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Black Hole Swallows Star

CmdrTaco posted more than 5 years ago | from the put-it-in-yer-mouth dept.

Space 166

Thorfinn.au writes "The New Scientist writes a conjectural piece to explain the light pattern of SCP 06F6 in what was first identified as a supernova — but observations show a skewed and stretched light curve not fitting with an current theoretical explanation of exploding stars. Also, the discussion in the comments is interesting."

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

"discussion in the comments" (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28250257)

and you couldn't summarize the "discussion in the comments" in the summary because...

Re:"discussion in the comments" (4, Funny)

stupid_is (716292) | more than 5 years ago | (#28250351)

Probably cos it mostly now reads:

This comment breached our terms of use and has been removed.

Re:"discussion in the comments" (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28250355)

This comment breached our terms of use [newscientist.com] and has been removed.

Because it's not interesting. (4, Insightful)

argent (18001) | more than 5 years ago | (#28250485)

Aside from all the "This comment breached our terms of use and has been removed" messages, most of the comments are by kooks or people who clearly misunderstood the article (like the guy who saw a 2s flare in Delphinus).

Re:Because it's not interesting. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28250545)

Aside from all the "This comment breached our terms of use and has been removed" messages, most of the comments are by kooks or people who clearly misunderstood the article (like the guy who saw a 2s flare in Delphinus).

Ahhh, so it's like the comments on Slashdot when a legal topic comes up?

Re:Because it's not interesting. (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28251077)

Ahhh, so it's like the comments on Slashdot when any topic comes up?

Fixed that for you!

Re:Because it's not interesting. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28251213)

Very true. Thanks for the correction.

Re:Because it's not interesting. (2, Funny)

BLQWME (791611) | more than 5 years ago | (#28251439)

I know there is a hemmorhoid joke in here somewhere.

Re:Because it's not interesting. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28251605)

I thought this was a story about Hugh Grant and a hooker. Thought it was little strange to be filed under Science.

Re:Because it's not interesting. (4, Insightful)

OldSoldier (168889) | more than 5 years ago | (#28251597)

One of the comments I like is the fellow who complains that:

So called scientific "facts" such as, black holes, big bang, stretched space, warped space, spacetime and so on,are merely flawed mathematical constructs. They have never been observed

What always strikes me with these sort of comments is the underlying belief that scientists are hiding something from the rest of us. Don't these posters realize that they're complaining about this "supposed conspiracy theory" in an article where scientists are openly admitting that they saw something they don't understand?

Re:Because it's not interesting. (2, Interesting)

czarangelus (805501) | more than 5 years ago | (#28251743)

The thing is, they DIDN'T see a black hole swallowing a star. They saw a massive burst of radiation. But they describe NOT what they actually observed, but their interpretation of what they observed instead. Are there no other possible sources for massive bursts of radiation than black holes swallowing stars? Given the aberrant numbers of high energy particles entering our star system, I would say it's premature indeed. Same with the neutron stars, or pulsars allegedly being stars that "rotate faster than dentist drills." The impossible is far more likely than the improbable.

Re:Because it's not interesting. (1)

profplump (309017) | more than 5 years ago | (#28252053)

If they just told us what they saw and not what they think it might be they'd simply be talking telescopes, not scientists. It's also disingenuous to suggest that they aren't publishing the original observations for third-party analysis -- they just aren't publishing those observations in the press release.

WHO said it WAS a black hole? (5, Insightful)

argent (18001) | more than 5 years ago | (#28252131)

The scientists gave a number of possible interpretations. The journalist who wrote the article, or his editor, picked the most interesting-sounding explanation for the thrust of the article.

I think anyone familiar with Slashdot summaries should be aware of this distinction.

LOOK at your TITLE bar! (1)

Nick Ives (317) | more than 5 years ago | (#28252405)

Although I do see your point about TFS on /. ;)

Re:LOOK at your TITLE bar! (1)

argent (18001) | more than 5 years ago | (#28253095)

"Free-floating black hole may solve space 'firefly' mystery"

Re:Because it's not interesting. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28252229)

With your degree in philosophy, I'm not sure that you're the best source to make claims on physics or astronomy.

I was wondering where you ran off to after getting banned at Fark.

Re:Because it's not interesting. (4, Informative)

Chris Burke (6130) | more than 5 years ago | (#28252559)

Same with the neutron stars, or pulsars allegedly being stars that "rotate faster than dentist drills." The impossible is far more likely than the improbable.

And... what's so improbable about a massive and extremely dense object spinning rapidly, vs an even more massive but much less dense object spinning at a rate that is proportionally slower?

I'd say that the impossible, in this case violating Conservation of Angular Momentum, is usually what is far more improbable.

