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Looking at Intel's New-ish Desktop Socket, LGA 1366

timothy posted more than 4 years ago | from the odd-number-of-RAM-sticks-means-cognitive-dissonance dept.

Intel 100

Slatterz writes "LGA 1366 is Intel's first new desktop socket in four years. It uses the same ZIF design as the familiar LGA 775 architecture, but it incorporates many more contacts. These big architectural changes are backed up by some less visible advances. Until now, Intel's quad-core processors have been constructed from two dual-core dies, but now Core i7 brings together four cores on a single die. It's also Intel's first processor design to use an L3 cache, shared between all four cores."

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Yawn (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28165785)

Wake me up with there is something worth posting to Slashdot

Slashdot EMERGENCY!!! Call the PARAMEDICS NOW!!!!1 (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28166219)

Wake me up with there is something worth posting to Slashdot

Try this [break.com].

~!@#$ MOD PARENT UP $#@!~ (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28166513)

Now THAT's what I call barbecue Indian masala!

Re:Slashdot EMERGENCY!!! Call the PARAMEDICS NOW!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28167255)

I'm posting anonymously coz the question might appear too stupid.
Can someone explain in simple scientific terms how did it happen?
How did the man 'burst' when he touched the HV lines above him?

Re:Slashdot EMERGENCY!!! Call the PARAMEDICS NOW!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28168039)

The heat generated when the electricity passed through his resistive tissue caused the water in his cells to boil. The cells couldn't contain the steam and burst.

Re:Slashdot EMERGENCY!!! Call the PARAMEDICS NOW!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28168763)

His body starts burning almost immediately. Does that means all the liquid content of his body is evaporated?
I find it strange and weird. His body starts burning a while after he isn't touching the HV lines anymore.

Re:Slashdot EMERGENCY!!! Call the PARAMEDICS NOW!! (2, Funny)

MBaldelli (808494) | more than 4 years ago | (#28167915)

Wake me up with there is something worth posting to Slashdot

Try this [break.com].

Holy hell.. This is clearly proof that the Gene Pool is in serious need of a fungicide.

Why are they making more silicon chips (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28165805)

Priorities, people! There are like 500 trillion starving people out there and all everybody's talking about is Intel this, microwsoft that, googel et setira. I say there should be no computers until after lunch. "Die" that, nerds!

I realised /. was slow sometimes... (3, Funny)

sznupi (719324) | more than 4 years ago | (#28165823)

...but c'mon.

Re:I realised /. was slow sometimes... (1)

Z00L00K (682162) | more than 4 years ago | (#28166873)

The 1366 socket has been around for almost a year now, so I also wonder why it appeared now.

Did someone mistype the year to 2009 this time last year?

Re:I realised /. was slow sometimes... (1)

Chabo (880571) | more than 4 years ago | (#28172541)

Give them a break; they're Australian. They're still playing Knifey Spooney.

It takes months/years for new hardware to reach them.

Uh, what? (4, Funny)

pathological liar (659969) | more than 4 years ago | (#28165841)

This might have been news 7 or 8 months ago when the chips were released.

What's next? ATX Power Supplies Explained? "Plugs into any ordinary wall socket! Flick the switch and it turns on! Use it to power your computer! You'll see them turning up in shops any day now!"

Re:Uh, what? (3, Funny)

Norsefire (1494323) | more than 4 years ago | (#28165981)

Right after they announce Tim Berners-Lee's new invention. I heard it's going to change the world.

Re:Uh, what? (1)

tygerstripes (832644) | more than 4 years ago | (#28166473)

I heard it's going to change the world.

Make it "could change the world", pull out some key facts, misspell the title and you've got a story!
kdawson

Re:Uh, what? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28170959)

Don't you mean Al Gore's new invention?

Re:Uh, what? (3, Funny)

LordKronos (470910) | more than 4 years ago | (#28166077)

Flick the switch and it turns on!

I've heard some of the newer designs are using pushbuttons instead of switches. I know....it sounds absurd, but apparently it's true.

It *is* absurd (1)

argent (18001) | more than 4 years ago | (#28166277)

Since the soft power pushbutton goes through the OS, you can be stuck there with a computer running and no way to turn it off but pull the power cable. Not having an actual switch on the power supply is frustrating.

