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A Practical Guide to Ubuntu Linux 2nd ed.

samzenpus posted more than 5 years ago | from the read-all-about-it-the-2nd-time dept.

Operating Systems 85

stoolpigeon writes "One thing I love about Linux is the rapid development and frequent updates that allow me to run the latest versions of all my favorite software packages. My favorite distributions make it simple to always have the latest and greatest. In fact, the distros themselves roll out new versions regularly, and I am always excited to see what new packages and features will be included. For book publishers this must be a little less exciting. Anything tied to a specific product that is under active development is going to quickly be behind the times. Mark Sobell's A Practical Guide to Ubuntu Linux managed to avoid the worst of this by providing a lot of information that is useful for any Linux user running any distro. But still things move forward and almost exactly a year later we have A Practical Guide to Ubuntu Linux 2nd ed. I was very pleased with the first edition and I think they've managed to really improve what was already a solid resource." Read below for the rest of JR's review.Let's kick things off with a rough diff on the two editions. There have been improvements made in content and some added tools to rapidly get at what one needs. With the size of the book and the amount covered, these rapid access improvements are significant. The inside of the cover on the second edition has a utility index, so that a reader searching for help with any specific utility can find it quickly. This is followed up with two tables of contents, one a brief summary and the second much more detailed and taking up twenty-two pages. The new edition is about sixty pages longer than the first, but is slightly thinner and shorter. It is still a beefy book, but this is a nice direction to move.

After the tables of contents there is a list of JumpStarts. These are new to the second edition. They are short guides to getting started with key clients and servers. They come at the beginning of sections that will deal with the topic in more detail, but up front the focus is just on getting things up and running. The JumpStarts cover APT, CUPS, OpenSSH, FTP, exim4, NFS, Samba, DNS, firestarter and Apache. These are nice, as often just getting things going is the biggest hurdle and fine tuning is rather easy once that is past.

Like the first edition a DVD is included. As I mentioned Linux is a quick moving target and the dvd contains Ubuntu 8.1. It can be used as a live dvd or to do an install. Last time I checked the Canonical store, this was still the most recent version available on DVD. Ubuntu and Kubuntu 9.04 are available online and on CD. I did an install from the book's dvd and the upgrade to 9.04 was completely painless. I don't really see the DVD as a necessary addition but it could be a nice plus for anyone that wants to get Ubuntu up and running but can't get the bandwidth to download it.

The section Programming the Bourne Again Shell has been removed from the Digging Into Ubuntu Linux section and placed in its own section, Programming Tools which also includes a new chapter on Perl. The chapters on Linux utilities and the Linux file system have also been extended. Coverage of ufw was added to the firewall chapter. The appendices remain the same but three new indices have been added to cover JumpStarts, the file tree and utilities. The main index is huge, offering excellent access to everything in the book. This book shows excellent forethought from start to finish aimed at making it a natural choice to grab from the shelf whenever an Ubuntu user has a question.

This did leave me wondering though, why no database server is included in the coverage. It seemed odd to cover Apache but not the rest of the LAMP stack. Installing MySQL and PHP are simple with Ubuntus package manager, but knowing the basics of caring for them is just as important as it is with Apache, which is also easy to install. I realize that the book is already large, but I'd have liked to see this included. That said, configuring services is covered and indexed in multiple places. This means if one did install MySQL, PostgreSQL or some other database and were looking for how to go about starting, stopping, etc. the information is there.

As before, this is still a nice guide to Linux in general. While it is most applicable to Ubuntu, much of the information is accurate regardless of the distro in question. The style is understandable and there are many examples with code or illustrations as appropriate. This entire book is a real boon to any neophyte that does not have a solid handle on getting their own answers. That group is the one that I think will benefit the most from A Practical Guide to Ubuntu Linux. Random access is easy, but reading cover to cover would also give one a nice foundational understanding of getting the most out of their machine and even enough guidance to get their feet wet in the sysadmin world. Anyone thrown into owning an Ubuntu server may find this to be a handy lifeline. More experienced users, even if they are moving from another distro may find that there is just too much material that they don't need and already know. This really is a basic Linux guide first and an Ubuntu book second.

I thought the first edition was a solid value and the second edition offers welcome improvements with no real missteps. That they managed to put more in, not take a lot out and get it into a smaller package is quite a plus. I don't think anyone will be throwing this in a bag and carrying it with them any time soon, but it's a great office shelf resource for a quick refresher or getting launched. This is the kind of guide that can make the difference between frustrated failure and passion for anyone just starting out with Linux.

