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A Visual Expedition Inside the Linux File Systems

kdawson posted more than 5 years ago | from the data-porn dept.

Data Storage 85

RazvanM writes "This is an attempt to visualize the relationships among the Linux File Systems through the lens of the external symbols their kernel modules use. We took an initial look a few months back but this time the scope is much broader. This analysis was done on 1377 kernel modules from 2.6.0 to 2.6.29, but there is also a small dip into the BSD world. The most thorough analysis was done on Daniel Phillips's tree, which contains the latest two disk-based file systems for Linux: tux3 and btrfs. The main techniques used to establish relationships among file systems are hierarchical clustering and phylogenetic trees. Also presented are a set of rankings based on various properties related to the evolution of the external symbols from one release to another, and complete timelines of the kernel releases for Linux, FreeBSD, NetBSD, and OpenBSD. In all there are 78 figures and 10 animations."

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Hmm (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28333035)

I could use a visual expedition among the various links on this summary.

Re:Hmm (1, Insightful)

arth1 (260657) | more than 5 years ago | (#28333699)

No kidding. Sometimes I like to (gasp!) RTFA, but in this case I couldn't find out which of the F links went to the F article.

Re:Hmm (1)

badc0ffee (969714) | more than 5 years ago | (#28353891)

RTFA? I had fun finding the pictures that looked like paper tape and hollerith punch cards... then I ran across the one that looked like a program board for an IBM 557 and gave up.

Re:Hmm (1)

suso (153703) | more than 5 years ago | (#28334497)

<AOL>Me too!</AOL>

Re:Hmm (2, Insightful)

PitaBred (632671) | more than 5 years ago | (#28337421)

You can't be from AOL... you used correct capitalization and the proper homonym of "too". I call shenanigans.

Re:Hmm (1)

suso (153703) | more than 5 years ago | (#28342145)

ur right. i'm from youtube show me how to make a linux filesystem

Re:Hmm (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28342203)

You're retarded, linux filesystems qre a scam, I bet you can't find a single person whos really seen one, dumbass!

Lick my (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28333037)

Fucking anus.

Please.

Re:Lick my (2, Interesting)

cheftw (996831) | more than 5 years ago | (#28334483)

Who types this?

But really I would like a visual expedition into the mind of whoever writes slashcode these days. I'm not even going to get started on UTF-8 support though. My problem is "Anonymous Cowardon". Latest Firefox stable shows no space between the two names (there is one, it's just tiny). It looks stupid, please fix.

I'd attach a screenshot, but I'd know better than to click on a link replying to a troll myself so you'll just have to imagine if your browser can render it correctly.

Re:Lick my (1)

badkarmadayaccount (1346167) | more than 5 years ago | (#28358929)

Same here. Also, does anybody else have rendering problems with part of the comments, more specifically, the dark gray band under the title which holds the username and timestamp? The band extends as a gray block from the username taking up it's width down to the Reply button. It's driving me nuts.

You left the best 'til last! (1)

Kawahee (901497) | more than 5 years ago | (#28333041)

In all there are 78 figures and 10 animations.

Let me correct that for you! (4, Funny)

Azeroth48 (855550) | more than 5 years ago | (#28333069)

This analysis was done on 1337 kernel modules

BSD? (2, Interesting)

Rosco P. Coltrane (209368) | more than 5 years ago | (#28333125)

So they finally managed to recover DNA evidence on BSD's corpse [jhu.edu] after all. Hopefully we'll find out who killed it.

Seriously, what a useless "analysis". It's all a bunch of unreadable tables, graphs and other things, such as the history of the number of exported symbols in the BSD kernel (yeah right...) nobody cares about.

Re:BSD? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28333393)

ahah. you are really dumb, aren't you?

Re:BSD? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28334243)

No kidding. The world was really waiting for the history of the number of exported symbols in the Linux kernel, right? Geez. If they ever legalize gay marriage where you live why don't you propose to Linus and get it over with. Until then, clean your room, your mom's pissed.

Verry Pretty ...but (4, Insightful)

Chrisq (894406) | more than 5 years ago | (#28333137)

What does it all mean?
Is having a large number of external symbols good because it has more integration points or bad because of bloat? I don't think I have ever RTFA and come away with so little understanding before.

