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Is IE Usage Share Collapsing?

kdawson posted more than 4 years ago | from the war-rejoined dept.

Internet Explorer 575

je ne sais quoi writes "Net Applications normally releases its statistics for browser and operating system usage share on the first of every month. This month, however, the data has not shown up — only a cryptic message stating they are reviewing the data for inexplicable statistical variations and that it will be available soon. Larry Dignan at ZDNet has a blog post that might explain what is happening: Statcounter has released some data that shows a precipitous drop in IE browser use in North America, to the benefit of Firefox, Safari, and Chrome. At the end of May, StatCounter shows IE usage share (for versions 6, 7, and 8 combined) at around 64%; at the beginning of June it is now about 56% — an astounding 8% drop in one month. We should keep in mind the difficulties in estimating browser usage share: this could very well be a change in how browsers report themselves, or some other statistical anomaly. So it will probably be healthy to remain skeptical until trend this is confirmed by other organizations. Have any of you seen drops in IE usage share for Web-sites you administer?"

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typo in summary (5, Informative)

je ne sais quoi (987177) | more than 4 years ago | (#28613949)

Hi there, submitter here. I left a typographical error in the summary. "in the beginning of June" should read "in the beginning of July". Oops, sorry about that.

Re:typo in summary (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28613989)

No problem, Noone reads the summary.

Re:typo in summary (5, Funny)

snl2587 (1177409) | more than 4 years ago | (#28614023)

Who is this Noone fellow?

Re:typo in summary (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28614439)

One of his cow-orkers.

Re:typo in summary (1, Funny)

philbert2.71828 (781399) | more than 4 years ago | (#28614449)

Who is this Noone fellow?

I wish I had mod points. The parent's post is pretty well on topic. My first reaction to the grandparent's post was that "Noone" was an intentional typo, since it was replying to a post about a typo. Now I'm not so sure.

OK, now I'm replying to a post about a typo that was in another post about a typo. I hope my post doesn't have any typos...

Re:typo in summary (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28614507)

I wish I had mod points. The parent's post is pretty well on topic. My first reaction to the grandparent's post was that "Noone" was an intentional typo, since it was replying to a post about a typo. Now I'm not so sure.

OK, now I'm replying to a post about a typo that was in another post about a typo. I hope my post doesn't have any typos...

I counted 6 including the subject.

Re:typo in summary (1)

gparent (1242548) | more than 4 years ago | (#28614359)

What summary? Is there anything past the headline? Must be those new Javascript changes...

Re:typo in summary (5, Funny)

MadFarmAnimalz (460972) | more than 4 years ago | (#28614375)

There's a summary now?

I was making do with the first eight characters of the headlines.

So, in response to "Is IE Us", I'll have to say no. No it isn't.

Re:typo in summary (5, Funny)

WebManWalking (1225366) | more than 4 years ago | (#28614389)

You must mean Peter Noone of Herman's Hermits. "I'm MSIE the 8th I am. MSIE the 8th I am, I am. I got bested by the browser next door. We've been tryin' 7 times before. And everyone was an MSIE. We wouldn't pass an AcidTest, no ma'am. I'm the User Agent MSIE, MSIE the 8th I am, I am. MSIE the 8th I am."

Re:typo in summary (2, Funny)

terraformer (617565) | more than 4 years ago | (#28614491)

Linux PC: $400 Monthly Internet fee: $50 You finally get a lead story published on /. and it has a typo: Priceless

It was to be expected (1)

ls671 (1122017) | more than 4 years ago | (#28613961)

It always takes a while to educate the whole population with regards to technical stuff, after a while, it becomes public knowledge although ;-)))

Re:It was to be expected (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28614075)

And some people will never be educated. They have to actually die to rid the world of their ignorance.

Re:It was to be expected (4, Insightful)

Swizec (978239) | more than 4 years ago | (#28614183)

It always takes a while to educate the whole population with regards to technical stuff, after a while, it becomes public knowledge although ;-)))

The tough part isn't making it public knowledge, the difficulty is in making it common knowledge.

To compare this to more sinister things: Notice of your house being demolished on Tuesday can be put up in a dark cellar with no stairs at the bottom of a locked filing cabinet in a disused lavatory of the planning office guarded by a Leopard. This is public knowledge.