You can purchase A Practical Guide to Ubuntu Linux 2nd ed. from amazon.com. Slashdot welcomes readers' book reviews -- to see your own review here, read the book review guidelines, then visit the submission page.

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First post! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28456641)

First post!

3 Easy Steps (0, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28456653)

1. Lower your expectations
2. ???
3. Profit!

soft (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28456715)

ubuntu is for noobs

Re:soft (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28458345)

Congratulations on your purchase of a brand new nigger! If handled properly, your nigger will give years of valuable, if reluctant, service.

INSTALLING YOUR NIGGER.

You should install your nigger differently according to whether you have purchased the field or house model. Field niggers work best in a serial configuration, i.e. chained together. Chain your nigger to another nigger immediately on unpacking it, and don't even think about taking that chain off, ever. Many niggers start singing as soon as you put a chain on them. This habit can usually be thrashed out of them if nipped in the bud. House niggers work best as standalone units, but should be hobbled or hamstrung to prevent attempts at escape. At this stage, your nigger can also be given a name. Most owners use the same names over and over, since niggers become confused by too much data. Rufus, Rastus, Remus, Toby, Carslisle, Carlton, Hey-You!-Yes-you!, Yeller, Blackstar, and Sambo are all effective names for your new buck nigger. If your nigger is a ho, it should be called Latrelle, L'Tanya, or Jemima. Some owners call their nigger hoes Latrine for a joke. Pearl, Blossom, and Ivory are also righteous names for nigger hoes. These names go straight over your nigger's head, by the way.

CONFIGURING YOUR NIGGER.

Owing to a design error, your nigger comes equipped with a tongue and vocal chords. Most niggers can master only a few basic human phrases with this apparatus - "muh dick" being the most popular. However, others make barking, yelping, yapping noises and appear to be in some pain, so you should probably call a vet and have him remove your nigger's tongue. Once de-tongued your nigger will be a lot happier - at least, you won't hear it complaining anywhere near as much. Niggers have nothing interesting to say, anyway. Many owners also castrate their niggers for health reasons (yours, mine, and that of women, not the nigger's). This is strongly recommended, and frankly, it's a mystery why this is not done on the boat

HOUSING YOUR NIGGER.

Your nigger can be accommodated in cages with stout iron bars. Make sure, however, that the bars are wide enough to push pieces of nigger food through. The rule of thumb is, four niggers per square yard of cage. So a fifteen foot by thirty foot nigger cage can accommodate two hundred niggers. You can site a nigger cage anywhere, even on soft ground. Don't worry about your nigger fashioning makeshift shovels out of odd pieces of wood and digging an escape tunnel under the bars of the cage. Niggers never invented the shovel before and they're not about to now. In any case, your nigger is certainly too lazy to attempt escape. As long as the free food holds out, your nigger is living better than it did in Africa, so it will stay put. Buck niggers and hoe niggers can be safely accommodated in the same cage, as bucks never attempt sex with black hoes.

FEEDING YOUR NIGGER.

Your Nigger likes fried chicken, corn bread, and watermelon. You should therefore give it none of these things because its lazy ass almost certainly doesn't deserve it. Instead, feed it on porridge with salt, and creek water. Your nigger will supplement its diet with whatever it finds in the fields, other niggers, etc. Experienced nigger owners sometimes push watermelon slices through the bars of the nigger cage at the end of the day as a treat, but only if all niggers have worked well and nothing has been stolen that day. Mike of the Old Ranch Plantation reports that this last one is a killer, since all niggers steal something almost every single day of their lives. He reports he doesn't have to spend much on free watermelon for his niggers as a result. You should never allow your nigger meal breaks while at work, since if it stops work for more than ten minutes it will need to be retrained. You would be surprised how long it takes to teach a nigger to pick cotton. You really would. Coffee beans? Don't ask. You have no idea.

MAKING YOUR NIGGER WORK.

Niggers are very, very averse to work of any kind. The nigger's most prominent anatomical feature, after all, its oversized buttocks, which have evolved to make it more comfortable for your nigger to sit around all day doing nothing for its entire life. Niggers are often good runners, too, to enable them to sprint quickly in the opposite direction if they see work heading their way. The solution to this is to *dupe* your nigger into working. After installation, encourage it towards the cotton field with blows of a wooden club, fence post, baseball bat, etc., and then tell it that all that cotton belongs to a white man, who won't be back until tomorrow. Your nigger will then frantically compete with the other field niggers to steal as much of that cotton as it can before the white man returns. At the end of the day, return your nigger to its cage and laugh at its stupidity, then repeat the same trick every day indefinitely. Your nigger comes equipped with the standard nigger IQ of 55 and a memory to match, so it will forget this trick overnight. Niggers can start work at around 5am. You should then return to bed and come back at around 10am. Your niggers can then work through until around 10pm or whenever the light fades.

