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What Free IDE Do You Use?

kdawson posted more than 5 years ago | from the ides-of-may dept.

1055

postermmxvicom writes "I program only occasionally and mostly for personal interest. I went to update my favorite free IDE, Dev C++, yesterday and noticed that it had not been updated since 2005! I went looking for other free IDEs and came across Code::Blocks and Visual Studio Express. I work from a Windows machine, use C++, and make mostly console apps; but have written a few Windows apps and D3D or OpenGL apps. I wanted to know what free IDEs you use and recommend. What do you like about them? What features do they lack? What about them irritate you (and what do you do to work around these annoyances)? For instance, when I used Visual C++ 6.0 in college, there was an error in getline that had to be fixed, and the code indenting in DevC++ needed to be tweaked to suit my liking."

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Vim (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28105751)

nuf sed

ID what? (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28105759)

I use nano, textwrangler, and jEdit depending on where I am...what's this "IDE" you speak of?!

Eclipse and Netbeans (5, Informative)

Ethanol-fueled (1125189) | more than 5 years ago | (#28105761)

I don't mess with C++ often but I still use Dev C++. Code::blocks wouldn't even install on my machine(or maybe it did, but never started up without a fatal error, can't remember which) and Visual Studio Express is a monstrosity which will take 45 minutes to install tons of weird crap while making your monitor flicker. Visual Studio express also allows only one programming language.

Contrast those with Netbeans and Eclipse which are known as Java IDEs but can be configured with plugins and add-ons to do all kinds of stuff, including C/C++ development. I haven't tried either of the two for C/C++ but I believe that Eclipse would be a the good middle ground between Dev C++ and the bloated NetBeans.

Here's [google.com] [PDF warning] a good place to start. Good luck.

Re:Eclipse and Netbeans (0, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28105827)

Give Code::blocks a try, if that does not suit you try Dev-c++.
Dev-c++ works perfectly for me as a developer

Re:Eclipse and Netbeans (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28105859)

Visual Studio Express only allows one language because you download the environment for the language that you want. For example, Visual C++ Express is just for C++.

With that said, Visual Studio Express has never taken me 45 minutes to install and it (and the other express editions) install quite quickly. Check your computer for viruses... The full install of Visual Studio (not free, hence not the Express edition) is a quite different story though, and you had better have some spare time while installing it.

Re:Eclipse and Netbeans (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28105891)

NetBeans is not that bloated.. it is comparable to Eclipse and in some cases better than Eclipse when it comes to Java.

Re:Eclipse and Netbeans (1)

Haeleth (414428) | more than 5 years ago | (#28106109)

I've experienced Netbeans taking up to five minutes to load, and that's on Sun's own current workstation hardware. If that's not bloated, then what is?

Re:Eclipse and Netbeans (1)

cubiczee (1531613) | more than 5 years ago | (#28106149)

For small projects, recent netbeans versions feels much more responsive than intellij or eclipse to me. Opens in a few seconds on my 3.5 year old thinkpad.

Re:Eclipse and Netbeans (5, Funny)

Hognoxious (631665) | more than 5 years ago | (#28105913)

I've used eclipse since version 2. I can't comment on it, I'm still waiting for it to open.

I'm here all week, try the tuna salad!

Emacs (5, Insightful)

onnellinen (303528) | more than 5 years ago | (#28105777)

What else would you need?

Re:Emacs (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28105785)

That's somewhat obvious.

Re:Emacs (0, Redundant)

umghhh (965931) | more than 5 years ago | (#28105815)

give the parent mod points for he is speaking the words of wisdom!

Re:Emacs (2, Funny)

Bazouel (105242) | more than 5 years ago | (#28105853)

vi?

Re:Emacs (4, Insightful)

Carewolf (581105) | more than 5 years ago | (#28106147)

vi is not an IDE or emacs competitor. Now vim on the other hand...

Re:Emacs (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28105955)

An editor to run on that fine OS.

Either emacsclient or ed (2, Interesting)

jonaskoelker (922170) | more than 5 years ago | (#28106003)

Say you're working with git (but it may be the same with other VCSs, not sure).

Say you run git-commit -a (with no -m) in a M-x shell. Then git wants to spawn your $EDITOR so that you can edit your commit message (and see what you're committing).