Making a news cast on the fact a new road is being run through your neighbourhood and personally notifying everyone whose house will be demolished is much more difficult. This is common knowlege.

Re:It was to be expected (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28614489)

You think it's EASY to get into a dark cellar with no stairs, and then leave a leopard behind to guard it??

Re:It was to be expected (5, Interesting)

Lumpy (12016) | more than 4 years ago | (#28614207)

What I noticed is a dramatic shift in the listening to your IT guy lately.

People actually listen now instead of blowing me off and going right back to their porn surfing with IE.

The bad economy makes people actually listen when the IT guy says "I'll be back in 30 days to collect another $250.00 if you dont change your internet habits."

I love a bad economy, it forces people to be less stupid.

Re:It was to be expected (3, Informative)

Swizec (978239) | more than 4 years ago | (#28614249)

I love a bad economy, it forces people to be less stupid.

But apparently a large portion of your business was relying on the fact people are stupid. Now what?

Re:It was to be expected (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28614347)

I think he'll be OK. There are a lot of stupid people out there...

Re:It was to be expected (1)

Tumbleweed (3706) | more than 4 years ago | (#28614497)

> I love a bad economy, it forces people to be less stupid.

But apparently a large portion of your business was relying on the fact people are stupid. Now what?

Ignorance can fluctuate, but stupidity seems to be a constant. No worries for him, I bet.

The ideal customer is one who is rich, trusting, and ignorant. The first of those three rarely goes along with the other two, unfortunately.

Re:It was to be expected (4, Insightful)

stevied (169) | more than 4 years ago | (#28614345)

At the risk of being slightly controversial .. how much of the difference between commercial and OSS really is technical?

Don't get me wrong, I'm rabidly pro-F/L/OSS [wikipedia.org], and nudge "ordinary" people towards it wherever I can, but I think it's a bit of a simplification to describe it as purely technically superior. When it does push the envelope, it normally drives the commercial world to react and improve, so they're usually roughly level-pegging at the feature level.

Where it really shines, I think, is in harder-to-define areas. Ethics, for one. Architectural taste, for another (debian got package management right 10 - 15 years ago - has windows caught up yet?) Social/organizational factors - the maintenance and repository models used by open OS distributions works so well that the commercial world is mimicking it with "app stores." Lastly, of course, there's motivation - I trust Ubuntu and Mozilla to fix security holes because it's the Right Thing and because they want to do a good job, and not just because they're scared of getting caught out, which I always feel is the mindset in the commercial world.

I understand these things are probably harder to explain to the general public, but can we at least be a bit more honest / precise amongst ourselves?

Proliferation of mobile browsers... (5, Insightful)

seramar (655396) | more than 4 years ago | (#28613977)

...could explain this, at least partially. All things combined and considered I am not suprised that IE is accounting for only 56% of browsers reported. Were we limited to desktop only, that might be different.

Re:Proliferation of mobile browsers... (4, Informative)

badasscat (563442) | more than 4 years ago | (#28614233)

My stats only count desktop browsers and I am at 52.4% for all versions of IE. And I don't run a tech-heavy site or anything, I run a site selling Japanese clothes. (http://www.tokyorebel.com)

Firefox 3.0 is at 35.6%, 3.5 is at a surprising 0.6%, but then it's new. (And thank God, because some of my CSS is totally messed up in 3.5.)

Actually now that I'm looking, I do have a stat that says "iPhone" which is at 0.2%.

Re:Proliferation of mobile browsers... (5, Interesting)

Maxo-Texas (864189) | more than 4 years ago | (#28614341)

The perception of myself (and finally! lately!) my non-technical friends...

is that using IE
a) has a ton of obnoxious ads- some are loud- some take over the screen.
b) is like walking around with a huge "kick me" sign on.
c) is frustrating because of the lack of many useful plugins (where would I get all these glorious HD Videos-- FINALLY "Blues Travellor" without firefox).
d) is frustrating because "they" own your browser-- not you. It's behavior serves "them", not you.

But mainly the virus/kick me thing.

After my bud clicked on a link (just a frikkin link!) on the yahoo message boards, he had to reinstall his entire computer!?!?!

With Firefox, Flashblock and Noscript- you are pretty darn safe.

Chrome got a lot of press- and to be honest, I've been looking at Safari myself. (once you break yourself of IE, you ask-- okay, but is there something else EVEN better than this?)