Re:Because it's not interesting. (3, Interesting)

stevelinton (4044) | more than 5 years ago | (#28253177)

The article does say that someone has proposed this as the best fit to the details of the observed data, while someone has proposed something else (a massive supernova of a star surrounded by carbon dust). Dozens of other possibilities probably got considered and rejected before making the article. If you read the actual scientific papers they will likely consider many more alternatives and explain in detail why they don't fit what's observed. They will also describe in detail

If you want the raw details you need to read the papers and be prepared for some maths (in which they work out which theories fit the data and which don't). The idea that pulsars are neutron stars, for instance, emerged over several years and was confirmed as the predictions it made about what kinds of patterns would, and wouldn't be seen in pulsar radiation panned out. Many other ideas fell by the wayside.

The real data is published and discussed, multiple interpretations are considered, but in scholarly articles, not in press releases.

Re:Because it's not interesting. (2, Insightful)

AlecC (512609) | more than 5 years ago | (#28252793)

And nobody has actually seen an electron, a nucleus, a photon outside the visible spectrum, the other side of the moon... We infer most of the things we have "seen" from instrument readings. Of course, the body of different measurements for the electron is much greater than it is for, say, dark matter, so we have a higher confidence level in the former. But there is no qualitative difference between the two, or the other quoted things, merely the size of the pile of evidence. And even some of those things are pretty well documented.

Re:Because it's not interesting. (1)

stevelinton (4044) | more than 5 years ago | (#28253193)

Basically correct, but people have seen the other side of the moon directly. Only about 30 people all told, but they have seen it.

Re:Because it's not interesting. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28252867)

The best part is some of those *have* been observed. I can't find a link, but a clock was flown around in an airplane or satellite or something and showed a skew compared to an identical clock synced at the beginning of the experiment.

Re:Because it's not interesting. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28251761)

Better than finding a 2 flares around Uranus

Is this another George Michael story? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28250693)

Black hole swallows star... Is that what you nasty fags are calling it, now?

BTW, where are all the hysterical shrieks of "Fascism!" now that the US government really IS taking over the private sector? Next up: Health care and energy. Next time, try reading the fine print, folks, instead of just the shiny packaging.

Re:Is this another George Michael story? (0, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28250803)

Considering the bulk of all money paid in the US health care has created some of the wealthiest people in the world, its clear there is no competition. In a world were a pack of [what is essentially] cotton (~$40 wholesale) can cost upwards of $600, its clear there is no competition. One of the purposes of government is to stimulate business. Since health care in America has run amok and they clearly do not want to be forced to compete (they'd rather rape every US citizen while laughing all the way to the bank), they've left no other option.

If you're angry and the government, first and foremost you need to be angry at the business who have done nothing but rape, pillage, and plundered every US citizen.

pervyj nah! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28250263)

pervyj nah!

Everyone panic! (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28250283)

We're next! Ahhhhhhhhhhh!

First Ur Mom Post (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28250291)

A black hole swallowed your ur mom.

All according to plan (3, Funny)

null etc. (524767) | more than 5 years ago | (#28250315)

I guess Samantha Carter's plan worked!

I knew she was old, but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28251255)

I guess Samantha Carter's plan worked!

FTFA:

...the object sits some 2 billion light years away...

I guess plastic surgery and short hair go a long ways towards making you look a whole lot younger.

Re:All according to plan (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28251635)

Thank god we didn't listen to McKay.

new research shows (5, Funny)

wjh31 (1372867) | more than 5 years ago | (#28250333)

over 50% of black holes in the western hemisphere are clinically obese. It's though that the high availability and low cost of stars is to blame. Ejection of gas is one of the many unfortunate side-effects.

Re:new research shows (3, Funny)

noundi (1044080) | more than 5 years ago | (#28250561)

The messed up part is that now these obese black holes are entitled 2 seats when traveling by wormhole.

Re:new research shows (1)

Draek (916851) | more than 5 years ago | (#28250755)

You know how sometimes in the mornings, before you're completely awake, you get the weirdest ideas that in retrospect made no sense at all? Well, I just had one when reading your comment.

I wondered how a black hole's gas smells like.

Re:new research shows (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28251451)

Hydrogen and a bit of Helium?

Probably doesn't have any noticeable smell.

I've been there before (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28250363)

A black prostitute swallowed my cum in New Orleans last weekend.

I'm not scientist (1)

Ukab the Great (87152) | more than 5 years ago | (#28250369)

But wouldn't a roving black hole produce a tell-tale roving gravitational lensing?

Re:I'm not scientist (2, Informative)

wjh31 (1372867) | more than 5 years ago | (#28250421)

gravitational lensing happens on the scale of galaxies and galaxy clusters.