In that case, you'd want either emacsclient, which tells emacs to open up a new window for the to-be-edited file (and when you say you're done, emacsclient terminates).

Or, you know that the thing that call $EDITOR from M-x shell require very light-weight editing, so you want a small editor which doesn't use curses.

Yes, I'm seriously suggesting to learn how to use ed. If you know sed and/or vi, it's as simple as spending five minutes with the man page, plus having the man page open for reference the first few times.

It's also a powerful tool for programmatic text manipulation, sitting in a niche where sed is not powerful enough and perl/sh/... is too general to do what you want easily. [it's kinda' like sed but with the whole file in the pattern space and with a few more powerful transformations.]

Re:Emacs (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28106015)

sup dawg. I heard you like emacs, so I replaced your vmlinuz with emacs. I hope everything still works ok, but since you posted I guess you didn't notice. If you don't believe me, check the checksum. /made you look

Re:Emacs (5, Funny)

syousef (465911) | more than 5 years ago | (#28106037)

What else would you need?

Vallium, Panadol and Coke.

Re:Emacs (0, Redundant)

mikeage (119105) | more than 5 years ago | (#28106099)

It's a nice OS... but it needs a good text editor

Re:Emacs (1)

BattyMan (21874) | more than 5 years ago | (#28106163)

Really... is this even a question?

Eclipse (5, Informative)

cblack (4342) | more than 5 years ago | (#28105779)

I like Eclipse as an IDE because it supports many languages/modes and is very customizable. I mostly use it for Java, Perl and HTML/XML/CSS right now. There are MANY plugins and the context-aware help/auto-complete is very well done.

GVIM (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28105781)

GVIM does everything I need it to and more.

I also happen to work in multiple character sets depending on the project (pure ASCII, UTF-8, pure SJIS, EUC, etc.) and to date I have never found an editor other than GVIM that will let me open and save files to different character sets effortlessly.

The only complaint I would have at this point is the auto-suggest or whatever it's called, it didn't quite work for me when I tried it though I may not have set it up properly.

Re:GVIM (1)

mcvos (645701) | more than 5 years ago | (#28105915)

GVIM is not an IDE however. It's an editor, and one that can be integrated in various IDEs.

I've even used GVIM in Visual Studio.

99% of the answers are going to be Eclipse (3, Insightful)

linzeal (197905) | more than 5 years ago | (#28105787)

I like it, just wish I could get CUSP (Lisp plugin) working in Ubuntu. If anyone says Emacs or Vi they are insane and have never done 10k lines of code in a modern environment.

Re:99% of the answers are going to be Eclipse (2, Informative)

1s44c (552956) | more than 5 years ago | (#28105883)

If anyone says Emacs or Vi they are insane and have never done 10k lines of code in a modern environment.

There's the thing, it's not about 'modern environment', pretty displays, or cute graphics. It's about writing good stuff and cuteness is just a distraction from that.

Both vi and emacs can handle files with 10k lines easily. Chances are they both can handle much longer files before swapping then any IDE.

Re:99% of the answers are going to be Eclipse (1)

Chris_Jefferson (581445) | more than 5 years ago | (#28105929)

Seriously? Swapping because of much larger files?

Even 50MB of pure source is inconceivable to me (someone might provide a good counterexample), and that's a tiny amount of the memory of any modern system.

Re:99% of the answers are going to be Eclipse (2, Informative)

1s44c (552956) | more than 5 years ago | (#28106073)

Seriously? Swapping because of much larger files?

Even 50MB of pure source is inconceivable to me (someone might provide a good counterexample), and that's a tiny amount of the memory of any modern system.

I wasn't suggesting that source code comes in files 10k lines long. linzeal was suggesting it as a reason for IDE's being better than vi or emacs. I was ( trying to ) point out it was a silly argument for exactly the reasons you have said.

Re:99% of the answers are going to be Eclipse (5, Insightful)

Tyris (1315133) | more than 5 years ago | (#28105969)

If you're writing 10,000 lines in a single file regularly, then your probably need to re-evaluate your coding methods (and you're probably not writing "good stuff"). An IDE does more than just allowing you to fill a file with many lines of text, it keeps your 10,000 lines over multiple files organised... and you know... a huge number of other helpful things (code-completion/etc).

