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Montana City Requires Workers' Internet Accounts

timothy posted more than 5 years ago | from the are-you-now-or-have-you-ever-been dept.

Privacy 836

justinlindh writes "Bozeman, Montana is now requiring all applicants for city jobs to furnish Internet account information for 'background checking.' A portion of the application reads, "Please list any and all, current personal or business websites, web pages or memberships on any Internet-based chat rooms, social clubs or forums, to include, but not limited to: Facebook, Google, Yahoo, YouTube.com, MySpace, etc.' The article goes on to mention, 'There are then three lines where applicants can list the Web sites, their user names and log-in information and their passwords.'"

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WTF (5, Funny)

Jaysyn (203771) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377255)

They are seriously asking for people's passwords? If this some kinda of social engineering test where if you actually put them down you fail?

Re:WTF (4, Insightful)

sys.stdout.write (1551563) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377283)

If there weren't people over 50 I wouldn't be so scared...

Re:WTF (5, Insightful)

emudoug42 (977380) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377461)

Ok, new plan:

1) Make up phony job.
2) Put up lots of "now hiring" signs.
3) Ask for online account information, passwords.
4) Massive credit card fraud -- chances are people use the same passwords for everything
5) PROFIT!

Re:WTF (5, Funny)

e9th (652576) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377627)

The ad is actually for positions in their sister city, Bozeman, Nigeria.

Re:WTF (2, Interesting)

mitch_feaster (1193053) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377727)

This could be just the thing for me to break into the pen business -- MD5 hash capabilities on a ballpoint!

Re:WTF (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28377787)

I think a simple "go Fuck yourself" will suffice!

Broad brush strokes (1)

arizwebfoot (1228544) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377261)

"One thing that's important for folks to understand about what we look for is none of the things that the federal constitution lists as protected things, we don't use those. We're not putting out this broad brush stroke of trying to find out all kinds of information about the person that we're not able to use or shouldn't use in the hiring process," city attorney Sullivan said.

I don't know how much broader you can get - passwords indeed!

Re:Broad brush strokes (3, Funny)

Beezlebub33 (1220368) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377511)

Almost makes me want to apply so I can down my alt.com and bmezine.com usernames and passwords. If nothing else, it will be enlightening for city employees who get to review it. :-)

And then I'd be rich when they refuse my application because of it and I sue their asses off.

Passwords? (1)

Iphtashu Fitz (263795) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377271)

Glad I don't live in Montana... I am absolutely shocked that they're requesting passwords. I'd tell them to go to hell and shove the application where the sun doesn't shine.

Re:Passwords? (5, Funny)

Morlark (814687) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377453)

Ah, but it's perfectly safe. When you write your password out on the application form it comes out as ******!

Re:Passwords? (3, Insightful)

bagorange (1531625) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377483)

as someone on boingboing pointed out, can we assume that this breaks terms of service for quite a lot of groups / websites?

are they genuinely fishing for stuff to exclude applications from consideration? Or just looking for an excuse to fire you later because you didn't disclose all of your online activities?

perhaps trying to avoid employer liability for stuff you say "in secret". They ask you for it so they can vet you, and you hid stuff from em; so they are not liable?

Re:Passwords? (1)

poetmatt (793785) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377501)

I'm going off a hunch here, but I'm guessing this is pretty much illegal, too. Not to mention that every website in question probably has policies against giving out your account info.

that or you can sue Montana City for violating your privacy even with giving them the information, I'd suspect.

Re:Passwords? (1)

HaZardman27 (1521119) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377507)

I used to live in Bozeman; that's far from the only thing that sucks about that place. Worst drivers I've ever been around, and all the land is owned by the upper-class, so the middle-class is forced to live in apartment complexes and trailer parks.

Past experience - healthcare records (3, Insightful)

rwade (131726) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377519)

The potential for misuse is absolutely incredible. I recall reading many events during which folks at the US Social Security Administration were looking up political candidates' records, where hospital employees in Los Angeles were looking up the medical records of celebrities that visited their hospital for care.

Now they want me to let the HR drones have the ability to log into my facebook, slashdot, etc accounts?

Um, No (1)

orrigami (769691) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377273)

Guess no Slashdotter is ever going to work for the City of Bozeman.