Re:I'm not scientist (0, Flamebait)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 5 years ago | (#28250797)

O RLY? [wikipedia.org] Detectable gravitational lensing [wikipedia.org] happens on the scale of galaxies and galaxy clusters. HTH, HAND.

Re:I'm not scientist (4, Informative)

Gunnut1124 (961311) | more than 5 years ago | (#28251181)

um, wasn't it first discovered using the sun?

I could have sworn that something like that happened in 1919 when a guy named Arthur Eddington kinda helped confirm the theory for Einstein [wikipedia.org] . Proximity allowed us to see the lensing, which we can't easily see from a distance, but it's there on all objects of sufficient mass, not just galaxies.

Re:I'm not scientist (1)

SquirrelsUnite (1179759) | more than 5 years ago | (#28251859)

Every massive objects creates a gravitational lens effect: for example it is used to detect extrasolar planets. As a star passes behind a solar system (as seen from Earth) its apparent brightness increases first because of the lensing effect of the foreground star then due the planet. Some of the smallest exoplanets have been discovered using this technique.

As for black holes acting as gravitational lenses, I'm not sure it has ever been observed. Some of the problems would be the environemnt of the black hole drowning out any background image, lack of backgroud objects, or in the case of microlensing surveys not recognizing that the lensing object is a black hole.

Re:I'm not scientist (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28252353)

Not just at that scale, there are surveys to find MACHOs (MAssive Compact Halo Objects) around our galaxy that just look at an enormous amount of stars to measure their brightness. When a MACHO crosses close to our line of sight to one of these stars its brightness will increase a bit because of gravitational lensing of the star (the MACHO needs to be between us and the star for this to work). These events are called 'microlensing' events. As all things mircro in astrophysics micro is still pretty big :P

See for instance:
http://arxiv.org/pdf/0905.2044

Re:I'm not scientist (3, Informative)

Xeriar (456730) | more than 5 years ago | (#28250577)

But wouldn't a roving black hole produce a tell-tale roving gravitational lensing?

Only if you were extremely close by or got a perfect lineup. The former, we could probably notice out to a significant fraction of a light year or so if we were watching the sky.

The latter case is rather problematic, as it would be hard to distinguish a black hole's lensing effect from noise - one frame you see a few photons, the next you don't. Was it a galaxy? A star? Nebula? Random noise?

Re:I'm not scientist (1)

nedlohs (1335013) | more than 5 years ago | (#28251135)

"""The amount of the stretching suggests the object sits some 2 billion light years away"""

So if the conditions are perfect and it's moving exactly sideways with respect to us, and it's moving at the speed of light (the first is unlikely, the second is impossible)) - then in a year it moves 0.00000003 degrees in our view.

Good luck.

Especially considering the lensing will be insignificant, since the black hole isn't a galaxy cluster.

repaired Hubble Telescope may come in handy here (4, Interesting)

MollyB (162595) | more than 5 years ago | (#28250385)

from the last paragraph of tfa:

Gaensicke hopes one of Hubble's new cameras, the Wide Field Camera 3, which was installed on the last space shuttle mission to visit the telescope, could reveal more about the object's origins. The camera may be able to spot a host galaxy around the object that was too faint to see with other instruments.

As our instrumentation improves, we'll probably have many more head-scratching discoveries...

Re:repaired Hubble Telescope may come in handy her (3, Insightful)

SatanicPuppy (611928) | more than 5 years ago | (#28250791)

Heh. The more you learn, the more you realize you don't know...Unless you're an asshole or a teenager. In the grand scheme, we're still just scratching the surface. There are so many things we do not understand.

Maybe we'll get a chance to see this happen! (4, Interesting)

TheLeopardsAreComing (1206632) | more than 5 years ago | (#28250391)

Well unfortunately you cannot tell very much about what happens in this system ( wether it is a binary system or not) by what is happening with the light. You would have to look at the x-ray spectrum to be able to measure the kind of energies in the system. Chandra observatory is the best we can do at the moment... but it seems they still like to measure things in Crabs! But in the mean time, this would be cool to get some photo's of this happening!

90's flashback (5, Funny)

jollyreaper (513215) | more than 5 years ago | (#28250395)

*creepy smile* black hole sun, black hole sun

Re:90's flashback (2, Interesting)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 5 years ago | (#28250769)

Black Hole Sun [flickr.com] , won't you come
And wash away the rain...

It's really a beautiful piece that has to be stood next to in order to be appreciated. The sun wasn't in the right place for me to take any brilliant photos (and all I'd have had was my cellphone) but this one at least gives you a nice clear view.

Re:90's flashback (1)

Dragonslicer (991472) | more than 5 years ago | (#28250961)

Wow, I never did understand that bit in the polka. It might be kind of sad that in the last few Weird Al albums, I've never heard most of the original songs. I'm getting old, huh?

