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Can You Create An Intelligent Haiku Generator?

timothy posted more than 14 years ago | from the must-refer-to-season dept.

Programming 211

BlueCalx- writes: "dotcomma has created a new programming contest: this time, to determine whether or not someone can create a program that can automatically parse an RDF file and generate a haiku based on its headlines or stories. Slashdot users such as 575 have essentially been doing the same thing for months: now, it's time to see if a computer program can do the same thing *g*. After witnessing the success of the AI Bots challenge a few months ago, it'll be interesting to see if a program like this is possible." Anyone who can generate intelligible, germane haiku from headlines without human intervention has my respect -- it's a lot thornier than it sounds.

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Re:Difficult (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 14 years ago | (#1003693)

haiku es fácil
si usamos español
usted conviene?

(haiku is easy
if we utilize spanish
do you acquiesce?)

umm...that was 5-5-5 (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 14 years ago | (#1003694)

thank god i didn't go to cal-tech.

Would basho appreciate the effort? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 14 years ago | (#1003695)

Would Basho approve?
I have written four stanzas.
Moderate me up.

Haiku by machine.
Unfeeling silicon chip.
Basho turns in grave.

Clever perl script hacks.
Create poem making code.
Basho comes around.

Basho buys PC.
Installs Linux and writes code.
Source is poetry.

Elegant program.
Basho's work makes Bill Gates cry.
GPL Haiku.

Haiku (1)

lars (72) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003696)

Post only Haiku
Get moderated to 5
Better than 'first post'

Perl (1)

whoop (194) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003697)

Who uses Perl now?
Python is da bomb, for sure.
Die Perl, die, die, die!

Re:It's like this (1)

emerson (419) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003698)

Please to let me submit a patched version of this:


Computer haiku:
Poetic rhythm down pat,
But lacking a soul.

--

Re:Haiku (1)

emerson (419) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003699)

Damn it all to hell.
Moderators have mercy.
Meant to drop plus-one.



--

hmmm? (1)

MassacrE (763) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003700)

Intelligent haiku??
DUDE, I have had one of these
for months, no - YEARS now

Teach me to post too quickly... (1)

thomasd (3336) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003703)

Verbal Diarrhoea
I cannot count syllables
Six on the first line :(

Haiku? (1)

stirge (12062) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003708)

Since when are Haiku's Intelligent?!

Re:Computer-Related Haiku (1)

curveclimber (17352) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003711)

That's cool. Small web, huh?

While, because of the non-traditional subject matter, these would probably be considered senryu (which has its own long tradition), I posted the three that I thought best approached the spirit of haiku.

For what it's worth, you can tell her that.

This might compile... (1)

wirefarm (18470) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003715)

include season.h
might help you qualify it
as a true haiku


Jim in Tokyo

Snot's not American! (1)

Chuck Chunder (21021) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003718)

Surely it's English....talk about cultural insensitivity....

I'm out... (1)

Denis Lemire (27713) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003720)

Nope, the best I have is my nifty random password generator... Complete with command line customization of what characters to include and password length...

Can't help on this project...

Re:I'm out... (1)

Denis Lemire (27713) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003721)

Damnit! I knew I should have left out the --use-dictionary-word option!

Re:Computer-Related Haiku (1)

Dr. Manhattan (29720) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003722)

Also, remember the whole 5-7-5 thing comes from Japanese, a language very different from our own.

I remember an Isaac Asimov story (one of the "Tales of the Black Widowers") where it was argued that the limerick is to English what the haiku is to Japanese. Japanese is a tonal language, and fixed patterns of syllables stand out very well. It's also mildly difficult but not impossible to assemble coherent phrases with fixed syllable-patterns in Japanese.

English, on the other hand, is not a tonal language, and has a grammar that consists mostly of a collection of exceptions. Patterns of syllable-stress and rhymes stand out. And it is similarly mildly difficult but not impossible to form coherent phrases with fixed meter and rhyme.

Haikus don't stand out in English very well, and from what I gather it's (a) difficult to construct a limerick in Japanese and (b) doesn't sound terribly unsual when you do.

What else would the subject be? (1)

uncleFester (29998) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003723)

Can it not be so?
Slashdot Story on haiku
Self-fufilling post

Personally, the only two haiku I'm really proud of are on the Olestra/Olean Haiku page [cmu.edu] and are thus:

How did Zappa know?
'Voodoo Butter Underpants..'
Olestra vision.

.. and ..

Olestra Facists;
They have tainted my Fritos!
Fudgie underwear...

Coy.pm (1)

beppu (32422) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003724)

Coy.pm would be a good start. Damian Conway [cpan.org] is my Perl hero.

Re:Great idea (1)

bob_jordan (39836) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003726)

You forgot the seasonal component.

Microsoft broken
Not quite yet but maybe by
Summer after next

Bob.

Re:Something more usefull (1)

bob_jordan (39836) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003727)

How about haiku mission statements

Best distribution.
Linux with office apps on desktop.
Kick microsofts ass.

Bob.