Re:99% of the answers are going to be Eclipse (5, Funny)

BadAnalogyGuy (945258) | more than 5 years ago | (#28105999)

If you're writing 10,000 lines in a single file regularly, then your probably need to re-evaluate your coding methods

Word wrap is deceiving. I only wrote 5 lines of code. They are just very long lines.

Re:99% of the answers are going to be Eclipse (1)

1s44c (552956) | more than 5 years ago | (#28106057)

If you're writing 10,000 lines in a single file regularly, then your probably need to re-evaluate your coding methods (and you're probably not writing "good stuff"). An IDE does more than just allowing you to fill a file with many lines of text, it keeps your 10,000 lines over multiple files organised... and you know... a huge number of other helpful things (code-completion/etc).

I agree about the 10,000 line files. It shows something else is wrong that an IDE, vi, emacs, or whatever can't directly solve. My point was that choosing an IDE over emacs because IDE's handle 10,000 line files better doesn't make sense.

From what I've seen IDE's help people write code faster, but they don't help people write better code. Maybe I should try out this Eclipse thing just to see what all the fuss is about.

Re:99% of the answers are going to be Eclipse (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28105987)

If you've got 10k lines in one file ur doing it wrong.

Re:99% of the answers are going to be Eclipse (5, Insightful)

C3c6e6 (766943) | more than 5 years ago | (#28106005)

I don't think the parent's point about handling 10k lines of code has to do with with ability to load these files into memory but rather about managing the complexity of such projects. When a program becomes this big, it becomes harder to keep track of all the names of variables, the argument types of subroutines etc. IDEs like Netbeans or Eclipse have autocompletion functionality that make your life as a developer at lot easier.

It's possible of course that Emacs or vi provide similar functionality but the main point is that you need some type of IDE when managing a large, complex development project.

Re:99% of the answers are going to be Eclipse (2, Insightful)

oGMo (379) | more than 5 years ago | (#28106127)

If anyone says Emacs or Vi they are insane and have never done 10k lines of code in a modern environment.

Heh. If you think that, you have never written (or perhaps grokked) a single line of Common LISP in SLIME. There is nothing quite like developing your code while it's running. And debugging and changing your code. While it's still running. And, well, never really being out of your program.

IDEs are a quaint imitation. Source analysis? Pfft. How about "active running code analysis" that's tied into what you're currently editing. Integrated debugger? Pfft. You mean you have to stop your program to fix the function you're in the middle of?

Re:99% of the answers are going to be Eclipse (1)

PeterBrett (780946) | more than 5 years ago | (#28106135)

If anyone says Emacs or Vi they are insane and have never done 10k lines of code in a modern environment.

Emacs. And I have done several large projects entirely using Emacs, and I've never found it to be anything other than an excellent IDE which does exactly as little or as much as I need it to.

All of my attempts to use so-called "modern" development environments have left me frustrated at their wanton squandering of screen real estate, ridiculously slow start-up times, and lack of integrated, competent diff and merge utilities.

But I forgot -- I'm insane, so clearly my experiences and opinions are irrelevant and can be dismissed out of hand. Of course.

Re:99% of the answers are going to be Eclipse (2, Interesting)

debatem1 (1087307) | more than 5 years ago | (#28106159)

I like it, just wish I could get CUSP (Lisp plugin) working in Ubuntu. If anyone says Emacs or Vi they are insane and have never done 10k lines of code in a modern environment.

Let me start this out by saying that I use Eclipse daily, and that I consider that a modern environment.

Let me qualify that statement by saying that if our ultimate ancestors had known that the eventual development of Eclipse was the price of progress, they would have stayed in the trees.

I may be insane but 10k is nothing compared to some of the projects I've worked on using vim, and while I can't claim to be 100% satisfied, at least I don't feel like it's actively fighting me.

Your VC++ irritation (5, Insightful)

BadAnalogyGuy (945258) | more than 5 years ago | (#28105789)

Keep in mind that VC++ is not the Microsoft Platform SDK. These are two completely different, albeit related, products. The SDK had a bug in getline(), but VC can't really do anything about the quality of the installed SDK.

The best free IDE is the one that you don't have to think about, it just gives you the tools to do your job without getting in your way.