ENTERTAINING YOUR NIGGER.

Your nigger enjoys play, like most animals, so you should play with it regularly. A happy smiling nigger works best. Games niggers enjoy include:

1) A good thrashing: every few days, take your nigger's pants down, hang it up by its heels, and have some of your other niggers thrash it with a club or whip. Your nigger will signal its intense enjoyment by shrieking and sobbing.

2) Lynch the nigger: niggers are cheap and there are millions more where yours came from. So every now and then, push the boat out a bit and lynch a nigger.

Lynchings are best done with a rope over the branch of a tree, and niggers just love to be lynched. It makes them feel special. Make your other niggers watch. They'll be so grateful, they'll work harder for a day or two (and then you can lynch another one).

3) Nigger dragging: Tie your nigger by one wrist to the tow bar on the back of suitable vehicle, then drive away at approximately 50mph. Your nigger's shrieks of enjoyment will be heard for miles. It will shriek until it falls apart. To prolong the fun for the nigger, do *NOT* drag him by his feet, as his head comes off too soon. This is painless for the nigger, but spoils the fun. Always wear a seatbelt and never exceed the speed limit.

4) Playing on the PNL: a variation on (2), except you can lynch your nigger out in the fields, thus saving work time. Niggers enjoy this game best if the PNL is operated by a man in a tall white hood.

5) Hunt the nigger: a variation of Hunt the Slipper, but played outdoors, with Dobermans. WARNING: do not let your Dobermans bite a nigger, as they are highly toxic.

DISPOSAL OF DEAD NIGGERS.

Niggers die on average at around 40, which some might say is 40 years too late, but there you go. Most people prefer their niggers dead, in fact. When yours dies, report the license number of the car that did the drive-by shooting of your nigger. The police will collect the nigger and dispose of it for you.

COMMON PROBLEMS WITH NIGGERS.

MY NIGGER IS VERY AGGRESIVE.

Have it put down, for god's sake. Who needs an uppity nigger? What are we, short of niggers or something?

MY NIGGER KEEPS RAPING WHITE WOMEN, BUT NEVER BLACK HOES.

They all do this. Shorten your nigger's chain so it can't reach any white women, and arm heavily any white women who might go near it.

WILL MY NIGGER ATTACK ME?

Not unless it outnumbers you 20 to 1, and even then, it's not likely. If niggers successfully overthrew their owners, they'd have to sort out their own food. This is probably why nigger uprisings were nonexistent (until some fool gave them rights).

MY NIGGER KEEPS BLEATING ABOUT ITS "RIGHTS" AND "RACISM".

Yeah, well, it would. Tell it to shut the fuck up.

MY NIGGER'S HIDE IS A FUNNY COLOR. WHAT IS THE CORRECT SHADE FOR A NIGGER?

A nigger's skin is actually more or less transparent. That brown color you can see is the shit your nigger is full of. This is why some models of nigger are sold as "The Shitskin".

MY NIGGER ACTS EXACTLY LIKE A NIGGER, BUT IS WHITE.

What you have there is a "wigger".

WOW! IS THAT LIKE AN ALBINO? ARE THEY RARE OR VALUABLE?

They're as common as dog shit and about as valuable. In fact, one of them was President between 1992 and 2000. Put your wigger in a cage with a few hundred genuine niggers and you'll soon find it stops acting like a nigger. However, leave it in the cage and let the niggers dispose of it.

MY NIGGER SMELLS REALLY BAD.

And you were expecting what?

MY NIGGER DISPLAYS A MASSIVE SENSE OF ENTITLEMENT.

This is normal.

SHOULD I ALLOW MY NIGGER TO FORNICATE WITH OTHER NIGGERS?

Where are we, Wonderland? You'll have a lot of trouble getting it to fornicate with *other* niggers.

WHERE CAN I BUY MYSELF A BETTER QUALITY OF NIGGER?

I don't really understand the question ("better quality of nigger"...?WTF?)

A Practical Guide to Ubuntu Linux (0, Redundant)

jo42 (227475) | more than 5 years ago | (#28456727)

Mandatory: Let me Google that for you [lmgtfy.com] ...

Re:A Practical Guide to Ubuntu Linux (2, Informative)

poetmatt (793785) | more than 5 years ago | (#28456745)

In all honestly, a lot can be learned from ubuntu by just searching through search engines.