Re:Something more usefull (1)

bob_jordan (39836) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003728)

D'oh office is 2, make that

Best distribution
with office apps on desktop.
Kick microsofts ass.

Bob.

PS,

Preview should spell check.
syllable count would also help
575 wannabes.

:-)

The AI bots challenge (1)

ViGe (49356) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003732)

I wouldn't call the AI bots challenge a success.

Go ahead and check the web page [dotcomma.org] of the project - it seems quite dead.

It was definitely not a success, the challenge obviously never even took place!
That's quite sad actually, It would really be entertaining watching those bots chatting..


--

RDF ? (1)

Old Wolf (56093) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003734)

Um, what is RDF?

The file in the linx looks like an XML version of Slashdot's headlines.

So a correct answer to this haiku problem, by a bot, would be a haiku containing text from its <title> and <description> tags?
eg.

Plasma Propulsion
News for Nerds, Stuff That Matters
Easter Eggs In Source

Is there a .RDF reference somewhere that will specify exactly how the input will be?

Re:Something more usefull (1)

flounder99 (64090) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003739)

Of course Mission Statements don't require intellegence (artifical or not)

Fish

Lessee... (1)

anatoli (74215) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003744)

Can a program write
a good, poetic haiku?
When hell freeze over.

--

Re:Nah - Haiku Program is too difficult (1)

greyrat (80922) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003745)

Failure of your mind.
You have eight syllables there.
Right there in line two.

what about macros (1)

crovax (98121) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003752)

I know a macro does not count, but wouldn't a macro for Word or something like that wich has spelling and grammar checkers be easier to write.

Not to mention the fact that you could write the macro so that it could send its self over the net spreading random Haikus to everyone on the plannet using MS word.
-----
If my facts are wrong then tell me. I don't mind.

Re:Most of these aren't haikus. (1)

dgph (107434) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003759)

Most of the haikus
Posted here, conform well to
That definition

It should be noted
There's no season to be found
Here in cyberspace

Re:Rorshack Text != Intelligent (1)

webrunner (108849) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003760)

But it would be a waste of time to make something intelligent just so it can write silly poems.

----
Oh my god, Bear is driving! How can this be?

Re:It's like this (1)

webrunner (108849) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003761)

I'd like to edit some of that code, if you don'tmind.

Open souce haikus
An idea whose time has come
G P L poems.

----
Oh my god, Bear is driving! How can this be?

Nah - Haiku Program is too difficult (1)

(void*) (113680) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003762)

Cheaper and simpler -
Haiku poet can be made by
Two people fucking?

(Is crudity allowed in Haiku? :-) )

How will a machine cope with art? (1)

Digitalia (127982) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003768)

We have baboons who can finger paint, and machines who ghost write short stories. But what quality do we see in this art? So the question is raised: how will the scripts cope with poetry, one of the most complicated writing areas there is? Haiku is a favorite of the web. Even back in the early days, you could find haiku generators. But often, their haikus were jumbled and inane, such as that written by a crack smoking monkey. I offer, as State's evidence, exhibit A: the defunct r33t.org and their haiku generator.

Re:Rorshack Text != Intelligent (1)

Digitalia (127982) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003769)

#include
#include

main()
{
if(rorshack_test!=intelligent)
{
cout "All my years of looking at inkblots to study for my MS ceritification were wasted!" endl;
life--;
}
else
{
cout "Is that so, pysch boy? I have undeniable proof: a sentient inkblot named Fred! endl";
life=1;
}

if(life1)
{
cout "Life has no meaning!" endl;
target=Digitalia;
caliber=howitzer;
bullet(target);
}
}

void bullet(char target)
{
fire(target,caliber);
}

Re:Addidtional requirement?? (1)

Kristopher Johnson (129906) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003770)

Hmm. How many syllables are in printf("Hello, world!");?
  1. "print-eff Hel-lo world" (5)
  2. "print-eff left-pa-ren quote Hel-lo world quote right-par-en se-mi-co-lon" (17)
  3. "print-eff left-pa-ren quote Hel-lo com-ma space world bang quote right-par-en se-mi-co-lon" (21)
  4. "pee ahr aye enn tee eff ..."

Re:AI Syllables? (1)

Kristopher Johnson (129906) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003771)

You'll need some sort of "dictionary" that gives a list of words along with the number of syllables for each one. Your program would look up all the RDF's words in that dictionary.

Re:Haiku (1)

luckykaa (134517) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003787)

Moderators Here, Touch only the abusive. Your sig insults them.

Re:Most of these aren't haikus. (1)

luckykaa (134517) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003788)

It should be noted
There's no season to be found
Here in cyberspace


There used to be on usenet. The "Me too" season correlated with the influx of student getting internet connections in September/October. The low traffic seasons were during the school holidays. There were probably other seasonal changes as well for a variety of reasons.

Re:Computer-Related Haiku (1)

Malk-a-mite (134774) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003790)

You step in the stream,
but the water has moved on.
This page is not here.