Re:It *is* absurd (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28166349)

Try pushing and holding the button for 3-5 seconds, JACKASS!

Re:It *is* absurd (1)

sexconker (1179573) | more than 4 years ago | (#28170177)

Depends on BIOS, JACKASS!

ALWAYS have a physical power switch.
ALWAYS.

Re:It *is* absurd (1)

michrech (468134) | more than 4 years ago | (#28171397)

Uhhh, no. In my 15-ish years as a PC tech, I've not once run into an ATX machine that didn't turn off when the power switch was held unless there was a malfunction in the power supply or the switch itself. Some machines take a few seconds longer to power off than others, but they *all* work.

Re:It *is* absurd (1)

sexconker (1179573) | more than 4 years ago | (#28174531)

We have a rack full of dell servers that let us disable this in the BIOS.

If the thing hangs, you have to pull the plug.

Re:It *is* absurd (1)

toddestan (632714) | more than 4 years ago | (#28175945)

Any decent ATX power supply includes a physical power switch to cut the juice. Also comes in handy when working in the PC - you can turn the switch off to kill the power but leave the cord plugged in so the chassis is grounded. I hate the cheap ones with no switch on the back.

Re:It *is* absurd (1)

Matt_R (23461) | more than 4 years ago | (#28176951)

Here in the developed world, we can turn the power off at the wall socket.

Re:It *is* absurd (1)

sexconker (1179573) | more than 4 years ago | (#28183033)

I HATE switches at wall sockets.
So easy for some fool to bump it and take shit offline.

That's what a circuit breaker box is for.

Re:It *is* absurd (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28325535)

I live in the UK where we have switches on just about every single fucking power socket and I have never had an incidence of someone accidentally bumping the switch and turning it off. It is far more likely for the cord to be knocked and pull the plug out of the socket. Do you have retarded socket designs where you live that make it easy to accidentally bump the switch off?

Re:It *is* absurd (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28166403)

Since the soft power pushbutton goes through the OS

Oh, really? So, how does it happen that the "soft power pushbutton" works when the computer is off?

You're an idiot. Please don't post here anymore.

Re:It *is* absurd (4, Informative)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 4 years ago | (#28166667)

You're an idiot. Please don't post here anymore.

Either you or your computer can set that power button to ACPI only, at which point holding it down for five seconds doesn't do anything except make the button temporarily shorter.

You are an asshole. Please log in so you can be modded down.

First they ignore you, then they laugh at you (0)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 4 years ago | (#28167871)

Then they mod you down. Eau de irony.

Re:First they ignore you, then they laugh at you (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28170679)

nerdrage..

Re:It *is* absurd (1)

argent (18001) | more than 4 years ago | (#28167523)

So, how does it happen that the "soft power pushbutton" works when the computer is off?

It doesn't. The computer is never off, it's just in idle mode: the CPU is shut down but parts of the motherboard are powered up and listening to the power button and often for Wake On Lan from the NIC. Once the OS boots, it takes over ACPI and the soft power button has no effect.

As a result, incidentally, it's still using about 1W while it's "off". Hard power switches on the front of computers would save a significant amount of energy.

Re:It *is* absurd (1)

NJRoadfan (1254248) | more than 4 years ago | (#28168143)

As a result, incidentally, it's still using about 1W while it's "off". Hard power switches on the front of computers would save a significant amount of energy.

Well that WAS the case with the old AT standard power supplies. Nothing is stopping one from hooking the computer up to a power strip and switching that off when you aren't using it.

Re:It *is* absurd (1)

argent (18001) | more than 4 years ago | (#28168547)

The significant energy savings would come from people all over the world who *don't* care flipping the switch on the front they normally flip and getting the computer actually turned off. Not from the dozen or three people who do care going to the bother of installing a power strip.

Re:It *is* absurd (1, Informative)

LordKronos (470910) | more than 4 years ago | (#28169617)

So, how does it happen that the "soft power pushbutton" works when the computer is off?

It doesn't. The computer is never off, it's just in idle mode

But I think you missed the point. You said the soft power pushbutton goes through the OS. However, when the machine is shut down there is no OS loaded. When you first plug it in, there is no possibility of any part of the OS still being resident in memory, yet the power button still turns it on.