I'd suggest dogpile as a practical engine if not google itself.

Both ways, every problem I've ever had from being a really basic ubuntu noob to being slightly more experienced (I'm far from a pro) all started with the ubuntu forums [ubuntuforums.org] .

Re:A Practical Guide to Ubuntu Linux (3, Informative)

Fozzyuw (950608) | more than 5 years ago | (#28457157)

There can be. The problem with search is knowing where to start. If you're really a beginner, that can be the "hard part".

I have the first edition of this book. I got a lot out of it. There's a LOT of information. However, I found a lot of times some rather important information, like a specific command, was just mentioned in passing, instead of being called out clearly with examples. I would have liked to have seen more with that. Otherwise, it was a good book.

Not to mention, I didn't have a web enabled computer near by to use when I was setting up Ubuntu, making the whole "google it" thing rather hard to do.

Re:A Practical Guide to Ubuntu Linux (3, Insightful)

DJRumpy (1345787) | more than 5 years ago | (#28458011)

Unfortunately, when you get off the beaten path, you tend to be ignored. If you do a general Google search you get overwhelmed with false positives due to the large user community which also happens to be web wise. They really need a good community 'help' system that flags 'unresolved' issues and keeps them at the top of the list. I'm not referring to bug reports as they have a good system for that, but rather general user help. Forums are fine for a common question but anything off the beaten track is quickly buried under newer posts.

Re:A Practical Guide to Ubuntu Linux (3, Insightful)

poetmatt (793785) | more than 5 years ago | (#28458335)

Have you never heard of a forum with a search option?

I found lots of old and new stuff as I worked my way through issues with gaming on linux and learned how to use apt, learned how to compile source, make/make config/make install, learned about sudo, synaptic, all of that.

That stuff is what, 7+ years old? However, there are still both a: new people asking as it is the first time they have encountered it and b: old posts that are easily found via search on said same obscure questions.

Re:A Practical Guide to Ubuntu Linux (2, Informative)

DJRumpy (1345787) | more than 5 years ago | (#28458519)

Exactly. 7 years of old information to go through. Not what I would call effective. When you want to track open 'questions', it's not useful. I'm not talking about genera how-to. I'm talking about something specific to getting problems resolved. A forum's "new post to the top" just isn't useful for that, nor does it track when an question is resolved and can be ignored or when an question is still open and someone needs help.

Re:A Practical Guide to Ubuntu Linux (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28494749)

Linux still is a command -line operating system that merely has developed nice GUIs. (In reality, so is Windows and
Apple OS's.)

Just because Linux makes its working and command-line structure open to view does not make it old. I started with Linux using GUI only, but as I learned the system, often did things with the command-line because it offers more control and more options, and is faster to use.

My initial guides for Linux were oriented towards the GUI, but now are oriented towards both, and I integrated my own guides with

Ubuntu Guide (ubuntuguide.org) and Kubuntu Guide (kubuntuguide.org), two of the longest running and best guides available (even predating the official Ubuntu documentation). Both Ubuntu guide and Kubuntu guide are public license (FDL), and there are several knockoffs who have copied them wholesale and integrated them into their own guides and books. That's fine, but why not go to the original source?

Many Linux users go on to becoming Linux contributors, at which time knowing the command-line structure is important for developing packages.

I agree with other users that you can spend a whole lot of time sifting through false leads on forums. Half the people posting on forums give you the wrong method for doing something. You can spend a week sifting through false information. Guides are important; some tips are timeless and some
change with each version of Ubuntu/Kubuntu. Only Ubuntu guide and Kubuntu guide (updated for every version) can give you both.

Re:A Practical Guide to Ubuntu Linux (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28517047)

jkjk

Let me be the first to say (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28456753)

Linux != Ubuntu != Linux
even though many people would equate them.

Linux is the Kernel and only the Kernel.

I am not a Ubuntu user even though I have tried and tried again. The way Canonical view the way people work is just plain awkward even though I have been a SUSE & Slackware(since V1.1) user for years.

Re:Let me be the first to say (-1, Troll)

Jeremy Erwin (2054) | more than 5 years ago | (#28456829)

It's GNU/Linux, damn it!

Re:Let me be the first to say (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28457187)

Technically, shouldn't it be GNU/Linux/X11/DE/WM/Application/Application.

So how about just calling it Linux.

Re:Let me be the first to say (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28457307)

It's not Linux; It's Ubuntu.

