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Intel Demos Wireless "Resonant" Recharging

timothy posted more than 4 years ago | from the really-strikes-a-chord dept.

Power 184

Al writes "Last Thursday researchers from Intel demonstrated a way to recharge electronics from about meter away using a 'resonant' magnetic field. At an event held at the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, the researchers showed off a pair of iPod speakers connected to a 30-centimeter-wide copper coil that received power from a similar, but larger, copper coil about a meter away. The recharging technique relies on a phenomenon called resonant coupling, in which objects can exchange energy when tuned to resonate at the same frequency. A similar approach was developed by researchers at MIT in 2007, and spun off into a company called WiTricity. This company has already developed a few products that use resonant coupling to recharge, including a car battery."

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184 comments

Pacemakers? (2, Interesting)

sexconker (1179573) | more than 4 years ago | (#28425023)

Pacemakers lol?

Seriously, this is nothing more than a simple application of a simple science experiment.

Wireless fields / broadcasts are a joke, and until we change the laws of physics, always will be. (Directed transmissions are not a joke.)

Re:Pacemakers? (2, Insightful)

Culture20 (968837) | more than 4 years ago | (#28425091)

You jest, but charging pacemakers or other internal devices would be almost the only practical use for this technique.

Re:Pacemakers? (1, Troll)

ShieldW0lf (601553) | more than 4 years ago | (#28425351)

Didn't Tesla figure this stuff out decades ago, before the US government seized all his research?

Re:Pacemakers? (1)

draggie3k (1187915) | more than 4 years ago | (#28425523)

You jest, but charging pacemakers or other internal devices would be almost the only practical use for this technique.

i wonder if grandpa with a 30cm copper coil attached to his body would serve as a lightning rod...

Re:Pacemakers? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28425781)

According to mythbusters, you pretty much have to put a door knob on your face before it makes a difference for lightning.

Re:Pacemakers? (1)

Culture20 (968837) | more than 4 years ago | (#28426275)

You jest, but charging pacemakers or other internal devices would be almost the only practical use for this technique.

WTF? How is this a Troll? Wireless power loses energy, so the only places it makes sense are were wires can't go or batteries can't easily be replaced. ie In The Human Body. If you're going to moderate, think a little before applying -1 Troll or -1 Flamebait.

Re:Pacemakers? (3, Insightful)

vertinox (846076) | more than 4 years ago | (#28425135)

Pacemakers lol?

If you think replacing a battery on an iPhone is hard, try replacing your own pacemaker battery.

Re:Pacemakers? (1)

sexconker (1179573) | more than 4 years ago | (#28425867)

You jest, but it's actually easier than an iPod.

Pacemaker people often get leads for recharging, or an easy-access flap for replacement. You can even charge through the skin.

Re:Pacemakers? (2, Interesting)

rsmits (962410) | more than 4 years ago | (#28425697)

Pacemakers lol?

Seriously, this is nothing more than a simple application of a simple science experiment.

Wireless fields / broadcasts are a joke, and until we change the laws of physics, always will be. (Directed transmissions are not a joke.)

I was doing this as a kid in the sixties with a one transistor radio powered by rf from the local broadcast station. The radio had two tuned circuits - one for receiving power, one for tuning to the station. It's exactly the same principle used here. So now we get thousands of new sources of radio frequency interference from these chargers! Thanks a lot.

Re:Pacemakers? (1)

Bigjeff5 (1143585) | more than 4 years ago | (#28426215)

Yeah, this is only a million times more efficient. This operates at the Watt level, not the MegaWatt level. It took massive amounts of energy to just barely power a device that uses far less energy than an iPod in your case.

Also, regarding the radio polution, these resonance devices operate at very high frequencies, and as a radio afficianado you must know, higher frequencies mean less distance and less substantial objects can block the signal. Furthermore, differing frequencies don't interact with one another, and the required tuning for higher frequency devices is much higher than low frequency devices. Chances are the EM waves for this device couldn't leave a room or penetrate the skin.

Re:Pacemakers? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28425925)

Yeeehhaaaawww!!! My fucking ass is on fire, ya'll! Mother fucking hot wings messin' with ma hemorrhoids again

Intel expects this technology will be a hard sell (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28425059)

As everyone's credit cards were erased during the demo.

They did expect users with paper currency and PMs would be more open to purchase.

Oh this is going to look cool (4, Funny)

ColdWetDog (752185) | more than 4 years ago | (#28425071)

At an event held at the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, the researchers showed off a pair of iPod speakers connected to a 30-centimeter-wide copper coil that received power from a similar, but larger, copper coil about a meter away.

I'm having a little trouble here with the concept. Instead of small white box plugged into the wall we have these freaking huge copper wires running in circles everywhere. Just doesn't jibe with the trendy iPod image.

Can you imagine a Beowulf cluster of these things?