My in-laws have a Mercedes. On the infrequent opportunities I have to drive it, I am always amazed at how well it supports my driving. It is the little things like rotating the headlights into a turn, actually automatically switching into neutral when the car comes to a stop, and auto-dimming rear view for night driving that make driving it a pleasure.

wxDev-C++ extended that project (5, Informative)

jfern (115937) | more than 5 years ago | (#28105793)

version 7.0 RC5 came out 2 months ago.
Wiki page with link [wikipedia.org]

Vim/DevC++ (1)

polymerousgeek (1196703) | more than 5 years ago | (#28105821)

On the rare occasion I'm forced to write something for windows, I prefer DevC++ [bloodshed.net] . Even though I haven't seen or heard anything new about it in years, it was the first IDE I ever used, and my first experience with C/C++, so I'm still very fond of the interface. For all my real work (on Linux), I stick with vim.

IDE ? (1)

Jae686 (1203100) | more than 5 years ago | (#28105823)

I'm more than happy with gedit and make.........

Re:IDE ? (1)

1s44c (552956) | more than 5 years ago | (#28105893)

I'm more than happy with gedit and make.........

Vi is arcane but it does some powerful stuff that you don't get in gedit. Get used to vi and you will see a productivity improvement.

Visual Studio (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28105839)

As long as you don't piss yourself in disgust when Microsoft is mentioned (as many here do) - Visual Studio is actually very good.

Re:Visual Studio (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28105953)

If i piss myself i have to sit in it, so i piss on YOU in disgust

Seconding this (4, Insightful)

Unoriginal_Nickname (1248894) | more than 5 years ago | (#28106009)

I use Visual Studio exclusively when developing in Windows. My only complaint is the lack of multi-monitor support but that's coming in 2010.

Re:Seconding this (1)

RanCossack (1138431) | more than 5 years ago | (#28106103)

I use Visual Studio exclusively when developing in Windows. My only complaint is the lack of multi-monitor support but that's coming in 2010.

So... I hear you can use it with multiple monitors if you run it in Linux under wine. Should make your projects a little less complicated.

Especially QA.

Re:Seconding this (1)

DarkProphet (114727) | more than 5 years ago | (#28106141)

Hmm I dunno if this is true. I tried to install Visual C# Express on wine/Kubuntu 9.04 and the installer fails with a missing module error or some dumb thing.

Has anyone been successful in installing Visual Studio under wine? I'd actually really like that!

Re:Seconding this (1)

Billy the Mountain (225541) | more than 5 years ago | (#28106119)

Can't you just drag the window wide so it fills all the screens?

BTM

But it's not free (0)

BattyMan (21874) | more than 5 years ago | (#28106029)

Go read the article. He said "free".

Re:But it's not free (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28106071)

He clearly meant free as in beer.

Re:But it's not free (2, Informative)

stevenvi (779021) | more than 5 years ago | (#28106101)

Review their web site [microsoft.com] . Microsoft Visual Studio Express is free.

Re:But it's not free (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28106107)

Visual Studio Express is. The only problem is lack of free subversion or other repository support

Re:But it's not free (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28106145)

Visual Studio Express is surely free (as in beer).

Re:But it's not free (1)

DarkProphet (114727) | more than 5 years ago | (#28106183)

I am pretty sure the Express versions are now, but I don't think they were always "free". Unless you mean "free" as in compiling the IDE from source yourself, in which case it is not! :-)

VI (0, Flamebait)

1s44c (552956) | more than 5 years ago | (#28105841)

Just vi. It's all about function not cuteness.

But lets not start the whole vi V emacs thing again, I'm sure lots of people are happy with emacs.

Re:VI (5, Funny)

BadAnalogyGuy (945258) | more than 5 years ago | (#28105851)

I'm sure lots of people are happy with emacs.

I'm sure lots of people are happy with American cars too, but we have objective standards for a reason.

Re:VI (1)

1s44c (552956) | more than 5 years ago | (#28105923)

I'm sure lots of people are happy with emacs.

I'm sure lots of people are happy with American cars too, but we have objective standards for a reason.

Are there objective standards for how productive a coder is? It doesn't seem an easy thing to measure.

Re:VI (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28105945)

It's not about the productivity of the coder. It's all about the quality of the editor.

