, Insightful)

ironicsky (569792) | more than 4 years ago | (#27987017)

I've gotten used to the ribbon by force, but Im still not the biggest fan. I find the location of alot of commands to be counter intuitive. For example, no Page Setup in the print option from the Office Orb item. Office 2007 introduced alot of good features such as saving as a PDF but I wish they would give users the option of collapsing the ribbon back in to proper menu's for consistency with every other app not made by Microsoft. Its great they are trying something different but seem to have little buy in from software vendors, otherwise all apps would be ribbons instead of menus

Re:Not the biggest fan (2, Interesting)

wootest (694923) | more than 4 years ago | (#27987067)

I actually agree with them on the Page Setup thing. You're changing how the document looks and it affects the layout - it should belong near the canvas like everything else that has to do with formatting.

The Ribbon is a good fit for document-based, layout-heavy applications with many commands. It's barely a good fit for all Office applications. It should have stayed in Office, or at least never leaked to applications with much smaller footprints. I'd also like for them to upgrade it with a command search that highlights where to go so that you may learn, not one (like the add-in from Office Live) that just brings you matching commands.

Re:Not the biggest fan (1)

YrWrstNtmr (564987) | more than 4 years ago | (#27987093)

but I wish they would give users the option of collapsing the ribbon back in to proper menu's for consistency with every other app not made by Microsoft

Right-click on the ribbon|Minimize the Ribbon
Done.

Re:Not the biggest fan (4, Interesting)

blincoln (592401) | more than 4 years ago | (#27987389)

Right-click on the ribbon|Minimize the Ribbon

That doesn't give you the old menus back. It gives you the ribbon tabs which expand back to the full ribbon when you click on them.

My theory is that MS implemented the ribbon because they seem to have a mistaken belief that their UI should be consistent across platforms (desktop PC/server, table, tablet, handheld). In the end, they have a UI that doesn't work well for any of them. The Start Menu is a terrible paradigm for a handheld device, and the ribbon is a terrible one for desktop PCs.

This is even infecting their design of server-side applications. All of the MMCs for e.g. IIS 7 are more like navigating through Windows Explorer in icon mode than previous versions.

Different device types should have different interfaces that take advantage of the strengths of that platform. Keeping them consistent is less important than making them as user-friendly as possible.

Re:Not the biggest fan (2, Insightful)

DarkOx (621550) | more than 4 years ago | (#27987515)

My problem with the ribbon is that its in the way. Most of us are working most of the time on documents we intend to print portrait on 8x11 paper when we use Office software. The trend as of late is to monitors that are 16x9 or 16x10 aspect. That is not conducive for portrait work in the first place, its a real PITA when you start sucking up the remaining vertical space for your 200px think ribbon.

Ribbon might have been a good idea if it was done vertical up the side rather then along the top.

Re:Not the biggest fan (2, Interesting)

mehrotra.akash (1539473) | more than 4 years ago | (#27987103)

somehow, unlike everyone else, I find the ribbon quite useful compared to the original menu system, have discovered many options in word/excel/ppt that i never knew were there making pivot tables had also been made much easier in 2007 also, the formatting dialog that opens when you select some text is incredibly useful wonder what more innovations we will get in 2010

Re:Not the biggest fan (1)

sponga (739683) | more than 4 years ago | (#27987227)

You mean like AutoCAD adding the ribbon bar and a lot of other beta software out there now in development; you would be surprised how the younger AutoCAD developers take a liking to it while the vets will stick to their command line.

You should check the beta software scene out for Windows, you might be in for a rude awakening for what is upcoming in some of the most popular software and the ribbon bars they have added.

Obviously things like CD/DVD burning and other little chickenshit software has no need for ribbons, movie editors and things like Final Cut Pro could probably take a tip from this. Navigating the Final Cut Pro menu is pretty hectic from what I can remember in some of the use I did with it.

Agree with things being counter intuitive. (2, Interesting)

taxman_10m (41083) | more than 4 years ago | (#27987483)

Need to insert a column or row in Excel? Go to the tab labeled Insert and...