Re:Proliferation of mobile browsers... (2, Informative)

asa (33102) | more than 4 years ago | (#28614253)

All mobile browsing combined probably doesn't break 1% of Web usage. The chances that any large-scale swing has anything to do with mobile browsing are very, very, very slim.

It's the iPhOnE! (0)

Spy Handler (822350) | more than 4 years ago | (#28613993)

cos IE doesn't run on iPhone!

Re:It's the iPhOnE! (1)

alexborges (313924) | more than 4 years ago | (#28614153)

Well...

Yes, it IS the iphone...

Plus all those shiny new macs. Plus all those firefoxes out there (ff is still second on all charts and gains strongly as ie looses). Plus Chrome, which is backed by a strong player.

Scary stuff for redmond.

Re:It's the iPhOnE! (3, Informative)

asa (33102) | more than 4 years ago | (#28614211)

iPhone/iPod browsing makes up about half of one percent of Web usage. Desktop Safari makes up about 10% of Web usage. Firefox makes up about 25% of Web usage. I don't think the iPhone is having quite the impact you think the iPhone is having.

Not Surprising (1, Informative)

gubers33 (1302099) | more than 4 years ago | (#28614011)

Mozilla has grabbed a large portion of the market share and the explosion in Mac purchases has increased the use of Safari. The third browser which is taking many of the users away is Google's Chrome which is probably the most innovative of all of the browsers with many neat features which include interaction between windows, the most customization of any of the browsers in terms of placement of objects as well as bringing users unmatched speed.

Re:Not Surprising (3, Interesting)

orsty3001 (1377575) | more than 4 years ago | (#28614113)

I agree, the main reason I don't use Chrome is because of all the plugins I use with Firefox. Also I've notice more Macs in my server logs over the past few years. And definitely more people using Firefox. I've noticed a lot more Wii's and PS3's in the logs as well. Not sure if I'm just noticing it more though.

Re:Not Surprising (1)

asa (33102) | more than 4 years ago | (#28614285)

Chrome has been available for about 9 months and it's managed to carve out about 2% of Web browser usage. It got about 1/3rd of that in only days after release. It's not "taking many users away" from IE unless by many you mean about half as many as Firefox has in the same time period.

In utter disarray? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28614013)

Is it dying? Has netcraft confirmed it? Did it loose 73% of its core developer?

Re:In utter disarray? (5, Funny)

Endo13 (1000782) | more than 4 years ago | (#28614097)

Did it loose 73% of its core developer?

I dunno, but what I'm interested in is what they did with the other 27% of him.

Re:In utter disarray? (2, Funny)

Red Flayer (890720) | more than 4 years ago | (#28614317)

Did it loose 73% of its core developer?

I dunno, but what I'm interested in is what they did with the other 27% of him.

Obviously, they tighted the other 27%.

But that's sexist to assume it's a him.

I'm interested with what they did with the other 27% of her.

Or, since we don't know the state of the core developer, perhaps we should be interested in what they did with the other 13.5% of him and the other 13.5% of her.

Or something. It's a little late in the day for me to be recalling Schroedinger.

Re:In utter disarray? (1)

Maestro4k (707634) | more than 4 years ago | (#28614475)

Did it loose 73% of its core developer?

I dunno, but what I'm interested in is what they did with the other 27% of him.

Try the meatloaf in the cafeteria.

My statistics (3, Informative)

GoNINzo (32266) | more than 4 years ago | (#28614055)

I run a somewhat largish non-technology site, and I saw yesterday:
40.91% MSIE 7.0
27.11% MSIE 6.0
14.60% Mozilla/5.0
12.98% MSIE 8.0

Everything else below .1%. So that's 81% MSIE, 14.6% Mozilla, and everything else in the remaining 4.4%.

Re:My statistics (4, Interesting)

panaceaa (205396) | more than 4 years ago | (#28614131)

Does your web site not work on Safari or are you reading your statistics wrong?

Re:My statistics (1)

GoNINzo (32266) | more than 4 years ago | (#28614217)

It works, we just don't see a lot of traffic from Safari. It's less than .01% according to the logs with the user agent: Safari*

Re:My statistics (1)

MrMista_B (891430) | more than 4 years ago | (#28614147)

How many of those MSIE browser percentages are /other/ broswers that are merely spoofing 'MSIE' to your site?