Re:90's flashback (3, Insightful)

jollyreaper (513215) | more than 5 years ago | (#28252015)

Wow, I never did understand that bit in the polka. It might be kind of sad that in the last few Weird Al albums, I've never heard most of the original songs. I'm getting old, huh?

You and me both. The last Weird Al parody I've heard before he did it (talking recent music) was for Amish Paradise. I had no idea what raps All About the Pentiums and White and Nerdy were based on. I consider this to be a good thing. You know what's considered artistic in rap? Buster Rimes, he has a track on GTAIV. It's a soulful little ditty called "where my money" where he goes ranting about how he's taller than a hall of midgets and if he doesn't get his cake he's gonna kill bitches and niggas, where my fucking money?

I'd like to think if MLK came back from the dead he'd go all Cosby and start smacking these idiots upside the head.

Re:90's flashback (2, Insightful)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 5 years ago | (#28252117)

I'm pretty sure that Busta has a full appreciation for the complete ridiculousness of the whole affair. He's some sort of Hip-Hop Gangsta Satire in my book. Maybe I'm wrong and whoever dresses him is the genius, I don't know.

I do share your sentiment that it's a positive sign when you don't recognize pop culture references. I was being annoyed by the music in some store the other day and I caught myself saying to myself "Wow, that's worse than the Eighties!" Of course, as anyone knows, that's fucking impossible. If the seventies weren't worse than the eighties, there's no fucking way this decade has a shot at it. (The nineties? Maybe. I'm still in denial about most of it.) And so I did my best to think back and actually, it was basically the same music as the eighties, with a slightly different pace and sets of vocoder effects, voices, and samples.

Re:90's flashback (1)

teknopurge (199509) | more than 5 years ago | (#28250841)

fantastic song - fantastic band.

could someone please explain (2, Interesting)

v1 (525388) | more than 5 years ago | (#28250419)

Gaensicke and colleagues envision two scenarios that might explain the object. In one, a carbon-rich star gets too close to a middle- or heavy-weight black hole, which tears the star apart. Some of this material is absorbed by the black hole, and some is blasted away in a flare that was eventually seen from Earth as SCP 06F6.

I'm not educated in astrophysics and everytime I read something like this I wonder, how does anything manage to get "blasted away" from a black hole? I was under the impression anything that got close to it was absorbed?

Re:could someone please explain (4, Informative)

samcan (1349105) | more than 5 years ago | (#28250453)

One possible way would be a jet of energy streaming from a rotating black hole...

Wikipedia article. [wikipedia.org]

Re:could someone please explain (5, Informative)

Xeriar (456730) | more than 5 years ago | (#28250665)

I'm not educated in astrophysics and everytime I read something like this I wonder, how does anything manage to get "blasted away" from a black hole? I was under the impression anything that got close to it was absorbed?

Simple, black holes are very messy eaters - they radiate a significant fraction of their food as photons. Keep in mind you are accelerating much of the star to a significant fraction of c, letting it collide with itself. This goes double for stellar mass black holes - you have a million+ kilometer star getting 'swallowed' by a twenty kilometer black hole. Even a perfect landing is going to result in most of the star's mass getting flung back out into space if only because the hole is smaller than the core of the star.

Re:could someone please explain (3, Informative)

forkazoo (138186) | more than 5 years ago | (#28252979)

Simple, black holes are very messy eaters - they radiate a significant fraction of their food as photons. Keep in mind you are accelerating much of the star to a significant fraction of c, letting it collide with itself. This goes double for stellar mass black holes - you have a million+ kilometer star getting 'swallowed' by a twenty kilometer black hole. Even a perfect landing is going to result in most of the star's mass getting flung back out into space if only because the hole is smaller than the core of the star.

Simple analogy I sometimes use to explain black hole emissions in a way most people are familiar with...

Ever flush a toilet and notice a splash that jumps above the rim? Same thing.

While the majority of the mass gets pulled into the hole, the chaotic nature of the flow means that some mass gets ejected every which way. Depending on where you are situated, the ejected material can be quite noticeable.

Re:could someone please explain (5, Informative)

John Hasler (414242) | more than 5 years ago | (#28250733)

Anything that crosses the event horizon is absorbed. Anything that does not interacts gravitationally with the black hole as it would with any other massive object. Black holes don't have any sort of magical ability to suck things in. All they have is gravity (Well, ok. They also have charge and spin.)

Re:could someone please explain (4, Funny)

Chris Burke (6130) | more than 5 years ago | (#28251805)

All they have is gravity (Well, ok. They also have charge and spin.)