One of the early lessons of GUIs (5, Insightful)

hey! (33014) | more than 4 years ago | (#27987027)

was for developers to stop creating their own interfaces for things like printing or saving files. Our applications would be more usable if we just used the underlying platform's routines and conventions.

I wonder whether Office turning its back on Windows UI conventions isn't a long term hedge against the desktop OS monopoly collapsing. Without a monopoly, is Windows worth the effort and cost for Microsoft?

Imagine that Windows fails. Office remains an economically important platform. Who knows? Maybe we'll have a return to the days of dedicated word processing hardware, with devices that "run office".

Re:One of the early lessons of GUIs (0, Offtopic)

NevarMore (248971) | more than 4 years ago | (#27987071)

It looks like business as usual to me.

MS will eventually shift the standard file ops to this new style, but only after they've been using it in their own products long enough to make competitors (OpenOffice?) look behind the times.

Re:One of the early lessons of GUIs (1)

wootest (694923) | more than 4 years ago | (#27987089)

I'm inclined to believe Microsoft when they say that the vast majority of the features requested were already in the product. At that point, you have to do something about the user interface. We can argue over whether the Ribbon was the best way to go, but if you want to take Microsoft to task for *spuriously custom* UIs, there are much better examples than the Ribbon.

Re:One of the early lessons of GUIs (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27987109)

This is a good point, but I think Office has these special UI elements for psychological, not technical reasons - they differentiate Office from the rest of the OS (and horizontal competitors like OO.org) in your mind & make you think Office is somehow special/unique/valuable. The earliest example I can think of is Office 2000 (iirc), which had gradients in the title bars before the rest of the OS supported it.

Re:One of the early lessons of GUIs (1)

Val314 (219766) | more than 4 years ago | (#27987177)

Office allways did its own way in GUI widgets.

Lets look at Word 95 [sunflowerhead.com] that hast "Microsoft" as a non-standard Text in the title bar
Or the new Open dialogue that came in some version and later was made the default in Windows.
Or hacks like (some?) Office 2003 on Win XP that made the documents of the MDI apps appear as separate "Apps" in the Task bar.

So: i wouldn't read anything into this. the ribbon is comming in Windows 7 to some apps and most likely in Windows 8 to the rest of them.

Re:One of the early lessons of GUIs (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27987341)

The ribbon UI is abundant in Windows 7, and is provided as part of the MFC update to Visual Studio 2008. It's not turning its back against the OS, it's showcasing it.

What the f*** is happening to Office? (4, Insightful)

rx-sp (1161741) | more than 4 years ago | (#27987053)

I know Office extremely well... Or at least I used to. With these latest releases, it's like the developers have taken magic mushrooms and decided to visit Venus. Seriously, what's going on? Why has everything changed? Who are these changes designed to help? Why did they decide to abandon the system of menus that's been in service since 1984? Just because they've been in service since 1984? That's like Ford abandoning the idea of a steering wheel because it's been used in cars since 1900. When I look at things like this, I see how far from the straight and narrow Microsoft has strayed. They are really losing all track of what's important to users. They've just lost touch completely. I'll say one thing for Bill Gates, and one thing only, but the guy could keep his organization together and produce some half-decent software. Ballmer's just a nutjob who's steering the company into the ground.

Re:What the f*** is happening to Office? (1)

mehrotra.akash (1539473) | more than 4 years ago | (#27987129)

the ribbons actually make the interface much more usable to new users, ask any 10-15y old kid thats microsofts target audience isnt it??

Re:What the f*** is happening to Office? (1)

nitroyogi (1471601) | more than 4 years ago | (#27987583)

Yes. 10-15y old kids. Thats what those ribbons are for. Infact the whole MS Office is for 10-15y old kids. Yes. They are 'the' target audience. Yes, indeed.

Oh wait ... did someone say - 'Business Users'?

Aa. Must be Ballmer's gas.

But I can't help thinking - No wonder the economy is in drains if MS Office powered 10-15y olds are doing business.

Re:What the f*** is happening to Office? (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27987151)

If they keep the look stable and just add refinements it becomes only a matter of time before Open Office and the like completely replicate not only functionality but also the look making them truly interchangeable.

