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Don't Copy That Floppy! Gets a Sequel

timothy posted more than 5 years ago | from the not-the-jailhouse-fantasy-I-signed-up-for dept.

The Media 523

theodp writes "Back in 1992, the SIIA released Don't Copy That Floppy!, a goofy video in which anti-piracy rapper MC Double Def DP convinces a young lad not to copy a game by appealing to his sense of right and wrong. Now, to address what it calls 'new generations and new temptations,' the SIIA has uploaded a trailer for a new anti-piracy rap video — Don't Copy That 2 — that will be released this summer. To underscore the video's it's-not-just-a-copy-it's-a-crime message, the new film is a tad darker than the original. A smug teen who's downloading files from 'Pirates Palace' and 'Tune Weasel' finds his world turned upside down when automatic weapons-toting government agents break down the door and take his Mom away in handcuffs. The teen finds himself in a prison jumpsuit forced to tattoo shirtless adult inmates who eventually turn on him, physically attack him, and make him run for his life back to his jail cell (image summarizing his plight)."

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BILLY MAYS HERE... (5, Insightful)

BillyMays (1587805) | more than 5 years ago | (#28603133)

...with scare tactics!

Seriously though, the first DCTF was happy and upbeat (and for good reason, as many people simply didn't know that copying a floppy was piracy). What happened to that feel? Are we really at a point where we're so influenced by the RIAA/MPAA's ways of doing things that SIIA's first sequel in 17 years immediately jumps to scare tactics?

Maybe it's just me, but I see this quickly becoming one of those "You wouldn't steal a car" type of things - jumping to such an extreme that it becomes a satire piece.

Re:BILLY MAYS HERE... (5, Insightful)

MBCook (132727) | more than 5 years ago | (#28603225)

Watch the preview video. It's there now.

I agree that at least DCTF served a purpose. This one is exactly where the RIAA/MPAA is. Kid copies some software, ends up making prison tattoos and being chased (so he can be beaten/killed) because he wasn't good at making the tattoo.

It's clear cause and effect here: own a computer, be annoyed by an 80s reject rapper, get shanked in prison.

What they need is another DCTF, just not corny. If they ran PSAs saying it's important to buy software, otherwise people won't be able to make The Sims 4, Crysis 5, or Barbie Horse Adventures 7: The Mysterious Case of the Calico Clydesdale, they could probably get a whole new generation of kids to think twice about copying.

Instead they made themselves a joke again.

Even if they had to do this campaign, did they really have to tie it into DCTF? That can't possibly lend them credibility. I bet if I showed this new video to the average 12 year old, they'd think it was some kind of internet sketch comedy thing.

Re:BILLY MAYS HERE... (5, Funny)

Zero_Independent (664974) | more than 5 years ago | (#28603279)

Even if they had to do this campaign, did they really have to tie it into DCTF? That can't possibly lend them credibility. I bet if I showed this new video to the average 12 year old, they'd think it was some kind of internet sketch comedy thing.

You mean it's not?

Re:BILLY MAYS HERE... (4, Insightful)

MBCook (132727) | more than 5 years ago | (#28603463)

That was literally my first thought when I saw this, but I checked out other videos by that YouTube user and it looks totally legit. If this is a joke, they went a long way.

The new U.S.: Violence is entirely acceptable. (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28603529)

The new United States: Violence and corruption is entirely acceptable.

Pay taxes to kill Iraqis? Sure.

Many hours spent playing violent video games? Sure.

Government run by thieving banks? Sure.

Re:The new U.S.: Violence is entirely acceptable. (0, Troll)

MickyTheIdiot (1032226) | more than 5 years ago | (#28603599)

Violence to further corporate interests: Double-super-sure.

Thanks Dick Cheney! This is his true legacy.

Re:The new U.S.: Violence is entirely acceptable. (4, Informative)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 5 years ago | (#28603695)

Don't give Cheney too much credit. State violence in support of corporate interest has been as American as apple pie since before he was a gleam in the milkman's eye.

Re:BILLY MAYS HERE... (4, Interesting)

DMalic (1118167) | more than 5 years ago | (#28603743)

Yeah, but honestly. Wouldn't someone at the marketing department mention the fact it looks identical to parodies of piracy PSAs, and that releasing it just might be counterproductive?

Re:BILLY MAYS HERE... (4, Funny)

EdIII (1114411) | more than 5 years ago | (#28603799)

Instead they made themselves a joke again.

Which works exactly again them. It tends to make young people take them less and less seriously. You might as well run a PSA against teen age sex by convincing young men there are teeth in young women's vagina's and their peepee's will turn green and fall off if they touch themselves.

Of course nobody takes them seriously anymore.

