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Inflatable Tower Could Climb To the Edge of Space

ScuttleMonkey posted more than 5 years ago | from the out-of-breath dept.

Space 296

MonkeyClicker writes with mention of a proposal that could see an inflatable tower helping to carry people to the edge of space without the need for rocket propulsion. This would function in place of previous space elevator designs which featured a large cable and could be completed much faster, if proponents of the project are to be believed. "To stay upright and withstand winds, full-scale structures would require gyroscopes and active stabilization systems in each module. The team modeled a 15-kilometer tower made up of 100 modules, each one 150 meters tall and 230 meters in diameter, built from inflatable tubes 2 meters across. Quine estimates it would weigh about 800,000 tonnes when pressurized — around twice the weight of the world's largest supertanker."

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anonymous coward could get first post (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28257329)

suck my balls

From TFS: (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28257359)

See any serious problems with the story?
E-mail our on-duty Editor

Indeed I do see a serious problem with the story. It's fucking stupid. And the space elevator ones are also fucking stupid.

Re:From TFS: (2, Funny)

neokushan (932374) | more than 5 years ago | (#28258265)

Isn't that what people said about Nikola Tesla?

Are you fucking kidding me? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28257361)

Seriously? Are you, seriously, expecting me to believe this? An inflatable... why? Why do you do this to me, engineers? What the fuck?

bounce house (4, Funny)

hguorbray (967940) | more than 5 years ago | (#28257385)

yep -world's biggest bounce house

for the world's richest, most overgrown kids

-I'm just saying

Yah... (4, Funny)

eln (21727) | more than 5 years ago | (#28257397)

I came up with lots of ideas like this in college...I also smoked a lot of weed in college.

Re:Yah... (2, Insightful)

Kell Bengal (711123) | more than 5 years ago | (#28257713)

I'm also joining the me-too choir on this one. I had the idea a couple of months ago and ran simulations that said it was unfeasible at best. I'll be very interested to see if they can actually make it work.

Re:Yah... (4, Insightful)

Kell Bengal (711123) | more than 5 years ago | (#28257801)

Oh, and also, to make the helium-filled sections carry their own weight, you need to make the sections increasingly large in volume to account for the decreasing pressure of air that can support less mass per cubic meter. Eventually you get to the ridiculous point where your tower is >100 m wide because the atmosphere is so thin. It's a structural nightmare, gyroscopes or not.

Re:Yah... (3, Funny)

Abreu (173023) | more than 5 years ago | (#28257947)

I thought making your house fly with helium balloons was something only old people did...

Re:Yah... (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28258131)

I thought making your house fly with helium balloons was something only old people did...

In Korea maybe.

Re:Yah... (1)

Ucklak (755284) | more than 5 years ago | (#28258153)

You must be thinking of that movie "What's Up [iwatchstuff.com] " where an old guy gets a hot air balloon to lift up his house and rescue people.

Re:Yah... (4, Funny)

Red Flayer (890720) | more than 5 years ago | (#28258361)

Eventually you get to the ridiculous point where your tower is >100 m wide because the atmosphere is so thin.

You naysayers will be crying when I build my giant space marshmallow chain.

100 m wide? I don't think so. The trick is to fill them with your lighter-than-air mixture at the local atmospheric density... create, heat, inflate, rigidify, cool. And 100 m is just about right, from the base all the way up.

When it gets too high, then you simply start at your Chambered Heuristic Orbital Clasp Object -- Ladder Attachment Terminal Endpoint, and work your way back down.

The big problem I see is the earthbound anchor, but I believe professor William T. Graham (a pasty-white fellow my less couth colleagues refer to as a 'cracker') is working on a solution to that.

All of humanity shall be as neanderthals around the campfire, envying the colossal testament to my intellectual superiority. Plus, they'll probably have a hankering for S'mores, what with the figurative campfire and all.

Re:Yah... (1)

Brian Gordon (987471) | more than 5 years ago | (#28258425)

How long have you been waiting to use that? An entire post about graham crackers?