You yourself know that vi (crisp and lean) is better than Emacs (bloated and buggy). Are you trying to find some kind of safe middle ground? Is there a benefit to running a bloated and buggy text editor?

Buggy? (1)

BattyMan (21874) | more than 5 years ago | (#28106079)

emacs may be many things, but it's not buggy. It's an app which can run for _months_ without trouble. In eleven years I do not believe that I have ever managed to make it crash.

Re:VI (1)

isama (1537121) | more than 5 years ago | (#28106155)

no longer needing to run linux to code?

Re:VI (1)

centuren (106470) | more than 5 years ago | (#28106157)

Are there objective standards for how productive a coder is? It doesn't seem an easy thing to measure.

Back in 2000 we were taught by our CS instructors that 10 lines of code per hour was a good measurement for a productive programmer, all things considered. It was an old school faculty (some had never used Windows before), and I've no idea how accurate that was or is now, as there's only one realistic metric I've used to review programmers' work, perfectly illustrated by that xkcd comic I can't find (dammit).

Coder productivity is measured by how many "WTF?"s come up when the code is reviewed.

What I use (3, Interesting)

JazzXP (770338) | more than 5 years ago | (#28105857)

For Java & PHP development, Eclipse. Does everything I need it to. For Windows C++ development, VS2008. Work in a MS shop, so not much choice here. Mac Objective-C development, Xcode. Not much choice with this due to nib's being so intergrated with the code.

Re:What I use (1)

mrsteveman1 (1010381) | more than 5 years ago | (#28105967)

You don't actually have to use nibs, do you?

It's not C++ but... (1)

adamkennedy (121032) | more than 5 years ago | (#28105861)

... for Perl the Padre IDE [perlide.org] is getting pretty awesome.

Works identically on Windows, Mac and Linux and they even managed to get the entire IDE to install itself from the CPAN.

Re:It's not C++ but... (1)

BadAnalogyGuy (945258) | more than 5 years ago | (#28105887)

Trippy [perlide.org]

Eclipse CDT (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28105863)

I recently switched from emacs to Eclipse CDT with emacs key bindings (an option in preferences). I am pretty happy with it so far.

Mix and match (1)

SpazmodeusG (1334705) | more than 5 years ago | (#28105865)

Personally i mix and match to make an IDE.
For the code editing i have notepad++.
For the compiling i have the intel core compiler.
For debugging i use Intel Debugger.

There's plugins for notepad++ to make the compiler/debugger only a keyboard shortcut away.

Re:Mix and match (1)

kitzkar (980045) | more than 5 years ago | (#28106167)

While notepad++ is a very good editor, it has terrible plugin support. Each and every update removed some plugins saying that they are not compatible with the current version. For example, the function list plugin is not supported by the current notepad++ version. I guess the developers never heard of backward compatibility.

Turbodelphi (2, Informative)

andersa (687550) | more than 5 years ago | (#28105869)

Free edition of Delphi [turboexplorer.com] .

xwpe ftw! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28105871)

xwpe ftw!
http://www.identicalsoftware.com/xwpe/screenshots.html

KDevelop 4 and Qt Creator (4, Informative)

EsbenMoseHansen (731150) | more than 5 years ago | (#28105877)

Two options that have not come up yet. KDevelop 4 is shaping up really good, but I do not think it is actually working on win32/64 yet. The other is Qt Software's offer Qt creator [qtsoftware.com] which is also getting a good deal of praise. The latter is probably extra good if you use Qt... and if you don't, I would recommend at least looking at it, since it is a very nice LGPL library.

Re:KDevelop 4 and Qt Creator (1)

dwater (72834) | more than 5 years ago | (#28106021)

> The other is Qt Software's offer Qt creator which is also getting a good deal of praise.

It seems to have some modicum of 'vi' support too, though I've not tried it (yet).

Visual Studio Express is quite good (4, Informative)

daVinci1980 (73174) | more than 5 years ago | (#28105879)

You hit it in the summary. I program professionally. At work, I use gcc, xcode or msvs (depending naturally on the platform).

At home, for personal development on Windows in C++, nothing beats Visual Studio Express. It's lightweight, meaning they've trimmed out most of the stuff that you don't care about anyways for personal projects.

As much as it might pain the free software crowd, Microsoft has done a good job with Visual Studio Express.