Re:BILLY MAYS HERE... (4, Insightful)

cbiltcliffe (186293) | more than 5 years ago | (#28603229)

Since he's "running for his life," does that mean they're essentially saying "You wouldn't steal a car, but if you copy Microsoft Office, we'll kill you?"

Sounds like a threat to me....

Re:BILLY MAYS HERE... (4, Insightful)

fractoid (1076465) | more than 5 years ago | (#28603443)

The "you wouldn't steal a car" ad always annoyed the hell out of me. Bad analogy, and all that. It wasn't until just now that I realised that this Peugeot ad [youtube.com] is what you're actually doing when you download media. You're using your own hardware to create a (usually lower fidelity) replica of the car.

Re:BILLY MAYS HERE... (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28603657)

You Bastard! Now I'm going to have that song in my head for another six months!

Re:BILLY MAYS HERE... (5, Insightful)

Goldberg's Pants (139800) | more than 5 years ago | (#28603791)

Got into this argument with someone today. They said they wouldn't be STEALING a movie they want to see. I pointed out that downloading it is hardly stealing when, by my downloading it, I am not depriving a single person from seeing it.

The car analogy doesn't work unless when I download Big Robots Part 8, someone going to see the movie gets turned away. "Sorry, Goldberg's Pants pirated this film so you can't see it."

And yet these idiots just don't get how their analogy is utterly flawed. The thing is the media have spent so much time yelling IT'S STEALING! IT'S STEALING! IT'S STEALING! that the majority have bought into the lie put forward by the RIAA, MPAA etc... Despite the fact that they can say it a million times, and it still won't make it true.

People who get hauled up for downloading are NOT charged with stealing or theft. It'd be better for them if they were because theft, rape etc... Carry far lesser sentences than what they are ACTUALLY charged with. Criminal copyright infringement.

On a related note, I saw a nice piece of juxtaposition the other day that highlights the insanity. The RIAA verdict saying $84,000 or whatever it was per song, right next to a story saying the victims families of the Air France crash would get $24,000.

Three human lives are worth one song apparently.

Re:BILLY MAYS HERE... (1)

Korin43 (881732) | more than 5 years ago | (#28603567)

I would download a car..

Re:BILLY MAYS HERE... (2, Interesting)

Ethanol-fueled (1125189) | more than 5 years ago | (#28603259)

The efficacy of the ad (which Roger Ebert rated two middle fingers up) depends on copyright infringement actually involving jackbooted thugs and jail time, and we know that the content providers have agents in Washington. As others have noted below, the ad itself seems to be goofy and not necessarily the scare-tactic public service announcements we saw during the Bush I and Reagan eras.

Also, one more Association to add to my shit-list.

Re:BILLY MAYS HERE... (1)

unlametheweak (1102159) | more than 5 years ago | (#28603261)

I'm sure the SIIA (along with their equivalents in the movie and music industry) are lobbying governments around the world to make sure that these scare tactics become reality. These organizations do want governments and prisons to support the business community. Labor is even cheaper in prison, and prisoners can't unionize and are not allowed to cast a vote.

Re:BILLY MAYS HERE... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28603343)

The other side remains happy and upbeat [youtube.com] , at least.

Re:BILLY MAYS HERE... (1)

nEoN nOoDlE (27594) | more than 5 years ago | (#28603351)

The trailer for it seems very tongue-in-cheek so maybe they are still maintaining the happy and upbeat feel of the first.

Re:BILLY MAYS HERE... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28603379)

I'm pretty sure this is a joke, mocking the original... I could be wrong.

Re:BILLY MAYS HERE... (5, Insightful)

snowgirl (978879) | more than 5 years ago | (#28603417)

People seem to have a big problem with understanding what "illegal" means. You cannot go to jail for every illegal action. Some illegal actions create a civil liability, and some create criminal liabilities... and then criminal liabilities are separated into misdemeanors and felonies.

I've had issues with people commenting that "prostitution is like murder, it's illegal", and I point out, "No, prostitution is like jay-walking... it's illegal." Prostitution is a misdemeanor and will not get one a lot of time in jail. It's why prosecutors (hell, law enforcement themselves) are so eager to offer a prostitute immunity in order to testify against their pimp (which is a felony).

People just have a very hard time understanding that you cannot be sent to jail for every illegal action. ESPECIALLY, a hard jail. Typically the worst that you can be hit for with copyright violation is fines... it can make your life difficult, or even hell, but it can't take away your freedom.

Re:BILLY MAYS HERE... (3, Interesting)

Beardo the Bearded (321478) | more than 5 years ago | (#28603627)

Moreover, the unlawful activities fall under different Acts (or statutes? What do Americans call them?)