Re:Oh this is going to look cool (4, Funny)

vertinox (846076) | more than 4 years ago | (#28425199)

Just paint the copper wires white.

Re:Oh this is going to look cool (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28425979)

And charge a lot for them to offset your ad campaign costs in which hipsters mock plugs.

Re:Oh this is going to look cool (1)

Hurricane78 (562437) | more than 4 years ago | (#28426611)

Well, I think being fryed (a little, or a little more) when standing in-between the devices, also does not "jibe" that much...

Try to put them anywhere near me, and I will sue you to hell and back. ^^

Re:Oh this is going to look cool (2, Insightful)

dontmakemethink (1186169) | more than 4 years ago | (#28426753)

Not only is it completely impractical, not only it is not original, another much more practical contact-free charging method has been in widespread use for over 10 years. Inductance charging is reasonably efficient and very handy for waterproofing rechargeable devices, like my Panasonic shaver [thegourmetdepotco.com] (link to charger image). Not nearly the range of "resonant charging", but all the other advantages apply, and no tumors or pacemaker failures.

Dumb question... (2, Interesting)

DoofusOfDeath (636671) | more than 4 years ago | (#28425083)

Isn't resonant vibration the way tons of energy transfers occur, including plain old radio communication?

What makes this so novel?

Re:Dumb question... (1)

Steegest (1317083) | more than 4 years ago | (#28425137)

Lazy people can be even lazier? I.E. no more bending over to reach that last inconvieniently placed outlet...

Re:Dumb question... (2, Interesting)

neomunk (913773) | more than 4 years ago | (#28425255)

80% power efficiency.
 

Re:Dumb question... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28425451)

"80 percent efficiency within a range of about a meter"
My power cord is longer...

Re:Dumb question... (1)

2gravey (959785) | more than 4 years ago | (#28426061)

and it's 100% efficient!

Re:Dumb question... (1)

Emb3rz (1210286) | more than 4 years ago | (#28426209)

I'm not educated in the ways of electricity, so I don't know which one of these contradicts you, but I'll let someone smarter than me pick:

  • Impedance
  • Resistance

Either way, it most certainly is NOT 100% efficient.

Re:Dumb question... (1)

BeardedChimp (1416531) | more than 4 years ago | (#28425455)

Electromagnetic induction is the way 'tons' of energy transfers. It is also how transformers work but it is only efficient at short range.

This application is different in that it makes use of resonance to overcome these shortcomings. From wikipedia: [wikipedia.org]
"resonance comes in and helps efficiency dramatically by "tunneling" the magnetic field to a receiver coil that resonates at the same frequency. If resonant coupling is used, where inductors are tuned to a mutual frequency and the input current is modified from a sinusoidal into a rectangular or transient waveform, significant power may be transmitted over a range of many meters."

power consumption (4, Interesting)

mehrotra.akash (1539473) | more than 4 years ago | (#28425107)

what is the power consumption of the transmitting coil when there is no load coil, also, does the power consumption increase or decrease based on the number of receiving coils??

and, what happens if you place a HDD, or your phone contains a HDD and is charged using this method, wont the magnetic field damage the magnetic media??

similarly, magnetic fields can mess up CRT's, try taking a magnet to a CRT screen..

Re:power consumption (1)

vintagepc (1388833) | more than 4 years ago | (#28425161)

Nah... If you get distortion problems it just means your CRT is incompatible with the new technology (That was meant jokingly, but I suppose it applies literally too!). You'd have to take it in to a repair center where they replace it with a brand-new LCD for twice the cost of the in-store model.
Same with HDDs -->SSDs. I sense a business opportunity here :)

Re:power consumption (1)

MBGMorden (803437) | more than 4 years ago | (#28425429)

Well, in reality CRT's are pretty much on their way out these days. Sure there are some uses for them, but they're somewhat specialized now. I haven't seen a CRT monitor on a store shelf in years. If you go to an online retailer they might have a FEW of them (Newegg currently lists ONE CRT monitor and 215 LCD monitors) but at roughly equivalent prices to LCD's (and any minor price advantage is usually offset by a higher shipping cost). The ones that ARE still out there working for regular home use have a limited lifespan.

As noted CRT's on retails shelves are all but gone. In 8-10 years I'd guess that they'll be exceedingly rare in home settings at all. And realistically, I don't think any holdout with a 10-15 year old CRT still chugging along is going to be an early adopter in line for wireless recharging technologies . . .

Re:power consumption (2, Insightful)

Hurricane78 (562437) | more than 4 years ago | (#28426869)

And what about humans.

You know that our brain and nerves work electromagnetically, and many processes in our body do not expect a strong magnetic field on the outside.

A weak field, OK. But a strong one will be bad. So the question is: How strong is still OK, and is the one who defines this trustworthy?