Re:Yah... (2, Funny)

eclectro (227083) | more than 5 years ago | (#28258015)

I'm also joining the me-too choir on this one. I had the idea a couple of months ago

I have had the idea before either of you, and actually have started construction [a1balloonrentals.com]

World of goo (5, Funny)

Fizzl (209397) | more than 5 years ago | (#28257405)

n/t

Beavis and Butthead: +1, True (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28257407)

Huh-huh...huh...huh...... Let's break something.

OK. Here's a pin . Pop the inflatable tubes. Huh-huh.......huh.

Yours In Bakinour,
K. Trout

Spaced Out (3, Funny)

mediocubano (801656) | more than 5 years ago | (#28257409)

I guess this means that other crap idea of the space elevator is dead? (Maybe if we built a huge wooden badger.)

Re:Spaced Out (0, Offtopic)

Sun.Jedi (1280674) | more than 5 years ago | (#28258255)

(Maybe if we built a huge wooden badger [badgerbadgerbadger.com] .)

FTFY. ;)

Not same as elevator (2, Insightful)

Captain Segfault (686912) | more than 5 years ago | (#28257449)

Note that this is would only extend a few tens of kilometers. It's to the edge of space, whereas a full elevator is aimed at getting *out* of Earth's gravity well.

They're solving two different problems and aren't really that comparable.

Re:Not same as elevator (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28257481)

They're solving two different problems and aren't really that comparable.

What problem is the inflatable tower going to solve?

Re:Not same as elevator (2, Funny)

oldspewey (1303305) | more than 5 years ago | (#28257625)

The problem of how to build something 15km tall that can have some corporate fucking logo plastered all over it?

Re:Not same as elevator (1)

Allicorn (175921) | more than 5 years ago | (#28257629)

Job losses in the bouncy-castle-manufacture industry due to the credit crunch?

Re:Not same as elevator (0)

somersault (912633) | more than 5 years ago | (#28257649)

Penis envy? "You should see the size of MY tower".

Re:Not same as elevator (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28257693)

Well, if you control the deflation just right it could create "the fart heard round the world". Maybe they are going for the Guinness Book of World Records for the largest every whoopee cushion?

Re:Not same as elevator (1)

Happler (895924) | more than 5 years ago | (#28257795)

They're solving two different problems and aren't really that comparable.

What problem is the inflatable tower going to solve?

Too much government hot air? They are going to need a place to blow it all soon..

Re:Not same as elevator (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28258075)

Somewhere to throw George W Bush from so it takes longer than 2 minutes to land?

Re:Not same as elevator (2, Interesting)

DirtySouthAfrican (984664) | more than 5 years ago | (#28257647)

Actually, "out of Earth's gravity well" would truly be the "edge of space", i.e., infinitely far away. As I understand, the biggest problem in getting to space is to spend as little time as possible in the deepest part of the well, because, going straight up, maintaining that altitude costs a lot of power. But if the structure is self-supporting, then you can hoist up your fuel and payload using more efficient means, since you don't have to actively maintain your altitude. It's called "gravity drag". I'm not really up on the numbers, but the first 10% costs you a helluva lot more fuel than the "last" 10%, for most values of $destination.

Re:Not same as elevator (4, Informative)

hardburn (141468) | more than 5 years ago | (#28257917)

15km isn't that far out. You can still use oxygen-burning jets at that altitude if you design them right. The SR-71 went up to 24km. Amature high-altitude ballons can break 30km [natrium42.com] and might get out to 50km if they try hard enough.

If this thing can plausibly get out to 100-200km, they might have something, but 15km isn't very impressive for what it needs to do.

Think of it as a railgun or catapult. (3, Informative)

Ungrounded Lightning (62228) | more than 5 years ago | (#28257915)

Note that this is would only extend a few tens of kilometers. It's to the edge of space, whereas a full elevator is aimed at getting *out* of Earth's gravity well.

Well if you just use it as a regular elevator and stop at the top, it's a nice tall observation deck where the atmosphere is really thin but not quite "into space".

But if it can support the weight of the elevator and observation platform, it should be able to provide an equal upward force to a lighter payload that is being accelerated. Such a projectile might leave the top of the structure with enough velocity to put the apogee of its trajectory in low-earth-orbit altitudes.