Re:Um, No (3, Funny)

cashman73 (855518) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377531)

Anonymous Coward might still have a shot, since s/he does not have a username or password to disclose,... ;-)

To Bozeman, Montana... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28377287)

Um. No.

As offensive as this is... (1, Troll)

jcr (53032) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377289)

If it deters people from applying for city jobs, it could prove to be a good thing.

-jcr

Re:As offensive as this is... (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28377383)

I suspect that the available pool of applicants all favour abrogation of privacy rights for whatever personality driven reason. The problem will perpetuate.

City jobs are a bad thing? (5, Insightful)

spun (1352) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377479)

Is there any level at which collective action (otherwise known as 'government') is a good thing? What is wrong with city jobs? Would you have the private sector take over all functions of government, on all levels? I would think, at the very least you would be in favor of a public police force to protect your property. No matter how many guns you have, someone has more, and is more willing to use them than you are. Fire departments are nice, too. As are public roads. In fact, I can't think of many things that city governments currently do that the private sector could do better. The private sector exists to give you as little value for your dollar as you can be convinced to accept. The government is an agent working on your behalf.

Re:City jobs are a bad thing? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28377659)

The government is an agent working on your behalf.

Bwahahahahahahaha!!!!! That's a good one!

Oh, you're not joking? You seriously think that? Wow.

Re:City jobs are a bad thing? (0, Troll)

dada21 (163177) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377789)

Queue anarcho-capitalist reply.

First, all government is force. It uses force to do what it wants to do. So far, no government has ever done what every voter has wanted them to do. Ever. Have you read laws that enable "government agents" to work on your behalf? Ever?

The private sector does EVERYTHING better, because it is done voluntarily. They don't force you to make a decision against your will.

It's ok for 10 crooks in office to take your money by force, or tell you what you can do with your land or your body or your tools (by force), but if CmdrTaco and I decide to lift your wallet, it's illegal?

More: http://www.lewrockwell.com/blog/kinsella/kinsella15.html [lewrockwell.com]

Re:City jobs are a bad thing? (4, Interesting)

Attila Dimedici (1036002) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377795)

Where I live the fire department is a private volunteer organization. Everything I have ever seen indicates that it is a more efficient organization than any government fire department.
The police force does not protect you or your property, they apprehend and hold for trial those who stole/damaged your property. That doesn't do you any good. The damage is already done.

Give away your password... (5, Insightful)

javelinco (652113) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377299)

If they are able to hire people with these policies, then they are hiring people that they deserve, and those being hired are getting what they deserve. I honestly cannot envision going into a job interview and writing down, on a piece of paper that will end up who knows where, all of my user names and passwords, for every account I have on the Internet. I have trouble envisioning the idiots who would do so, but I'm guessing they look like the people who came up with this policy. And they deserve each other.

Re:Give away your password... (2, Insightful)

sweatyboatman (457800) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377403)

I would like to mod you "Right On" but there is no such option.

Re:Give away your password... (4, Funny)

NovaHorizon (1300173) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377499)

I have trouble envisioning a piece of paper large enough for all of my login accounts, let alone 3 lines. And I hope they understand when I just give 5 passwords at the top and tell them to keep trying for each site cause I don't remember which password goes with which account :|

Re:Give away your password... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28377503)

It would be kind of funny to automatically generate a few hundred thousand legitimate user accounts and passwords to various websites automatically, and print thsese off onto a few hundred sheets of paper and hand them in.

Unpopular (5, Informative)

mlingojones (919531) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377315)

According to the online poll accompanying the article, 98% of respondents think it's an invasion of privacy.

That's as big a landslide as it gets, folks.

Re:Unpopular (5, Funny)

Red Flayer (890720) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377459)

That's as big a landslide as it gets, folks.

Well, technically, no. It could be 99% [1].

I mean, I get your point, but on a site filled with pedants, most of them highly attuned to mathematics, perhaps that wasn't the best choice of words.

[1] 99% is as big a landslide as it gets. 100% would mean the land was falling, not sliding. Assuming that the percentage in a landslide victory correlates to the slope of the surface the land is sliding along.

Oh crap... I've opened the door for the pedants to tar and feather me as well, haven't I?