We've got the functionality of office suites pretty much figured out, the only place they can differentiate themselves is in the GUI interface and the shark can't stop moving.

Re:What the f*** is happening to Office? (5, Insightful)

DeadChobi (740395) | more than 4 years ago | (#27987287)

Menus are an archaic throwback to a time where we had to press keyboard combinations to access anything. They aren't well organized for mouse users, but the fact that they're organized in an "up-down/left-right" fashion makes them perfect for people who use the keyboard to navigate. I find the ribbons make me much faster at formatting documents than the old system of menus. What's really nice is that I don't have to enter 4 sub menus just to insert a math equation or a symbol into my work. And the visual table insertion tool is really useful for those of us who don't want to think about how many, just how it should look.

Seriously, if you keep one hand on the mouse and one on the keyboard, it's much faster to create equations and documents in Word than in OpenOffice. I used to be a staunch OpenOffice supporter, but it's nice to not have to memorize keywords and keypress combos just to be halfway efficient at writing documents.

$200.00 is $200 well spent for me.

Re:What the f*** is happening to Office? (2, Informative)

centuren (106470) | more than 4 years ago | (#27987293)

I haven't seen or read anything about the new interface before this, so the screenshots weren't especially helpful in seeing what people are complaining about. So I found a video, while not the best walk through by a long shot, shows some of the new interface in action [youtube.com] .

Generally, I like new ideas being tried out, even when part of the benefit of a product is everyone being familiar with the previous way it did things. In this specific case, I don't particularly have much of a stake in how it turns out. I just write content from time to time (technical specs for small development projects) and someone else provides the template, so it hasn't been that important what word processor is used (it's been Pages mostly, with a little Word).

Even so, watching this video made me think "click, click, click, click", or something along those lines. Without the standard menu, are keyboard shortcuts (of the alt-f or alt-e variety, quick-browing menus to find an option) still be as prevalent?

I imagine tabbing toolbars and that panel down the left is a move to "unbury" options from menus and make them more accessible, but if I end up having to go to the mouse more often it'll be less productive for me, even if it's generally more intuitive overall.

Re:What the f*** is happening to Office? (4, Funny)

Kenshin (43036) | more than 4 years ago | (#27987371)

Yes, and why the hell did they abandon the command line for all this mouse bullshit? Why has everything changed? They must be eating mushrooms and are crazy!

Re:What the f*** is happening to Office? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27987441)

hahahaha
have you seen the screenshots? "SEND A SMILE" - it lets you send either a smiley face or a FROWN to Microsoft, telling them what you think of their products.
It goes to show that MS pretty much didn't read any feedback whatsoever, now they've hired maybe one or two guys to read up the tally.

Drone 1: "98 frowns? is it defective?"
Drone 2: "Uh.. I'm off to sell my stock"

Re:What the f*** is happening to Office? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27987495)

To answer your specific questions:

"Seriously, what's going on?"

The interface is changing.

"Why has everything changed?"

Because it was shit. Something like 19/20 top features requests were for features that were already in the Office menu system.

"Who are these changes designed to help?"

The people who requested features that were already in Office, but they couldn't find them. Also, new users.

"Why did they decide to abandon the system of menus that's been in service since 1984?"

It's abandoned because it was a decent design for 1984 and it is a shitty design now, and you can only get away with it because of the momentum of people that are used to it.

"Just because they've been in service since 1984?"

No. Instead of the steering wheel analogy, consider this: it's like if Ford abandoned the gasoline engine for some alternative fuel. They aren't doing it because the gasoline engine is old, but because it's really not the right choice anymore, nor has it been for some time. You can question whether the new fuel source is a good idea, but it's not a bad idea simply because the gasoline engine worked for a long time.

Leaving the archaic menu system as-is for all time: that's losing touch. I think you've lost touch. You seem to think that the menu system was working perfectly fine and scaling with no problems, and that's an out-of-touch viewpoint.

Why the politeness? (1, Insightful)

idiotnot (302133) | more than 4 years ago | (#27987069)

"ribbon seems to be on every application now, which is great for consistency's sake."