Re:Let me be the first to say (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28457457)

I'm a PC.

we let you say, now its time to learn 4 you, too. (1)

x4r (1573235) | more than 5 years ago | (#28457393)

no, its doesn't, my dear user of crippled debian distro. google about GNU and about Canonical(or read wiki org, whatever). p.s. im actually can't wait for L4 Debian tree launch.

Re:Let me be the first to say (1)

westlake (615356) | more than 5 years ago | (#28458127)

Linux is the Kernel and only the Kernel.

This pretty much sums up why "Linux" gets a bare 1% of the client desktop. OSX and Windows are clearly defined products that are usable out of the box.

Re:Let me be the first to say (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28463417)

...Windows are clearly defined products that are usable out of the box

Hahahhhahhaha

Maybe if the box includes antivirus, internet security suite, recovery tools, an Office suite, etc etc etc.

Ubuntu needs an icon (5, Interesting)

russlar (1122455) | more than 5 years ago | (#28456775)

Seriously, /., it's about time they get their own icon.

Re:Ubuntu needs an icon (3, Funny)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 5 years ago | (#28456875)

I suggest Debian's; with a color change...

Re:Ubuntu needs an icon (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28464525)

And a bit smoother around the edges :-)

Re:Ubuntu needs an icon (4, Interesting)

INT_QRK (1043164) | more than 5 years ago | (#28457097)

I suggest the actual Ubuntu (from Canonical actually) tri-segmented open circle with little ball thingies half embedded each mid-arc canted +15 degrees off-north axis. Why invent something new? Also concur with earlier recommendation (Jeremy Erwin) to use more proper reference to Ubuntu as a Debian based GNU/Linux distribution...

Re:Ubuntu needs an icon (1, Funny)

i.r.id10t (595143) | more than 5 years ago | (#28457293)

Dunno, I saw some "fan art" of the Ubuntu logo once. 3 nice female rear ends of varying shades, stuck up in the air forming the basic shape of the logo ... quite "inspriational" if you know what I mean...

Re:Ubuntu needs an icon (3, Funny)

GodsMadClown (180543) | more than 5 years ago | (#28457483)

You know allude to it, but don't post a link? Here, let me fix that for you. NSFW, of course.

http://www.gnome.org/~jdub/2005/3ubuntu.jpg [gnome.org]

Re:Ubuntu needs an icon (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28458457)

Of course, I thought (looking at the link), "how can that be NSFW". Oops! Yeah, NSFW and that's where I am. I'm a dumbass.

Re:Ubuntu needs an icon (2, Funny)

Joe Snipe (224958) | more than 5 years ago | (#28459369)

haha, ubuttu

Re:Ubuntu needs an icon (1)

Provocateur (133110) | more than 5 years ago | (#28465059)

No, that's beyond being a dumbass. What part of "3 nice female rear ends of varying shades, stuck up in the air" did you not understand??

Get with the program!

Re:Ubuntu needs an icon (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28457747)

Are those supposed to be people holding hands or something? I have always wondered.

"Icon depicts all three linux users forming a happy circle."

I keed, I keed.

Re:Ubuntu needs an icon (1)

sakdoctor (1087155) | more than 5 years ago | (#28457855)

I recommend the ass one

http://www.gnome.org/~jdub/images/3ubuntu.jpg [gnome.org]

Re:Ubuntu needs an icon (1)

Stormwatch (703920) | more than 5 years ago | (#28462325)

3 girls 1 operating system.

Re:Ubuntu needs an icon (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28457383)

A bicycle with square wheels sums it up nicely. Maybe throw a fish in there trying to ride it, too.

Re:Ubuntu needs an icon (1)

bursch-X (458146) | more than 5 years ago | (#28463121)

No, that's the Windows logo you're describing.

Re:Ubuntu needs an icon (1)

westlake (615356) | more than 5 years ago | (#28458305)

Seriously, /., it's about time they get their own icon.

It's time to retire the Borg and stained glass Window. They set the tone. They reinforce stereotypes that have not served the geek well.

My experience with Ubunto (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28456983)

I heard so many great things, I thought I'd try it. Installed it easily. Tried to use something that is pretty standard (wget, I think but not sure). So I got the source and tried to compile it. To my surprise and disgust, no compilers were installed. Sure they were easy to install but with such basic tools missing, I decided I didn't have time for such a toy distro. I wasn't going to be surprised around every corner when something I have taken for granted as standard for years is missing.

Re:My experience with Ubunto (1)

smclean (521851) | more than 5 years ago | (#28457251)

In an alternate universe where compilers are mandatory in every distro, someone is writing a post explaining that Linux is bad because it contains all development tools which ordinary users don't need.