If you can't measure that, you don't have an accurate measurement.

Re:My statistics (1)

hansamurai (907719) | more than 4 years ago | (#28614261)

I've heard this thrown about a lot but how commonplace is this spoofing? Seems reasonable maybe six years ago but I don't see the reason behind it anymore.

Re:My statistics (1)

GoNINzo (32266) | more than 4 years ago | (#28614315)

Er, if they are reporting themselves as a type of browser, then yes, I have accurate usage rates of reported browser type. It's a non-scientific number, sure, but it's not manufactured to have a desired outcome either.

In the end, I'm more interested in finding out what browsers my users are using, or even if they are just saying they're using, so I can better tune our site for their needs.

Re:My statistics (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28614401)

The number of browser users that even know how to spoof their browser's user agent is infinitesimally small. Imagining that it's even enough to break through the noise is silly.

Re:My statistics (2, Interesting)

dedazo (737510) | more than 4 years ago | (#28614403)

2001 called and said you can't use that tired old argument anymore. The default install of Firefox since 2.x (I believe) does not spoof IE in the user agent string. Firefox being the largest market share aside from any version of IE, the weight given to any other browser would be a statistical blip at best. In fact, if I remember correctly Konqueror in KDE3 and 4 actually spoofs Gecko by default. And Opera stopped spoofing MSIE after 6.x, IIRC.

Re:My statistics (1)

amicusNYCL (1538833) | more than 4 years ago | (#28614457)

I really doubt there are many people spoofing their user agent. Opera made that easy to do, but not a lot of people even use Opera, let alone using Opera while spoofing IE. I doubt many Firefox users are spoofing IE also, Firefox is big enough that nearly any website that works in IE also works in Firefox (if I find a site that doesn't work in Opera, like GoDaddy's stupid nameserver update process, I try it in Firefox before IE).

So, my point is that there's no reason to believe that a statistically significant number of users are actually spoofing their user agent string. It's possible to do, but there's no reason to believe people are actually doing it.

Re:My statistics (1)

bestadvocate (816742) | more than 4 years ago | (#28614195)

Do you have usage rates from a prior date for comparison? All websites have their crowds (I bet Slashdot gets more than its fair share of minority browsers).

Re:My statistics (3, Informative)

GoNINzo (32266) | more than 4 years ago | (#28614271)

No not really, we don't really track over time, though I have that capability. I do know that the MSIE 8 usage is way up, and really hitting the MSIE 7 usage more than anything else. The Firefox is about where it usually is.

Re:My statistics (1)

Dr_Ken (1163339) | more than 4 years ago | (#28614203)

Same with my sites too. Factor out the cellphone users and you get a whole different set of numbers. I doubt if Redmond is sweating it more than usual. But their Black Swan nemesis is probably coming...

Re:My statistics (3, Interesting)

spyka (1127127) | more than 4 years ago | (#28614309)

I run a tech-related site, so Firefox does have an above average share but no major changes in share month to month:

Firefox:
June 6, 2009 - July 6, 2009 63.55%
May 6, 2009 - June 5, 2009 63.77%

Internet Explorer
June 6, 2009 - July 6, 2009 20.83%
May 6, 2009 - June 5, 2009 21.68%

Opera
June 6, 2009 - July 6, 2009 5.86%
May 6, 2009 - June 5, 2009 6.48%

Chrome
June 6, 2009 - July 6, 2009 5.62%
May 6, 2009 - June 5, 2009 5.07%

Safari
June 6, 2009 - July 6, 2009 3.44%
May 6, 2009 - June 5, 2009 2.33%

No drop off here (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28614057)

We've seen no major drop off, just a steady and slow decline. We track over 15 million users a day across the sites we manage here in the UK (mainly council properties).

Yes, of course (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28614073)

IE usage is shrinking, duh, and thank goodness. With that said the reason for the data review is actually because Linux usage dropped from 1% (omg woohoo, Linux is taking over the world!!!111) back to 0.64'ish percent. Don't get too excited zealots.

Not true (-1, Troll)

nausea_malvarma (1544887) | more than 4 years ago | (#28614083)

I recently found an article [notlong.com] that contradicts these findings.