Who cares if it's consistent; it still seriously overshadows all the other good things Microsoft has done to Office.

TFA should have read, "the ribbon still sucks, and now it's on every application."

FTFY.

Re:Why the politeness? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27987233)

TFA should have read, "the ribbon still sucks, and now it's on every application."

FTFY.

And that should have been "the ribbon still sucks IMO".

Maybe I'm in the minority of people that actually quite likes it, but you can't get all uppity with the submitter just because they expressed a subjective opinion. It's not like you're now required to like it because it's been said on Slashdot, and you're definitely not required to buy a copy of this once it's released.

Unless you think that your opinion is the only one that matters here maybe you should take a leaf out of the submitters book in terms of politeness. If you don't like the feature, vote with your wallet.

Can we just bring back the "File" menu, please? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27987085)

The whole Orb/Microsoft Office squiggle thing is silly and unintuitive. It took me a while to even realize it was a clickable menu.

Worse is trying to describe things over the phone. (2, Interesting)

taxman_10m (41083) | more than 4 years ago | (#27987577)

If someone isn't familiar with the terminology for these things it's a pain in the ass. Click the big multi colored button thing. Click the icon that looks like..., no the other one..., no to the left of that.

Menus were a lot easier to describe to people.

Ohhh another version of word.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27987105)

And no doubt companies will be lined up to buy the new version of office that does nothing more than the last few versions except for the new backwards semi-compatible file formats that you must upgrade to or your company will die. yada yada yada..

And we'll have the new fud how openoffice is so out of date not having the "patented" ribbon interface and all these glossy features that probably less than 1% of the world will ever use..

rant over..

I just downloaded Office 2010 . . . (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27987111)

. . . and it's awesome. I haven't used Office since Office 2000 (though I used 2003 a bit here and there). I can't wait for the retail version. Bye bye and fuck OpenOffice.

Re:I just downloaded Office 2010 . . . (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27987615)

Ha ha ha.

Keep waiting for the retail version sucker. As Ballmer's toilet slave you got nothing much to do anyway.

Why does everyone hate Ribbon? It's great! (5, Insightful)

WarwickRyan (780794) | more than 4 years ago | (#27987135)

I really can't understand the hate for Ribbon on slashdot. It all seems to be centered on "but they changed it".

Slashdot is an technology community: we're the people who're either instigating change, or are always putting ourselves on the bleeding edge. We accept the fact that we often have to relearn things, because we then gain the advantages of progress.

Ribbon's a really good example. Once you're used to it, you'll find it so much easier to use than the old system that you'll never want to go back.

For example, take Excel 2007. One of the most common functions in Excel is creation of pretty reports using tables and charts. With Ribbon it's so much easier to create and use tables. The interface is fantastic. Far superiour to the old menuing system. The way that they've build the seperation of symantics and style, an made is easy to use is just fantastic. I mean, you've got an cell in an spreadsheet which contains faulty data.

Like most slashdotters I was suspicious at first. You can't help but be after hearing such bad press. However within a day of actually using it, the benefits were clear.

So, if you've not spent much time with Ribbon, do yourself an favour and spend a day playing with it in Excel or Word. You'll learn to love it, and then you'll never want to go back to the 'old' way.

Re:Why does everyone hate Ribbon? It's great! (1)

Maxo-Texas (864189) | more than 4 years ago | (#27987211)

Why do I hate the Ribbon.

It took me about 2 months to get used to the UI differences between Windows 2003 and OpenOffice.
At 9 months and counting- I still havn't regained my productivity in Office. There are some things which I just haven't figured out a quick way to do again.

AND- ever since it was installed my laptop went from being a speedster to being a dog.

Re:Why does everyone hate Ribbon? It's great! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27987269)

Nerds don't like change for the sake of change. We're not that simplistic. We instigate change when change is necessary--when we see that yes, there truly is a better way of doing things and that the old ways are broken or otherwise insufficient.

The ribbon interface, at least for me, is change for the sake of change.