For example, murder is against the Criminal Code of Canada.

Speeding is in the Motor Vehicles Act. (And there's a great loophole there, should you care to read through this Act.)

Practicing Engineering without a licence is against the Engineers and Geoscientists Act.

Unauthourized duplication of copyrighted material is against the Copyright Act.

The list can go on and on but I won't bother.

Anyway, all of the aforementioned activities are unlawful, but the difference in enforcement and penalties is extreme. It varies from a $125 file to life without parole. Like you, I've always hated the "if you've ever driven even ONE MILE over the limit, that's the same as SERIAL MURDER. IT IS ILLEGAL!!1!ELEVEN!" argument.

Re:BILLY MAYS HERE... (3, Insightful)

hamburgler007 (1420537) | more than 5 years ago | (#28603753)

But it can take away your freedom. Most prosecutors won't touch a file sharing case but that doesn't mean they can't.
From www.copyright.gov:

(a) Criminal Infringement. â" (1) In general. â" Any person who willfully infringes a copyright shall be punished as provided under section 2319 of title 18, if the infringement was committed â" (A) for purposes of commercial advantage or private financial gain; (B) by the reproduction or distribution, including by electronic means, during any 180-day period, of 1 or more copies or phonorecords of 1 or more copyrighted works, which have a total retail value of more than $1,000; or (C) by the distribution of a work being prepared for commercial distribution, by making it available on a computer network accessible to members of the public, if such person knew or should have known that the work was intended for commercial distribution.

This doesn't apply to every file sharer, but it does apply to many more than prosecutors would ever want to go after. But to say they can't take away your freedom for it, when they clearly can if they desire to, is false.

Scare tatics (4, Insightful)

Lord Byron II (671689) | more than 5 years ago | (#28603559)

Or like the anti-drug commercials that aired immediately after 9-11 that attempted to link smoking a joint with supporting Osama Bin Laden.

Re:Scare tatics (3, Funny)

it0 (567968) | more than 5 years ago | (#28603763)

Just to put it into perspective. Al Queda is pressuring farmers in afghanistan to grow poppies to make cocaine. There is a large effort to convert to convert the farmers to grow something else like saffraan.

But cocaine!= weed, but there is some truth in that message.

Re:Scare tatics (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28603823)

Just to put it into perspective. Al Queda is pressuring farmers in afghanistan to grow poppies to make cocaine.

Poppies are processed to opium which is processed to heroin. Cocaine is made from coca.

Re:BILLY MAYS HERE... (1)

Wahakalaka (1323747) | more than 5 years ago | (#28603693)

Would you download a car? Would you download a TV? Would you download someone's purse? I know I would.

Re:BILLY MAYS HERE... (1)

Goldberg's Pants (139800) | more than 5 years ago | (#28603739)

This is asinine. I wouldn't mind if they put EQUAL effort into going after the real criminal copyright infringers who bootleg in mass quantities. But organized crime is much harder to prosecute and build a case against, whereas Joe Average User is a soft target who can't afford to defend him or herself, so they go after them instead.

Go catch the REAL criminals making MONEY off copying your products, or quit whining. See, we've given you a choice.

Re:BILLY MAYS HERE... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28603795)

Doesn't anyone care about children anymore? Copying games and movies or using free and open source software is like cancer that kills cute little babies. Are you a murderer?

Re:BILLY MAYS HERE... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28603819)

I sure picked a great night to watch 1984.

So... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28603145)

Anyone got a link to the torrent?

Re:So... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28603609)

Why, yes. It's on the TPB.. err, no. It's on Demonoid.

A better video (5, Funny)

Aphonia (1315785) | more than 5 years ago | (#28603167)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CGXavXZwRcg [youtube.com] From the IT crowd (BBC) - an anti piracy ad. Except its for films. yet its a better video.

Re:A better video (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28603537)

"This video is not available in your country due to copyright restrictions."
so use: instead try http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x9ovyz_the-it-crowd-anti-piracy-ad_fun

p.s and the show is on channel4 not bbc

Exactly what I was Thinking! (1)

ZirconCode (1477363) | more than 5 years ago | (#28603677)

The IT Crowd was my very first thought!

It's sad though to see this VERY VERY satani *cough* satireistic movie become reality.

And doesn't the government get at least a little mad? Last time I checked their prison system wasn't supposed to be depicted like that...

British TV (5, Interesting)

jciarlan (1152991) | more than 5 years ago | (#28603171)

Forgive the youtube link, but a British TV show called "The IT Crowd" did a pretty good anti-piracy warning. [youtube.com]

Re:British TV (1)

hnangelo (1098127) | more than 5 years ago | (#28603293)

I wonder how long it will take for them to reach that point...