Re:Verry Pretty ...but (2, Insightful)

RuBLed (995686) | more than 5 years ago | (#28333167)

As the child in me would say.. Just look at the pictures.

Re:Verry Pretty ...but (1)

frodo from middle ea (602941) | more than 5 years ago | (#28333205)

what does it all mean ?
ZFS rules ?

ducks.

Re:Verry Pretty ...but (0)

Tenebrousedge (1226584) | more than 5 years ago | (#28333275)

ZFS rules ducks?

It's cases like this, and that damn gun-toting panda [wikipedia.org] that remind us of the need for proper use of punctuation. Though it's always puzzled me how people can write code all day long and then fail to use analogous typographical rules correctly in communication. Or maybe there's more "Hello ,Wrold!" code than I'm aware of.

Oh well. I, for one, welcome our new anatidaen overlords!

Re:Verry Pretty ...but (2, Interesting)

lorenzo.boccaccia (1263310) | more than 5 years ago | (#28333337)

you know that punctuation is logically wrong, in respect of parenthesis and quotation? The logically trained are more inclined to use them as balanced delimiters

Consider, for example, a sentence in a {vi} tutorial that looks like this:
Then delete a line from the file by typing "dd".
Standard usage would make this
Then delete a line from the file by typing "dd."

(from the jargon file, Hacker Writing Style)

Re:Verry Pretty ...but (1, Offtopic)

smallfries (601545) | more than 5 years ago | (#28333473)

Is that an American style of punctuation? In British English the first (more logical) example is correct.

Re:Verry Pretty ...but (0, Offtopic)

rant64 (1148751) | more than 5 years ago | (#28333697)

If the entire sentence were a quote, then the second example would be correct, at least around here (NLD). But the "dd" is not a quote, it's a literal string that should not include the period.

Both of them make sense.

Re:Verry Pretty ...but (0, Offtopic)

lorenzo.boccaccia (1263310) | more than 5 years ago | (#28333909)

British have it's own exception, such as you shouldn't put commas after brackets, as the closing bracket is enough of a pause.
-- or something like that, I'm nowhere near an English nor American speaker

Re:Verry Pretty ...but (0, Offtopic)

Sinbios (852437) | more than 5 years ago | (#28333905)

Your incorrect conclusion that quotation marks are logically wrong arose from the fact that you don't understand how quotation marks work.

Re:Verry Pretty ...but (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28333985)

Or you're just plain wrong [homestead.com] .

Re:Verry Pretty ...but (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28345825)

said the one with the wrong quotation stile in the signature:

Anyone can "stand up for what they believe", but it takes a very brave individual to change what they believe. - Loundry

Re:Verry Pretty ...but (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28359525)

Then please educate us, there are more of us who do not understand the second usage of quotation marks (as it would be incorrect in many languages I've come across).

Re:Verry Pretty ...but (1)

GaryOlson (737642) | more than 5 years ago | (#28333859)

This means ZFS will continue to suffer from an unknown formative malaise because it cannot be properly analyzed. Without the full analysis, a proper treatment cannot be attempted without further damaging the file system. Isolation is the best recourse at this time.

Re:Verry Pretty ...but (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28333425)

You can draw several conclusions from the images. One of them is how similar some filesystems are.

Have a look to the hierarchical clustering and hamming distances graphs.

What software did he use? (1)

fccoelho (818860) | more than 5 years ago | (#28347117)

What software did he use for the analyses ?

Typo in summary. (4, Funny)

SharpFang (651121) | more than 5 years ago | (#28333163)

This analysis was done on 1377 kernel modules from 2.6.0 to 2.6.29

I think they meant 1337 kernel modules?

Re:Typo in summary. (0, Offtopic)

M8e (1008767) | more than 5 years ago | (#28333355)

Very funny, moding that Informative.

Re:Typo in summary. (0, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28333357)

Umm, I don't think this was meant to be informative. I think SharpFang was trying to be funny.

Re:Typo in summary. (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28333497)

That moderation shows just how far /. has fallen...