Re:Why does everyone hate Ribbon? It's great! (2, Insightful)

lordandmaker (960504) | more than 4 years ago | (#27987367)

In my experience, the Ribbon is a vast improvement over the 'old' UI. Sure, the 'old' UI wasn't broken, but neither were steam engines.

I was really hoping to lambast MS for getting it wrong again with change for the sake of change, but I really think they got it right this time.

Re:Why does everyone hate Ribbon? It's great! (1)

RiotingPacifist (1228016) | more than 4 years ago | (#27987399)

The old way is broken, menubars and static toolbars do not scale well to all the fancy functionality wanted in a modern office suite!

Re:Why does everyone hate Ribbon? It's great! (1)

Korbeau (913903) | more than 4 years ago | (#27987297)

Cedric: Why don't you want to wear the ribbon?
Kramer: Why should I?
Cedric: You have to, everyone is.
Kramer: That's why I don't want to.

Re:Why does everyone hate Ribbon? It's great! (1)

jmv (93421) | more than 4 years ago | (#27987353)

"If I need to read the manual before I can use the new version of X, the interface is crap". That's what I have against the ribbon. Thankfully, I rarely have to deal with MS Office.

Re:Why does everyone hate Ribbon? It's great! (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27987559)

*blink*

I can see somebody used to the old software being temporarily slowed down finding functions in new software.

But I just don't believe you when you claim you have to read the manual to use the new version.

Re:Why does everyone hate Ribbon? It's great! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27987439)

I've been "using" Office 2007 since February of last year. And did I finally start "loving" it? Nope. Looks like the next office suite upgrade for me will be to OpenOffice, which thankfully still uses a sane UI.

Re:Why does everyone hate Ribbon? It's great! (4, Insightful)

Gryffin (86893) | more than 4 years ago | (#27987445)

Why do we hate the ribbon? Because it's dynamic.

Microsoft sees that as a plus: customize the UI based on what Office thinks the user is trying to do. Nice, in theory. But it depends on a level of application telepathy that doens't exist. (Yet?)

Users see it as a minus: the commands they want aren't always where they expect to find them, so they end up wasting productive time trying to find them. More than a little frustrating when you have a deadline bearing down on you.

If Office did a better job of reading the user's mind, the Ribbon would rock. But since that's not likely to happen, Microsoft should go back to UI Design 101: a good UI is a consistent UI.

Don't suprise users by capriciously moving tools, or they'll hate you forever. Which is pretty much where 90% of Office '07 are right now.

Re:Why does everyone hate Ribbon? It's great! (2, Insightful)

WarwickRyan (780794) | more than 4 years ago | (#27987517)

It's dynamic, but only in relation to the menu which is maximised. All of the other options are there, you just need to click on them.

Compared to 'dynamic' menus in the old version (i.e. everything greyed out), it's much better. Plus it's right 80% of the time, which means greater productivity 80% of the time at the cost of an extra click 20% of the time.

Re:Why does everyone hate Ribbon? It's great! (4, Insightful)

BitZtream (692029) | more than 4 years ago | (#27987481)

Considering I'm not really a heavy Excel user, but I do occasionally create tables and charts.

In my experience, it could not be 'much easier' with the Ribbon as it wasn't hard before the ribbon.

Having used both I can confirm that it really isn't 'Much Easier' to do it via the ribbon because it really wasn't hard and only took one more click in the old version. (2003)

If you think this new interface is 'far superiour' you have become a fanboy. Its not really a lot different, they mostly just jumbled up the toolbar by craming the menu and the toolbar together.

The reason most of slashdot's problem with it is 'because they changed it' is because thats really all they did. To anyone who knew how to use the products before hand its an annoying change that costs people time. For people who think they've made things easier, all thats happened is that you bothered to take the time to look around for a change and find features.

I've spent a couple years using 2007 now, I still hate it. From reading your post, I can say that your problem is that you never really knew how to use Office in the first place, so now that you've been hit in the face with a 2x4 of change you finally bothered to look into it more. This is not good if it happens to everyone.

People who go crazy with Office 'Features' make documents that are fucking shit to work with.