DP (5, Funny)

tnok85 (1434319) | more than 5 years ago | (#28603183)

Is it just me or does MC Double Def "DP" sound like a black porn star's stage name?

Re:DP (1)

anagama (611277) | more than 5 years ago | (#28603441)

Hmmm ... you stole my allusion, at least the DP part. Prepare yourself for a life behind bars!

Re:DP (2, Funny)

BlackSabbath (118110) | more than 5 years ago | (#28603475)

That would be MC Double Dong "DP".

Re:DP (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28603815)

Ears are an orifice, too...

Since When Does Infringement Equal Jail Time? (5, Interesting)

eldavojohn (898314) | more than 5 years ago | (#28603193)

A smug teen who's downloading files from 'Pirates Palace' and 'Tune Weasel' finds his world turned upside down when automatic weapons-toting government agents break down the door and take his Mom away in handcuffs. The teen finds himself in a prison jumpsuit forced to tattoo shirtless adult inmates who eventually turn on him

Huh, that's funny. Last I checked you normally don't get jail time for copyright infringement. Search warrants? For your computer maybe. Serving papers for a court date? Sure. Arrested on the spot? Don't think so. Jail time? Not to my knowledge. The only legal consequence the SIIA lists on their site [siia.net] are "significant fines for copyright infringement." Unless the kid was uploading unreleased Guns N' Roses tracks or orchestrating the huge operation of The Pirate Bay I don't think he'll be doing time.

Maybe they should do a little more research before they imply that you will end up in a gulag tattooing cartoon characters on convicts?

Don't get me wrong, I'd be fine with the kid (assuming he's 18+) getting a letter in the mail saying he has to appear in court and then a slow five year montage ending with him settling out of court and not being able to go to college or only attending a community college. That'd be pretty realistic. I still don't agree with it but that's how it works these days. Who knows? Maybe the over emphasized results will backfire on them and the general populace will see how unrealistic the charges are for copyright violation? I mean, that's not going to change until a politician looks bad taking a sack of money in campaign contributions ... or realizes that it bothers his constituents that lives are being ruined over something that maybe isn't so serious that a person should be financially hobbled for the rest of their life or next seven years from bankruptcy or whatever results. Huge fines are enough to stop me from copyright violations but lets face it, you're not going to jail if you do it. You're not a hardened criminal with a rap sheet serving time next to murderers if you're convicted of file sharing. You're most likely going to settle out of court and be financially stunted.

Re:Since When Does Infringement Equal Jail Time? (3, Insightful)

corsec67 (627446) | more than 5 years ago | (#28603247)

Just look at the "You wouldn't steal a car..." videos.

The MPAA didn't seem to care that they were comparing unrelated crimes.

Re:Since When Does Infringement Equal Jail Time? (1)

oneiros27 (46144) | more than 5 years ago | (#28603257)

Huh, that's funny. Last I checked you normally don't get jail time for copyright infringement. Search warrants? For your computer maybe. Serving papers for a court date? Sure. Arrested on the spot? Don't think so. Jail time? Not to my knowledge.

What? next, you'll tell me that Don't Download This Song [youtube.com] was a parody.

I think it's in the NET Act somewhere... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28603295)

> Huh, that's funny. Last I checked you normally don't get jail time for copyright infringement. Search warrants? For your computer maybe. Serving papers for a court date? Sure. Arrested on the spot? Don't think so. Jail time? Not to my knowledge. The only legal consequence the SIIA lists on their site are "significant fines for copyright infringement." Unless the kid was uploading unreleased Guns N' Roses tracks or orchestrating the huge operation of The Pirate Bay I don't think he'll be doing time.

Google the NET Act. Basically, it seems to have been intended to make certain types of file sharing into commercial piracy (and those have a prison sentence). I believe it added a clause saying that if you give someone infringing works with the expectation of getting some in return, that makes the activity "commercial." And this was passed in the days before BitTorrent, so I don't think it's ever been enforced quite like that. More likely they were going after big warez groups/ratio sites where you do things like that.

Anyhow, I don't think anyone has actually *gotten* jail time for what most of us would think of as non-commercial file sharing, but that doesn't mean it's impossible what with the copyright czars and RIAA lawyers in this administration...

A backlash against this nonsense is stirring and the RIAA types are making sure they have a firm grip on our legislators ears and wallets ahead of time. That's also why they want to go after the recording of courtroom audio, etc. Too bad they don't know about the Streisand Effect. A lot of people who were ignoring those recordings might start listening to them...

Re:Since When Does Infringement Equal Jail Time? (1)

QuantumG (50515) | more than 5 years ago | (#28603329)

It's a wet dream of the copyright owners that one day the police with fight a war on their behalf.