Re:Not true (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28614145)

Kaspersky reports that links to a virus

Virus here (1)

GoNINzo (32266) | more than 4 years ago | (#28614179)

Yeah, this is a set of viruses that does a lot of popups and more. Skip this link, if you can. Think we'll see more of it in the future as well.

Re:Virus here (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28614435)

whats a virus? is that some kind of windows/ie feature?

hmm.... it's summer? (5, Funny)

timtux (1203162) | more than 4 years ago | (#28614089)

Couldn't it just be that all the geeks are running firefox/opera/chrome and everyone else is outside in the nice weather?

Re:hmm.... it's summer? (1)

nschubach (922175) | more than 4 years ago | (#28614371)

I think you underestimate the number of "non-tech" people that kill time on the Internet...

even less, here (1)

phriedrich (658327) | more than 4 years ago | (#28614091)

On some small pages I have to maintain the rates of IE dropped below 50%. The highest IE-rate I got on a page for a hotel with 46% and the lowest with 28% on the one for my soaring club.

It's because IE 6 support was droped on some sites (4, Informative)

denis-The-menace (471988) | more than 4 years ago | (#28614103)

There are a few sites where IE 6.0 displays things badly because the web master stopped kludging for it.

Slashdot.org
some parts of Google.
(Help me here!)

Joe-six paks noticed this and has found out that he has options...

IE8 likely to blame (1)

Cryophallion (1129715) | more than 4 years ago | (#28614109)

I'm betting there is an issue with the user agent reporting with IE8, or the stats are focused on IE7.
MS pushed IE8 out as a security update this month, and I bet most non-business computers got auto-updated.

Either that, or they didn't like IE8 with compatibility mode (hey, there's an idea, let's re-break the sites so they display the way the webs designers had to code it to get around our own bugs), so they went to FF 3.5.

Or, everyone could have just given up and gone to Mac and Linx/Unix derivative. But I think that is too much to hope for.

Re:IE8 likely to blame (1)

ivan256 (17499) | more than 4 years ago | (#28614323)

Bingo. And it was a Critical update, so most users woke up to find it auto-installed for them.

IE8 was a pretty big UI change, and users don't like it (they hate "new"). I know that when people ask me how to switch back I tell them that "they can't, but they can use Firefox instead".

Looking from multiple angles (5, Informative)

asa (33102) | more than 4 years ago | (#28614123)

If you look at the longterm trends reported by Net Applcations, something that StatCounter doesn't offer, it's hard to conclude that anything dramatic has just happened.

http://weblogs.mozillazine.org/asa/archives/2009/06/historical_view.html

These longer trends are steady and smooth and there's nothing that's happened in the last couple of months that would cause IE to fall off the cliff.

That being said, there is a lot of churn in the various browser versions. IE is really a collection of browsers with measurable share, IE 6, IE 7, and IE 8. Looking at these versions, it's clear that a lot is happening.

http://weblogs.mozillazine.org/asa/archives/2009/07/a_browser_prediction.html

It's likely that IE 7 and IE 6 will fall to under 10% global share by the end of this year and that IE 8 will grow to approximately 40%. That would give IE 60% overall, Firefox about 25%, Safari about 10%, and "other" would hold the remaining 5%.

Re:Looking from multiple angles (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28614529)

IE6 is never going to die. It is the punishment for our sins.

Skeptical (3, Insightful)

fm6 (162816) | more than 4 years ago | (#28614127)

So it will probably be healthy to remain skeptical until trend this is confirmed by other organizations.

Especially after all the breathless "Firefox is taking over" stories on Slashdot, submitted by fanboys every time there's a spike in downloads (like after a release!) or the browser's market share gains a tiny fraction of a percent.

Mind you, I'm really glad to see that we're finally getting some serious competition in the browser marketplace. But before you congratulate yourselves too much, send a psychic "Thanks for Shooting Yourselves in the Foot!" to Steve and Bill. Firefox, Safari, Chrome and Opera all have real advantages, but none of these would have overcome IE's big advantage: being the default browser on the desktop OS that owns 90% of its market. The only thing that could have overcome that advantage is not the advantages of the competition, but the extreme crappiness of IE itself.