You'd have to provide additional thrust during that hop to bring the PERIGEE above significant atmospheric braking in less than half an orbit. But you've won half the battle by getting above the significant atmosphere on electric power rather than rocket reaction.

Perhaps lean the thing over to get significant downrange velocity - and support its less-vertical run with more compression members of a similar construction while building a broader structure of multiple members to avoid bending between supports. (Octagon truss, anyone?)

And the payload might also be composed of something like a long, thin, "cannon" with a "bullet" that is your final payload. "Fire" it (electromagnetically again) when near apogee. Then the "bullet" is circularized and the "cannon" returns to Earth for reuse with less momentum than when it left the elevator/catapult. Reenter and glide down - or land into another similar elevator structure and be gently lowered for reuse while the energy from the cannon stage's momentum and altitude is recycled into electric power.

Re:Think of it as a railgun or catapult. (1)

Ungrounded Lightning (62228) | more than 5 years ago | (#28258173)

(Octagon truss, anyone?)

Make that "octahedron truss".

zeppelin (5, Funny)

Hognoxious (631665) | more than 5 years ago | (#28257451)

They were trying to buld a zeppelin, but the printer did the plans in portrait format.

Could happen to anyone.

"Science" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28257471)

Balloon science ain't no science. Actually it ain't even balloon science - it's a bummer of flashback.

pic? (1)

YayaY (837729) | more than 5 years ago | (#28257491)

I want pictures

Re:pic? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28258103)

I'd like to fuck you to death with a ebola-coated chainsaw. Just guess which one of us is going to get our wish.

Re:pic? (1)

YayaY (837729) | more than 5 years ago | (#28258165)

I guess that would be me.

Irving Schlock, I presume? (5, Funny)

mrbene (1380531) | more than 5 years ago | (#28257493)

Who else would be at the forefront of inflatable technologies [wikia.com] ?

Re:Irving Schlock, I presume? (3, Funny)

ViennaSt (1138481) | more than 5 years ago | (#28257853)

No, its wacky waving inflatable arm flailing tube man! Wacky waving inflatable arm flailing tube man! Going to space! Try Wacky waving inflatable arm flailing tube man! [youtube.com]

Re:Irving Schlock, I presume? (1)

rubah (1197475) | more than 5 years ago | (#28257865)

I needed that dose of sluggy; thank you!

and Monkeys Could Fly Out My Ass!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28257505)

Is anyone else getting tired of these stories that make ludicrous claims being justified by the word COULD?

Babel (5, Funny)

dugn (890551) | more than 5 years ago | (#28257559)

Didn't we do this already? I thought this is how we ended up with all the different languages.

Re:Babel (4, Funny)

rbrausse (1319883) | more than 5 years ago | (#28257911)

was sagen Sie da?

Re:Babel (2, Funny)

Abreu (173023) | more than 5 years ago | (#28257981)

No entiendo ni madres

Re:Babel (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28258067)

Your hovercraft is full of eels ?

Re:Babel (1)

SupremoMan (912191) | more than 5 years ago | (#28258267)

Yes before the damned Tower of Babel there was only one computer language. And all nations of the world wrote in single syntax!

Re:Babel (1)

Amazing Quantum Man (458715) | more than 5 years ago | (#28258325)

Unfortunately, that one language was Brainfuck.

Re:Babel (3, Funny)

newcastlejon (1483695) | more than 5 years ago | (#28258407)

There was still the war of tabs vs. three spaces. Lest we forget those who fell in righteous indentation!

Where will all the helium come from? (5, Informative)

Joce640k (829181) | more than 5 years ago | (#28257569)

Their 15km version would need ten years of the entire world's helium production to fill it.

The 200km version would use up over half the world's estimated helium reserves.

Re:Where will all the helium come from? (2, Funny)

oodaloop (1229816) | more than 5 years ago | (#28257653)

Can't we just mine helium from the sun?

Re:Where will all the helium come from? (4, Interesting)

Dice (109560) | more than 5 years ago | (#28257765)

Jupiter would probably be easier. 8-12% Helium by volume [wikipedia.org] in the upper atmosphere, and the rest is Hydrogen.