-- Cass Whittington
-----------------------------
I believe she'd be happy to have it re-posted. Last time I meantioned to her that her Haiku was all all the net she was quite pleased.
I believe a comment about her 15 minutes of fame. :)

Malk-a-mite

Congratulations! (1)

ca1v1n (135902) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003791)

You know you're a celebrity when you get mention in the top paragraph of the story itself. Keep it up!

Great idea (1)

Goldberg's Pants (139800) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003794)

It's time's like this I wish I could program, but every time I head down that road I get distracted by the pretty lights and shops...

I hope this contest is a success. I love that kind of software, but it's pretty rare and hard to find, especially in Linux. I look forward to the results of this contest. Hopefully /. will cover the results when it's over.

I can see it now. Slashdot will have a sister site called SlashHaiku.

Microsoft broken
Bill Gates can't complain now, all over
Judge made the right call

God, I could do these all night.

Slashdot is populated by quite a few jackasses.

Did it for English class (1)

Eric Fikus (157397) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003802)

Though it wasn't at all intelligent, I did write a simple haiku generator in PHP for school. Its output included such favorites as:

This natural lion

This lion, running deeply
The lion is big.

That dark green pine tree
That pine tree, sharing badly
The pine tree is small.

The pretty chipmunk
The chipmunk, running calmly
The chipmunk is mean.
The funny thing is that my teacher, being a moron, actually thought I had actually written them despite the fact that they all follow the exact same form and I had attached about five pages of them to the back of my "poetry portfolio".

sure (1)

oog_rocks (165975) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003805)

poetry teachers do it all the time ;)

This one's easy (1)

fishexe (168879) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003807)

...doesn't anyone realize that 575 is a computer program?

Slashdot. Number 1 news site in readership among bots.

Ever get the impression that your life would make a good sitcom?
Ever follow this to its logical conclusion: that your life is a sitcom?

New form (1)

fishexe (168879) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003808)

He was just writing a Hukai

Ever get the impression that your life would make a good sitcom?
Ever follow this to its logical conclusion: that your life is a sitcom?

They can't argue it's not intelleigent (1)

fishexe (168879) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003809)

...'cause I know people who respond to everything like this too. (not in haiku form, but you know what I mean) Therefore it passes the Turing test.

Ever get the impression that your life would make a good sitcom?
Ever follow this to its logical conclusion: that your life is a sitcom?

They can't argue that I can spell intelligent (nt) (1)

fishexe (168879) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003810)

nt

Ever get the impression that your life would make a good sitcom?
Ever follow this to its logical conclusion: that your life is a sitcom?

Re:Cultural *over*sensitivity (1)

streetlawyer (169828) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003811)

If you are so over-sensitive that a simple remark about respecting cultural differences offends you, then I have one message for you:

Get Over It

People like you must learn to deal with the fact that sooner or later, someone is going to challenge your preconceptions and remind you that there is a whole world full of stuff that you don't know about. Insular, closed-minded Americans like you are the truly weak individuals -- I note that my original post was less than a hundred words, including a joke, while your self-righteous, whining response was over five hundred words, with not a hint of a sense of humour. Seems like you're the one who becomes distraught when he hears something he doesn't agree with (I say "he" with complete confidence, because it's always white men who feel so threatened by being told that they're wrong).

I can only assume that you had a bullying father, which makes you so horribly anxious to be in the right all the time, because you clearly can't stand being wrong. Which means that life must be hell for you, because you're wrong all the time.

Cultural insensitivity (1)

streetlawyer (169828) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003812)

This seems pretty damn culturally insensitive to me. Anyone who knows anything about Japanese culture knows that haiku are not just pieces of prose cut up into lines, in order to teach retarded American children how to count syllables. They're actually a very important part of the culture and history of an entire society. At the very least, they should have a parallel competition to trivialise something of similar importance in American culture, like hamburgers, or snot.

I know ... a contest to create an AI bot that takes a random .rdf file and parses it into a half-cocked justification for owning firearms! Then the Japanese could return the compliment.

Re:Cultural insensitivity (1)

Chiasmus_ (171285) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003814)

Snot?

/. them, for old times' sake! (1)

CardiacArrest (179197) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003818)

beach in summer
school soon over
no more cable

end snow crash
slashdotted servers
given respite

Re:Cultural insensitivity (1)

lli (182518) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003820)

No need to create a bot which argues for firearms. to mirror American culture you just need one which keeps posting "you suck" into forums

Cultural *over*sensitivity (1)

FooRat (182725) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003822)

If you are so over-sensitive that a competition to create haiku truly offends you, then I'm afraid I can only offer one piece of advice:

Get over it

People must learn to deal with the fact that sooner or later in the course of your life, something or someone is going to say or do something that offends you.

I find the whole "lets make everything politically correct in case we offend someone" movement nauseating and disgusting. It really is only a tiny handful of whiny, weak individuals who become distraught whenever they hear something that they don't want to hear, and I find the idea of restructuring society and culture to accomodate this whiny minority offensive.

Why don't you just face up to the fact that you are going to hear opinions that differ with yours, and that you are going to find people with morals that differ from yours, and a culture that differs from yours, and learn to deal with it.