Re:Visual Studio Express is quite good (1)

cathector (972646) | more than 5 years ago | (#28106007)

+1 VSE. the editor is allright (actually i prefer vi or crimson editor for straight-up text editing) but VS has a couple features which are hard to find elsewhere:
* a very fast find-in-files: this may seem unsexy, but it's the number one thing i use VS for. it's so much easier to search for a symbol than navigate a source hierarchy. VS must be building indexes or something, because it takes just a second or so to grep a largish codebase for a symbol while actual grep takes maybe ten or fifteen.
* memory breakpoints: being able to break when a particular byte of memory is changed is pretty cool. i'm not sure if VS express has it. there is a hefty performance overhead tho, so you really only want to use it when smaller guns haven't panned out, if you'll pardon the mixed metaphors.

i was a regular purchaser of whole tomato's VS code-completion-companion tool for several versions, but around 2007 i un-installed it due to general crapiness of recent versions.

in the big scheme of things, i think it's good not to rely on any IDE too much. time-savings are cool, but so is understanding what the heck is going on.

Re:Visual Studio Express is quite good (2, Informative)

wannabgeek (323414) | more than 5 years ago | (#28106125)

a very fast find-in-files: this may seem unsexy, but it's the number one thing i use VS for. it's so much easier to search for a symbol than navigate a source hierarchy. VS must be building indexes or something, because it takes just a second or so to grep a largish codebase for a symbol while actual grep takes maybe ten or fifteen.

ever heard of a tool called "cscope"? It integrates nicely with vim and does the same thing you're talking about. And more.

memory breakpoints: being able to break when a particular byte of memory is changed is pretty cool. i'm not sure if VS express has it. there is a hefty performance overhead tho, so you really only want to use it when smaller guns haven't panned out, if you'll pardon the mixed metaphors.

gdb (the one debugger I know) does it too. One of my biggest pains with using VS is the lack of power (in other words, scripting support) for the editor and the debugger. I don't think the default editor of VS supports regex substitution even today, which is one of the most basic features of an editor. Similarly, it's very easy to fire gdb up and let a program run and collect some stuff while the program runs (breakpoints, and commands). To do it in VS editor is a pain, AFAIK.
http://tech.slashdot.org/story/09/05/26/2249208/What-Free-IDE-Do-You-Use?art_pos=1# [slashdot.org]

Re:Visual Studio Express is quite good (1)

chronos (3076) | more than 5 years ago | (#28106185)

Lately I have had to write code in Visual Studio and I find that I don't like it at all.
It seems like for every little task I have to fight it every inch of the way.
The IDE assumes that it knows more than I do and so tends to get in the way.

I would much rather deal with emacs or vi since I can get them to do what I want
with little effort. These editors may not have the cute graphics but they do have
the virtue of doing what I want.

eclipse (4, Informative)

tero (39203) | more than 5 years ago | (#28105881)

I swear by Eclipse - I mostly do Java these days though, but I do have it setup for C++, Perl and PHP as well.
Good plug-in support - easy to install and update.. what's not to like? :-)

Integrates with most versioning tools through plug-ins (CVS, SVN etc).

Runs on all platforms. It's great.

Re:eclipse (-1, Troll)

OrangeTide (124937) | more than 5 years ago | (#28106077)

Vim runs on DOS and VMS and OS/2. Does Eclipse run on those?

standard Java runs on one platform, the JVM.

Xcode with Ada plug-in (2, Informative)

iliketrash (624051) | more than 5 years ago | (#28105889)

I use Apple's Xcode with the Ada plug-in from www.macada.org

vim (1)

gzipped_tar (1151931) | more than 5 years ago | (#28105903)

Vim with a bunch of addons has been good enough for me.

Re:vim (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28105975)

Colorless green Cthulhu waits dreaming furiously.

What a brilliant merging of the works of Chomsky and Lovecraft.

Eclipse (4, Informative)

ErikPeterson (912282) | more than 5 years ago | (#28105909)

I use Eclipse http://www.eclipse.org/ [eclipse.org] for all my IDE needs. I have found that it works well on any platform (and with any language) that I find myself sitting behind (or coding in). Eclipse gets my vote mainly for its very wide language AND platform support.