Re:Since When Does Infringement Equal Jail Time? (1)

eldavojohn (898314) | more than 5 years ago | (#28603369)

It's a wet dream of the copyright owners that one day the police with fight a war on their behalf.

Oh, you haven't seen the list of projected wars have you? It's going to be known as "The War on Consumers" and it's down the list somewhere past "The War on Drugs" and "The War on Terror" but I'm pretty sure it's before "The War on Air." I think Gore has already declared victory on that last one though, I don't know I zone out a lot when politicians talk about wars on abstract things.

Re:Since When Does Infringement Equal Jail Time? (1)

bertoelcon (1557907) | more than 5 years ago | (#28603697)

What happened to "The War on Wars", that one would make for excellent campaign buzz as it makes you think that they want peace.

Re:Since When Does Infringement Equal Jail Time? (2, Interesting)

Asclepius99 (1527727) | more than 5 years ago | (#28603439)

Actually, I think the fastest way to see a change would be if a senator's/governor's/etc. son/daughter was caught pirating their favorite song/movie/whatever.

Re:Since When Does Infringement Equal Jail Time? (4, Insightful)

The MAZZTer (911996) | more than 5 years ago | (#28603703)

I bet the RIAA have already traced sharers to an IP, gotten a home address, found out it's the home of some celebrity or politician and immediately dropped it.

Re:Since When Does Infringement Equal Jail Time? (2, Insightful)

vux984 (928602) | more than 5 years ago | (#28603721)

Actually, I think the fastest way to see a change would be if a senator's/governor's/etc. son/daughter was caught pirating their favorite song/movie/whatever.

Unfortunately not. The copyright holders would treat them with kid gloves, drop the case, and give them a gentle, 'hey don't do it again speech'.

Re:Since When Does Infringement Equal Jail Time? (1)

PachmanP (881352) | more than 5 years ago | (#28603771)

Actually, I think the fastest way to see a change would be if a senator's/governor's/etc. son/daughter was caught pirating their favorite song/movie/whatever.

While I don't think much of the RIAA/MPAA/MAFIAA, I can't imagine them being that stupid! It would certainly be nice, but I think it's right up there with world peace.

Re:Since When Does Infringement Equal Jail Time? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28603481)

For a copyright crime you wouldn't get that type of federal prison. You would be sent to a Federal Prison Camp (FPC) where there are no cells, locked doors or fences. This would be a pure "club-fed" sentence. The feds are not going to spend money on high security for a copyright conviction. I would be greatly surprised if they did "time" at all, just probation and a fine.

I did over three years in a FPC for phacking Sprint back in '87 for $30M in phone calls (Z-Tell anyone?) so I do know what I'm talking about here.

I'm posting anon because I'm looking for a job and this is the Internet and all, but I have a very low four digit ID here.

Confirmation? (1)

basementman (1475159) | more than 5 years ago | (#28603203)

Can anyone provide a link to confirm that the SIIA is actually making this? The trailer jumped the shark when the kid started spinning the CD endlessly on his finger, so my first impression would be that it is a parody of the original.

Re:Confirmation? (1)

Hewligan (202585) | more than 5 years ago | (#28603273)

The SIIA link to it from their own site on this page [siia.net]

(Check number 01 in the image fader thing on the page)

Re:Confirmation? (1)

ceoyoyo (59147) | more than 5 years ago | (#28603337)

Do you suppose they posted it on YouTube, or did someone rip it off their site and put it on YouTube without permission?

That would make it even funnier.

Dangerous stuff (5, Informative)

harmonise (1484057) | more than 5 years ago | (#28603213)

...finds his world turned upside down when automatic weapons-toting government agents break down the door and take his Mom away in handcuffs. The teen finds himself in a prison jumpsuit forced to tattoo shirtless adult inmates who eventually turn on him, physically attack him, and make him run for his life back to his jail cell

The message I get from this is, "Wow, movies and music sound like dangerous stuff. I better avoid them at all costs whether purchased legally or not."

Re:Dangerous stuff (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28603633)

'The message I get from this is, "Wow, movies and music sound like dangerous stuff. I better avoid them at all costs whether purchased legally or not."'

Ditto. I don't feel like buying any software, music, or movies anymore.

Also, a lot of this is overblown well beyond what the law or even case law allows. Young teenagers committing and brought up on murder charges don't often have their parents handcuffed alongside them. So why is it that a front for corporations threatening physical harm and intimidation is legal, but an individual or group/gang doing such a thing is not?

Further, if bloodlines are a legal basis for arrest, why aren't business bloodlines, such as industry fronts and parent companies? Every SIIA member should at least be investigated for making terroristic threats and government bribery, or at least the government should be suing the SIIA for slander.