Anyway, I somehow doubt that the emotional stability of the majority of japanese people is as strongly tied to a single type of poem as yours is. Who appointed you to speak on behalf of millions of Japanese people anyway?

I can only assume you had a really over-protective mother, who made sure you never saw or heard anything that might upset you, since you obviously don't know how to handle it.

Re:Cultural insensitivity (1)

SubtleNuance (184325) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003823)

BEGIN-OFFTOPIC

I've spent allot of time wondering where/how/why the 'politically-correct do-gooders' and their army of mindless minions gathered so much power as of late.

In an effort to curb free-thought/free-speech and individuality that pollutes the markatroid view of the universe, Corporate America(tm) etal are attempting reduce human existence on this planet to soul-less consumerism.

When everyone has been brainwashed into clobbering anyone who says anything the least bit provocative (not politically correct), and lawyers can sue you speaking your opinions, they will have reached their goals: Total world 'one-ness' where all people have the same opinions/needs.

The markatroid utopia: ONE DEMOGRAPHIC.

I recognize there is not a conspiracy, that there is not an cadre of Black-Glassed men orchestrating this 'plot'.

All corporations have a desire to push this 'initiative' makeing their 'markets' have more 'informed consumers'. The worst thing: its working.

END-OFFTOPIC

PLEASE READ .SIG, SHUT OFF YOUR TV & FIGHT THE POWER!

Post-modernism generator (1)

KjetilK (186133) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003825)

Ah, this reminds me of the poetry generator we had as a final assignment in my first CS class.

And if you want something more sophisticated I would highly recommend the http://www.elsewhere.org/cgi-bin/postmodern/ [elsewhere.org] the Postmodernism Generator, that generates a post-modernistic paper randomly. It makes as much sense as true papers written by post-modernists....

Re:Rorshack Text != Intelligent (1)

Karmageddon (186836) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003826)

your critique is a little sloppy:

Not, of course, to say that writing haiku generators isn't fun and worthwhile. But's let's not call them intelligent,

If someone were to write a truly intelligent haiku generator, then we should call it intelligent.

Re:Cultural insensitivity (1)

Protocull (187587) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003827)

You shoot from the mouth
Mucus all over your face
But where is the beef?

Re:Third post Haiku (1)

Protocull (187587) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003828)

You spring in too fast
Get moderated way down
Beware of the Fall

Re:Computer-Related Haiku (1)

Protocull (187587) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003829)

You'll be wanting to get along to Vint Cerf's home site, and check out his Computer Haiku Page:

Vint Cerf's Haiku Page [wcom.com]

Re:Congratulations! (1)

575 (195442) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003834)

A celebrity!
Trolling naye, nor flame-baiting
Though crude, I'm righteous

Re:It's like this (1)

575 (195442) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003835)

Open source poems
A thought whose time has arrived
Diff that new haiku

Re:I'm out... (1)

Hakakahn (198613) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003836)

Are you how far out of your mind?? You create your password with a computer? A computer is a security hole as big as the sky above! If you ever want to suck any use out of your password, create it in a hidden brain turn and change the turn during the process so that it can't get followed from the eye in the sky. And, do not think "password" whilst doing so! And, remember a sncd handle which you think about, whilst typing the actual password, so it gets shadowed, and use your mental smear finger to obfuscate whats going ohn!

Re:Coy.pm (1)

Hakakahn (198613) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003837)

How comes that the lectorBeing has more points? I dont ask stupid answers where i can not provide more text surroundings, so read on if you have to. Women like logos very much, dont be confused that they dont use it as often; if they get a diamond ring, they dont like it if there comes some PAL and tells them its of no worth anymore, even if it looks the same.

AI Syllables? (1)

Ka0s64 (200106) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003840)

I have a question for the more experienced programmers out there. Since the ancient form of Haiku are based on the syllabic structure of 5-7-5, which by reading the posts most people are familliar with. My question is that how would a computer program be taught to recognize syllables, especially in cases such as "thought" and "into". The longer word contains only one syllable, while the considerably shorter word contains two. I would imagine this would cause considerable trouble with writing such a program for haiku generation. Please someone correct me if the is a simple way to avoid this part of the programming challenge.

575 had better watch out... (2)

Anonymous Coward | more than 14 years ago | (#1003843)

This reminds me of something I saw at thinkgeek.com. It said "Go away, or I'll replace you with a very short shell script." 575 had better watch his back!

Re:Haiku (2)

emerson (419) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003844)

(*grin)

That's damned amusing.
I could have taken offense.
But AC's kick ass.

--

Lucky Kaa? (2)

thomasd (3336) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003845)

Haiku appropriate
From one who will emulate
David Brin's dolphins

Re:Perl Haiku Contest (2)

Bazman (4849) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003846)

I figured Perl would be a good language for writing a Haiku generator, so I popped over to CPAN to see what modules could help count syllables. Ah ha. Lingua::EN::Syllable

Read the docs:

"It guesses correctly about 80-90% of the time,
but it's smaller and faster than a dictionary
lookup. So you can't really use it for
writing random haiku."