No, you are wrong. The button doesn't go through the OS. It goes through the BIOS. The BIOS will then send ACPI messages to the loaded OS and allow the OS to handle the response to the power button. However, when you hold it down for 4 seconds, that is not treated as an ACPI event. That gets handled internally by the BIOS. The BIOS just then cuts the power without giving the OS the opportunity to do anything.

Every computer I've ever used since the soft power button came into use has behaved this way. Even if the computer has completely locked up, holding the power button for 4 seconds shuts it off. I'm nearly 100% certain that the specification says it should work this way. If you have a computer that doesn't do this, I'd claim your motherboard is defective (either in manufacture or in design). Either that or user error.

Re:It *is* absurd (1)

argent (18001) | more than 4 years ago | (#28170127)

But I think you missed the point.

You're telling me that I missed my own point. Good job.

The BIOS will then send ACPI messages to the loaded OS and allow the OS to handle the response to the power button. However, when you hold it down for 4 seconds, that is not treated as an ACPI event. That gets handled internally by the BIOS.

Unless (a) the OS is so broken the BIOS is trashed too, or (b) the computer is configured to always go through ACPI. And, yes, I've seen just about everything from Windows 2000 through the latest Windows and Linux fuck up the BIOS this badly on our test floor.

I'm nearly 100% certain that the specification says it should work this way.

Unless the computer is configured to always go through ACPI.

Re:It *is* absurd (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28171437)

You're telling me that I missed my own point. Good job.

Well apparently that wasn't the only thing you missed, because I wasn't talking about your point. I was talking about the point you apparently missed which was made by an AC about asking how the machine powers on. You said the OS handles the button and he pointed out that the OS can't do anything when the machine is off, so you responded about how it's not really off. That's beside the point. Whether it is physically off or just soft-off, the point is there is no OS running to handle the button. I'm beginning to think I was onto something when I mentioned the possibility of user error.

Re:It *is* absurd (0, Troll)

argent (18001) | more than 4 years ago | (#28173009)

I think you must be reading a different thread. The OP was making a joke, not asking a question.

Re:It *is* absurd (0, Flamebait)

LordKronos (470910) | more than 4 years ago | (#28176099)

And you didn't even read my post. For crying out loud, I didn't say a damn thing about the OP. I said the AC asked a question. You seem to be having trouble remembering the context just a few posts into the thread, so I'll summarize it all here for you:

argent:
Monday June 01, @08:05AM
Post #28166277

...the soft power pushbutton goes through the OS...

Anonymous Coward
Monday June 01, @08:25AM
Post #28166403

...So, how does it happen that the "soft power pushbutton" works when the computer is off?

argent
Monday June 01, @10:10AM
Post #28167523

It doesn't. The computer is never off, it's just in idle mode

Re:It *is* absurd (1)

argent (18001) | more than 4 years ago | (#28183815)

Why should I care about what some AC posted?

Seriously.

Re:It *is* absurd (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28185571)

I'm being trolled. That's the only reasonable explanation.

Re:It *is* absurd (1)

symbolset (646467) | more than 4 years ago | (#28177007)

Actually, usually these virtual power buttons are connected to a very low power embedded computer system on the motherboard that provides a web interface and contains some logs and sensors. It runs on "Standby power", which is always available if the computer is plugged in. It shares video memory in the traditional text console as well as VGA with the main processor, and passes through serial events for mouse and keyboard. It can also map an .iso over the network as a boot device for installing operating systems. So you can not only hit the remote power button, you can wake the system up and watch it POST, and as the OS comes up you can manipulate it as if it were in front of you -- even if you don't actually know where it is, which is becoming more common lately. Typically this is handled on a separate network or VLAN (the management has its own port) which is called the "server management network".

Technically, this embedded system is a computer with it's own OS and BIOS, so you're both right.

/At least that's the way it works with HP gear. And of course theres a central management server that aggregates the sensor logs, presents the datacenter as a single website graphical diagram where you can drill down to individual servers or image vast sets of them, manage power by server, rack, row, room or site, etc, etc.

Re:It *is* absurd (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28193773)

Technically, this embedded system is a computer with it's own OS and BIOS, so you're both right.