Worse, I feel oddly compelled to own or make some firearms now. I don't own any now, but just reading that summary makes me feel suddenly weak and defenseless. You're executing warrants for a non-violent crime using the threat of death and severe bodily injury with unholstered automatic weapons? Are you phrakin kidding me?

They're going to elevate this so that it seems law enforcement is going gonzo on people, which increases the perception of the danger, and they'll be some whacko shootout--is that really what they want to turn this all on its head?

Someone get a list of every idiot member of the SIIA and put name brands alongside pics taken from the vid.

So, basicly, (4, Funny)

Minwee (522556) | more than 5 years ago | (#28603241)

it's RIAA-porn.

Anybody else have a flashback... (1)

cranky_chemist (1592441) | more than 5 years ago | (#28603243)

to the "federal pound-me-in-the-ass prison" scene from Office Space? This is meant as humor, right?

Well, at least it's truth in advertising (3, Insightful)

RLiegh (247921) | more than 5 years ago | (#28603269)

Because we've seen that the RIAA will go after your family if they don't think they can get any money out of you; regardless of whether or not any of you even own a computer!

Re:Well, at least it's truth in advertising (1)

Doctor_Jest (688315) | more than 5 years ago | (#28603543)

..Ironic that this little propaganda film is the first time the RIAA actually told the truth. :)

For workers revolution against capitalist insanity (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28603275)

Reforge the Fourth International, world party of socialist revolution!

Remember Children (2, Funny)

HavePatience (1538937) | more than 5 years ago | (#28603281)

If you make copies of intellectual property, liscensed video games ans software programs, you will be erased with state violence.
It is okay to kidnap and possibly kill people with state violence for things they do with ideas.

Well, of course. (2, Funny)

Nebulious (1241096) | more than 5 years ago | (#28603289)

How else can he afford another solid gold Humvee? And diamond studded swimming pools? These things don't grow on trees.

Re:Well, of course. (1)

bertoelcon (1557907) | more than 5 years ago | (#28603741)

(Said as a Humvee falls out of a tree) Weird Al does a ironically good job of making the music industry look bad by putting out good music about them looking bad.

public service raps to improve morals of the *IAA (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28603303)

We need some public service announcement raps to improve the morals of the *IAA.

Don't litigate our children, the deceased, and the poor.
That song is just a dolla, not $80K, not more.
Get a businees model, for ya internets and tubes.
Or we goin' digital, without ya freakin fools.

Vanilla Ice available ?

Subliminal messaging? (1)

damn_registrars (1103043) | more than 5 years ago | (#28603305)

The one of the news tickers in the video is describing the impeachment of the governor of Illinois a while back ... will the same thing happen to you if you pirate music?

Whew (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28603319)

Thank God they got to me before I took a wrong turn in life!

Don't download this song (3, Funny)

orkysoft (93727) | more than 5 years ago | (#28603349)

This one's much better:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=32wmepTVM3I [youtube.com]

What I learned (1)

ChinaLumberjack (1443691) | more than 5 years ago | (#28603357)

Woah! I just learned that you can copy digital media!!!

It should be a crime (1)

QuantumG (50515) | more than 5 years ago | (#28603363)

To blatantly and deliberately mislead the public into believing something is a crime when it isn't.

"Production of propaganda with an intent to mislead" or something.

I bet it's already illegal in Germany.
 

Don't read this message (1)

cmburns69 (169686) | more than 5 years ago | (#28603381)

I think I know where they get their inspiration. The description sounds just like the video for Weird Al's "Don't Download This Song": http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yz-grdpKVqg [youtube.com]

Huh (1)

Ian Alexander (997430) | more than 5 years ago | (#28603405)

Yeah, watching that trailer my first response is "wow, they're douchefucks for doing that to someone over some media."

Don't copy that floppy was funny and appealed to your sense of right and wrong/interest in supporting content creators so they'll be around to produce more good stuff. This just sounds like trying to scare people into line. Which can work, but it does rather rob you of any moral high ground when your argument is "or we'll fuck you up, put you in prison, and go after your family."

Where have I heard these scare tactics before? (0, Troll)

damn_registrars (1103043) | more than 5 years ago | (#28603419)

Oh, yeah, from the perpetual pro-pot propaganda pushers.

Who would like everyone to believe that every hour of every day, in every city in every state in this country, there are evil, evil, police officers armed to the teeth kicking down doors of houses and apartments based on individual rumors of the presence of pot. Where of course then the innocent pot smokers are immediately hauled off to federal pound-me-in-the-ass prison and sentenced to 5*10^30 years in prison for possession and repeatedly assaulted and ass-raped by gorillas, ostriches, elephants, and of course their cell mates - all of whom are convicted serial killers who will be released next week.