Amongst their properties are... I'll come in again.

Re:could someone please explain (5, Informative)

tjonnyc999 (1423763) | more than 5 years ago | (#28250965)

The common view that a black hole has a definite "boundary" beyond which nothing can escape, although essentially true, overlooks several important factors.
Yes, the "event horizon" (EH) is the boundary beyond which nothing can escape the gravitational pull of the black hole.
However, it's not a physical boundary (black holes do not have a physical surface), it's the mathematically-calculated boundary beyond which events inside the EH cannot affect an outside observer. As a particle gets closer to the EH, its chances of escape shrink to infinity, and once the EH is crossed, it's effectively gone from the outside world.
That being said, under certain conditions, particles can be radiated outward from a black hole:
1.) If an object inside the "photon sphere" (Schwartzchild Radius X 1.5) but still outside the EH emits photons, those photons can still escape. (Photons coming inbound are screwed, though. Approaching on a tangent, have a slim chance to "bounce off" due to rotational gain.).
2.) If the black hole is rotating, and a particle is approaching the black hole at a tangent, it may also escape via "stealing" some of the rotational energy.
3.) Rotating black holes also emit particles via Hawking radiation, which is more of a particle-antiparticle explanation that I want to get into here.

So, yeah, it's sort of an issue of semantics - if you consider the zone right outside the EH a part of the black hole, then yes, things can escape from a black hole; if you take the common (and incorrect) view that a black hole has a definite "border", and discount all the fun stuff that's going on around the black hole, then no, nothing can escape.

(Of course, this is a ridiculously simplified explanation, and I do expect at least one Slashdot astrophysicist to poke it full of holes (pun intended).)

Re:could someone please explain (4, Informative)

tjonnyc999 (1423763) | more than 5 years ago | (#28251067)

Oh damn, forgot to include the relativistic jet. Idioth. Anyhoo... black hole spins, drags stellar gas / dust / occasional star towards it (accretion disk, om nom nom), things spin around faster than the speed of light (yes, FTL. Objects can't move faster than speed of light, but regions of spacetime can move FTL relative to other regions), eventually the sheer rotational energy + radiation forces the particles outward in a thin jet, perpendicular to the accretion disk, which can be as long as tens of thousands of parsecs. There's enough junk flying outward, and at high enough speed, to create its own disturbance in the Force^H^H^H^H^H spacetime continuum, in addition to the screwiness created by the black hole itself.

Re:could someone please explain (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28252479)

How big are the chances of escape before they "shrink to infinity"?

Re:could someone please explain (1)

Prefader (1072814) | more than 5 years ago | (#28251045)

IANAPhysicist/Cosmologist/whatever applies here, so please do verify this yourself.

The star isn't IN the black hole . . . yet. The black hole is somewhere close to the star, and we're seeing the energy being thrown off by the stuff being pulled into it. There's an awful lot of colliding going on, so stuff is getting thrown around in a lot of directions at once.

Light (and other stuff) outside of the event horizon can escape. That's my understanding of the definition of "event horizon" . . . the proximity to the black hole at which light can no longer escape the black hole's gravitational pull. As long as stuff happens outside of that region, we can observe it.

Re:could someone please explain (4, Informative)

Colonel Korn (1258968) | more than 5 years ago | (#28251153)

Gaensicke and colleagues envision two scenarios that might explain the object. In one, a carbon-rich star gets too close to a middle- or heavy-weight black hole, which tears the star apart. Some of this material is absorbed by the black hole, and some is blasted away in a flare that was eventually seen from Earth as SCP 06F6.

I'm not educated in astrophysics and everytime I read something like this I wonder, how does anything manage to get "blasted away" from a black hole? I was under the impression anything that got close to it was absorbed?

Black holes gravitationally pull matter toward them like any other object with the same mass, until you're inside the event horizon, at which point there is no escape. Thus, outside the event horizon, objects will tend to orbit the black hole just as they'd orbit a star of equal mass. Over time, the orbit of gas falling into a black hole decays and the gas falls toward the singularity and its orbital velocity increases. When this happens, the volume occupied by the orbit of the gas decreases, leading to higher density gas and thus heat generated through friction and compression. This heat raises the temperature of the gas, which increases its pressure and can result in a portion of the gas being blown off into space.

The cow says "mooooo!" (5, Funny)

MoldySpore (1280634) | more than 5 years ago | (#28250447)

The star says "Shine shine shine!"

The black hole says "NOM NOM NOM!!!!"

...Sorry, I couldn't resist.

Re:The cow says "mooooo!" (3, Funny)

the donner party (1000036) | more than 5 years ago | (#28251901)

I thought the star would say "Run, Coward, Run!"