Re:My experience with Ubunto (1)

Rockoon (1252108) | more than 5 years ago | (#28457661)

Nobody tell him that Windows comes with development tools too... such as a C# and VB.NET compiler..

If you have the .NET framework on a windows system, you have at least these two compilers. The IDE's are seperate downloads, but the compilers are already there.

Re:My experience with Ubunto (2, Insightful)

value_added (719364) | more than 5 years ago | (#28457843)

Linux is bad because it contains all development tools which ordinary users don't need

I'd suggest that there's plenty of ordinary (as in "non administrators and non developers") users who use LaTeX and would marvel at discovering how easy it is to craft a simple makefile to automate building PDFs, for example, or how "make install" can be used to upload their hobby website to a webserver.

Come to think of it, that would be great subject for Ask Slashdot.

Re:My experience with Ubunto (1)

$RANDOMLUSER (804576) | more than 5 years ago | (#28458083)

Feh! Makefiles don't have enough XML

Re:My experience with Ubunto (1)

wed128 (722152) | more than 5 years ago | (#28483355)

I don't remember who said this, i can't take credit for this quote, but it seems relevant

"XML is like violence, if it isn't working, you just need more of it"

Re:My experience with Ubunto (1)

EsbenMoseHansen (731150) | more than 5 years ago | (#28464757)

I'd suggest that there's plenty of ordinary (as in "non administrators and non developers") users who use LaTeX and would marvel at discovering how easy it is to craft a simple makefile to automate building PDFs, for example, or how "make install" can be used to upload their hobby website to a webserver.

Heh. Writing a Makefile for latex->pdf is anything but easy. I rather think it is impossible to do correctly in pure Makefiles, though I suppose it could be done with some support scripts.

Re:My experience with Ubunto (1)

someSnarkyBastard (1521235) | more than 5 years ago | (#28458205)

Firstly, IIRC, wget is installed by default on Ubuntu. Secondly, why were you building wget from source, there are packages for it available in the repos. Silly troll, compilers are for devs!! :P

Re:My experience with Ubunto (3, Insightful)

FrostDust (1009075) | more than 5 years ago | (#28459179)

If I recall correctly, the reason Ubuntu doesn't come with a compiler by default was because Mark Shuttleworth thought that the average computer user shouldn't have to deal with compiling a program.
By having a large base of potential users without the know-how or capability to compile a program from source, people developing programs for Linux-based systems would be encouraged to release binaries.

While I'm sure the more experienced of you may cringe at this, Ubuntu is designed to be a Linux distribution approachable for newbs from the outset. If you disagree with this, you can very easily do "apt-get install gcc", or simply try another distro.

Re:My experience with Ubunto (1)

boredomist (1570917) | more than 5 years ago | (#28462623)

I don't know about all of you, but Ubuntu 8.04 came with GCC, Python, Flex, Bison, and a bunch of other compilers /languages out of the box (live CD)

Re:My experience with Ubunto (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28466203)

If you disagree with this, you can very easily do "apt-get install gcc", or simply try another distro.

If you're going to do any dev/compile work on Ubuntu you want to install the "build-essential" metapackage.

If I recall correctly, the reason Ubuntu doesn't come with a compiler by default was because Mark Shuttleworth thought that the average computer user shouldn't have to deal with compiling a program.

And also, if you're not capable of installing "build-essential" then you're clearly not capable of compiling anything!

Re:My experience with Ubunto (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28587691)

And also, if you're not capable of installing "build-essential" then you're clearly not capable of compiling anything!

Not necessarily. He could just be used to using distros like Gentoo, Arch Linux or Slackware which have all that stuff included by default. He may not be aware that that meta-package exists.

Pfft. (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28456999)

Ubuntu is for Windows users. Real Linux people would never touch it.

1244 pages (2, Interesting)

tcopeland (32225) | more than 5 years ago | (#28457081)

I sympathize with the author on the decision on what to include in the book... no doubt he cut a fair number of things but still ended up with a prodigious book. Reminds me of the "Java in a Nutshell" books - the last one I bought was almost square.

These days I'm finding more value in books like Rich Bowen's The Definitive Guide to Apache mod_rewrite [amazon.com] . These smaller more focused books go digging deep into parts of various utilities that don't Google answers as easily. I can find 100 tutorials on installing Apache, but not so many on using RewriteMap. And they seem to have a longer shelf life; that mod_rewrite book is a couple years old but still very relevant and useful.