1% maybe... (3, Informative)

mwhahaha (172475) | more than 4 years ago | (#28614135)

On the two sites I have access to for this info IE dropped about 1% for May vs June. One site (~19M visitors a month) it was 57.91% vs 56.64%. The other (~132M visitors) it was 60.17% vs 59.40%. I always question these sort of numbers because browser usage is very closely tied with demographics, and I wonder just what sites are they using to get them...

Anonymous Coward (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28614149)

Considering that the unemployment numbers continue to rise, less business users running IE + more consumers running iphones might account for part of the change.

Looking from multiple angles (-1, Redundant)

asa (33102) | more than 4 years ago | (#28614159)

If you look at the longterm trends reported by Net Applcations, something that StatCounter doesn't offer, it's hard to conclude that anything dramatic has just happened.

http://weblogs.mozillazine.org/asa/archives/2009/06/historical_view.html [mozillazine.org]

These longer trends are steady and smooth and there's nothing that's happened in the last couple of months that would cause IE to fall off the cliff.

That being said, there is a lot of churn in the various browser versions. IE is really a collection of browsers with measurable share, IE 6, IE 7, and IE 8. Looking at these versions, it's clear that a lot is happening.

http://weblogs.mozillazine.org/asa/archives/2009/07/a_browser_prediction.html [mozillazine.org]

It's likely that IE 7 and IE 6 will fall to under 10% global share by the end of this year and that IE 8 will grow to approximately 40%. That would give IE 60% overall, Firefox about 25%, Safari about 10%, and "other" would hold the remaining 5%.

Re:Looking from multiple angles (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28614415)

The nice thing about StatCounter is that it offers statistics for different countries/regions for free (Net Applications needs a subscription for that).

According to StatCounter, Firefox has almost caught up with IE in Europe and there are several countries (Germany, Finland, etc.) where Firefox is the number one browser. China, on the other hand, seems to be completely dominated by IE with a 96% share :)

What would really be useful... (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 4 years ago | (#28614213)

Would be a breakdown of browser share by type of user/system.

Different users and systems have, by their browser choices, effects on different aspects of the web. For instance, Big Serious Corporate setups are likely a bastion of IE6, maybe some 7 among the adventurous ones. This has an enormously strong influence on developers of corporate intranet stuff, and portal sites; but probably has relatively little effect on your trendy web 2.0 entertainment/social networking outfits. Most places that are still using IE6 probably have IT staff blocking friendTube and Twitbook and whatnot.

The situation with, say, college students is pretty much exactly the opposite. Aggregate numbers are interesting, and it is always fun to watch IE's share sink; but they don't really tell you what you actually want to know; which is "What mixes of browsers are particular sites or categories of sites running into, what browsers are different groups of people using(and how willing are they to switch)?"

I know why its broken.... (1)

twebb72 (903169) | more than 4 years ago | (#28614229)

Q: Whats all that churning and bubbling in there? A: That's Mr. Inexplicable Statistical Variations

Please let this be true! (4, Informative)

mcrbids (148650) | more than 4 years ago | (#28614231)

Not only would this change be welcome, but it would force Microsoft to "play ball" with the standards for HTML rather than roll their own and mark all the bug reports "will not fix".

Take a look at the history:

1) Microsoft is all about selling stuff on CD-ROM with the marketing vision "Information at your fingertips".

2) The Internet happens, and overnight, Netscape is a raving success because it actually PUT information at your fingertips.

3) Billy boy issues a memo to the whole company to turn as fast as possible to support the Internetz.

4) IE comes out - first a sucktacular mess, and finally almost livable around IE 5 or so.

5) IE 6 comes out, Netscape crumbles.

6) Netscape goes underground at AOL who throws a few developers at it while using it to negotiate a link on the Desktop. IE Dominates so tremendously that it's the platform of choice simply because it's installed everywhere.

7) Microsoft stops doing anything for half a decade. (whistle whistle)

8) Navigator continuously improves, finally re-emerging as Phoenix/Firefox. Suddenly, Microsoft's browser looks like a 5-year-old pile of cruft that's difficult to program for.

Suddenly, Microsoft will give a shiat. They might finally fix the things that developers!developers!developers! have been whining, bitching, complaining, and screaming about all these years.

Irony: "Free Internet Exporer 8" ad at the top while I type this message!