*exchanges tinfoil suit for flame-retardant suit*

Re:Unpopular (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28377729)

Actually, per the density the real numbers, there is no "biggest" landslide, values, since, if $x<1$, $(x+1)/2$ will still be less than unity, but also be larger than $x$. To quote a wise man (I assume; if not please allow me to buy you a drink to make it up to you),

I mean, I get your point, but on a site filled with pedants, most of them highly attuned to mathematics, perhaps that wasn't the best choice of words.

Re:Unpopular (4, Funny)

alexlm (1374833) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377469)

How are there even 2% that don't consider it an invasion of privacy?

Re:Unpopular (5, Insightful)

hampton (209113) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377629)

How are there even 2% that don't consider it an invasion of privacy?

They're the trolls who loudly proclaim "if you're not doing anything wrong then you have nothing to hide" regarding every privacy issue.

Re:Unpopular (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28377723)

The other 2% don't have any accounts, so they assume nobody else does either.

Re:Unpopular (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28377543)

This just in: 2% of online users twitch when they click.

Re:Unpopular (1)

Statecraftsman (718862) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377551)

The other two percent clicked accidentally. Or are failbots.

Re:Unpopular (2, Interesting)

mrcaseyj (902945) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377769)

So what if the employer is a Republican and you're a Democrat (or vice versa) and you've been participating in private Internet forums where you discuss political strategy? What if you've been communicating with your lawyer over a private Internet forum? What if you've been collaborating with partners on an invention you plan to patent over a private Internet forum. Does your prospective employer have a right to access all your private Internet communications? Why not just insist that all prospective employees put video cameras in every room of their house for a month before hiring?

If you have public accounts in your own name then they might be able to get away with this for those accounts. But if you use a fake name then I'd think you'd have some expectation of anonymity.

This can't be legal (3, Insightful)

Viros (1128445) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377331)

Why should workers have to supply personal information that isn't in any way relevant to the job? Why should workers give their bosses the means to invade on their personal lives? I realize there are cases (mainly national security type jobs) that may view these as compromising security, but then they should only require NDAs or, at worst, closing these accounts.

Re:This can't be legal (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28377791)

Why should they have to supply it? To make it easier for the Government to obtain information it has no right to obtain.

I can only imagine someone thinking this will make it easier for them to fire/litigate dissidents, and that's the only reason it became "company" policy.

User reaction == best part (4, Insightful)

Benanov (583592) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377337)

FTFA: "No one has ever removed his or her name from consideration for a job due to the request, Sullivan added."
Then they're getting exactly what they asked for. Considering that users will hand out their passwords for a chocolate bar, this sort of line doesn't scare me much any more. Is that sad or am I just bitter?

If pressed, I would consider handing out the *wrong* passwords, though; when they come back saying they couldn't log in, I'd alert it to the sites in question as a TOS violation, employment discrimination, etc..

Re:User reaction == best part (1)

iamhigh (1252742) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377649)

Well, considering the city has a population of about 2200, they are all probably each others friend on facebook anyways. Small towns like that... you already know everyones business.

Worst Policy EVAR!!! EVER EVEN!!!! (5, Insightful)

Derekloffin (741455) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377341)

That is just plain moronic. You do NOT ask for people's passwords ever. That's bloody ridiculous. You'll get a total of two types, liars who give you nothing or fakes, or idiots you actually give you this info.

Re:Worst Policy EVAR!!! EVER EVEN!!!! (2, Funny)

TheGratefulNet (143330) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377717)

You'll get a total of two types, liars who give you nothing or fakes, or idiots you actually give you this info.

hang on. I now see the logic in this.

this is for GOVERNMENT work. I think you just described the ideal government civil-service worker!

maybe there's more thought to this than it appears.

Business Websites??? (4, Insightful)

ATestR (1060586) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377343)

"Please list any and all, current personal or business websites..." Really? Even if they can justify asking for personal information, business websites could include things like previous employer intranet logins, personal bank accounts, etc. If presented with a job application that included this kind of stuff, I would run, not walk, to the nearest exit.

HAHA OH WOW (1)

Riddler Sensei (979333) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377349)

Asking for your online hangouts is in poor taste, but asking for your USER NAMES AND PASSWORDS is in absolutely horrendous practice. It'll probably breed an entire employee base that's comfortable with putting in their user name and password into a site that TOTALLY looks like their bank's website except it has some odd porn ads for some reason.