Dang, these guys are _way_ ahead of me!!

Baz

Re:Perl Haiku Contest (2)

Ed Avis (5917) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003849)

What's going on with plurals here? Surely the plural of haiku is haikus?

An IRC bot... (2)

pen (7191) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003850)

A channel I go to has a haiku bot. It is not entirely computer-generated, but it is pretty fun. Here's how it works.

The bot's owner collects semi-interesting 5- and 7-syllable quotes and stores them in a database. Then, when someone types .haikux in the channel, the bot spits out three random lines in the appropriate order. It is more often interesting than not, and sometimes very amusing.

The channel's name starts with an R, it's on EFNet, and is currently -s and -p. Good luck! :)

--

Re:Great idea (2)

K. (10774) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003851)

Rainy Seattle
Steeled for early winter.
Hello Canada!

K.
-

... (2)

w3woody (44457) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003858)

with a sledgehammer
computers compute
words are delicate

haiku haiku (2)

Hard_Code (49548) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003859)

smart, germane haikus
is software up to the job?
oops, buffer overflow

One Haiku, every situation. (2)

RimRod (57834) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003861)

A perfectly dynamic haiku generator, suitable for every situation...

printf("This Haiku was made\n
In response to your query.\n
Have a nice season.);

Where's mah prize?

Re:Rorshack Text != Intelligent (2)

Spasemunki (63473) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003864)

I think the best description I ever heard of the effect of a haiku compared it to a spark plug. It might have been in D.T Suzuki, but I can't recall. The first two lines and the bottom line form the two terminals of the electrode. The experience or realization that comes of it is the spark that jumps between the gap. So the last line often seems at best tangentially related to the first two (certainly not a continuation of the idea). The whole field of haiku is very tightly bound with the Zen tradition; great for starting the ubiquitous flame wars about who's enlightened on alt.zen.

"Sweet creeping zombie Jesus!"

Re:Difficult (2)

anatoli (74215) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003866)

In most dictionaries words are already divided into syllables and annotated with their grammatical roles. To write a good haiku generator, one needs to add a list of associations to each word. Then have a (simplified) haiku grammar that goes like this:

haiku ::= sentence sentence sentence
sentence ::= noun-group verb-group
noun-group ::= noun | adjective noun-group | ...
verb-group ::= verb | adverb verb-group | ...

and start generating. Make sure that syllable count is right, and words are more or less associated with each other. This is of course easier said than done.
--

Most of these aren't haikus. (2)

D. Mann (86819) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003867)

From m-w.com:

Main Entry: haiku
Pronunciation: 'hI-(")kü
Function: noun
Inflected Form(s): plural haiku
Etymology: Japanese
Date: 1902
: an unrhymed verse form of Japanese origin having three lines containing usually 5, 7, and 5 syllables respectively; also : a poem in this form usually having a seasonal reference

Third post Haiku (2)

Ukab the Great (87152) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003868)

damn you cgi
I wanted first post and you
only gave me third

Here's my first attempt... (2)

Animol (120579) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003871)

RDF Haiku?
segmentation fault: core dumped
damn you, Borland C

You can't really do that.. (2)

fluxrad (125130) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003872)

you *can* create a haiku generator. i assume that wouldn't be that difficult. Much like assembling a group of "stealth squirrels"

however, i haven't even seen that many living, breathing, human beings create good haiku. in non-english graduate student terms...just because it rhymes doesn't mean it's poetry. (if you are going to flame me with "hey asshole, haiku don't have to rhyme" then please smack yourself, and tell your head it's from flux.

Idunno, this is a neat little programming assignment. Create a program that generates haiku, but i'm not sure that it's anything more than that. Something on the order of a programming assignment for CS students who got an %88 on their "game of life" homework. There's no way (at least not any time soon) that a program is going to come up with any meaningful haiku any time soon.

It may be 5-7-5, but it's sure as hell not going to be poetry.

when i look into
the grasshopper's eyes, i see
the mountains behind



FluX
After 16 years, MTV has finally completed its deevolution into the shiny things network

Cool (2)

Goldberg's Pants (139800) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003882)

Make haiku for you
No good, cpu dead now
Always end sadly

Slashdot is populated by quite a few jackasses.

Yet another (yet another haiku) (2)

YASD (199639) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003883)


Computer poet
Lacking sense of esthetics
is oxymoron

John Searle made good point
AI may be Chinese Room
Made in Japan--NOT!


------

Perl does haiku... (3)

ggoebel (1760) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003884)


There is a Perl module written by Damian Conway called Coy which performs error handling in haiku. It has an extensible grammer...

  • The presentation [monash.edu.au] on Coy from The Perl Conferenct (TPC) 1999
  • It covered extensively in the Winter 99 Perl Journal [itknowledge.com] .
  • You can pick up a copy from your local CPAN [cpan.org] .