JavaScript AI to the rescue for Internet Explorer! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28614235)

Artificial Intelligence [scn.org] created expressly for MicroSoft Internet Explorer (MSIE) will save the day (but not save the Planet Earth from rapacious HomoSapiens forebears of Machine Intelligence).

JavaScript [google.com] for artificial intelligence lets the True AI Mind come alive in the IE browser.

Artificial intelligence in Forth and JavaScript [google.com] encourages a continuing high market share for Internet Explorer (IE).

MJ Factor, plus, it is summer (2, Interesting)

kenh (9056) | more than 4 years ago | (#28614243)

First, the MJ factor - these stats my be low, but I bet they will rise again once all the web-surfing born-again Michael Jackson fans are reflected in the stats for July.

Also, the summer factor is huge - at $WORK (Public school district) we have over 1,000 windows boxes that are now sitting idle through August, their IE 7 and IE 8 browsers aren't flipping through the most popular websites anymore. There are likely MILLIONS and MILLIONS of idle Windows machines at Universities and public schools skewing the stats down for IE 6, 7, and 8.

Re:MJ Factor, plus, it is summer (2, Interesting)

nschubach (922175) | more than 4 years ago | (#28614455)

Plenty of time to go install FF3.5 on all those machines so the students will enjoy working in the lab again... ;)

Re:MJ Factor, plus, it is summer (1)

nschubach (922175) | more than 4 years ago | (#28614493)

Actually, now that I think about it...

If that's true, that would only show that IE is only popular because of silly campus/business mandates that their students/employees be forced to use IE and that they choose to use other browsers when they can. I know I fall into that situation. I'm sure I'm not alone.

Re:MJ Factor, plus, it is summer (1)

AscianBound (1359727) | more than 4 years ago | (#28614525)

I doubt this school effect is really as significant as you claim (with no support). And even then, probably a decent portion of school computers use alternatives to IE. As equally anecdotal counter-evidence to your claim that summer decreases IE usage, I'd like to point out that the browser I am forced to use at my summer workplace is IE. There is no reason to believe that changes in user habits during summer will only move away from IE. And finally, has this kind of change away from IE been seen before during the summer? I do not keep up with broswer shares, but if this was normal for summer, I doubt people would be pointing it out or checking their numbers.

I CHANGED IT. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28614277)

Window just isn't ready for the intelligent yet. It may be ready for the web servers that you blonds use to distribute your porous subroutines across the world wide web, but the average computer user isn't going to spend months learning how to use a CLI and then hours compiling packages so that they can get a workable graphic interface to check their mail with because they don't have to with Linux, especially not when they already have a Windows machine that is so security flawed and is backed by a major corporation, as opposed to Linux which is only supported by a few million developers verses a few hundred droids. The last thing I want is a level 5 windows dwarf providing me my secure-less OS.

There I fixed that for you.

Matches my numbers (1)

dogmatixpsych (786818) | more than 4 years ago | (#28614289)

While my various sites (blogs) are all relatively low-traffic, I consistently run at about 56% IE with the rest dominated by Firefox and Safari (although some sites have a lot more Firefox traffic than IE traffic).

end of semester (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28614291)

Could this be in part attributed to the time of year? There is less surfing at schools and universities that run IE and more usage at home with the alternative browsers.

My stats (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28614343)

Ok, I've just checked my stats for my site, which is reasonably high-traffic but a geology/earth-sciences site so it may be skewed with a large percentage of university campus access - so please don't read too much into the figures, but it still makes interesting reading:

7/09 is of course July 2009 and the earliest stats I have is March 2005. Note that earlier stats also had a few % for Mozilla which I haven't added to the Firefox total, so it's simply Firefox v IE v Safari v Chrome.

          7/09        1/09           7/08        1/08           7/07                           3/05
IE        65.9%       68.5%          73.7%       74.2%          75.4%             --- -        83.4%
Firefox   22.6%       21.2%          19.2%       15.3%          14.6%                           6.1%
Safari     4.6%        4.8%           2.9%        2.5%           2.2%                           0.8%
Chrome     2.3%        0.1%            -           -

So, not exactly a dramatic falloff, but certainly a trend that's continuing to give bad news to Microsoft.

I hope someone made screen shots (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28614379)

This report's data is currently under review. It will become available as soon as possible.