Re:HAHA OH WOW (1)

AndersOSU (873247) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377651)

for political appointments asking for online hangouts might be due diligence, but for a normal career type job, it's over the line. (asking for passwords is just asinine no matter what the situation.)

What counts as business? (2, Insightful)

orrigami (769691) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377351)

Do the user names and passwords to Banking Sites count as Business Accounts? Mortgage Accounts, e-trade accounts? Crazy Bozeman, MO city HR people. HR should stick with paper hats and cake. It is the only thing they are good at.

Pedantry (2, Informative)

XanC (644172) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377419)

MO = Missouri
MT = Montana

Re:Pedantry (3, Insightful)

orrigami (769691) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377621)

Thanks.

Invest in lead (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28377355)

That's all I have to say.

Real Opportunity (5, Interesting)

stoolpigeon (454276) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377357)

1. Create Account with social site
2. Put name and password on app
3. Wait for it to be leaked and abused
4. Profit!

No need to get a job - this is like money in the bank.

Re:Real Opportunity (4, Insightful)

OzPeter (195038) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377681)

Hell don't even wait for it to be abused.

Abuse it yourself and claim that the City did it!

Seriously? (1)

whisper_jeff (680366) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377361)

Seriously? The only logical comment I can come up with for this is "BWAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHahahahahahahahahahaha!!"

I know, not the deepest comment ever posted on /. but this has got to be one of the biggest jokes ever... I'd expect to see something like that on April 1st...

My Klingon Keyboard (5, Funny)

iron-kurton (891451) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377367)

I just told them that even if I wrote down passwords, they are all written in Klingon and are only usable on Klingon keyboards, so they would be of no use to them. I was hired on the spot.

Sorry, we are going to have to let you go. (5, Funny)

Tilzs (959354) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377369)

It has come to our attention that you lied or omitted information on your employment application. We have found out that you neglected to mention that you registered at creative.com 8 years ago to download some drivers and 3 years ago at dvorak.org/blog when you posted "get of my lawn".

no freaking way (1)

xDraveNx (1543953) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377371)

This is completely without merit and rather insane. I would walkout right then and there. As long as I show up and perform my duties as required my employer has right or even need to look into my personal life.

Re:no freaking way (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28377565)

This is actually so bad that whoever thought it was a good idea should be fired, and a large fine applied to the city to act as a warning and deterrent to other cities. This is nothing less than a grossly invasive and unreasonable request.

Bank accounts (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28377379)

Hopefully banks do not have any forums or chat rooms on their pages.

They really understand what they are asking for? (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28377391)

So, they are offically asking to violate the Terms of Service of all of these services?
I'm sure that each one has a policy about not sharing login information for your personal accounts.

What's next, asking for your login for your banking information, so they can see how you spend your personal money?

Personal background checks are fine (and valid for many jobs, maybe not for a rank-and-file city job, but meh).
But they need to be done properly and honestly. This is just a really lazy and silly way to do it.
Obviously this policy and application wasn't vetted by anyone with a clue.

Re:They really understand what they are asking for (1)

ciggieposeur (715798) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377697)

So, they are offically asking to violate the Terms of Service of all of these services?

I think actually the city is asking people to violate the law by giving city hiring folks unauthorized access to computing facilities. Users of Facebook/Myspace/etc. are not legally owners (or agents acting on behalf of owners) who can declare what is and isn't authorized access.

Re:They really understand what they are asking for (4, Informative)

gujo-odori (473191) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377763)

Judging by TFA, it was apparently vetted by their city attorney. Maybe even written by him.

Oh, wait. Anyone with a clue. Never mind. Nothing to see here, folks. Move along, move along.

Uh yeah. (1)

tnk1 (899206) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377399)

Good luck with that.

Yeah sure, here's my wonderful web page with absolutely no offending material. And look, it shows my love for the city of Bozeman, MT!

What? Is that all of my accounts? Of course it is!

I mean, what are they going to say if you only give them the accounts that you want them to see, or better yet, say that you don't have any, except an email address (which is one you just created on Google Mail and has no connection to anything else you have online)?