When someone says some piece of hardware is handled "through the OS", you and I both know they don't mean a piece of software on some embedded system. They mean Windows, Linux, OSX, etc.

Metaphor (4, Funny)

goldaryn (834427) | more than 4 years ago | (#28165851)

"LGA 1366 is Intel's first new desktop socket in four years. It uses the same ZIF design as the familiar LGA 775 architecture, but it incorporates many more contacts

Bigger number! Woo-hoo! With the POWER of MATHS I can tell you ...1366 over 775 = 76% better!

Reminds me of when I upgraded my disposable razor from one with 3 blades to 4 FREAKING BLADES!!!11!1

I get 33% more hot babes now.. FUCK YEAH

(Yeah, yeah, 33% of 0....)

Re:Metaphor (0, Offtopic)

TeknoHog (164938) | more than 4 years ago | (#28165951)

Reminds me of when I upgraded my disposable razor from one with 3 blades to 4 FREAKING BLADES!!!11!1

I get 33% more hot babes now.. FUCK YEAH

(Yeah, yeah, 33% of 0....)

And that's why they call it "machturbo".

Re:Metaphor (1, Funny)

cripkd (709136) | more than 4 years ago | (#28166011)

4 blades? Why are you leaving in the stone age? Why don't you use a knife instead? We have upgraded to 6 (yes, SIX) blades like for... months!!! Best sell your flintstone car and buy an SUV. They will be the next big thing.

Re:Metaphor (1)

kestasjk (933987) | more than 4 years ago | (#28166075)

More contacts -> more data transfer at same clock rate. More blades on a razor -> not much difference. (Also re:title: "Metaphor"? Don't you mean "analogy"?)

Re:Metaphor (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 4 years ago | (#28166447)

More specifically, many of those extra pins are there for the on-die memory controller that Intel was just too cool for during the period when the A64s where kicking their asses. Now they have one as well, and it provides just as big a boost, for a rather nicer core.

Re:Metaphor (2, Funny)

L4t3r4lu5 (1216702) | more than 4 years ago | (#28166201)

I can shave so quickly with my new R^hAzor [shave.com] that the last four letters of the name accelerate faster than the first one!

Whooosh!

Did you TRY going back to fewer blades? (1)

SmallFurryCreature (593017) | more than 4 years ago | (#28166395)

I thought myself, "what the fuck, why am I paying 32 euro for a couple of razor blades!" and I bought the cheap generic brand 2 blade stuff.

OUCH! Not saying it cut my face, it didn't but there really is a HUGE difference between the "quality" 5 blade razors and the cheap 2 blade kind. It is a smooth shave versus having the hair torn from your face.

Crybaby you might say, or I might just have had a really bad 2 blade razor but still. I ain't going back again.

So if you got a baby soft skin and a 5 o'clock shadow, then more blades are actually a good thing. Or maybe just really sharp blades.

Re:Did you TRY going back to fewer blades? (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 4 years ago | (#28166687)

You're better off with a two-blade Bic than a four-blade Trim. The biggest difference between good razor and shitty razor is the steel.

Re:Did you TRY going back to fewer blades? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28167471)

That is funny. You paid 32 euros for a disposable razor, when about the same amount of money could have gotten you a quality straight razor. Once you've learned how to use a straight razor, you'll never want to use any other kind. Close shave, but unlike the (dear god are we actually up to five blades? That was a joke I saw in a cartoon years back) disposable razors, you won't have any ingrown hairs.

Re:Did you TRY going back to fewer blades? (1)

Chris Burke (6130) | more than 4 years ago | (#28169587)

I thought myself, "what the fuck, why am I paying 32 euro for a couple of razor blades!" and I bought the cheap generic brand 2 blade stuff.

OUCH! Not saying it cut my face, it didn't but there really is a HUGE difference between the "quality" 5 blade razors and the cheap 2 blade kind. It is a smooth shave versus having the hair torn from your face.

I had the exact same experience when I tried to buy cheap generic 2-blade razors to replace my expensive name brand 2-blade razors. Because it's about the quality of the individual razors, not the quantity of them. You can buy crappy 5-blade razors that will also feel like you're shaving with 60 grit sandpaper.