Red Matter (0, Redundant)

starglider29a (719559) | more than 5 years ago | (#28250493)

Yes, I AM out of my Vulcan mind.

Reavers! (1)

T Murphy (1054674) | more than 5 years ago | (#28250499)

The article calls it the 'firefly event'. It wasn't a black hole. It was the reavers.

Re:Reavers! (1)

Tyrun (944761) | more than 5 years ago | (#28250595)

Dugg for firefly reference... I mean, ow my head, what was I saying?

I felt a great disturbance (2, Funny)

Laser Lou (230648) | more than 5 years ago | (#28250527)

in the Force, as if millions of voices suddenly cried out in terror and were suddenly silenced.

Sorry, couldn't resist.

Roving black hole (2, Interesting)

aereinha (1462049) | more than 5 years ago | (#28250535)

I don't seem to grasp that black holes can become mobile. I can not imagine something would be able to exert enough force on the black hole to actually accelerate it.

Re:Roving black hole (1)

Jamu (852752) | more than 5 years ago | (#28250637)

Everything creates enough gravitational force to accelerate a black hole. Although those things with a comparable mass (or energy), close to the black hole, should be more noticeable.

Re:Roving black hole (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28250869)

motion is relative.

Re:Roving black hole (1)

James Skarzinskas (518966) | more than 5 years ago | (#28250955)

Well then, I volunteer you to go check for us.

Re:Roving black hole (5, Interesting)

Dragonslicer (991472) | more than 5 years ago | (#28251005)

I don't seem to grasp that black holes can become mobile. I can not imagine something would be able to exert enough force on the black hole to actually accelerate it.

Other than the obvious everything-attracts-everything-else, also remember that black holes don't magically appear from nothing. Whatever matter initially created the black hole was most likely moving, and that momentum doesn't go anywhere.

Re:Roving black hole (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28251341)

Ok, ya got me thinking. I'll share aloud.

If a black hole is moving (but not spinning rapidly), that momentum is going to be working with its gravitational pull on the side facing the direction the black hole is moving, and against it on the opposite side. So the EH should be "weaker" in that one place. I realize the EH is the distance at which things cannot escape by definition, so I suppose wording it as "the EH is not spherical" is better.

Suppose that the black hole is moving fast enough, wouldn't it be possible for this momentum to counteract the force of gravity enough for objects to escape? In short, create a weak point or break in a highly elliptical EH, directly behind the black hole as it moves through space. Somebody explain why this won't work, or why it would.

Re:Roving black hole (1)

Culture20 (968837) | more than 5 years ago | (#28251727)

Ok, ya got me thinking. I'll share aloud. If a black hole is moving (but not spinning rapidly), that momentum is going to be working with its gravitational pull on the side facing the direction the black hole is moving, and against it on the opposite side. So the EH should be "weaker" in that one place. I realize the EH is the distance at which things cannot escape by definition, so I suppose wording it as "the EH is not spherical" is better. Suppose that the black hole is moving fast enough, wouldn't it be possible for this momentum to counteract the force of gravity enough for objects to escape? In short, create a weak point or break in a highly elliptical EH, directly behind the black hole as it moves through space. Somebody explain why this won't work, or why it would.

I think you stand a better chance of getting an answer if you don't post Anon. Some people only read 2+ (me, I read -1).

Re:Roving black hole (1)

Chris Burke (6130) | more than 5 years ago | (#28252245)

So the EH should be "weaker" in that one place. I realize the EH is the distance at which things cannot escape by definition, so I suppose wording it as "the EH is not spherical" is better.

The EH is often non-spherical, mostly due to the rotation of the black hole if I understand. But I realize what you're saying, an egg or teardrop shape favoring the trailing side.

Suppose that the black hole is moving fast enough, wouldn't it be possible for this momentum to counteract the force of gravity enough for objects to escape?

Momentum is mass times velocity. Gravity is a force, mass times acceleration. Once the object is so close that the gravitational acceleration is so great that even photons, which naturally have a velocity of c, cannot escape then no other matter has a hope either, regardless of what the momentum of the black hole is.

About the only difference the black hole's velocity would make is to make it less likely that an object would get close enough to be drawn in by the hole's gravity from the trailing side. Like if you were trying to fly your spaceship into it, you'd have to match or exceed its velocity to get close enough for its gravity to drag you in. Once you were close enough, though, that'd be it.

Re:Roving black hole (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28252325)

I assume that you're thinking of a gravitational field shaped like a falling raindrop -- a semi-sphere on the leading edge tapering to a point on the opposite end. But raindrops are only that shape because of air resistance; falling in a vacuum raindrops would be spherical. Likewise there is nothing to "push against" the gravitational field as an object moves through space, so there is no reason for that field to deform.