Re:Typo in summary. (0, Offtopic)

rant64 (1148751) | more than 5 years ago | (#28333703)

Umm, I don't think this was meant to be informative. I think SharpFang was trying to be funny.

You're trying to be informative, Wise Guy?

Re:Typo in summary. (1)

wezeldog (982156) | more than 5 years ago | (#28334193)

Devito: "You mean, let me understand this cause, ya know maybe it's me, I'm a little fucked up maybe, but I'm informative how, I mean informative like I'm a philosopher, I enlighten you? I make you think, I'm here to enlighten you? What do you mean informative, informative how? How am I informative?"

Devito? huh? (1)

BitterAndDrunk (799378) | more than 5 years ago | (#28335457)

Did he do a parody of Pesci's speech in Good Fellas that I'm unaware of?

Re:Typo in summary. (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28333791)

Funny doesn't build up karma

So what? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28333165)

Ok pretty visualisations, but what do we learn from them?

Re:So what? (4, Insightful)

Rosco P. Coltrane (209368) | more than 5 years ago | (#28333191)

Nothing. The whole point was do create said visualizations. From the "expedition" homepage here [jhu.edu] :

This is an exercise in visualization and kernel exploration. I'm not an expert in either of them but I like file systems and I also find great pleasure in creating visual representations of the things around me. --RazvanME

He likes file systems and he likes to create visual representation of things. There's your explanation. I suspect the guy is a student with too much free time and a desire to be featured on Slashdot.

Re:So what? (4, Insightful)

gbjbaanb (229885) | more than 5 years ago | (#28333293)

Which is fair enough (unless you happen to have had a quick look at the summary, an even quicker look at the diagrams and thought "d'uh WTF?" to yourself). I think if he'd created a colourful fractal image, or moving dots swirling around then everyone would be saying how great it was. As it is, it looks like dull statistics.

I found the interesting bits to be how closely tux3 kept coming up next to fat or ntfs, whilst btrfs was close to xfs, and ext4 with ext3 and ext2. Maybe there's something in the analysis after all!

Re:So what? (1)

machine321 (458769) | more than 5 years ago | (#28333373)

I found the release timeline graphs for OpenBSD fascinating. Visualization really gave insight into the meaning of the data.

Re:So what? (0, Flamebait)

networkconsultant (1224452) | more than 5 years ago | (#28334505)

I wonder if he's ever had a date?

Useless exercise (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28333225)

I agree that it's a useless analysis, since if you're building a kernel you only build the parts that you're going to use, on your arch. Even a distributor doesn't necessarily compile "all" of the filesystems, for one example. A silly distro kernel uses initramfs and stuff so everything can be modules anyways. Not everyone loads them all. So whoopee doo if the whole mess is several megabytes.

There's a lot of functionality available, and you can choose what you want. Representing it in a meaningless graph does not at all show alarming, or even interesting trends.

Re:Useless exercise (1)

hedwards (940851) | more than 5 years ago | (#28334201)

That's sort of what I want to know. For FreeBSD, as an example, there's no reason to compile more than a small fraction of those at a given time. I think most users could exist quite well without anything beyond just NTFS, UFS, NFS, ISO9660, ZFS and MSDOSFS. And you can throw out NTFS, NFS and MSDOSFS as often as not.

I'd assume that Linux is similar except subbing one of the EXTFSes in for UFS.

Warning (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28333245)

Slashdot user BadAnalogyGuy is a scientologist.
If he offers you a free personality test, firmly refuse him.

Re:Warning (2, Funny)

Chrisq (894406) | more than 5 years ago | (#28333283)

Slashdot user BadAnalogyGuy is a scientologist. If he offers you a free personality test, firmly refuse him.

Thanks, but you don't have to worry. I have no personality.

My chart (4, Funny)

iamdrscience (541136) | more than 5 years ago | (#28333271)

Usefulness of a hammer:
XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

Usefulness of an average Slashdot article:
XXXXXX

Usefulness of a screen door on a submarine:
XXXX

Usefulness of this Slashdot article:
X

Re:My chart (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28333347)

Usefulness of a hammer:
XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

Pass me that hammer, there's a fly on my mother-in-law's forehead

Re:My chart (1)

Yosho (135835) | more than 5 years ago | (#28333735)

Pass me that hammer, there's a fly on my mother-in-law's forehead

Now that's what I call killing two birds with one stone!