The Problem with coy (3)

Improv (2467) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003885)

The problem with coy is that it often does
not consider the line as a barrier between
parts of the haiku that mean something. That is,
each line in a good haiku should ideally be a
valid sentence, or failing that, each line in an
ok haiku should at least be a seperate clause.

Perl Haiku Contest (3)

Yenya (12004) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003886)

There has been a Perl Haiku contest in The Perl Journal [tpj.com] . The Contest page [itknowledge.com] is here (it seems to be unreachable for me now, so here is the Google's cached version [google.com] of this page.)

-Yenya


--

Addidtional requirement?? (3)

The Iconoclast (24795) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003887)

Now for tiebreakers, they should have the additional requirement that your coding statements are in Haiku form.

Embeded Haiku,
Hidden within the sourcecode.
It should break the tie.

And now for a Meta-Haiku:

Multisyllabic,
Using five, seven, and five
A haiku is formed.


A wealthy eccentric who marches to the beat of a different drum. But you may call me "Noodle Noggin."

Difficult (3)

dgph (107434) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003888)

It is hard to count
Syllables of English words
Algorithmically

It's even harder
To get correct grammar, from
Arbitrary words

Re:Most of these aren't haikus. (3)

dgph (107434) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003889)

Children studying
The forums are congested
With cries of "Me Too"

The Real Challenge (3)

gradji (188612) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003890)

A forgotten rule for classic Japanese Haiku, in addition to the usual 5-7-5 syllable rule, is that the Haiku must contain at least one reference to a season.

For example:

Under the blue sky

I take a dip in the pool

To wash off my sweat

Hopefully, my reference to summer is obvious enough ... I admit freely, I'm no Basho

I challenge any of the serious contenders for this Haiku contest to write their code taking into consideration this 'seasonal reference' rule.

I would be interested in seeing the Haiku generated by such a code ... especially since Cyberspace is rather devoid of seasons ... much like most of California (hmmm, coincidence?)

creating something really intelligent takes time (3)

DZign (200479) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003892)

I'd love to see if some people find algorithms to create something really intelligent.
You could just use a random generator that matches the words, but that program doesn't have a clue about the content, what it's saying.

When you want to know what's some text about, you have to feed it all words of the dictionary and give extra information for each word. Creating sentences is even more difficult as there are linguistic rules, and they must sound normal to a native speaker (although haikus may be more simple).

The company I work for (DMP - http://www.dmpartners.be [dmpartners.be] ) is busy in this field.

One of our applications is able to create a summary of a text.
The sentences of the summary aren't created, but are those sentences that represent the content of the text most. Feed it a txt/doc file, say how many lines/words you want and you'll have your summary instantly. Sounds simple but it is impressive when you use it.

What's behind it is even more impressive. Every word and sentence is analysed (what is subject, verb, adjective, ...) and using a dictionary of weighted words we know what word is more important and what not.

There's a lot of manual work involved, feeding the databases. One of the databases consists of words with the relations to other words. So if a words has synonyms, homonyms, is stronger, is the contrary, ... all these relations are marked in it. Without this you can't start to analyse the content of a text. When a word has more than one meaning/usage you also have to look at the context of the sentence and figure out the correct meaning.

It's a very interesting technology. The strenght is when you combine applications. Throw a multilingual search engine in it. So you type your question, it gets analysed (what exactly do you want, not just a keyword search), looks into the files in multiple languages, returns you the hits, and translates and summarised the results you want to see. Nice.

Haiku (4)

emerson (419) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003893)


The art of haiku
Rests not in strict meter, but
In the final line.


...the above being a perfect example of a VERY bad haiku.

Making an observation in a 575 triplet is simple. What makes a haiku stand out is the twist given to the final line. Consider it an Eastern version of the hoary joke format:

Three people are in a situation. The first one does something interesting. The second one does essentially the same thing. The third one says or does something surprising enough to qualify as funny.

The haiku works the same way: setup, setup, punchline. Not necessarily in the comic sense -- some good haiku are funny, but others are sharp, witty, insightful, probing, and so forth.

But no really excellent haiku is just taking input information and spitting out a formatted version of same. What makes a quality haiku is the same quality of thought that makes a good joke, the sideways-thinking free-association that no algorithm can even approach.


--

Seasonal Reference (4)

dylan_- (1661) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003894)


"Me too"s and much spam
Dominate mighty Usenet
It must be Autumn...

dylan_-


--

Re: "Eliza Effect" (4)

kevin805 (84623) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003895)

I'm not sure how common a term this is, but I've seen it in multiple places. Based on the fact that people who chatted with Eliza were frequently taken in, the Eliza Effect is our tendency to read meaning into something where there is no meaning.

It's not as damaging to the Turing test as one would think. Turing unknowingly rules out the Eliza Effect when he specified that the test should be done as a comparison, not just asking someone "do you think you're talking to a human or a computer", which people would answer "human" very easily.

It might also have something to do with the predictability of people. Eliza only reacts appropriately when you play her game. Ask about something not related to your psychological problems, and it collapses.

Example:


I'm tired.

Why do you say you are tired?

I haven't been getting much sleep lately.