Re:Roving black hole (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28253067)

and that momentum doesn't go anywhere.

No, that's the thing, it DOES.

Re:Roving black hole (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28251355)

Outside the event horizon, the black hole's motion is subject to the very same influences that the motion of any object with the same mass would be subject to; from the viewpoint of gravity, a black hole outside its event horizon is just a really really small, somewhat heavy star that doesn't emit any radiation whatsoever (though anything that gets close enough to be swallowed does emit, on the way down).

Re:Roving black hole (1)

mrdoogee (1179081) | more than 5 years ago | (#28252469)

A Galaxy

A more massive black hole

A more massive star

Pretty much anything, although there would have to be a lot of anythings for the effect to measurable by humans.

Slashdot's gone cold (0, Offtopic)

Smidge207 (1278042) | more than 5 years ago | (#28250569)

Slashdot's gone cold I'm wondering why I got out of bed at all The morning rain clouds up my window and I can't see at all And even if I could it'll all be gray but your picture on my wall It reminds me, that it's not so bad -- it's not so bad Dear Rob, I wrote but you still ain't callin I left my email, my ICQ, and my yahoo chat at the bottom I sent two emails back in autumn, you must not-a got 'em There probably was a problem with your sendmail or somethin Sometimes I scribble email addees too sloppy when I jot 'em but anyways; fsck it, what's been up? Man how's your boxes? My boxes is linux too, I'm bout to be a compiler once I learn gcc, I'ma go on and compile for hours I read about your Palm Pilot too I'm sorry I had a friend lose his Palm over at the airport in Maradonna I know you probably hear this everyday, but I'm your biggest fan I even read all your bullshit Linux news and Microsoft's man I got a room full of your posters and your pictures man I like the way you sold your ass out too, that shit was fat Anyways, I hope you get this man, hit me back, just to chat, truly yours, your biggest fan Dear Rob, you still ain't called or wrote, I hope you have a chance I ain't mad - I just think it's FSCKED UP you don't answer fans If you didn't wanna talk to me outside your Linux World you didn't have to, but you coulda signed an autograph for Matthew That's my Senior sys admin he's only 26 years old We waited on a 9600 baud for you, four hours and you just said, "No." That's pretty shitty man - you're like his fsckin idol He wants to be just like you man, he likes you more than I do I ain't that mad though, I just don't like bein lied to Remember when we met in Boston - you said if I'd write you you would write back - see I'm just like you in a way I never had a clue about shit either I gcc'd shit with my wife then beat her I can relate to what you're saying in your page so when I feel like rmusering I read Slashdot to begin the rage cause I don't really got shit else so that shit helps when I'm depressed I even got a tattoo of slashdot across the chest Sometimes I even packet myself to see how much it floods It's like adrenaline, the DDoS is such a sudden rush of blood See everything you say is real, and I respect you cause you tell it My girlfriend's jealous cause I talk about you 24/7 But she don't know you like I know you Rob, no one does She don't know what it was like for people like us growin up You gotta call me man, I'll be the biggest fan you'll ever lose Dear Mister-I'm-Too-Good-To-Waste-A-Packet-On-My-Fans, this'll be the last packet I ever send your ass It's been six months and still no word - I don't deserve it? I know you got my last two emails I wrote the @ signs on 'em perfect So this is my payload I'm sending you, I hope you hear it I'm on my modem now, I'm doing 9600 baud so fear it Hey Rob, I drank a fifth of vodka, you dare me to code? You know the song by Deep Purple or Slayer its irrelevant by playing on my linux player while I write some php scripts and play some Dragonslayer That's kinda how shit is, you coulda rescued me from drowning Now it's too late - I'm on a 1000 downloads now, I'm drowsy and all I wanted was a lousy letter or a call I hope you know I ripped +ALL+ of your pictures off the wall I love you Rob, we coulda been together, think about it You ruined it now, I hope you can't sleep and you dream about it And when you dream I hope you can't sleep and you SCREAM about it I hope your conscience EATS AT YOU and you can't BREATHE without me See Rob {*screaming*} Shut up bitch! I'm tryin to code Hey Rob, that's my senior admin screamin from the comode but I didn't cut the power off, I just rebooted, see I ain't like you cause if rm -rf'd we'd suffer more, and then the boxes die too Well, gotta go, I'm almost BGP bridged now Oh shit, I forgot, how'm I supposed to send this packet out? Dear Stan, I meant to write you sooner but I just been busy You said your box is running now, how'd you like your gcc? Look, I'm really flattered you would install 7.0 Redhat and here's an autograph for your senior sys admin I wrote it on the Starter cap I'm sorry I didn't see you at the show, I musta missed you Don't think I did that shit intentionally just to diss you But what's this shit you said about you like to DDoS lamers too? I say that shit just clownin dog, c'mon - how fucked up is you? You got some issues Stan, I think you need some counseling so heres some more Linux stories to keep your ass busy when you get down some And what's this shit about us meant to be together? I sold Slashdot for thousands so now I'm a single jetsetter I really think you and your boxes need each other or maybe you just need to treat them better I hope you get to read this letter, I just hope it reaches you in time before you hurt yourself, I think that you'll be doin just fine if you relax a little, I'm glad I inspire you but Stan why are you so mad? Try to understand, that Linux and MS is just grand I just don't want you to do some crazy shit I seen this one shit on the news a couple weeks ago that made me sick Some dude was drunk and switched his router for a bridge and his packets were blackholed, and his DNS couldn't get digged and in the colo they found a tape, but they didn't say who it was to Come to think about, his name was.. it was you Damn!