Re:My chart (1)

Hurricane78 (562437) | more than 5 years ago | (#28336489)

Reminds me of the best way to die, ever: Take a parachute drop, but without the parachute. Instead put a large thorn/needle/picket on your head. Then land exactly on your favorite bad guy.

When I'm old and gray, this is what I am going to do. If it were today, I'd take the boss of Monsanto or some Rothschild boss with me.

Re:My chart (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28333729)

How does the average Slashdot reader rate on that scale?

Re:My chart (1)

Shikaku (1129753) | more than 5 years ago | (#28333765)

.

Filter error: You can type more than that for your comment.

Re:My chart (1)

Sulphur (1548251) | more than 5 years ago | (#28334401)

When a hammer is wrong, then the result is not funny.

Re:My chart (1)

Hurricane78 (562437) | more than 5 years ago | (#28336409)

Talk about an open door with just a screen door left between you and 500 feet or polar ice water.

A hammer. Bah. Crybaby. ;)

Re:My chart (1)

bertoelcon (1557907) | more than 5 years ago | (#28335023)

I would have thought a screen door on a submarine was on par with an average article, or rather the average of all articles.

Re:My chart (0, Troll)

shutdown -p now (807394) | more than 5 years ago | (#28339399)

You forgot

CowboyNeal:
(-INF)

Re:My chart (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28340985)

Where does pr0n fit in?

Eye-candy knowledge (4, Insightful)

koolfy (1213316) | more than 5 years ago | (#28333285)

Am I the only one not understanding a word nor the point of those graphics, but still going to print them as posters and put them everywhere in my bedroom ?

'cuz dude, it's so beautiful !

Employment sought (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28333287)

*spam? warning*
Gimme a job. This world is a zoo, but I need money.
I'm based in Ireland at present.
How the zoo could be improved:
Google for example could run webservers using bit torrent technology developed by the genius Bram Cohen. Bit torrent should be used in many areas including distributed bit torrent-esque web deployments. Imagine a virtual server farm where all accounts on clients act as servers for the greater bandwidth.

Google OS: Google brought forward google Maps and Google Earth etc. all these rich tools that u have to open in a browser like a donkey. They should be embedded inside the desktop. MS Active desktop was sh1t but the idea was good. Putting content on the desktop. Using linux, u could have multiple desktops each with a different purpose that u could flick through like thumbnails. A desktop preconfigured with a maps API embedded into it - forget that tab independent process nonsense.
Keep only one of these desktops in D3D mode (the one with Google Earth embedded in it) and use that for games too.

Encryption: Is there not some easier way to do it at speed and securely? Like using hash functions to and pseudo random numbers generators. U could use some kind of deliberately flawed PRNG algorithm seeding off very gray time (like hours/date of year) or seeding from a message header encoded as a number, so that the data would be all random unless u had the key. Kind of like randomized data with some back door for a key to de-random it (maybe thats what encryption is though :> )
Random.mess("hello world") = 010001101100 etc. backdoor.PRNG(010001101100) = "hello world"

Bit torrent uploading: We can use it for downloading but we have to upload too. This is usually time consuming as it's not the priority for servers. Why not have a distributed bit torrent based server take care of it. I upload securely to many machines all around me that in turn share the load of uploading to the server.

I'm just full of ideas. Here all day folks! Send your vacancies now!!

fandeath AT gmail DOT com

External symbols for 2.6.29 + tux3 (1)

bagsta (1562275) | more than 5 years ago | (#28333449)

As far as I can tell, from this table [jhu.edu] the external symbol mcount is used by all file systems... :)

And Obama is president of US...

After perusing the article, and ... (2, Insightful)

OneSmartFellow (716217) | more than 5 years ago | (#28333459)

...slowly loosing the will to live as my eyes became tired and I confused by the lack of any conclusions which could possibly be drawn from such an overwhelming variety of apparently useless graphical analysis of kernel ABI calls made by mostly arcane file systems, I couldn't help wondering .....
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
. Who gives a shit ?

Re:After perusing the article, and ... (1)

shish (588640) | more than 5 years ago | (#28335775)

Who gives a shit ?