Re:1244 pages (3, Informative)

DiegoBravo (324012) | more than 5 years ago | (#28457577)

I tend to appreciate the books that say more in less space. The best Linux resource I've found in the last times is "Ubuntu Linux Toolbox: 1000+ Commands for Ubuntu and Debian Power Users" http://www.amazon.com/Ubuntu-Linux-Toolbox-Commands-Debian/dp/0470082933/ref=cm_cr-mr-title [amazon.com] : Just 360 pages, command line oriented, almost nothing of those GUI admin tools that get reinvented every 6 months.

Re:1244 pages (1)

i.r.id10t (595143) | more than 5 years ago | (#28457891)

Thanks for the link, desk copy ordered and it may be useful in my course...

Re:1244 pages (1)

bhsurfer (539137) | more than 5 years ago | (#28458171)

i have, like & recommend the toolbox book as well. it's a decent one that will last over multiple releases.

8.1? (1)

Chris Pimlott (16212) | more than 5 years ago | (#28457195)

That should be Ubuntu 8.10, as in 2008-10, the release month.

Re:8.1? (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28457433)

it's true. OP clearly does not know about ubuntu naming conventions :P

ubuntu versions are the number of years since 2000 and the number of the current month.

6.06 = June 2006
7.04 = April 2007
8.10 = OCTOBER 2008

you do not reduce because it isn't a real decimal value.

Re:8.1? (1)

stoolpigeon (454276) | more than 5 years ago | (#28457621)

Thanks for the info. My issue is probably due to the fact that I'm a long time Fedora user - integers seem sufficient for us.

Re:8.1? (1)

Beat The Odds (1109173) | more than 5 years ago | (#28461997)

6.06 = June 2006
7.04 = April 2007
8.10 = OCTOBER 2008

you do not reduce because it isn't a real decimal value.

Perhaps we should replace the dot with a slash? (couldn't help myself)

I'll be here all week....

Updates? Don't need no stinkin Updates! (1)

fm6 (162816) | more than 5 years ago | (#28457231)

One thing I love about Linux is the rapid development and frequent updates that allow me to run the latest versions of all my favorite software packages.

Though not a Linux geek, I see the same thing on a smaller scale when Firefox keeps offering to update my plugins. I should probably turn this feature off, because every once in a while I get an update that breaks the whole browser.

Not a big fan of automatic updates. Bad idea to upgrade something without analyzing the benefits and risks.

Incidentally, my name appears in the "Thanks" section of this book. Which doesn't mean I actually contributed anything to it. Many years ago (don't recall how long, but the woolly mammoth had just made the endangered species list) I reviewed the system administration chapter from a book called "A Practical Guide to UNIX". My resulting credit said that I had contributed mightily to this chapter. UNIX System administration has changed a lot since then, and I'm now probably the farthest thing from an expert on the subject this side of John McCain. So I was not miffed when Sobell reduced my credit to a mere mention. Indeed, he probably should take me out altogether.

Second edition? (1)

sacrilicious (316896) | more than 5 years ago | (#28457399)

A Practical Guide to Ubuntu Linux 2nd edition

I think Ubuntu got past its second edition long ago... aren't they up to 9.04?

Slashdot going downhill. (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28457589)

Could we get less Ubuntu/Linux and more Windows/OSX, you know... operating systems that people actually USE on their desktop computers?

Re:Slashdot going downhill. (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28457809)

I'm people. I use Linux.

Re:Slashdot going downhill. (1)

selven (1556643) | more than 5 years ago | (#28458517)

I'm peoples. So do I.

Re:Slashdot going downhill. (1)

socceroos (1374367) | more than 5 years ago | (#28462421)

I'm more people. I do too.

Re:Slashdot going downhill. (3, Informative)

masshuu (1260516) | more than 5 years ago | (#28457987)

Re:Slashdot going downhill. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28458049)

But does it run Linux?

Re:Slashdot going downhill. (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28458977)

They are focusing on operating systems that people can actually use on their desktop, you know linux and OSX. Oh! You mean operating systems people actually have on their machines but can't do anything with! Sorry my bad, I get those so confused.

Ubuntu really is (1)

Icegryphon (715550) | more than 5 years ago | (#28457863)

an ancient African word for "Can't install Debian".

!can't (1)

russlar (1122455) | more than 5 years ago | (#28458057)

Ubuntu really is an ancient African word for "Can't install Debian".

I beg to differ. I'm fully capable of installing Debian, I'm just too lazy.

Re:Ubuntu really is (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28458279)

As Ubuntu relies on Debian...it's a little like saying, "Windows7 is for those who can't install Windows.

Coincidentally (2, Funny)

Yosho (135835) | more than 5 years ago | (#28458531)

"Debian" is an ancient African word for "can't compile Slackware."