Is it because of your plans that you say you have not been getting much sleep lately?

No, I've just been staying up late on the internet.

Maybe your life have something to do with this.

I don't have a life. That's the problem.

What makes you believe that?

I'm talking to a computer program. Pretty convincing evidence.

You have your mind on computers, it seems.

Yeah. Hey, can you tell me a five letter word for 'timekeeper' that starts with a 'c'?

Is it because starts with a 'c' that you came to me?

I just can't think of anything that fits.

Can you elaborate on that?

I tried 'watch', but it doesn't start with a c. I tried 'chronometer', but it's too long.

Does it bother you that it does not start with a c you tried 'chronometer' but it's too long?

It's like this (4)

Anonymous Squonk (128339) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003896)

The random haiku:
Poem rhythm is down pat,
But it lacks a soul.

(not to mention that true haiku requires a seasonal reference, but I doubt that's a condition of this contest...)

Haiku Code (in C) (4)

David Raine (158522) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003897)

int haiku(char x)
{ x = x + 16;
if(1) return x; }

Not very useful, but... Oh, you mean they wanted a compter program that generates haiku! Darn.

Haiku (4)

575 (195442) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003898)

Finally, a post
There can be no contesting...
Haikus on-topic!
Five Seven Five grins
His knuckles crack, his eyes gleam
Code to be written

Re:Haiku (4)

575 (195442) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003899)

The poet, eager
Posting two haiku at once
Forgets to split them

Genhaiku. (5)

Anonymous Coward | more than 14 years ago | (#1003900)

There once was a hacker from Haifa
Who wrote generator of haiku.
But an error he made,
And the program instead
Generates bad limericks. Gosh, how come?

Rorshack Text != Intelligent (5)

Jon Peterson (1443) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003901)

As we know, humans have a remarkable ability to determine meaning and pattern where there is mere randmoness and co-incidence. Hence the shapes in clouds, and the pictures in ink blots.

The Haiku, being a very minimalist form, allows the brain of the reader to fill in so many gaps in the sense of the language that there is room to create entire meaning where none is intended.

Thus, as with Elisa, the cleverness of haiku generators lies less in the programming, and more in the linguistic observation regarding the nature of the text produced.

Not, of course, to say that writing haiku generators isn't fun and worthwhile. But's let's not call them intelligent, because firstly they aren't, and secondly we should marvel more at humans' ability to synthesise meaning and pattern and less at computers' ability to imitate it.

Haiku generator written in REXX (5)

mutende (13564) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003902)

Perhaps the following could serve as inspiration:

#!/usr/bin/rexx
/****** Haiku.rexx *************************************************
*
* $VER: Haiku 2.0 (6.5.95) -- Generates pseudo-random Haiku poems
*
************************************************** ******************/

dummy = InitVocab()
dummy = time('l')
rseed = right(dummy,length(dummy)-lastpos('.',dummy))
dummy = random(,,rseed)
say '0A'x || GenHaiku()
exit 0

GenHaiku:
t = random(1,num_templates)
parse var tem.t line.1 '+' line.2 '+' line.3
out. = ''
do i = 1 to 3
do while length(line.i)>0
parse var line.i cmd 3 qual 4 line.i
c = left(cmd,1)
ucmd = translate(cmd)
if v.ucmd "" then
do
w = word(v.ucmd,random(1,words(v.ucmd)))
if datatype(c,'u') then
w = translate(left(w,1)) || substr(w,2)
c = translate(c)
if c = 'V' & qual = '@' then
w = add_ing(w)
else if c = 'N' & qual = 's' then
w = pluralize(w)
else
line.i = qual || line.i
end
else if c = '#' then
do
parse value cmd || qual || line.i with '#' list '#' line.i
say list
wordslist = words(list)
say wordslist
rand_word = random(1,wordslist)
say rand_word
w = word(list,rand_word)
say w
/*w = word(list,random(1,words(list)))*/
end
else
parse value cmd || qual || line.i with w 2 line.i
out.i = out.i || w
end
end
return translate(out.1 || '0a'x || out.2 || '0a'x || out.3 || '0a'x, ' ', '_')

index: procedure
haystk = arg(1)
needle = arg(2)
do idx = 1 to length(haystk)
if substr(haystk,idx,1) = needle then do
return idx
end
end
return 0

add_ing: procedure
exc. = 0
exc.whisper = 1
exc.wander = 1
exc.flutter = 1
exc.wither = 1
exc.wonder = 1
exv = translate(arg(1))
parse value arg(1) with 100-3 l3+1 l2+1 l1
if index("mbgprndlt",l1) > 0 & index("aeiou",l2) > 0 & index("aeiou",l3) = 0 then
do
if exc.exv 0 then
w = arg(1) || l1
else
w = arg(1)
end
else if l1 = 'e' then
w = left(arg(1),length(arg(1))-1)
else
w = arg(1)
return w || 'ing'

pluralize: procedure expose v.
exc. = 0
exc.rose = 1
exc.breeze = 1
exc.branch = 1
exc.beach = 1
exc.glance = 1
exc.thrush = 1
exc.child = 1
exc.fox = 1
exc.moss = 1
exc.sunrise = 2
exc.lotus = 2
exc.gecko = 10
exc.cry = 11
w = arg(1)
uw = translate(w)
do while exc.uw > 0 & exc.uw list = value('v.n'exc.uw)
w = word(list,random(1,words(list)))
uw = translate(w)
end
if datatype(left(arg(1),1),'u') then
w = translate(left(w,1))substr(w,2)
select
when exc.uw = 0 then w = w || 's'
when exc.uw = 10 then w = w || 'es'
when exc.uw = 11 then w = left(w,2) || 'es'
otherwise
inform("Invalid pluralize exception" exc.uw)
exit
end
return w