Frankly having used 2, 3, 4 and 5 blade quality razors I think about the only difference is that more razors means less pressure with the same amount of force so you're less likely to nick yourself when you wake up late and have to shave in 2 minutes before having any coffee. Otherwise, the extra blades seem practically worthless... if the first 3 blades didn't cut the hair, then it's too low for the last two to cut either. The blade that's right behind the allegedly-hair-raising rubber bumper thingie is where all the action is (and will cause you to replace the blade when it, not the 5th, blade wears out).

I guess you get a slightly cleaner shave in one pass, so if speed is of the essence... why aren't you using an electric? Anyway, two passes of a two-blade razor gets me a better shave than one pass of a 5-blade, so I'm pretty satisfied.

Re:Did you TRY going back to fewer blades? (1)

piojo (995934) | more than 4 years ago | (#28170251)

After using a 3-blade Gilette razor for a couple years, I tried the older 2-blade version and liked it a lot better. I can't really say why, but it seemed to give a cleaner shave and have less irritation. I consequently believe that all this "now with even more blades" nonsense is just marketing.

Re:Metaphor (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28166429)

4 blades? That's for pussies: http://www.theonion.com/content/node/33930 [theonion.com]

Re:Metaphor (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28167013)

I get 33% more hot babes now.. FUCK YEAH

Some study [telegraph.co.uk] disagrees.

Re:Metaphor (1)

Chris Burke (6130) | more than 4 years ago | (#28169703)

Bigger number! Woo-hoo! With the POWER of MATHS I can tell you ...1366 over 775 = 76% better!

I'm certain the number is just the pin count which is a typical way to name sockets. More pins isn't necessarily better but since in this particular case the explosion in pin count is due to adding three DDR3 channels on-chip I'm willing to bet it is.

Slow news day (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28165913)

Since there isn't going to be many comments, I am taking this opportunity to come out.

I'm a Mac user. An iphone owner. A friend of Dorothy. In short, I'm gay.

Re:Slow news day (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28165933)

I'll take the opportunity to come in.

About time! (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28165963)

About time they copied HyperTransport! If I remember correctly AMD had a leg up on Intel for a few quarters in the multi-core war because of HyperTransport.

Read More... link broken? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28165973)

Is it just in my browser of is the "Read More..." link broken?

Every time I click on one using Firefox, I get the same error:

Connection Interrupted

The document contains no data.

The network link was interrupted while negotiating a connection. Please try again.

This has been happening for days, maybe weeks now.

Not the new desktop socket (5, Informative)

nxtw (866177) | more than 4 years ago | (#28165991)

LGA 1366 is intended for servers, workstations, and high-end gaming PCs. LGA 1156 will be the mainstream
  desktop socket.

What's the difference? IIRC, LGA 1366 has a tripe-channel memory controller and support for dual CPUs (via another QuickPath link). LGA 1156 has dual-channel memory support with support for only one CPU.

The desktop CPU for LGA 1156 will be called Core i5.

Re:Not the new desktop socket (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28166085)

LGA 1366 has a tripe-channel memory controller

Can't be that bad, surely.

Re:Not the new desktop socket (4, Interesting)

asliarun (636603) | more than 4 years ago | (#28166259)

Please refer to the excellent Anandtech preview article on Lynnfield [anandtech.com] that will be the first family of CPUs to use LGA 1156. Lynnfield has uses a dual-channel DDR3 controller instead of using triple-channel integrated memory controller in its uncore like Nehalem does. However, the dual-channel controller should still provide enough bandwidth for most desktop apps (the Nehalem architecture is not bandwidth constrained at all, unlike all previous generation CPUs including Core2 that used massive L2 caches to offset the memory bandwidth bottleneck due to the FSB).

However, the main difference between Lynnfield/LGA 1156 and LGA 1366 used in servers is the fact that it doesn't use QuickPath at all. Instead, it uses a combination of integrated PCIe 2.0 x16 controller (to talk to the graphics subsystem) and a (much slower) DMI controller to talk to everything else. Its an interesting alternative to QuickPath which is frankly expensive overkill for desktops anyway. The key advantage of the new socket will be significantly lower prices of motherboards and CPUs, which will allow Intel to provide some credible alternatives to AMD's current offerings that may be slower than Nehalem but are also much cheaper.