People who use many features in Word and Excel as a general rule are doing it wrong. Playing with all your fonts, sizes and such in Word is generally a sign you're doing it wrong. You use standard styles so the document can be restyled later as needed or converted to another format. Instead people like you who have suddenly found the ribbon start setting fonts, colors, sizes and other formatting options on the text itself trying to make it look like YOU think it should look, even though most of you couldn't pass highschool english if you're life depended on it.

And I'm really happy that people are finding Excel's features, thats all I needed. Documents that are basically CSV's being turned into something akin to a powerpoint with a bunch of retarded charts and effects that matter not to the data nor do they present it in a better way, they just detract from it.

Re:Why does everyone hate Ribbon? It's great! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27987571)

Find someone who is a fast typist and who uses keyboard shortcuts. Find someone else who is good with computers, but uses the mouse whenever possible. Time the two of them doing similar tasks.

Its not even close. The fact that Microsoft (and many other software vendors) focus much more on the mouse users and force the keyboard shortcut users to cut their speeds by more than 50% is *extremely* annoying.

Re:Why does everyone hate Ribbon? It's great! (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27987613)

The Nazis had ribbons that they made the Jews use instead of standard menus

Change (1)

bryan1945 (301828) | more than 4 years ago | (#27987137)

Probably the only thing that can be counted on is that some to many of the changes will change again by the time the official release comes out. I'm not saying this is a good or bad thing, just that it tends to happen with most large programs/suites. Release early preview, get feedback, make some changes, release preview 2, etc. Actually, I guess that would probably put it into the "good" category.

Can only improve on great from here (5, Insightful)

nighty5 (615965) | more than 4 years ago | (#27987175)

As a power user of Word and Excel I find the inclusion of a native 64 bit version to be very welcomed indeed.

Excel 2007 added some much needed features that has truely turned it into a portable database program, whereby increasing the amount of rows from 64k to over 1 million, and from 256 columns to over 10k among other notable changes. http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa730921.aspx#Office2007excelPerf_BigGridIncreasedLimitsExcel [microsoft.com]

Like most people, I was apprehensive of the ribbon UI however after about 2 weeks of solid use I fell in love with it. Microsoft really nailed it, something had to be done given the shear amount of features available in a modern editor.

I hope to see some innovation from the OOo team to give their program a fresh face although I was impressed to see some improvements in their 3.1 release.

Re:Can only improve on great from here (1, Troll)

johannesg (664142) | more than 4 years ago | (#27987433)

Excel 2007 added some much needed features that has truely turned it into a portable database program

Frankly I'm at a loss for words to describe the type of idiocy that leads people to use Excel as a database program. Especially when that is followed by an exclamation of joy that it is now possible to store billions of "records" in Excel as well...

Re:Can only improve on great from here (-1, Flamebait)

BitZtream (692029) | more than 4 years ago | (#27987509)

And thank you for being a prime example of how stupid users will use the wrong tool for the job over and over again.

If you have a problem with a 64k limit of rows in Excel, then YOU HAVE A PROBLEM. Excel does not. You are using the wrong application for the problem. Excel is not a database, stop trying to shoe horn it into one. You're using a screwdriver instead of using a hammer. Sure, you can, but you end up wasting time and energy that you would have saved had you just used the hammer (or in this case a database, even just Access) instead.

Re:Can only improve on great from here (0, Flamebait)

cheros (223479) | more than 4 years ago | (#27987579)

Maybe you should smoke less.

1 - why do you need a Excel to be a portable database? If you must process that amount of data for anything analytical you are in serious danger of (a) losing data and (b) lose audit capability. If your model is worth anything to the business you should consider using proper tools for the job. If you crunch financials I think you may actually be in breach of a few laws.

2 - if you need a database, use a database. That's why it's called a database - it specialises in these things. Trust me. I don't know about the new Access, but the "old" Access is a but Mickey Mouse in that aspect as it can't talk to proper databases without some help. But you you could always install OpenOffice Base instead, would also mean you could use a Real OS to do the work.