Re:Where will all the helium come from? (1)

jcwayne (995747) | more than 5 years ago | (#28258237)

Jupiter would probably be easier. 8-12% Helium by volume [wikipedia.org] in the upper atmosphere, and the rest is Hydrogen.

Sounds like Hydrogen would be cheaper as it's more plentiful. What could possibly go wrong?

Re:Where will all the helium come from? (2, Funny)

nmg196 (184961) | more than 5 years ago | (#28258099)

No need to use helium - just use air and then take out all the heavy bits.

Or use a vacuum - that's even lighter than helium and far easier to manufacture by simply removing air from a container.

Re:Where will all the helium come from? (1)

newcastlejon (1483695) | more than 5 years ago | (#28258135)

Then the container implodes.

Re:Where will all the helium come from? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28258291)

Not if you turn the atmosphere inside-out first!

Re:Where will all the helium come from? (1)

QuantumG (50515) | more than 5 years ago | (#28257683)

Heh, just using air would seem to make a lot more sense.

Re:Where will all the helium come from? (4, Funny)

Dunbal (464142) | more than 5 years ago | (#28257793)

I just don't want to be the one to have to blow it up. I get dizzy after 5 balloons or so...

Re:Where will all the helium come from? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28257699)

I didn't RTFA but from TFS it's just a big inflatable tower... you sit on top of it and then it gets blown up underneath you, lifting you up - it can be filled with just air.

Re:Where will all the helium come from? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28257773)

Well, our fusion reactors will produce helium as waste! Its great, we can actually use that helium for something useful that isnt talking like the Disney squirrels.

Re:Where will all the helium come from? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28257891)

The answer is ... cow farts and burps!

Harness the methane gas from all the world's cows!

A renewable and ecological-friendly way to reach for the stars.

Re:Where will all the helium come from? (2, Funny)

rcamans (252182) | more than 5 years ago | (#28257913)

No, actually, it runs on hot air. We can have congress fill the whole structure in just 9 months (they don't work a whole year, you know)

Re:Where will all the helium come from? (1)

srothroc (733160) | more than 5 years ago | (#28257959)

What if they used different gases? For example, heavier gases on the bottom parts, lighter gases on the top parts... I'm not scientist, but might that make a difference and allow it to stabilize slightly better?

Re:Where will all the helium come from? (1)

jonnat (1168035) | more than 5 years ago | (#28257985)

Not a problem. By the time this would get ready to be built, all our energy will be provided by nuclear fusion.

(Certainly controlled nuclear fusion seems much more feasible than this nonsense)

Physics (1)

mcrbids (148650) | more than 5 years ago | (#28258097)

No, I haven't done the math behind this. But given that the force of gravity decreases by the inverse square law, using something like the infltable tower might make the space elevator much more feasible to create.

You mention helium, but why not simply use compressed air, especially at the higher levels?

In any event, this is the sort of out-of-the-box thinking needed to make space travel feasible!

Re:Where will all the helium come from? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28258171)

How about a combination of solar power with batteries to heat the air inside like a hot air balloon? Panels on the outside with a combination of batteries and several Fscking heaters for the night. As well as the sun hitting it all day long would heat up the air inside naturally. Does helium even need to be involved?

If nothing else, it seems like this could be a useful tactic to get a giant carbon nanotube wire up there. or hell, why can't we do both? How about a combination of a nanotube wire along with the helium/hot air to relieve some of the strain on the wires?

If this makes no sense whatsoever for scientific reasons, forgive me, I'm not a scientist and I expect to be shot down for even posting these thoughts.

Re:Where will all the helium come from? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28258287)

Might want to recheck your math there. My estimates show that the 15km version would use less than half the world's helium production for one year.

Re:Where will all the helium come from? (1)

Mr_Nitro (1174707) | more than 5 years ago | (#28258305)

just use/build nuclear hydrolysis plant to make gas from seawater, no big deal compared to the benefits. to me it seems much more realistic idea compared to wire-based space elevator...

Re:Where will all the helium come from? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28258385)

In the actual paper, they propose using a gas of low atomic mass, such as helium OR HYDROGEN. No absolute requirement to tax He reserves on this.