Re:Not the new desktop socket (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28166497)

the Nehalem architecture is not bandwidth constrained at all

Don't be silly. Total bandwidth to all 4 cores of an i7 920 on triple-channel DDR3/10333 is only 20GB/s. That's about 1.8 bytes per core per cycle. Given the existence of SSE instructions reading 16 bytes per cycle you're about 90% short of unconstrained bandwidth.

Even with the best DDR3 money can buy you're still 80% short.

I think you meant to say the Nehalem architecture is not bottlenecked at all.

Re:Not the new desktop socket (2, Interesting)

asliarun (636603) | more than 4 years ago | (#28166903)

Thanks for the correction. Yes, I meant to say that Nehalem is not bottlenecked.

just one x16 link and a slow dmi link is too small (1)

Joe The Dragon (967727) | more than 4 years ago | (#28166877)

just one x16 link and a slow dmi link is too small

as 1 / 2 video cards cards will eat up the x16 link. Making sound / ide / sata / network / system and bios IO / other pci-e slots / firewire / usb all share the slow DMI link or force MB makers to put pci-e switches (driving costs up) one the x16 link.

AMD wins aging all cpus use HT driving MB costs down as well letting the same MB run low and high end cpus.

Re:Not the new desktop socket (4, Interesting)

asc99c (938635) | more than 4 years ago | (#28166281)

The socket for Core i7 equivalent Xeons is the same LGA-1366, but the standard Core i7 only has one QPI link, so you can't use them in dual CPU configs.

I hadn't heard about LGA-1156, but I'm a bit suspicious whether it will really take off. I don't really understand now that Intel have launched LGA-1366 where is the room for a slightly lower spec socket. I wouldn't have thought a few extra pins in the socket is that expensive, and buying RAM in packs of 3 isn't that much of a problem - and it's optional anyway.

By Q3 when LGA-1156 is due, Core i7 will be already heading down into the mainstream.

Re:Not the new desktop socket (1)

nxtw (866177) | more than 4 years ago | (#28166437)

i5 systems will be much cheaper - turns out that they won't have QuickPath at all, but will have an integrated PCI-e controller instead. This should allow for cheaper/simpler system boards. I think this will lead to lower power use as well.

LGA 1156 wil replace LGA 775 as the mainstream socket. And LGA 1366 won't take over as the mainstream desktop socket when all the CPUs are well over $100 and there are no chipsets with integrated graphics available.

Re:Not the new desktop socket (1)

asc99c (938635) | more than 4 years ago | (#28168743)

Lack of integrated graphics is a good point. Anandtech's article linked to by asliarun above suggests that LGA1156 is well designed to run with integrated graphics, based on having an internal PCIe controller.

But still, unless LGA1156 is really *much* simpler and cheaper to build, I would expect that the existing LGA775 / Core 2 Duo / Core 2 Quad platform would remain the cheapest option for quite a while. By the time you'd think about LGA1156, it seems LGA1366 would be the one to go for.

Re:Not the new desktop socket (1)

Lvdata (1214190) | more than 4 years ago | (#28171381)

Not all I7's lack integrated graphics. I am running a http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813182167 [newegg.com] in a low cost server application. It only goes to 1024x768 - not great with my monitor that does 1366x768 Wide Screen, but then most of the time I am using it with a remote desktop connection.

Re:Not the new desktop socket (1)

bhtooefr (649901) | more than 4 years ago | (#28176201)

Usually "integrated graphics" refers to graphics on the northbridge, not a discrete 2D chip on the motherboard - that Supermicro board has a Matrox chip on there to handle 2D graphics.

Re:Not the new desktop socket (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28169463)

My paranoid delusion - being able to get a full monopoly on the chipset sales for anything QPI is the main reason for the i5/i7 push. Look at how many companies are building chipsets for the i7/i5 processors. Look around the grumblings about the whole Atom/ION bundling pricing. Nvidia seriously wants and is capable of providing competitive (and cheap) integrated motherboard solutions, but Intel really wants to be the only fish in the pool. As a result, Intel has full control over the market segmentation on this platform. LGA1366 is meant to be their high profit-margin. There's about a $100 difference between high-end LGA1366 and AM-3 motherboards - some is due to more expensive PCB costs and lower volume/quantity discounts, but since Intel can arbitrarily set the pricing on the northbridge chipset, they can directly control what the end price/product volumes are. *This* is the reason why i5 will be much cheaper - the i7 is seriously inflated right now.