3 - I'm glad the ribbon works for you. That does, however, indicate that you're not really a power user because anyone who wants to use more advanced functionality now has to hunt for it all (which is another reason why OpenOffice has become so popular, I think). So if MS has "nailed" it for one, that hammer has hit quite a few times past the nail for others.

I've used both. OOo is driving me up the wall as well at times, but for more acceptable reasons (I admit that is slightly subjective - it works better for ME), the "WTF did that feature go" search takes too much of my time. Try working with doc variables, for instance. I wish you luck.

No sale for me.

Re:Can only improve on great from here (1)

jonbryce (703250) | more than 4 years ago | (#27987601)

Oh dear.

If you have more than 65536 records or 256 fields, you really really shouldn't be using Excel.

Inconsequential (5, Insightful)

Tubal-Cain (1289912) | more than 4 years ago | (#27987301)

'... some applications have changed a lot more than others. The ribbon seems to be on every application now, which is great for consistency's sake. ... The biggest change, in my opinion, is that the no file/orb menu is no longer a menu. When you click the colored office button, you get a screen that is shown in the second screenshot for each application.'

Meh. What we really want to know is: How's the ODF compatibility?

Re:Inconsequential (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27987359)

That depends on who's asking the question. If you're a regulator the answer is "great, fully functioning as promised, now leave us the fuck alone to exploit people as we see fit", if you're not, then the answer is "just use our formats like a good boy and stop asking questions you already know the answer to".

Re:Inconsequential (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27987425)

Or if you're a government / corporate buyer who has been fooled by this ODF rubbish then the answer is "of course it's perfect, just renew the contract with us and we won't be forced to smear you as a communist / terrorist / child molester and get you fired. Tendering is pointless when Microsoft are here to solve all your IT problems."

Nobody's interested (1)

user84767464 (1556473) | more than 4 years ago | (#27987307)

Looks like they can't generate enough commercial interest and have had to upload it as a torrent as with Windows 7, Windows ME 2 (Vista) BIOS hack etc.

Thanks, exactly my thoughts (1)

cheros (223479) | more than 4 years ago | (#27987503)

Desperately trying to make it seem like anyone still cares..

I bet it's not even going to get pirated. Pirates only make duplicates where it makes money, and I'm not sure anyone will care. Which is a good thing IMHO.

Just what we need (0, Flamebait)

russotto (537200) | more than 4 years ago | (#27987385)

More of that awful Ribbon. Gratuitously modal interfaces are just SO helpful. I mean, I appreciate that Microsoft is actually trying to innovate, but they're really no good at it.

WTF???? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27987471)

I liked the Ribbon.

But if what Ars says is true, that clicking on the office button will result in this needlessly modal screen [arstechnica.com] , that means that to do a simple operation like "save as", you'll need to go to that huge screen.

For the lack of a better word (sorry for the pun), that's pretty screwed up.

Plus Office 2010 just looks like Office 2007 with a facelift.

OpenOffice adoption (1)

MagnusE (1019984) | more than 4 years ago | (#27987555)

Hi to all, is OpenOffice really adopted by others in your day-to-day life (public services, schools/universities, public sector) as I read online the last years?

In Greece its use is negligible, as in "OpenOffice: Is this the new name of MS office? really?"... on the other hand we always are at least a couple of years behind the real world. :)

Open Office is nowhere near Word...yet (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#27987607)

In typical Slashdot fashion, as seen here the first comment is...

"I have everything I need in OpenOffice, and it is better priced too..."

I respectfully disagree, many trivial tasks done easily by a 9 year old Office XP still can't be done through the latest Open Office 3.0 writer.

I'll give one specific example, make a deeply nested numbered list, ie
1.0 Head topic
1.1 Sub Topic 1
1.1.1 Sub Sub Topic 1 ...etc

and try linking that to a autogenerated TOC with that numbering *preserved*. OOO Write has failed miserably for me in this aspect so much that I had to wrestle with it to no avail and limp back to Office XP.

I know this is only one example from one user but this is the sort of thing that needs to be ironed out before making the claims as above.

I'm not trying to troll anyone here, please fix this before telling Jon Doe to use OOO.

Cheers.

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