Re:power consumption (1)

Celeste R (1002377) | more than 4 years ago | (#28425707)

you're surrounded by magnetic fields, whether it's from the power wiring in the house you live in or your wifi access point.

I'm guessing that the most significant reason why they have antennas that size is because they're trying to -not- have it interfere with things (well, your old microwave will still do that, but you can't do too much about that aside from replace it).

The threat from magnetic fields comes from strong magnetic fields (it polarizes the atoms). This is why magnets around CRTs is a bad idea, but that being said, it takes a SIGNIFICANT amount of power to make an amagnetic object behave in a magnetic fashion.

Re:power consumption (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28425849)

isnt wifi on electrical field, not magnetic??

Re:power consumption (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28426885)

It's electromagnetic. So technically it's both.

Re:power consumption (1)

ckthorp (1255134) | more than 4 years ago | (#28426521)

The magnetic coercion of a hard drive is so high that I doubt that these coils could cause the media to be damaged. However, the extra EMI might just make the logic circuits fail.

Re:power consumption (1)

mehrotra.akash (1539473) | more than 4 years ago | (#28426703)

never tried it with a hard disk, but a small set of 2.1 speakers has caused me to lose a lot of data from floppy disks

This story resonates with me (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28425119)

I get a real charge out of it.

Nicola Tesla (2, Funny)

FudRucker (866063) | more than 4 years ago | (#28425125)

i always wondered what that coil was for
NicolaTesla [teslasociety.com]
he was recharging his ipod!!!

Re:Nicola Tesla (0, Troll)

theverylastperson (1208224) | more than 4 years ago | (#28425205)

Thank You! I bet my buddy here that someone in the first 10 comments would mention Tesla.
Of course he still thinks we're talking about music.

Re:Nicola Tesla (1)

dyingtolive (1393037) | more than 4 years ago | (#28426749)

There is a lot of places in here where people mentioning Tesla are getting modded into the dirt. Is there some Edison fanatic out there with mod points today or is there something I'm missing? Genuinely asking.

Already have wireless power.... (3, Interesting)

Itninja (937614) | more than 4 years ago | (#28425171)

....it's called 'using batteries'. With a 3 meter range and relatively huge copper coils involved, how is this better that using batteries? Most devices use a transformer to customize the input for the device. With wireless power, would each device need some kind of special wireless receiver/transformer? And this would be better how?

Re:Already have wireless power.... (4, Insightful)

MBGMorden (803437) | more than 4 years ago | (#28425279)

Um, this wasn't touted as a replacement for batteries. It was touted as a replacement for charging cables. IE, when I get home I throw my cell phone on the desk and it starts charging, rather than having to plug it into a cord.

Personally, I CAN see some benefit to that concept. Not the least of which is that I just plain forgot to plug in my phone sometimes, but I ALWAYS sit it on the desk when I get home. It would also just clear up some of the clutter (I'm up to 4 different cables sitting on my desk now - a generic USB extension, a mini-USB connector, a cell phone charger, and an iPod connector).

That said, every wireless power transmission scheme I've seen was EXTREMELY inefficient. Unless the technology could be made to work in the same ballpark efficiency as our current wired methods, I just don't see it as a good long term solution. If it was just a case though of "Yeah, we figured it out. Want one?" though then I'd be first in line.

Re:Already have wireless power.... (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28425547)

The receiving end of this arrangement is a 12 inch copper coil. Unless your phone and iPod are fucking enormous, you'll still have to plug them into something. And you'll still have a tangle of wires bearing incompatible connectors.

In other words, this "invention" is no more useful than a wire, but loses 20% of your power and takes up a shitload of space in your room. Count me out.

Re:Already have wireless power.... (1)

lobiusmoop (305328) | more than 4 years ago | (#28425739)

They are using a 7Mhz transmission for the power, so the receiver antenna needs to be roughly 10m long [hottconsultants.com] (1/4 wavelength). If they cranked up the frequency into the gigahertz range it would allow for a smaller receiver, but lower efficiency I guess.

Re:Already have wireless power.... (1)

FudRucker (866063) | more than 4 years ago | (#28425889)

7Mhz, hmm i wonder what sort of mess this makes on the 40 & 71 meter HF band?

Re:Already have wireless power.... (3, Insightful)

lobiusmoop (305328) | more than 4 years ago | (#28426115)

FTFA:
"the type of radiation shared between the two coils is nonradiative,"

which I take to mean 'no more than a few Watts of power are involved', which is fine for mobile phones and the like I suppose.

Re:Already have wireless power.... (1)

SparkEE (954461) | more than 4 years ago | (#28425985)

Well then, screw mobile device. How about using this to recharge electric vehicles? A 12-inch coil is no big deal in an automobile. I could see this being useful in something like the Volt or Circuit. You could install the larger coil at home and recharge your car without having to hook up a cable. It would be great for people without the luxury of a garage, and could mitigate the risks of a high power cable laying around outside all day.