Nerds, which is what this website is for. If you're looking for some sort of pop culture website where things are only posted if they appeal to the majority, you're doing it wrong...

One other observation though... (1)

OneSmartFellow (716217) | more than 5 years ago | (#28333539)

How is it possible to create a file system driver which does not call "register_filesystem" ?

Re:One other observation though... (3, Funny)

jeremyp (130771) | more than 5 years ago | (#28333975)

It's easy.

I did it once and the fact that it couldn't be mounted was offset by the fact that no bugs were ever reported, nor did it it ever corrupt or lose any data. In fact, I didn't even have to write any of the implementation.

Re:One other observation though... (2, Informative)

jiriw (444695) | more than 5 years ago | (#28334373)

How is it possible to create a file system driver which does not call "register_filesystem" ?

If you 'rtfa'... it stated [jhu.edu] :

Another (again expected) observation is that the lack of (un)register_filesystem identifiers in the modules which only provides services to others: dlm, lockd, fat, and jbd2/jbd2.

Yes I did read the article and thought it was very interesting. For one thing the fact that in earlier kernel releases file system drivers used to use more or less the same set of external symbols and in recent releases they more often used exclusive external symbols. If that's a good or a bad thing I don't know because I'm not an expert in file systems. It may indicate file system kernel module writers are re-using code less or do no longer compare their work that much anymore or it could mean file systems are now functioning more efficiently because they use more specialized external functions now... or maybe it means nothing or something completely else ... I don't know really ....

Link to the article's Front Page please? (5, Informative)

AceJohnny (253840) | more than 5 years ago | (#28333541)

Dear submitter,

A /. summary is a bit like a main page on a website. Make the organization clear. Don't pile on shortcuts to different parts of the website: the reader risks being discouraged trying to find out how best to get to the important part of your website. Less is better.
I actually clicked on one of the links that appeared to go to the "Expedition" website (based on its similarity to other links, as shown in my browser's statusbar!), then changed the address in the address bar to get to the front page.

You actually didn't include a link to your article's front page [jhu.edu] , for heaven's sake!

Hope this helps for the next time you write a summary.

Re:Link to the article's Front Page please? (1)

Hurricane78 (562437) | more than 5 years ago | (#28336525)

Hope this helps for the next time you write a summary.

You must be new here...

Odd visualization, but not so bad (5, Interesting)

AceJohnny (253840) | more than 5 years ago | (#28333591)

My first reaction when browsing through the article was disgust about the measure being used. I couldn't see the value of graphs about the number of symbols used by different file-system modules. So vfat doesn't use kprintf, woo-fucking-hoo!

But then, the Hamming distance and hierarchical structure struck a chord. Huh, so NFS, uses a very different set of symbols than, ext3. (ok, this may be biased by NFS using a metric fuckton of external symbols where ext3 uses less), which implies that NFS is pretty different, internally, than ext3.

So now, I agree that such a visualisation, while very abstract from the implementation details, can be pretty useful to have a (very) rough overview of the filesystems and their code structure. And I think we need more abstract overviews like this.

Reminds me of Code Swarm [ucdavis.edu] , which creates a movie of commits to a repository.

Re:Odd visualization, but not so bad (1)

JasterBobaMereel (1102861) | more than 5 years ago | (#28333733)

This is a case of a thorough analysis done by someone who knows how to do an analysis but has no idea what they are analysing or what is important?

So you end up with lots of pretty graphs and trees that actually mean absolutely nothing

    NFS has more external symbols than VFAT and there are less than in the previous kernel version... and this means ..... well not a lot really ....

Re:Odd visualization, but not so bad (2, Funny)

OneSmartFellow (716217) | more than 5 years ago | (#28333925)

He's in training to work for Accenture (or Capgemini, Deloitte) where the chief product is useless graphs, presented in marathon PowerPoint sessions in which management try to impress each other by using the latest buzz-phrases.

They really do produce client-centric best practice inter departmental core competencies with a high return on investment and extremely low granularity event horizons. Just ask them !