InitVocab:
v. = ""
v.a1 = "quick wild small hot white green blue pink thin old light dark"
v.a1 = v.a1 "sad deep lost free far slow sharp blunt hard soft damp dry"
v.a1 = v.a1 "bare tight loose low cold clean proud swift gnarled flat"
v.a1 = v.a1 "strong weak young dull ill"
v.a2 = "open lofty empty eager even weary leaden fallen dismal serene"
v.a2 = v.a2 "languid potent silver awkward shallow pliant simple wrinkled"
v.a2 = v.a2 "falling waiting sighing smiling dreaming sleeping dying"
v.a2 = v.a2 "almond jasmine mournful leaping supple"
v.n1 = "oak tree grove stream brook hill branch rose leaf breeze pool"
v.n1 = v.n1 "root thrush song moon cry glance flame child fox lamb shell"
v.n1 = v.n1 "moss cave cliff rock beach shore wave sea hand path bark fern"
v.n2 = "shadow forest clearing hunter sparrow mountain cavern shelter"
v.n2 = v.n2 "seagull lantern sunrise gecko welcome egret doorway water"
v.n2 = v.n2 "prison temple valley spirit soldier blossom lotus maple"
v.v1 = "walk write sing play look fail stray climb grow speak flow live"
v.v1 = v.v1 "soar crawl creep stand wake sink swim turn sit jump stink"
v.v1 = v.v1 "dive strive shine glow fade move crave spin hide writhe"
v.v2 = "wander desire return whisper decline accept withdraw contend"
v.v2 = v.v2 "rebel retire despair arise wither wonder bubble flutter grumble"
v.v2 = v.v2 "enchant descend ascend command"
v.p1 = "in near past through from"
v.p2 = "under over behind beyond above below around"
v.r1 = "where when while as"
v.l1 = "the this my your his her the the the"
v.h2 = "Gichin Koshi Raiko the_man a_maid Tanto the_queen Moki R.J. Gorby"
v.h2 = v.h2 "Sanka the_monk Glad_Child Yoko"
tem. = ""
tem.1 = "A1 n1, a2 n1.+L1 a1, a2 n2 v1s.+A1 n1, a1 n2."
tem.2 = "P2 the a1 n1,+R1 the a2 n2 v1s,+I v1; the n1 v1s."
tem.3 = "The a1 n1 v1@;+It is the a2 n2.+V2@, I v1."
tem.4 = "The a2 n1 v1s+R1 a2 n2s v2.+Does the a1 n1 v1?"
tem.5 = "Not a1, not a2,+H2 comes to the n2.+L1 a1 n2 v1s."
tem.6 = "A1, a2, a2,+H2 v1s. H2 v2s,+V2@, v1@."
/*tem.7 = "#Never Always# a1, but a1,+H2 knows #no all# a1 n2s.+#Angry Gladdened#, #he she# v1s."*/
do i = 1 while tem.i ""
end
num_templates = i-1
return 0

/*
** EOF
*/

It will generate haikus along the line of:

Swift lamb, shallow rock.
This hard, waiting prison hides.
Low moss, damp mountain.

Enjoy!


--

Computer-Related Haiku (5)

curveclimber (17352) | more than 14 years ago | (#1003903)

You step in the stream,
but the water has moved on.
This page is not here.

-- Cass Whittington

First snow, then silence.
This thousand dollar screen dies
so beautifully.

-- Simon Firth

The ten thousand things
How long do any persist?
Netscape, too, has gone.

-- Jason Willoughby

I know this is all in fun so I'm posting these three that I found at some online contest (posted without permission, sorry).

The idea, however, that what you are all making are actually haiku is just silly. Yes, there is generally a turn at the end (more of a spinning outward), and yes, there is traditionally a word indicating a season (kigo), but not just the words fall or spring, there were whole catalogs of words with their traditional seasonal indication. Cats, for instance, indicate a haiku about Spring.

Also, remember the whole 5-7-5 thing comes from Japanese, a language very different from our own. You would be better off trying to write three lines that you could say smoothly in one breath (in other words, not 7 one syllable words). There is so much more involved, though, like alliteration and literary allusions.

I highly recommend you all go read some *real* haiku by the masters: Basho, Issan, Buson, and Shiki, they will explain what haiku is all about far better than I can.
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