Even better, business could install the large coils and have special parking spaces that recharge the employees' or customers' cars during the day.

Re:Already have wireless power.... (1)

DragonWriter (970822) | more than 4 years ago | (#28426241)

Well then, screw mobile device. How about using this to recharge electric vehicles? A 12-inch coil is no big deal in an automobile.

I expect that you will want to transfer energy more rapidly to your car than enough to power a single speaker. For more power at similar range, you will probably need a bigger antenna.

(And 20% power loss from transmitter to receiver is pretty horrible efficiency.)

It would be great for people without the luxury of a garage, and could mitigate the risks of a high power cable laying around outside all day.

So could a having a cable with a a cable reel and a fixed, locked cabinet, which would also give you a lot better transfer efficiency and capacity than this seems to offer.

Re:Already have wireless power.... (1)

SparkEE (954461) | more than 4 years ago | (#28426527)

I expect that you will want to transfer energy more rapidly to your car than enough to power a single speaker. For more power at similar range, you will probably need a bigger antenna.

(And 20% power loss from transmitter to receiver is pretty horrible efficiency.)

Quite true, but I personally have no idea how this technology scales. I wouldn't automatically assume that the antenna size needs to grow with power throughput. If I were to assume anything, I would assume antenna size is a function of the frequency being used. Perhaps that frequency is a function of power throughput though.

So could a having a cable with a a cable reel and a fixed, locked cabinet, which would also give you a lot better transfer efficiency and capacity than this seems to offer.

Yes, that's also true. However, I personally think that anything that would make plug-in electrics more convenient would help the adoption rate, and thus is worth investigating. I don't think many people really welcome the idea of having to wind up the cable from the car when it's pouring rain and/or they're running late for work.

Re:Already have wireless power.... (1, Funny)

Culture20 (968837) | more than 4 years ago | (#28425347)

Because now I can wardrive for power. Or, maybe I could drive a bumper-car on a road filled with these things.

Re:Already have wireless power.... (1)

Culture20 (968837) | more than 4 years ago | (#28426413)

Because now I can wardrive for power. Or, maybe I could drive a bumper-car on a road filled with these things.

Again... Wasn't trying to troll. I was joking about the wardriving for power, but I was serious about the road. People have been complaining about batteries in electric cars, and alternatives like cable-cars leave power lines dangling all over the road. Wirelessly powered mini-cars might be a good option.

Re:Already have wireless power.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28425401)

Lots of uses for this kind of technology. A single charing station you can set devices on to recharge, no cables involved, would be quite useful and is certainly possible. Cell phones, cameras, iPods, smart devices of many different types could be very conveniently recharged.

Of course, I'd still rather see this kind of technology used for wirelessly powering vehicles, rather than charging our iPods... All in good time I suppose. Good to see more of Tesla's experiments put into practice.

Re:Already have wireless power.... (1)

petershank (463008) | more than 4 years ago | (#28426121)

....it's called 'using batteries'

With this form of wireless power, you don't have to remember to replace the batteries, and you don't have to interrupt the device from working while the batteries are being replaced.

....With wireless power, would each device need some kind of special wireless receiver/transformer?

Yes, just like wireless phones, which each need a special wireless receiver/transformer.

Re:Already have wireless power.... (1)

nine-times (778537) | more than 4 years ago | (#28426133)

It's not a replacement for batteries, it's a replacement for cables. Right now, even battery-powered devices need cables once the charge in the battery is used up. I'd love wireless power, to be able to ditch the rat's nest of cables I have everywhere going to every appliance and device. Unfortunately, I would guess that wireless power technologies would generally be (a) inefficient; (b) unreliable; (c) dangerous; or (d) some combination of the above.

Re:Already have wireless power.... (1)

Chyeld (713439) | more than 4 years ago | (#28426171)

SAMPLE APPLICATION:

So when I get home today, I have a 'recharging' station where everything from my Wiimotes to my iPod get set so they can be plugged in and recharged. Each item has its own charger, with accompanying wall wart, and its own cord. I've attempted, in the past, to come up with 'stylist' ways over hiding this mess. LifeHacker had has many articles on building 'pretty' recharging stations, but nothing I've tried comes close to looking like anything more than a high tech tentacle monster attempting to rape my desk.

Cue this setup, which in the far future when everyone stops screwing around with proprietary recharging schemes, where I could have the coils hidden in a compartment in the desk and simply have to place all the devices requiring recharging on top of it. No more playing musical outlets to manage all the wall warts, no more tentacle monster.

Just a desk with a bunch of devices tossed on top.

        Now that's just the first thing I can think of off the top of my head. But there are all sorts of uses for a cordless method of supplying power within a yard radius. Any wireless device out there that is meant to be used in a fairly stationary location could benefit from this tech. Instead of batteries, outfit a house with strategically placed coils within the walls, the same way we do with outlets today. Now, anywhere you go inside the house is automatically powered. Of course, in that instance, you probably want to make sure you have the circuitry in place to 'cut' the power to the coils till there is a device to pull a load from, but these are things that are fairly easy to work out these days.