I wonder what bureaucrat came up with that great idea.

Of course, on the other hand, it's sort of a Darwin Award test for people who are both dumb enough to have compromising material online and who are not imaginative enough to realize that there is no way in Hell that they can enforce that.

Re:Uh yeah. (1)

cml4524 (1520403) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377481)

I mean, what are they going to say if you only give them the accounts that you want them to see, or better yet, say that you don't have any, except an email address

In all likelihood, nothing. However, if they find out later that you lied, they'll fire you for lying on your application.

Still, nobody with any common sense would agree to this.... which is sort of a moot point since they're hiring for government work.

Simple answer: lie (1)

Jailbrekr (73837) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377401)

What is the worst they can do? Sure they can try to tie you to an account, but that would involve money and time. If you put down nothing, the onus is on them to prove that you are telling the truth.

What else? (5, Insightful)

swb (14022) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377417)

Maybe my bank access info?

Keys to my house?

Maybe a beaver shot of my wife?

Re:What else? (5, Funny)

iamhigh (1252742) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377593)

Maybe my bank access info?

Keys to my house?

Maybe a beaver shot of my wife?

No. No. Yes, please.

Re:What else? (5, Funny)

swb (14022) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377751)

You might want to check my bank balance and a pic of my wife before you make that decision.

Yeah, pretty sure that's breaking the law (5, Insightful)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377421)

There is a LOT of stuff that prospective employers can't ask you [hrworld.com] (race, sex, family status, disability, etc.). One of those things is asking you about social organizations you belong to (presumably because someone could derrive illegal information from this like your age, nationality, religion, etc.). Asking for your Facebook/Myspace/etc. information would almost CERTAINLY fall under this (since things like age/sex/etc. are standard categories on most social websites, and this information is supposed to be basically anonymous) and is really opening them up for a rather impolite visit from the EEOC [eeoc.gov] .

I suspect that, in these hard times, it's just that no one has bothered to file a claim against them yet.

Re:Yeah, pretty sure that's breaking the law (1)

snl2587 (1177409) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377617)

And just think of all the free money I could get for "emotional distress"!

Pack your bags, gentlemen, we're going to to Montana!

Re:Yeah, pretty sure that's breaking the law (1)

hattig (47930) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377689)

So everyone that has applied for that job, could sue the city for discrimination because the application form broke the law, and for all you know it was the information that you may or may not have supplied there that decided it?

Of course, has your point actually been pointed out to the nosy busybody middlemanager that thought this would be a good idea?

At least they are polite (2, Funny)

Danathar (267989) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377441)

They DID say "Please"...

also... (4, Funny)

bcrowell (177657) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377449)

Further instructions on the form:

16d. Please analyze your own handwriting for us, and supply a full report on whether the results show that you may be predisposed to workplace violence.

16e. Please build your own polygraph machine, administer the test to yourself, and let us know whether it turns up any proclivity for white collar crime.

Biased towards people who violate rules (5, Insightful)

Ironica (124657) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377465)

Most of those sites (if not all of them) probably state in the TOS that you are not to share your login information. So... they're asking people to violate their agreements, and won't hire people who refuse. For example, Facebook's Terms [facebook.com] section 4 item 6 states "You will not share your password, let anyone else access your account, or do anything else that might jeopardize the security of your account."

Brilliant. If you want to bribe a city official, go to Bozeman, because they only hire people who violate policy.

Slashdot Account (4, Funny)

Sponge Bath (413667) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377471)

User: Anonymous Coward
Password:FAH-Q

I'm not surprised one bit (1)

swanzilla (1458281) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377487)

I have lived in Bozeman for the past decade. Our city council is the most asinine civic body I have ever encountered. The tech company I work for is located out of city limits due to their gross inability to complete rudimentary city tasks such as to approve building plans. Asking for passwords is pretty impressive, however...hats off to these guys!

They are testing how you leak city information too (1)

dUb (21971) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377513)

What if City is just testing their people how easily they give information which is related to their work on City?
If you give, you fail.

In the Internet... (1)

juanergie (909157) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377529)

... nobody knows you are a Montana worker.