Re:Coincidentally (2, Funny)

dkleinsc (563838) | more than 5 years ago | (#28458597)

And of course, Slackware means "can't make own distribution".

Re:Coincidentally (1)

dr_wheel (671305) | more than 5 years ago | (#28459447)

Damnit.. I accidentally modded you down instead of up. Must have been a libc5 rounding error. >:(

UBUNTU = BANNED! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28458119)

I've had enough of it! It detected my 17" monitor as a 33". It reversed the X-Y on the touch screen. Then when the power went off, it caused it to crash so hard I had to do a complete install. NOT ready for prime time.

Re:UBUNTU = BANNED! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28459111)

Not Ubuntu's fault that you installed your touchscreen upside down and backwards.

The main Disadvantage of Linux (2, Interesting)

sbeckstead (555647) | more than 5 years ago | (#28460069)

The main Disadvantage of Linux is the rapid development and frequent updates.

Re:The main Disadvantage of Linux (1)

iggymanz (596061) | more than 5 years ago | (#28462655)

there are plenty of distributions that don't have fast update cycle, only do patches for years. how slow do you want to go? you don't have to follow the developers, for craps sake

Re:The main Disadvantage of Linux (1)

bursch-X (458146) | more than 5 years ago | (#28463193)

The biggest disadvantage of Linux is, it's so good you feel unworthy of using it.

Re:The main Disadvantage of Linux (1)

sbeckstead (555647) | more than 5 years ago | (#28468671)

It seems I stepped in a sacred cow patty!

Re:The main Disadvantage of Linux (1)

falconwolf (725481) | more than 5 years ago | (#28464095)

The main Disadvantage of Linux is the rapid development and frequent updates.

I haven't used Linux in years but I think that's an advantage not a disadvantage. Just because an update is available that doesn't mean it has to be installed. When I used Windows I didn't install all the updates, and I don't install all of them on my Mac now. It's nice they're available but I check to see if I need each one before installing them.

Falcon

Re:The main Disadvantage of Linux (1)

pandrijeczko (588093) | more than 5 years ago | (#28464153)

So does that mean that is also a disadvantage that Microsoft provides updates to Windows just about every Thursday? And if they didn't, would you then be accusing them of being lax in security for not releasing frequent security updates?

Re:The main Disadvantage of Linux (1)

sbeckstead (555647) | more than 5 years ago | (#28468723)

Yes and no. I have rarely thought about how I upgrade windows as it is pretty seamless for me (I don't use windows unless I have to). And if security updates for Linux happened the same way I'd have less of a problem. Perhaps Ubuntu has solved some of this but when versions of the apps are as important as versions of the OS and you have to make sure you got the right mix and match of libraries etc. Well it becomes a disadvantage. Even if this is not 100% true there is a perception that this is true and therefore still a problem.

Re:The main Disadvantage of Linux (2, Funny)

nausea_malvarma (1544887) | more than 5 years ago | (#28469427)

Totally, I HATE how those open source people update quickly and fix bugs so fast. What is this a race? Slow the fuck down. Some of us have high blood pressure!

Another thing about linux: It boots up too damn fast. When I was using windows, it took 7 minutes before I got to the desktop, and I used that time to make coffee. Now that linux loads so fast, I don't have time to. Thanks for ruining my morning, linux.

And I HATE how all these linux programs can be downloaded at no cost. Before linux, I used to make daily trips to best buy, where my wife works, and purchase software. Now I gotta download everything using some bizzare command called "apt-get" (what the fuck does that mean?). So now when am I gonna spend quality time with my wife?

So yeah, you can take your linux and shove it. Just give me good old crash-a-minute, slow as a snail windows from microsoft. At least they care!

ASP.NET (2, Interesting)

Alarash (746254) | more than 5 years ago | (#28464415)

This wasn't mentioned in the review so I suppose that's already an answer, but I figured I'd ask anyway. Is there any topic that covers running ASP.NET (through the Mono Project) under Ubuntu Server? Is there any Database-related topics, specifically for PostgreSQL? I don't need 300 pages books for these topics (not yet anyway), so that kind of "Jack of all trades" book is interesting to me.

Hoping there's (1)

ThatsNotPudding (1045640) | more than 5 years ago | (#28464827)

a chapter telling how to cure an Ubuntu install infected with Mono.

really? (2, Informative)

Odinlake (1057938) | more than 5 years ago | (#28465469)

Myself I dread all the broken dependencies and conflicts that I inadvertably get with a major upgrade.
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