Do I see this as something that will actually happen in the near future? No. This new twist on the tech is an interesting one, but we've known in theory about this sort of thing for a long time now and people just don't trust 'power in the air'. Just think how paranoid the "don't live near high voltage lines" people would be over this sort of thing. But that doesn't negate what is being done, it just means that I imagine the tech will be matured far far earlier than the society it is meant for.

Test for other sources (4, Funny)

Lev13than (581686) | more than 4 years ago | (#28425183)

Did they ensure that the iPod speakers were properly shielded against RDF interference? Now that Jobs is getting his strength back, I fully expect that Apple devices will discard with batteries completely and just feed off his sheer willpower.

Efficiency? (3, Insightful)

juanergie (909157) | more than 4 years ago | (#28425303)

Anybody familiar with the efficiency of this process? What fraction of the wattage is lost during transfer?

Re:Efficiency? (0, Troll)

Darkness404 (1287218) | more than 4 years ago | (#28425619)

I love it how some mod managed to moderate about 50% of the comments here trolls... Including this one which actually isn't a troll.

We owe thanks to.... (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28425311)

Nikola Tesla and that crazy discovery of wireless energy transfer. Next time you power up your gizmo (via AC to DC conversion) raise a glass to the man who started it all!

Wasted Energy (3, Interesting)

wjousts (1529427) | more than 4 years ago | (#28425365)

So in this era of concern about energy supplies, we have a new way to charge our phones that is less efficient and will waste a ton of energy. But at least we won't trip over any cables.

Re:Wasted Energy (1)

twistedsymphony (956982) | more than 4 years ago | (#28426081)

how much energy are we saving by not manufacturing and eventually disposing of those cables?

Also keep in mind that it's 80% efficiency at distance, I'm sure it's higher at close range (eg: a charge plate on your night stand that your phone sits pretty much directly on) and once the technology is being mass produced, just like every other product on the planet improvements will be made to improve it's efficiency over time.

just because it's not perfect RIGHT NOW doesn't mean it wont be, but making it RIGHT NOW will often allow us to reach that pay-off point sooner. I also see this tech being beneficial for other applications... like putting a solar panel on on the roof of my garage and using this tech to charge the battery of my electric vehicle by simply parking in said garage.

Re:Wasted Energy (1)

wjousts (1529427) | more than 4 years ago | (#28426757)

Well, that's a fair point on manufacture and eventual disposal of cables, but those are one time charges, so the whether or not it balances out in the end will depend on the lifetime of the device in question, something that is disturbingly short in many devices. Probably a far more efficient solution would be standards for chargers so that you don't need a new charger for every device.

The fact is that this will never be as efficient as using a cable unless you can change the laws of physics. It'll have some applications, medical devices come to mind and I like your solar garage idea, but in general I think it's a bit of a non-starter unless you have plenty of clean energy to waste.

Similar technology already in Wacom tablets (1)

Captain Spam (66120) | more than 4 years ago | (#28425397)

Isn't resonant coupling what Wacom tablets use to both power and communicate with their styluses and pucks (kinda-sorta tablet mice)? I know it's not technically "charging" either of them, per se, but it IS powering them, and it's done by resonance coupling.

Good luck with the FCC (1)

odin84gk (1162545) | more than 4 years ago | (#28425497)

7MHz? Good luck getting that through the FCC regulations on radiated emissions, not to mention all of those HAM operators. However, if they do achieve 80% efficiency then I will wish them the best of luck.

Re:Good luck with the FCC (1)

moon3 (1530265) | more than 4 years ago | (#28426253)

Exactly, they achieved to build very powerful emitter, something that FCC is looking for like hawks to weed out from any consumer electronics.

useful, but dangerous (2, Funny)

Vanderhoth (1582661) | more than 4 years ago | (#28425517)

I read about this sort of thing awhile ago. http://www.pwrmat.com/ [pwrmat.com] There would be some nifty applications, you could build this sort of power distribution system into a wall. Then you just have to be within the proximity of the distributor. It would primarily be a convince/lazy thing, but at least you wouldn't have to worry about your kid putting a fork in a wall socket. Then again by doing that you could be removing a natural selection factor and end up with even more stupid people that otherwise would have been electrocuted and taken out of the gene pool.

Re:useful, but dangerous (1)

vlm (69642) | more than 4 years ago | (#28426879)

at least you wouldn't have to worry about your kid putting a fork in a wall socket.

Adding up all my wireless devices, a hundred watts delivered might be a power level that would be useful to me. Less than that, don't bother, more than that... read on for why that would be bad.