Inflatable Tubes? (1)

thezig2 (1102967) | more than 5 years ago | (#28257579)

Can we use these to upgrade our networks, too?

It seems (0)

kpainter (901021) | more than 5 years ago | (#28257613)

that there should be a Viagra joke here somewhere.

Re:It seems (2, Funny)

jcwayne (995747) | more than 5 years ago | (#28258297)

If your tower remains inflated for more than four hours, seek the advise of a structural engineer immediately.

Happy now?

just an idea (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28257637)

"800,000 tonnes when pressurized"
um .... fill it with a lighter gas....

Re:just an idea (1)

julesh (229690) | more than 5 years ago | (#28257929)

"800,000 tonnes when pressurized"
um .... fill it with a lighter gas....

Well, 800,000 tonnes He == ~430,000 tonnes H. Which, combusted with the appropriate amount of O2 releases:

~ 430,000,000,000 mol x 286kJ/mol
= about 34 TW hours.

I'm not sure how anybody would ever be convinced accumulating that much elemental hydrogen in a single place could ever be safe.

Re:just an idea (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28258129)

He != H

Re:just an idea (1)

FluffyWithTeeth (890188) | more than 5 years ago | (#28258333)

That is rather the GP's point.

The only gas lighter than helium is hydrogen.

Re:just an idea (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28258337)

Which may be enough to get the whole structure blown into space :-)
Hmm...

Re:just an idea (1)

bcmm (768152) | more than 5 years ago | (#28258365)

For a better idea of how much flamey stuff that is, that's about 30 megatons of TNT, or a bit bigger than the largest H-bomb the US ever built.

Al Quaida is already building a giant needle... (1, Funny)

Lazy Jones (8403) | more than 5 years ago | (#28257659)

... but can you imagine base jumping there?

Better idea: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28257675)

Dangle a really long rope from the ISS and have folks climb up to space.

And in other news....... (1)

p4g4nscum (1534793) | more than 5 years ago | (#28257685)

And in other news Mattel releases the hover board

Bad article. (4, Interesting)

Jartan (219704) | more than 5 years ago | (#28257707)

This could have some use for escaping earth's gravity. Among all the theorized technologies one of the most promising has always been just launching stuff into space via rail gun style. If you have a long tube with nothing but vacuum inside it you can drastically increase the efficiency of such a device. The problem is the end of the device has to exit into something near vacuum or it would be like slamming into a solid wall made of atmosphere.

If a tower like this could be built such that it contained a vacuum corridor inside it then we could perhaps finally pursue this idea with already existing technologies.

Re:Bad article. (1)

jonnat (1168035) | more than 5 years ago | (#28258073)

If you have a long tube with nothing but vacuum inside it you can drastically increase the efficiency of such a device. The problem is the end of the device has to exit into something near vacuum or it would be like slamming into a solid wall made of atmosphere. If a tower like this could be built such that it contained a vacuum corridor inside it then we could perhaps finally pursue this idea with already existing technologies.

Now all we need is the help from Maxwell's demon to keep an open ended vessel at a vacuum.

Re:Bad article. (1)

newcastlejon (1483695) | more than 5 years ago | (#28258167)

If one end is sealed and the other is in vacuum, how does the gas enter? Put an open bottle in a tank of water and see what (doesn't) happen.

Re:Bad article. (1)

Mr_Nitro (1174707) | more than 5 years ago | (#28258221)

there is vacuum on the other side:P no prob!

Re:Bad article. (1)

Jartan (219704) | more than 5 years ago | (#28258235)

There's no reason to keep the end open. You wouldn't even need to put a door on it. You could just seal the end with the equivalent of air tight paper machete. The air pressure at such a height would be so small that it wouldn't take much of anything to keep it vacuum sealed.

Extra points ... (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28257737)

Extra points for explaining why this is safer, easier or more useful than a tethered balloon!

I've seen this before (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28257759)

A tower into the heavens? Not a good idea.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tower_of_Babel

That's what... (1, Funny)

Chysn (898420) | more than 5 years ago | (#28257789)

she said...?