Why are they concerned about who you've been poking? And what if they are members of, say, a porn site? Do they really expect them to write "I'm a member of turtlescopulating.com"? Nobody will know that Joe Smith is "longandwild87".

I say workers should just create a Gmail account called FuckYouBozemanLaw@gmail.com and start emailing their representatives.

The City "Attorney" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28377567)

City attorney Greg Sullivan gets bonus points for starting every sentence in the interview with the word "so."

Guaranteed Hire? (1)

SketchOfNight (1010207) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377571)

You're all looking at this the wrong way - it's now become easier to fake who you are on a resume than ever before!

Step 1: Create fake profiles with perfect friends and political affiliations to suit your employer.
Step 2: Make bogus filler posts
Step 3: ???
Step 4: Prof--err, hired!

Not against the US constitution? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28377579)

Has anyone told Scott Adams (Dilbert) about this one yet?

I love the way they say "none of the things that the federal constitution lists as protected things"... so the right to privacy is not protected in the US? But i remember a judge throwing out a case where a cop read someone's diary without a warrant... the Judge rules that the right to privacy is essential to the right to free speech, for if we must censor our thoughts, we cannot be free.

The scary thing is, if things like this spread, they become impossible to avoid. Given a choice of working (and so not being homeless) or being free, well, most people will trade in their liberty, and those who don't starve or end up in jail, and the bastards *win*.

Go right ahead (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28377583)

Give'em that, turn around, sue their behinds off. Looks like homer to me.

Intrusive, but circumventable (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28377587)

I'm don't think they actually ask for passwords. I wish I could see the form.

But password aside, I figure I have thousands of web site accounts. An order of magnitude more if you count tracking cookies. I could easily fill three lines with meaningless info.

A Chance for some orginality. (1)

Kaldesh (1363017) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377625)

To me this would be an ultimate chance for some humor on my application. I would start writing down random sex sites (nothing illegal) and perhaps a few online dating sites, then make up some fake profiles. Hopefully that would teach these folks not to be so damn nosy.

What is this Internet thing you speak of... (1)

macbeth66 (204889) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377631)

I am sorry, I do not understand.

high integrity (0, Flamebait)

TheGratefulNet (143330) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377639)

quoting:

"So, we have positions ranging from fire and police, which require people of high integrity for those positions,..."

police. high integrity. ...head asplodes.

given that police have to be UNDER a certain IQ (google arond for the connecticut case where a cop applicant was denied for scoring TOO HIGH on an iq test!) I'm not so sure that cops are 'high integrity' individuals.

they need to be able to beat you senseless and not have an issues at all about it. and lie if it means covering for their fellow cops.

high integrity, indeed!

wait, Bozeman Montana... (2, Interesting)

spidercoz (947220) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377645)

Isn't that where the Vulcans landed?

Bozoman, MT (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28377671)

What else would you expect?

ToS (2, Informative)

KingPin27 (1290730) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377695)

What about the implications on ToS. I know google is a little light on their terms when it comes to passwords and account ...

http://www.google.com/accounts/TOS?hl=en [google.com]

6. Your passwords and account security 6.1 You agree and understand that you are responsible for maintaining the confidentiality of passwords associated with any account you use to access the Services. 6.2 Accordingly, you agree that you will be solely responsible to Google for all activities that occur under your account.

5.6 You agree that you are solely responsible for (and that Google has no responsibility to you or to any third party for) any breach of your obligations under the Terms and for the consequences (including any loss or damage which Google may suffer) of any such breach.

Facebook's terms of service are just as strict.

4.6 You will not share your password, let anyone else access your account, or do anything else that might jeopardize the security of your account.

I for one would not give that information and would suspect that the City is in violation of some law or other and that my providing usernames and passwords to these accounts would constitute my violation of terms of service and would get me in lots more trouble.

I call FUD (0, Redundant)

stickytar (96286) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377701)

This sounds like FUD to me. A quick look at the application for employment doesn't have anything like this on the forms. http://www.bozeman.net/bozeman/humanResource/forms/Application%20for%20Employment.pdf [bozeman.net] I'm not sure where this news organization gets their info, but that doesn't sound right.

Re:I call FUD (1)

stickytar (96286) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377753)

nvm... rtfa

Teach Your Children Well (2)

rbrander (73222) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377709)

We all know to Net-proof kids right from single-digit ages not to provide identifying information to electronic correspondents that might be predators.