So, at 20% efficient, my 100 watts delivered, dissipates 400 watts into heat. I'm guessing a surface area of a square foot or so. It'll be a nice space heater on 24 hours a day. Not so bad in northern climates in the winter. Not so good in the summer. A couple hundred watts with no ventilation, lay some papers on it, maybe not hot enough to ignite the paper, but easily hot enough to melt xerox/laserprinter toner.

I would worry a lot more about my wedding ring acting as a single turn transformer secondary. Lets figure it would adsorb the full power level. The effect on my finger would be roughly like, touch skin w/ 100 watt soldering gun and pull trigger. In other words, if I move my hand quickly to place and remove my recharging devices, in less than a second, it will be uncomfortable but no damage due to thermal mass if starting from body temperature. But, hold my finger there for ten seconds, serious burn damage, hold my hand there a minute and its definitely emergency room time/burn clean off. Also for a good time toss my round key ring on the table next to my phone, I estimate red hot in about 20 seconds if I guessed an appropriate wire gauge equivalent for my keyring's ring...

Nothing new (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28425551)

This is nothing new, "1894: Nikola Tesla wirelessly lights up vacuum tubes"

We need a standard for this (3, Insightful)

Animats (122034) | more than 4 years ago | (#28425561)

There are at least four schemes for short-range wireless power transmission around. This needs to be standardized so it can be deployed.

The very short range ones, which couple a tabletop pad to a device on it, would be most useful. All the little stuff that needs recharging should be on the same system, with recharging pads in bedroom, office, hotel room, car, airline tray table, Starbucks, etc. Unless the players get together and agree on a standard, this is going nowhere.

Troll Explosion (0, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28425579)

Why are there so many replies in this topic modded as "Troll"? Even ones that clearly are not trolls. Is someone trolling the mod system?

Re:Troll Explosion (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28425649)

I blew the last 4 of my mod points to correct some more egregious troll-marking.

Dang! (1)

NES HQ (1558029) | more than 4 years ago | (#28425595)

I guess we're going to have to stop using those 'wireless power' jokes that pop up whenever we come across equipment that's been unplugged!

Intel demonstrates wireless power for the home (0, Offtopic)

David Gerard (12369) | more than 4 years ago | (#28425625)

A future without batteries -- no need to charge phones or MP3 players, or even electric cars. No lost phone chargers, no running out of power sockets. Intel chief technology officer Justin Rattner demonstrated a Wireless Energy Resonant Link [today.com] as he spoke at the annual Intel developers forum in San Francisco yesterday.

Rattner demonstrated this by causing his ears to light up at 60 watts of power a yard from a power transmitter operated by his assistant Igor. Only four journalists were incinerated when the power earthed through them from his fingertips.

Rattner reassured us that pumping kilowatts of power around the home through magnetic induction power is absolutely harmless. "The human body is not affected by magnetic fields," he said as one journalist with a pacemaker collapsed and another with a knee replacement watched his leg catch fire. "There's no danger whatsoever from it, any more than there is from mobile phones cooking your brain, microwave leakage blinding you, chemical waste unraveling all the DNA in your balls or statistical clusters of kids with cancer wherever high-tension power lines run overhead. Asbestos and thalidomide were horribly slandered in their day too."

"Of course, Nikola Tesla did it first in 1899," said enthusiast Albert Tedious-Anorak, 54, of Little Boring. "I detailed this at length on Wikipedia, but they refused to believe the value of my revelations on this matter due to a conspiracy of Edison fans amongst the site administrators."

WTF? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28425669)

Why so many troll mods?

Here's a troll:

Seit einigen Jahren wird das GeschÃfft mit dem illegalen Welpenhandel unaufhÃfrlich grÃfsser, und damit steigt natÃf¼rlich auch das Tierleid. Der Grund warum das GeschÃfft so gut lÃfuft, ist vor allem mangelnde AufklÃfrung, unwissende HundekÃfufer, und Menschen die aus Mitleid kaufen. Welches Leid sie damit unterstÃf¼tzen wissen beim Kauf aber die wenigsten. Viele wollen Geld sparen und glauben einen Rassehund fÃf¼r sehr wenig Geld kaufen zu kÃfnnen. Andere sind schlicht nicht informiert wie ein seriÃfser ZÃf¼chter aussieht oder welchen Preis ein Rassehund normalerweise hat. Angeboten werden hauptsÃfchlich kleine Modehunde wie Chihuahuas oder FranzÃfsische Bulldoggen aber auch Retriever und so ziemlich jede andere Rasse. Die meisten kommen aus LÃfndern in Osteuropa und haben schon sehr lange Fahrten in winzigen Boxen hinter sich, viele Hunde sind so geschwÃfcht das sie schon die Fahrt nicht Ãf¼berstehen. Angeboten werden sie neben dem Internet auch auf WochenmÃfrkten oder direkt aus dem Auto heraus auf AutobahnrastplÃftzen. Die Welpen sind oft schwer krank, viele von ihnen erreichen trotz tierÃfrztlicher Versorgung nicht mal das 1. Lebensjahr. Sie sind weder geimpft noch in irgendeiner Weise gesundheitlich untersucht worden. Die Elterntiere werden einfach wild und ohne Verstand miteinander verpaart und nicht auf Krankheiten untersucht. Ungeimpfte Welpen die nach Deutschland oder Ãf-sterreich gebracht werden schleppen immer hÃfufiger gefÃfhrliche Krankheiten wie Parvovirose ein. Die Welpen wachsen unter sehr reizarmen und schlechten Bedingungen auf, eine gute Sozialisation ist so nicht mÃfglich. So lange es Menschen gibt die dort einen Welpen kaufen, sei es auch aus Mitleid, so lange werden diese HÃfndler ihre Hunde anbieten. Neben den HÃfndlern und Vermehrern gibt es aber auch noch BetrÃf¼ger vor denen man sich in acht nehmen sollte. Auch wenn der Betrug in den meisten FÃfllen mehr als offensichtlich ist, fallen immer noch tÃfglich genÃf¼gend Leute auf diese Masche hinein. Vor allem in Online TiermÃfrkten bieten dubiose HÃfndler aus Kamerun billige Welpen an, die direkt bis vor die HaustÃf¼r geliefert werden sollen. SpÃftestens jetzt sollten die Alarmglocken lÃfuten! Denn schon allein der Transport dieser Welpen per Schiff und Flugzeug wÃf¼rde den Kaufpreis WEIT Ãf¼bersteigen. Der Welpe soll nach Deutschland transportiert werden, Abholung am Flughafen manchmal wird auch angeboten den Welpen bis vor die TÃf¼r zu bringen. Das Geld fÃf¼r den Welpen muss man im Voraus bezahlen, das Geld ist natÃf¼rlich weg und einen Welpen gibt es auch nicht. Was macht einen guten ZÃf¼chter aus? Ein seriÃfser ZÃf¼chter: - zÃf¼chtet nur eine Rasse, allerhÃfchstens zwei - hat nur wenige Zuchttiere (1-2 HÃf¼ndinnen) - kann Sie ausreichend Ãf¼ber die Eigenschaften und Besonderheiten ÃzseinerÃoe Rasse informieren und steht ihnen auch nach dem Kauf mit Rat und Tat zur Seite http://www.zoopet.de/ [zoopet.de] [zoopet.de] - versucht nicht Ihnen einen Welpen ÃzaufzuschwatzenÃoe - erkundigt sich nach dem zukÃf¼nftigen LebensumstÃfnden des Welpen (Platz, Zeit usw.) - die HÃf¼ndin wirft hÃfchstens 1 mal im Jahr, es wird ihr genug Zeit gelassen sich zu erholen - die ZuchthÃf¼ndin wurde nicht vor der zweiten LÃfufigkeit gedeckt und ist nicht Ãflter als 8 Jahre - Elterntiere wurden auf rassetypische Krankheiten untersucht und sind vollkommen gesund - die Welpen werden nicht vor der 8. Woche abgegeben - man kann die MutterhÃf¼ndin mit ihren Welpen und andere beim ZÃf¼chter lebende Hunde, sowie das Lebensumfeld der Hunde betrachten (manchmal hat man auch die MÃfglichkeit den Vater der Welpen kennen zu lernen, wenn nicht sollte man wenigstens Fotos zu sehen bekommen) - Die Wurfkiste/das Welpenzimmer ist sauber - Die Welpen sind aufgeschlossen und neugierig - Besuche sind erwÃf¼nscht (meist erst ab der 3. Woche) - Die Welpen werden bestens geprÃfgt und sozialisiert (verschiedenstes Spielzeug, kennenlernen verschiedenster GerÃfusche, GegenstÃfnde, Menschen, Tiere usw.) - Die Welpen und die Zuchttiere sollten einen gesunden Eindruck machen - Die Welpen werden alle geimpft, mehrfach entwurmt und haben ein Gesundheitszeugnis - Welpen sind entweder durch einen Chip oder einer TÃftowierung gekennzeichnet -> Quelle: www.hundeseite.de

Powercast released wireless power products in 2007 (1)

TheNarrator (200498) | more than 4 years ago | (#28425743)

http://www.powercastco.com/ [powercastco.com]

True Wireless Power

Powercast recognizes there are several alternatives available for powering devices without the use of wires, each with different addressable markets. The alternative methods may seem similar on the surface, however, they offer limited solutions. Powercast is the only company with the technology and component-level products to deliver continuous charging, and provide its capability at a scalable distance.