Netbeans (1)

Rik Sweeney (471717) | more than 5 years ago | (#28105941)

I use Netbeans 5.5. I did upgrade to 6.x but quickly reverted back when I found out it did not support auto completion without having to import the package first. Maybe this was a bug in Netbeans 5.5 but I did like the way I didn't have to stop typing, use the keyboard combination or right click and select "Fix imports". Having to do this just to get method completion for something like a Hashtable was unacceptable to me.

Eclipse and Notepad++ (3, Informative)

Jartan (219704) | more than 5 years ago | (#28105949)

Notepad++ isn't really an IDE but it's probably the best c++ editor I've found for Windows. If you want a full blown IDE then Eclipse is probably your best bet. It's written in Java but with a little fiddling it's not too ugly. As for Dev-C++ it's probably lost support because it's written in Delphi of all things.

What I use(d) (4, Informative)

Lord Lode (1290856) | more than 5 years ago | (#28105961)

Years ago I worked mainly in MS Windows, and I used Dev-C++ as the free IDE, because it's fast and simple.

Then I switched to Linux. Tried KDevelop for a few days but didn't like it. Then discovered Kate, which can work as a sort of IDE, because you can open multiple documents, and open a console window at the bottom to type compile and run commands.

Then KDE4 was release and Kate suddenly was unusable for programming (due to ruined search function). And that's when I discovered Geany, which is really nice, it has the same functionality as Kate but is more clearly geared towards programmers.

Geany works great in Linux, I see that it's cross platform, so I guess you can also get it to work in Windows. But note that due to Windows not having the same compiler tools as Linux available by default, it might be handier in Windows to have something that comes with its own compiler like Dev-C++ :)

What about Microsoft free visual c++ express editi (2, Informative)

zymano (581466) | more than 5 years ago | (#28105973)

Express edition. Free of charge.

getline and IDE (2, Interesting)

shird (566377) | more than 5 years ago | (#28105981)

The error with getline is a bug with the library/compiler etc. This is separate from the IDE. It's not very difficult to modify the compiler/C runtime etc VC uses - its just an editor which calls out to other executables to do compilation.

In any case - I'm sure that problem has been fixed with Visual Studio express - Microsoft actually do IDEs and compilers very well, especially with their last few iterations. 6 is pretty old.

Personally I use vim on unix. But when doing GUI work on windows, Visual Studio is hard to beat.

Haven't seen Monodevelop mentioned yet.. (1)

Hillview (1113491) | more than 5 years ago | (#28105983)

http://monodevelop.com/ [monodevelop.com] - Supports C, C++, C#, Asp.net.. rather nicely I might add.

Lazarus (2, Interesting)

dvh.tosomja (1235032) | more than 5 years ago | (#28105995)

Thank you

silly question (1)

eneville (745111) | more than 5 years ago | (#28105997)

vim of course

I use a magnetized pin (2)

floydman (179924) | more than 5 years ago | (#28106019)

and I keep them here:
http://www.marthastewart.com/goodthings/magnetized-pin-box [marthastewart.com]

It looks cute, girls get interested in the field.

Re:I use a magnetized pin (4, Funny)

shockwaverider (78582) | more than 5 years ago | (#28106083)

A magnetized needle and a steady hand? Nah - Real programmers use ....

http://imgs.xkcd.com/comics/real_programmers.png

XCode (1)

Bored Grammar Nazi (1482359) | more than 5 years ago | (#28106033)

What else?

If you're moving towards .NET (4, Informative)

snookums (48954) | more than 5 years ago | (#28106043)

Try SharpDevelop if you ever decide to trade in C++ for C# and the .NET framework.

http://www.icsharpcode.net/OpenSource/SD/ [icsharpcode.net]
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SharpDevelop [wikipedia.org]

I'm not really a Microsoft platform coder any more, but I've used this one in the past and it's not bad. Basically a free (as in speech - LGPL) clone of VisualStudio.

NetBeans (5, Informative)

timothyb89 (1259272) | more than 5 years ago | (#28106075)

I've been using NetBeans lately for C/C++ development, and (for the most part) it has it's usual awesome editor features. Unfortunately, the C/C++ plugin only works with the Cygwin/MinGW development tools on Windows.