[http://marketshare.hitslink.com/operating-system-market-share.aspx?qprid=8 [hitslink.com]]

All reports are reviewed at the beginning of each month to ensure the following:

  • No data collection errors occurred
  • There are no major inexplicable statistical variations

All reports that have not been reviewed are prominently labeled with a warning. If any part of a report's data falls outside the reviewed timeframe, a warning is also displayed.

[http://marketshare.hitslink.com/status.aspx [hitslink.com]]

~20% here, and still in decline (4, Informative)

Enleth (947766) | more than 4 years ago | (#28614393)

That's for a major Polish website devoted to a popular, long-running game series. The userbase is indeed a little more tech-conscious than the average Internet user around here, but not by much - just a few power gamers and techies, lots of "casuals". Nevertheless, IE was at ~70% in 2004, ~50% in 2005 and so on down to ~25% in the late 2008 and ~20% now. Right now it's kind of stabilizing (but still falling) and I don't forsee it falling below 15% anytime soon, but I'm starting to suspect that by the end of the year, Opera might overtake it (16% and rising, mostly ex-Firefox users right now).

We're not actively doing anything anti-IE or pro-FF/Opera (well, maybe except that IE is getting all the CSS/JS bugfixes lats, but that's *because* it's so low in the stats - we can afford letting the IE support lag behind), so it's mostly an outside trend, I think.

All the statistics I'm basing this post on were generated by Google Analytics, by the way.

Is this New York Post for nerds? (2, Interesting)

brasselv (1471265) | more than 4 years ago | (#28614409)

I'm not on MS payroll, but honestly, is this article worth any attention?

I hope FF gets 99% of the market soon, but this type of baseless speculation certainly does not help.

I hope so! (1)

Abalamahalamatandra (639919) | more than 4 years ago | (#28614421)

I tell everyone I know, along with everyone I work with, that surfing anything but internal corporate sites with Internet Exploder is the same thing as saying "take my machine, please!" to the world at large. Since I'm in charge of security infrastructure for a nationwide company with over 10K employees, I get listened to a bit more than your average geek. I'm single-handedly responsible for at least 30-40 people, if not more, switching to Firefox over the last 6 months, I'm quite sure.

The current ActiveX video 0-day, plus the constantly-updated [sans.org] list of sites that are actively exploiting it, is perfect proof that you're a fool to surf with IE.

You're also a fool to run Windows XP on a daily basis, but that's another topic.

Hmm (2, Funny)

trifish (826353) | more than 4 years ago | (#28614465)

Or maybe NetApps just came up with a creative way to earn more money from ads by delaying the release and having people come back every day for one week to check if the data is already there...

Well, why not. It's ok. But let's not misinterpret that.

Firefox 3.5 Memory Leaks (0, Offtopic)

dooby_Monster (817224) | more than 4 years ago | (#28614505)

Off topic but, Has anyone noticed sever memory leaks with Firefox 3.5 left my machine on in work for about 3 days. Came in this morning and the firefox process was running at about 700MB Ram Usage. I was under the impression there was supposed to be big improvements in this area for the application. Surely i'm not the only person who has noticed this. There were only about 2 tabs open. Didn't take a note of what tabs were open but would of been nice if could of sent some sort of log but what guarantee is there that these ever get looked at anyway. dm

w3schools doesn't show anything (4, Informative)

Xtifr (1323) | more than 4 years ago | (#28614535)

W3 Schools [w3schools.com] which has an admitted alternate-browser bias does not show any sort of abrupt drop-off for IE, and if anywhere were going to, I would think it would be this site. In fact, it shows Firefox dropping for the first time since September of last year (when Chrome was initially released), but only half a percentage point. IE7 is losing ground to IE8 rather quickly, but IE6 actually gained a half a percentage point since May. Chrome is also up another half a point, and nothing else really had enough movement to be worth mentioning (Safari up a tenth, Opera down a tenth).

My Stats Disagree (3, Informative)

Bill Dimm (463823) | more than 4 years ago | (#28614541)

The stats for MagPortal.com [magportal.com] (should be fairly unbiased) are not showing a drop in MSIE of that magnitude. Here is a comparison going from the last week in May to the first week in July:

MSIE: 66.10% -> 64.34%
Firefox: 25.71% -> 27.41%
Safari: 5.90% -> 5.61%
Chrome: 2.29% -> 2.65%

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