They even won a best of CES 2007 award from CNET:

http://reviews.cnet.com/8301-12760_7-9673092-5.html [cnet.com]

They released working wirelessly powered Christmas tree lights in December 2007 as a consumer product!

http://news.cnet.com/8301-17938_105-9793204-1.html [cnet.com]

Stuff like this comes up all the time but disappears down the memory hole very shortly thereafter.

Hippies afraid of brain tumors will get this banne (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28425795)

They already afraid of Cellphones

Tesla would be proud. (2, Funny)

Kotoku (1531373) | more than 4 years ago | (#28425823)

Tesla would be so proud, many years later we are finally honing and putting to use technology that was before it's time.

I see a lot of... (1)

seramar (655396) | more than 4 years ago | (#28425895)

I see a lot of you saying things like, "big deal," "this idea sucks," "just use batteries," etc. As though the current implementation is the final version of this technology. I'm surprised that, on /. of all places, you guys aren't thrilled that this implies in the near future you won't even notice this technology... it ought to just work. Instead you're all bashing it and claiming it's a bad/stupid idea and implying they ought to just scrap the whole project. I say - keep working on it, no matter how ugly those coils are, because I know sooner or later, I won't even see the coils anymore.

New Palm Pre does this now (1)

Dcnjoe60 (682885) | more than 4 years ago | (#28425935)

The New Palm Pre does this now, just not across a large distance. The Pre has the alternate charger that you just place your Pre on (no wires to hook up or plug in to the Pre itself) and it charges through the back of the phone. Pretty cool, actually.

Samer Theory? (1)

kenp2002 (545495) | more than 4 years ago | (#28425989)

As a long time listener of Garage Logic on AM1500 (I only had AM in my car growing up, go fig) they frequently refer to a guy named Samer (sp?). He had a theory that the reason people, as a whole, have lost it, is that all the electromagnetic noise and radiation we have created litterally is frying out brain's ability to function normally.

With all this talk about wireless charging and what I see in the world, I am starting to wonder if this Samer theory has legs... and if so what are the implications on humans?

We know power lines can confuse cows internal compass. We've seen radar stations toss migratory birds a curve ball. What are the larger implications on humans since we've never really looked into how much all that 'noise' effects us.

Simply ask yourself this: You are in a room with 5 people in silence. Any stress? Ok now as the noise increases, does the stress? Now ask this: what about all the noise you don't perceive but still might pick up... is this going to be just more noise and if so what are the implications if we assume the Samer theory has some validity.

Induction FTW (1)

jtownatpunk.net (245670) | more than 4 years ago | (#28426055)

When I was a kid, I had an electric toothbrush that charged via induction. Not the same thing this article is about but it seemed like magic at the time. Set the plastic toothbrush in its plastic base with no metallic contacts on either and it would charge. I was just a kid but even I knew you needed conductive material to conduct electricity and plastic wasn't conductive. (I thought my grandpa was pulling my leg and taking the battery out and charging it at night while I was asleep.)

got your crowbar ready? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28426089)

I hope nobody throws a bunch of these off a cliff.

It could cause a resonance cascade.

No real porn use, so it's on to advertising (1)

Anti_Climax (447121) | more than 4 years ago | (#28426137)

Make it cheap enough and combine this with cheap electronic paper and we could have store aisles stocked with animated labels on anything big enough to carry a receiving antenna.

If you think walking with your child down the gauntlet that is the cereal aisle is bad now...

charging dish (1)

wren337 (182018) | more than 4 years ago | (#28426167)

I can imagine a dish or plate on top of your dresser where you can throw your ipod, phone etc at night and it charges without having to plug it in.

Begining baby steps of a new technology. (1)

ACMENEWSLLC (940904) | more than 4 years ago | (#28426201)

So here is what I imagine. You know how a generator works, right? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electrical_generator [wikipedia.org] Spinning copper wire around a shaft generating a current. And something has to spin the shaft.

With this, the idea is that the generator is something resonating. e.g. It is just moving back and forth. So you make these very small, and put them inline with a battery. If you come within a resonate field, your batteries are automatically charged.

There is a lot of waste. It's never going to be as energy efficient to plug one of field generators into a wall to charge up, versus an electrical cord. However, what if you use other power sources? Solar for example. Plug in a resonate field generator into a solar source, and have it generate this field all day long. You come home, leave your cell phone and Laptop unused on your desk, and by morning it is charged. That's the idea, at least. Baby first steps.

Nothing new here (3, Informative)

kpainter (901021) | more than 4 years ago | (#28426233)

A company I worked for was charging the batteries in medical implants in this manner 10 years ago. In fact, the implant's charge coil is inside its Titanium case. The magnetic field goes right through the case. The charger had a class E amplifier. It worked very well. I would not doubt if this company already has a patent on this technique.

Re:Nothing new here (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28426667)

Of course there is nothing new here. Nicola Tesla was doing this stuff like 100 years ago.

http://www.wirelesspowerconsortium.com/technology/resonant-coupling.html

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