This is old... (0, Redundant)

Schnoogs (1087081) | more than 5 years ago | (#28250611)

...they already explained this in the new Star Trek movie

Ooops! (5, Funny)

Sport89 (1320659) | more than 5 years ago | (#28250619)

Looks like the inhabitants of the nearest planet just switched on their brand-new LHC...

A starship making course correction, obviously. (1)

John Hasler (414242) | more than 5 years ago | (#28250653)

n/t

inforgmative MareMare (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28250697)

our ability to w_as at the same approximately 90%

Black hole says... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28250821)

om nom nom nom! [omnomnom.org]

ObSexistComment (0, Troll)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 5 years ago | (#28250823)

A whole star? Someone should Cc: this article to my girlfriend.

Star swallows Black Hole (1)

caywen (942955) | more than 5 years ago | (#28250833)

Now THAT's news!

Science (5, Interesting)

kenp2002 (545495) | more than 5 years ago | (#28250967)

We are in the earliest stages of undesrtanding how the universe works. For the first 8-10 thousand years we have looked what that which is in our universe and how it functions within our universe. Only in the last 3000 years have we started to look at how the universe (or if you prefer reality) itself works.

Based on our understanding the very fundamental laws of our universe at some point has changed. The laws, as we call them, 5 seconds before the big bang may have been very different then at the time of the big bang and vastly different a billion years afterwards.

We look to oddities like black holes to try and grasp and dredge out what additional laws that may exist to better understand how to exist within a system of laws. We must be ever so careful though as we go forward in collecting and looking at data. Who knows, perhaps we will find a white hole adding mass to our universe potentially signalling an escape from heat death or the big rip. Perhaps the graviton will be found... perhaps not.

The question all this begs is crucial to the core of our own existence, and is the harbinger to the meaning of life. The question must be asked after observing this article:

How could we miss an opportunity for a sexual joke with this?

Re:Science (1)

TinBromide (921574) | more than 5 years ago | (#28251589)

How could we miss an opportunity for a sexual joke with this?

Because every slashdotter knows that a black-hole spits as it swallows.

Re:Science (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28251655)

True. I think we all getting old, and married, so sex, porn and sexual jokes are becoming something lost faraway in the past.
But, I totally got that Ghetto-Ebony XXX joke...

wtf? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28251037)

Holy crap, what's with the dianetics.org banner on slashdot?

In other news... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28251175)

American swallows hamburger
Japanese swallows sushi
Lion swallows GNU (eeeh... gnu)

I've never seen a Dup this close... (5, Funny)

Culture20 (968837) | more than 5 years ago | (#28251289)

after the original. Posted less than an hour apart, right next to each other on the front page!

Has Bing Already Overtaken Yahoo? Posted by CmdrTaco on Monday June 08, @08:54AM [slashdot.org]
Black Hole Swallows Star Posted by CmdrTaco on Monday June 08, @09:38AM [slashdot.org]

And Taco posted both of them. Getting old, Taco?

Misleading headline (2, Funny)

imgod2u (812837) | more than 5 years ago | (#28251321)

There's nothing in the article about Paris Hilton.

Ambiguous (3, Funny)

ChrisMaple (607946) | more than 5 years ago | (#28251481)

Are these black hole swallows starring in Capistrano? Are there any chickadees?

Warp core or Red Matter... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28251755)

I'm guessing either a warp core breach.. or there was red matter involved.. just a guess...

Possiblity (1)

Terrorwrist (1376873) | more than 5 years ago | (#28252537)

When that star enters into the black hole, it would probably go out of the black holes butt, and the outcome would be a Black Star lol.

Red matter (0, Redundant)

canonymous (1445409) | more than 5 years ago | (#28252869)

Clearly the star was going to go supernova and threaten the entire galaxy, so Ambassador Spock took one for the team by dropping some red matter into it...
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