Now we're going to have to remember that "predators" needs to include "employers over a decade from now that may seize upon internet forum posts to take away your job or ruin your life".

So, kids: always set up accounts under a pseudonym. Use DIFFERENT pseudonyms. Strictly limit the friends that can connect your True Name (thx, Vernor Vinge) to your pseudonyms. And do not provide specific identifying information in any post. In forums that require True Names to work right (facebook), have Mom & Dad help you learn to consider words, and especially photos, carefully.

What they post at nine won't be held against them, but if you start developing their radar early, the appropriate attitudes of privacy and subterfuge will be reflexive by the late teens.

As for that first generation now looking for their first jobs with all kinds of youthful exuberance on the internet not staying on the internet - yikes, sorry, you're screwed. As the joke poster says, it may be your job to provide an example to others.

Rich People? (1)

iamhigh (1252742) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377733)

I don't know if this is a very accurate site, but I think I have used it before. Check out the stats on income and house prices... it's insane! City-Data for Montana City [city-data.com]

Not just passwords (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28377743)

Even though the mere thought of asking people for passwords is totally lunatic, I think this is waaay bigger.
Why the hell do they think I should tell them what I do in my free time? Should I also list the clubs I frequent? Make a list of all people I shagged? Books I read recently?
I think not only the people hiring and the people applying get what they deserve, but so do the voters.
This is what paranoia buys you.

Real reason? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28377745)

If I was hiring, I might ask this question. And anyone foolish enough to give me their passwords would be rejected flat out as a security risk.

FUCK those stupid officials and any LIKE them (1)

davidsyes (765062) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377757)

This may be a libelous/slanderous statement against the officials of the city of Bozeman, Montana, but fuck'em! Bozeman officials: You are crazy, stupid, mother*#(kers:

"That was the case for one person who applied for employment with the City. The anonymous viewer emailed the news station recently to express concern with a component of the city's background check policy, which states that to be considered for a job applicants must provide log-in information and passwords for social network sites in which they participate.

The requirement is included on a waiver statement applicants must sign, giving the City permission to conduct an investigation into the person's "background, references, character, past employment, education, credit history, criminal or police records."

"Please list any and all, current personal or business websites, web pages or memberships on any Internet-based chat rooms, social clubs or forums, to include, but not limited to: Facebook, Google, Yahoo, YouTube.com, MySpace, etc.," the City form states. There are then three lines where applicants can list the Web sites, their user names and log-in information and their passwords."

But, now i'm thinking this is a tactic to reduce the pool of applicants to government jobs there... Or, some lame "child-protection" law used as a smokescreen for other reasons...

Why the FUCK should a citizen/applicant provide their PASSWORDS AND USER ACCOUTS? For private activity? Even in the WORKplace, most companies and government agencies stress the importance of keeping passwords private.

Slashdotter unite (1)

Lazypete (863757) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377761)

Lets have some fun with that. Let them hire a bunch of people so in a couple of months like 9 months.. we all try to hack into their servers a steal the password list, then publish the story here, that Bozecrap city lost the password to al the accounts of their employee. It would be funny to watch them soo humiliated! Then we trash the passwords.. no fun with that.

Amazing (1)

Presto Vivace (882157) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377773)

what you can get away with in a down economy.

in Montana? (1)

140Mandak262Jamuna (970587) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377783)

It cant be! Isn't Montana one of the reddest of the red states populated by rugged individuals who cherish their liberty more than their lives? Where did that post come from? The Onion?

Here Are My InterNet Accounts +1, Informative (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28377793)

Name: Philboyd Studge

Organization: NRA ( National Rifle Association)

URL: N.R.A. [nra.org]

UserId: Uzziowner

Password: SportsmanNumber1

Notes: Buy more ammo for protection from Communists, Russkies, and DemocRATS.

I hope this helps stops the pinko commie DemocRATS.

Yours In War
Kilgore Trout [youtube.com]

just give them a link to the url that has (1)

TheGratefulNet (143330) | more than 5 years ago | (#28377799)

that nasty image of:

"two applicants, one job"

or, something like that. I might have gotton some of the words wrong.

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