Re:Not the new desktop socket (1)

niteshifter (1252200) | more than 4 years ago | (#28166297)

>

.... IIRC, LGA 1366 has a tripe-channel memory controller ....

So ... it's optimized for WIndows Server?

Re:Not the new desktop socket (2, Insightful)

313373_bot (766001) | more than 4 years ago | (#28166625)

For what it is worth, looks like artificial market segmentation = bad for upgraders. AMD is guilty of that, too.

Re:Not the new desktop socket (1)

nxtw (866177) | more than 4 years ago | (#28166815)

No, it appears there are significant technical differences - such as the inclusion of QuickPath and triple channel on 1366 and an integrated PCI-e controller on 1156. I wouldn't want an inefficient desktop because I had to use a socket with an excessively high bandwidth link.

Re:Not the new desktop socket (2, Insightful)

313373_bot (766001) | more than 4 years ago | (#28174007)

Point taken, perhaps "artificial" wasn't the best way to put it. But again, with few exceptions, the high-end technology of today becomes the mainstream of tomorrow.

2008's news again... (4, Funny)

ricky-road-flats (770129) | more than 4 years ago | (#28166105)

And I thought Australia was 12 hours ahead of us!

Re:2008's news again... (3, Funny)

schwartzg (1089259) | more than 4 years ago | (#28166135)

It has nothing to do with timezones and everything to do with distance. Boats powered by magazine editors have only now reached Australia, but since we have the internet we learned of their arrival at the same time they arrived. It makes perfect sense.

Kittens (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28166107)

Kittens are kinda awesome.

Just a bit behind (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28166159)

Everyone thinks this article is announcing news that's 6+ months old, but really it's just an April Fool's joke that's 2 months old.

wooohooo! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28166205)

Duz it haz poniez and lolcatz? 'N iz it pink? Gimme, wan' it now!

MB prices (1)

m.dillon (147925) | more than 4 years ago | (#28168365)

I have noticed that motherboard prices for higher-end AMD Phenom systems seem to be a lot lower then MB prices for Intel I7 systems. AMD's high integration approach seems to be paying off there. The only real issue seems to be AMDs lack of support for larger 16G memory configurations in its desktop line.

The whole-system price for a Phenom X4 system (using e.g. A Shuttle SN78SH7 as a base) is less then $600. Every year it seems I can buy a cheap off-the-shelf barebones system and completely replace several of the previous year's servers, if not for the HD performance requirements. The biggest constraint for ALL of my machines, these days, is HD performance.

On the storage and performance front I think the addition of external ESATA connectors to base motherboards may actually be the more important change. Manufacturers made the same mistake with direct, native NAS that they made with SCSI... they blew it by keeping prices ridiculously high. It is the same thing that allowed SATA to take over much of the consumer and mid-sized business markets from SCSI over the last few years. Now NAS has been relegated to having to compete directly with high-level protocols like NFS and is getting squeezed into a smaller niche. Firewire has become standardized too but could never break into the HD market as a native connection standard. The end result is that ESATA is likely to consolidate and become *THE* connect standard of choice for external storage subsystems.

-Matt

Re:MB prices (1)

RightSaidFred99 (874576) | more than 4 years ago | (#28169233)

Phenom (and AM2 and above) have been around a lot longer. 1366 MB prices are starting to plummet now.

Re:MB prices (1)

plonk420 (750939) | more than 4 years ago | (#28171439)

i wouldn't really say plummet. the cheapest i've seen is $180. down from $200 which it has sat at for a while. i got the MSI X58 Pro Openbox for $131 ...but then had to spend $48 on NB/SB coolers (2 x $24 for the HR-05 IFX; i probably could have gotten away with 1 + a cheaper SB cooler, but i was in a rush and didn't want to do even MORE searching and wait for it before powering on the machine)

i THINK the X58M MSRP is supposed to be $160, but that hasn't trickled down, yet.

Why? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28168791)

Why are we looking at it?

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