I'd say that it's most useful editing feature is it's code completion- it completes quite a few of the usual syntactical characters, and it enters them for you in a way that makes sense. Compare that to Eclipse, which only fills in (as far as I know) parenthesis and some brackets. Being accustomed to the completion NetBeans offers, I found the way Eclipse completes characters to be more frustrating than helpful.

For example, if you have this mostly-typed statement (')' autocompleted by editor):
some_function(something()[cursor])
...you might think that pressing the ';' key should make the cursor jump to the end and skip over the ')'. NetBeans will do the small things like this, where I haven't seen Eclipse do it.

I haven't used Eclipse as much as NetBeans, so I may have missed the "turn this feature on" checkbox, but I've always found NetBeans to be a more intuitive editor. I'm not an expert C/C++ programmer (Java is my main language), so I could just be making assumptions that may be true for one language but not another. Either way, its just my $0.02.

Komodo Edit (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28106087)

Im surprised at no mention of Komodo. The free IDE, Komodo Edit, is extremely nice. I use exclusively for python code and I've found the in-line syntax checking/bug checking a handy feature. Also the ability for it to recognize my own internal function/variables in my modules is extremely handy when I have lapses in my memory :p.

Padre for Perl (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28106091)

Padre for Perl, with now have all the goodness of plugins for catalyst, mojo and fantastic support, did I say free?

use no IDE (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28106097)

I recommend using no IDE.

U++ TheIDE (2, Informative)

luzr (896024) | more than 5 years ago | (#28106143)

http://www.ultimatepp.org/ [ultimatepp.org]

Well, you would probably get more than just IDE with that, as TheIDE is quite tightly coupled with the U++ library (http://www.ultimatepp.org/L$www$uppweb$idess$en-us.html_3.png, http://www.ultimatepp.org/L$www$uppweb$idess$en-us.html_4.png [ultimatepp.org] ), anyway, ide-wise:

- it has cool highlighting, including highlighting of C++ blocks and coloring parenthesis (see http://www.ultimatepp.org/L$www$uppweb$idess$en-us.html_2.png [ultimatepp.org] )

- its C++ code-parsing abilitites (for purposes of code-navigation and 'intelisense') are at the moment said to be better than CDT's or at par with Visual Studio, although the problem is that it parses only the project files (not 'external' headers) http://www.ultimatepp.org/L$www$uppweb$idess$en-us.html_5.png [ultimatepp.org] .

- if you are rebuilding large projects often, it has very fast build process. It uses two tricks, one widely known (using multiple CPU cores to launch compiler instances), one special (combining files to avoid header reparsing). In practice, on quadcore CPU, it can build up to 16 times faster than plain make.

- works in Win32 and X11.

But there is also a drawback for many users:

- as it adds a strong crossplatform modularity layer, it gets a lot of suffering getting used to it. Simply do not expect your usual Visual Studio copy...

mc (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28106171)

Midnight commander's built-in text editor colorizes code in many different languages. I've been using it for probably about 8 years now, including all the development I did for college projects. With the exception of when I was forced (read required by professor) to develop something in VS, I found it to be stupid slow, buggy, and just downright frustrating.

Also, there are simple lightweight text editors which work great without all the bulk of a full IDE, like TextPad, Kate, etc. TextPad has a free version which has an annoying pop-up at the beginning, but that's it. Essentially, its a commercial version of Kate anyway.

So yeah, text editors for modifying code, then compile with gcc/javac/whathaveyou. Its free, fast and works.

Codelite (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28106179)

Why is it nobody seems to know about the excellent CodeLite? Described as "a powerful open-source, cross platform IDE for the C/C++ programming languages (build and tested on Windows XP SP3, (K)Ubuntu 8.04, and Mac OSX 10.5.2)" see http://www.codelite.org/

Not Free, but... CodeWarrior (4, Interesting)

MaineCoon (12585) | more than 5 years ago | (#28106181)

Not free, and also no longer sold for Windows, but it's my favorite IDE of all time. I still use CW9 on Windows for anything that doesn't require absolute latest C++ compiler/libs (mainly, my MUD, which I do my dev on Windows, but run it on a Linux server).

CodeWarrior has a feature no other current Windows-based IDE has - independent free floating edit windows without being locked into an MDI container with grey backdrop. I'd gladly pay a few hundred dollars for a modern, actively supported editor that had such a feature (I hear SlickEdit has been planning it, but they have yet to deliver).

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