Re:Odd visualization, but not so bad (1)

JasterBobaMereel (1102861) | more than 5 years ago | (#28334097)

There usual recommendation is to rename the product and/or company ... which they did themselves Andersen Consulting became Accenture, this means you can advertise that you are the same as always and nothing interesting is going on ....

Informative timelines (3, Insightful)

AlpineR (32307) | more than 5 years ago | (#28334103)

My only interests in filesystems are how much free space I have and whether mine will recover from a power outage. Thus 95% of these graphs are a total bore to me.

But I do like the Timelines [jhu.edu] of kernel releases. Some kernels see an exponential slowdown of release rate as they approach finalization and others are released like clockwork throughout their lifetime.

I'd love to see these methods applied to other topics I care more about, like games and science

When I develop maps for Starcraft, I usually go with a "release when it's ready" approach. That leads to a first public release long after my internal rough draft. Then there are a few quick releases as major bugs are found. And later the releases slow to a trickle as the focus move from bug fixes to balance tweaks. The magnitude of the changes also decreases over time, but each one's effect on game play can be disproportionately large.

But recently I went with a public balancing approach. I released the rough draft to get a feel for how it played. Then released new drafts as often as twice a day as suggestions were made and problems became apparent. I love to see that contrast visually or see other patterns I hadn't considered.

Re:Informative timelines (1)

Eil (82413) | more than 5 years ago | (#28344355)

My only interests in filesystems are how much free space I have and whether mine will recover from a power outage.

I'm usually more concerned about how much free space I have after a power outage.

Satanic messages (2, Funny)

(pvb)charon (685001) | more than 5 years ago | (#28333655)

Man, I just thought I saw some obscured letters in one of the heatmaps but then realized it was just my damn glossy Macbook screen reflecting the writing on my t-shirt... Damn it...

Re:Satanic messages (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28333849)

I just thought I saw some obscured images in one of the heatmaps but then realized it was just my damn glossy windows vista computer screen reflecting my dick inside your mouth... Damn it.

Fixed it for you

Re:Satanic messages (1)

networkconsultant (1224452) | more than 5 years ago | (#28334517)

Did you try reading the other side of your macbook, I hear there's a satanic message from Steve in the apple logo.

Is it just me or ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28333727)

Is it just me or do those thing remind anyone else of those back inside covers of old Mad magazine?

I have this strange feeling that if I looked at the monitor for the edge that a bucktooth grin of Alfred E. Neuman would appear saying "What, me worry?"

it's obviously (1)

viralMeme (1461143) | more than 5 years ago | (#28333745)

Taking a look at the image [jhu.edu] , it's obviously a signal from some alien civilization. Now if we could only decode it. Oh, wait that's what all the coders are about [wikipedia.org] .. :)

This is Linux... I know this! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28333845)

This immediately conjured up thoughts of Jurassic Park, where the young girl is surfing through the "city block" of file systems.

oh Jurrasic Park, what a prophetic movie (1)

discogravy (455376) | more than 5 years ago | (#28335071)

Lex: It's a UNIX system! I know this!

Stop merginig useless file systems (1)

edivad (1186799) | more than 5 years ago | (#28336563)

Linux should stop merging file systems used by three individuals at most.
There are so many totally useless file systems inside the main tree, and I honestly fail to see why those should bloat the main tree while the junk could happily live in the hard drive of the three perspective users.
For God's sake, even POHMELFS was merged! Where does it end? Where the boundary to say NO, and keep this irrelevant code out of the tree?

Re:Stop merginig useless file systems (1)

Slashcrap (869349) | more than 5 years ago | (#28345439)

Linux should stop merging file systems used by three individuals at most.
There are so many totally useless file systems inside the main tree, and I honestly fail to see why those should bloat the main tree while the junk could happily live in the hard drive of the three perspective users.
For God's sake, even POHMELFS was merged! Where does it end? Where the boundary to say NO, and keep this irrelevant code out of the tree?

It's unlikely that anybody would care about your opinions even if they weren't stupid.

Painfully obvious (1)

Xylene2301 (883019) | more than 5 years ago | (#28389895)

Ho hum... Why did this nerd waste his time researching a matter that's obvious to everyone here. They had us run all this stuff down in the first 6 weeks of CS 101. I guess he thinks we're stupid! Harumph!
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