Re:Where have I heard these scare tactics before? (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28603783)

I don't know who's talking about evil, evil cops or hourly raids (maybe you should smoke a little bit less), but do you really have to be a pro-pot propaganda pusher to question no-knock SWAT raids based on shaky drug informants' information?

It sounds like a bit of a problem to me -- people ('evil' police included) even sometimes die as a result.
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ryan_Frederick [wikipedia.org] .

And now... our corporate anthem... (2, Insightful)

MickyTheIdiot (1032226) | more than 5 years ago | (#28603431)

Do what's best for the corporation... or we'll throw your ass in jail.

What a joke...

Worst (1)

dindi (78034) | more than 5 years ago | (#28603435)

Regardless of what it is about, it is the worst short film/clip/propaganda I have seen in a long time. That includes local (Costa Rican) commercials and Latin American soap operas .....

OMG .... shame on you for making me watch this

I wanted to watch Don't Copy That Floppy... (1)

Noodles (39504) | more than 5 years ago | (#28603445)

but when the rapping started they lost me.

SIIA Members: Google, IBM, Adobe, Intel, Oracle... (2, Informative)

theodp (442580) | more than 5 years ago | (#28603459)

A selection of U.S. companies from the SIIA Member Directory [siia.net] : Accenture, Adobe, AOL, Barclays, Bloomberg, CNN, Charles Schwab, Citi, Cognizant, CollabNet, College Board, Deloitte, Deutsche Bank, Fidelity, Goldman Sachs, Google, IBM, Infosys, Intel, Intuit, JPMorgan Chase, Lazard Freres, McGraw Hill, Merrill Lynch, Morgan Stanley, Novell, Oracle, Reuters, Salesforce, SAP, SAS, Standard & Poor's, Sun Microsystems, Symantec, Time Warner, UPI, The Wall Street Journal, Wells Fargo Bank.

So it's not a parody? (1)

British (51765) | more than 5 years ago | (#28603485)

Yes, it's almost spot-on like the video from the IT crowd, yet it's from the same creators of DCTF. You are shown police state tactics with a scene that reminds me of Brazil.

We have come a long way, America.

The scene with the blacksuits looks very familiar (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28603487)

That kid is named Blake, right?

Sweet! (2, Insightful)

dufachi (973647) | more than 5 years ago | (#28603491)

They are intimating that you can end up in Federal "Pound-You-In-The-Ass" Prison for making a dupe. Nice! The industry just needs to realize that it's free advertising and treat it as such instead of endorsing child rape.

This could be YOU! (1)

ShadowWraith (1322747) | more than 5 years ago | (#28603511)

Both illegal downloaders and the music industry know that it is pretty much impossible to sue every filesharer. This knowledge is basically what keeps filesharers going. The only reason that organizations like the SIAA sue individual parties for ridiculous sums of money is to induce fear in the overwhelming majority of filesharers and thereby cut down filesharing as much as possible by pure psychology. Coupling this video with the real-life verdicts carried out on a few of the millions of filesharers will effectively cause many eleven-year-olds to piss their pants in fear and not download that album. What the SIAA doesn't realize that the average eleven-year-old that will actually be intimidated by this will probably not BUY any albums either, and that almost all filesharers will simply see through the scare tactics and filesharing will live on. Therefore, what this amounts to is just a ton of money wasted by the SIAA on a stupid music video that will at best serve to entertain the public on youtube. The SIAA made a good move with their first video from the 90s; they appealed to people's sense of morality, detailing how much work is put into a game and why it is worth it to support the creators. Though appealing to conscience wouldn't stop all filesharing, people would at least feel moved to pay for games (or other media) that they enjoyed, supporting an industry of quality. I do not know why they have resorted to useless fearmongering instead.

Utopia for RIA and MPAA (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28603515)

This represents Utopia for the RIAA and MPAA and SIIA weasels.

IN SOVIET RUSSIA (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28603557)

Floppy Copy YOU!

Re:IN SOVIET RUSSIA (3, Insightful)

fractoid (1076465) | more than 5 years ago | (#28603681)

In evolutionary biology, floppy PREVENTS coppy.

Weird Al (1)

bertoelcon (1557907) | more than 5 years ago | (#28603619)

Seeing this really just made me think of "Don't Download This Song" by Weird Al, and that was a clear mockery of the system.

Anti-piracy advocates should be banned! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28603669)

anti-piracy advocates should be banned! paid by our taxes to solve a unsolvable thing, it's not even a crime as not everyone is doing it. and saying it is so is just criminalizing others, and this pointing fingers will cause people to join torrent sites and promote piracy. the more you prosecute the more people will pirate, as counter productive as the war on drugs (also paid by your tax money...) the majority of people buy (end of story).