Kinda Weighty, No? (1)

resistant (221968) | more than 5 years ago | (#28257909)

Oh, yeah, put a smiley face on this and it'll be Toppin' Fresh [wikipedia.org] for the kids. "Look, Mommy! It's ... the Pillsbury Doughtower! Can I climb him, pleeeaaassse?"

Heck, if you're gonna mess with inflatables and a lot of mass, why not just make a strong lightweight carbon-nanotube/aluminum alloy [nextbigfuture.com] airfield and float the thing way up there in the sky with near-space to orbit aircraft/spacecraft? Perfect for Han Solo!

Collapse? (1)

O'Nazareth (1203258) | more than 5 years ago | (#28257979)

And should something go wrong with the tower, failure of a few modules would not cause the whole structure to collapse.

Remember, the guys from Al-Qaeda are very creative. They will find a way.

Re:Collapse? (0, Offtopic)

Mr_Nitro (1174707) | more than 5 years ago | (#28258079)

fuck AQ, fuck all the bullshit pumped through our fucked up media to sell weapons and fear enslaving ppl. wake up.

Re:Collapse? (0, Offtopic)

Shihar (153932) | more than 5 years ago | (#28258217)

Remember, the guys from Al-Qaeda are very creative. They will find a way.

Pretty sure they won't. They knocked down two towers while the US wasn't looking and then went on to go whack a pile of poor, deeply impoverished bastards living in the ass end of the earth without any law or order. That is like whacking a big guy with a two by four while his back is turned and the running away to go beat up on elementary school children (and eventually getting your ass kicked by them). People give Al-Qaeda way too much credit. A bunch of bored and suicidal French chemistry college grads represent more danger. Hell, biking in Boston is more scary than Al-Qaeda. If you live in the US, you are a hell of a lot more likely to die by choking on a chicken bone than by being killed by Al-Qaeda.

Prior Art (5, Interesting)

realeyes (1565211) | more than 5 years ago | (#28258057)

Buckminster Fuller (my hero ;-) already came up with this, altho' he intended to use concrete. Basically, if the structure is large enough, making the inside of the structure a few degrees warmer than the outside air will cause it to float. Bucky described a sphere about 1 mile in diameter to be airborne, and somewhat smaller cones to be sea cities. Later . . . Jim

Re:Prior Art (2, Informative)

jcwayne (995747) | more than 5 years ago | (#28258383)

Buckminster Fuller (my hero ;-) already came up with this, altho' he intended to use concrete. Basically, if the structure is large enough, making the inside of the structure a few degrees warmer than the outside air will cause it to float. Bucky described a sphere about 1 mile in diameter to be airborne, and somewhat smaller cones to be sea cities.

Later . . . Jim

Yeah, that'll go over like a lead balloon [youtube.com] .

NewScientist Anyone? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28258085)

Wow, three articles of questionable scientific merit make it onto the main page from the same paper in one day?

Geeze, must be hard for NS since they stopped publishing on physical paper.

*Inflatable Tower Could Climb To the Edge of Space
*Black Hold Swallows Start
*Analysis Says Planes Might Be Greener Than Trains

Seen this movie before - Warning contains spoiler (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28258141)

They start out speaking Babylonian and by the time they get to the top of the Tower they speak french

Small Step (1)

voraciousveggies (1477215) | more than 5 years ago | (#28258169)

I guess 15km is better than nothing. Unfortunately it's just a tincy bit shy of the 35,790 km needed for geostationary orbit like a real "Space Elevator".

Near Space Phallus (1)

davidsyes (765062) | more than 5 years ago | (#28258239)

Launch it from San Fransideshow.... from near the Coit(us) Tower, of from the Stanford University "Phallic" (Hoover) Tower:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coit_Tower [wikipedia.org]

http://unixpapa.com/tower/ [unixpapa.com]

Now, if an ET sees that thing emerging into deep space, tethered to the Earth, grappling with it could be one "tough nut to swallow", as a saying goes...

Looney Tunes? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28258279)

Shouldn't there be a diving board coming off the end of it and a small glass of water down on earth?

"Papa, please get the moon for me" (1)

goffster (1104287) | more than 5 years ago | (#28258303)

To accomplish his task, "Papa" gets a "very" long ladder, and puts in on a "very" high mountain.

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