I'm glad to see (1)

morsmortis (1579229) | more than 5 years ago | (#28603675)

how our tax money is put to good use in these perilous times with the portrayal of a swat-like raid on a software pirate. You know because he probably spends the money he saves, by pirating software, on assault weapons, hardcore drugs, and danky craigslist girls.

What (1)

Smoke2Joints (915787) | more than 5 years ago | (#28603679)

Are they actually serious?

We've seen these tactics before... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28603727)

We've seen these tactics before - it's the same thing with people trying to stop us from shoplifting. What a bunch of douchbags. Walmart has plenty of money. And they use slave-labor in third-world countries. I should be allowed to stick it to the man. Screw them!

perfect Libertarian propaganda (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28603735)

This video isn't about piracy at all. It's the perfect police state scenario, this ought to scare all those kids into voting for Libertarians instead of Democrats and Republicans.

Obligitory Plug (Feel free to ignore) (1)

WheelDweller (108946) | more than 5 years ago | (#28603757)

Real operating systems come on torrents...and their organizers encourage you use them!

In Windows, as with the case of TCP/IP, it was a foreign body to Win95. Someone made "WinSock" and pirated the hell out of it, and later versions came as part of the OS as if it'd been there all the time. Moral: Microsoft didn't invent the internet: Unix did.

Later, they decided to build it in, but they butchered the standard. Instead of following the standard agreed-upon by hundreds of vendors, they detected when an IIS webserver was on the other end, and agreed to ignore the ACKs and NAKs. This wasn't the only time they munged the standard to make them look better. They also chewed up DHCP servers, because a Win95 host would KEEP TALKING AFTER IT LOST IT'S LEASE on an IP address.

So those parts have been thrown away, rebuilt, thrown away partly, given new logos, recompiled for marketing reasons and are as they are, today.

In Linux, TCP/IP was one of several standards adopted early on. Sure, *very* early they probably threw something away, but the development model is more about "polishing the apple" over, and over, and over again.

When you do that, parts of the OS, probably like login.c (inspired and running years before Linux was created, then with one major change when PAM came in) have been patched and matured to the point they need no more fixing: they've beaten all the bugs. Login.c is one of 100,000 files on my machine at this moment- they're all being polished into leaner, stronger, better files every time someone files a bug report.

Windows can't possibly do this. Never mind the stolen code from Sybase (now called Access, and largely re-written) every release, they have to *pay* a cadre of people to build something which has huge chunks that are fresh and buggy. Linux never does, and has an even larger audience to check for bugs, both before and after launch.

Where's this lead?

At some point, Microsoft won't be able to release a version more stable, or more bug-free than your garden-variety Linux. 20+ years later, and we're STILL fighting an ever-growing batch of malware of various kinds, we're STILL being told the new version will be stronger and we're STILL requiring a third-party program to help Windows make it through the day. And sometimes that's not enough.

Cisco makes routers that make sense of the "Windows Networking" that seems to have never figured out how to leave a subnet.

Banks all over the world, flush-n-fill each and every PC in their employ every night because it's more likely to let them miss viruses. They're real data is on non-Microsoft servers. More and more, guess who that is?

So yeah...continue with that horse-n-buggy thinking that has scared real creative geniuses out of the PC marketplace for 15-20 years. Help along that product-liability suit or that cadre of stormtroopers who comes in looking for pirated software and leaves with a $100,000 check a month later, after bringing your business to a halt.

My operating system was made *on the internet*, programmed by fellows with compassion and vision. Won't you leave your horse and buggy world and try something new?

A message from the all powerful Thulsa Doom (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28603787)

"My child, you have come to me my son. For who now is your father if it is not me? I am the well spring, from which you flow. When I am gone, you will have never been. What would your world be, without me? My son." - Thulsa Doom

Get down on your fucking knees and pray for forgiveness, mortal. It is only by His grace that you are allowed to awake daily to fulfill your meager 'needs'

If you had one iota of intelligence you'd recognize Thulsa Doom as the provider for your desire to live. Only by His guidance can you come to the true meaning of strength!

THULSA DOOM!

This sounds familiar (4, Funny)

Boawk (525582) | more than 5 years ago | (#28603789)

The teen finds himself in a prison jumpsuit forced to tattoo shirtless adult inmates who eventually turn on him, physically attack him, and make him run for his life back to his jail cell

Sounds like an average day working tech support.

The GNU Rap (1)

yams (637038) | more than 5 years ago | (#28603813)

Maybe RMS [wikipedia.org] could create a parody that goes like "Copy this...., this is NOT a crime". I'm sure it would be a big hit.
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