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IronKey Unveils Self-Destructing USB Flash Drive

ScuttleMonkey posted more than 5 years ago | from the better-than-having-to-eat-it dept.

191

fysdt writes to share that IronKey has released a USB flash drive with self-destruct capability. Specializing in "secure flash drives," IronKey has launched the S200 aimed at government and enterprise customers, "featuring hardened physical security, the latest Cryptochip technology, active anti-malware and enhanced management capabilities. It's the 'first and only USB storage device to achieve FIPS 140-2, Level 3 validation' and delivers advanced Cryptochip featuring AES-256, tamper-resistance and self-destruction circuitry."

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Nerdgasm (1)

amateur6 (1597289) | more than 5 years ago | (#28682701)

FTA: " Physical Security â" the IronKey cryptographic module includes the following physical security mechanisms that meet or exceed the Level 3 requirements:...Hard epoxy potting material (opaque to the visible spectrum) that encapsulates the multi-chip circuitry, thereby preventing removal/penetration attempts without causing serious damage to the chips "

I'm sorry, that's so straight-outta-Neuromancer-Gibsonesque I need to change my pants.

Re:Nerdgasm (4, Informative)

afidel (530433) | more than 5 years ago | (#28682767)

You're impressed that they coated the circuit board with black epoxy? The only impressive thing about that is they use so little power that heat transfer isn't an issue.

Re:Nerdgasm (1)

idontgno (624372) | more than 5 years ago | (#28682859)

Whadday mean, "heat transfer isn't an issue"? Of course it's an issue. How do you think they achieve "self-destruct"?

Re:Nerdgasm (3, Interesting)

Jah-Wren Ryel (80510) | more than 5 years ago | (#28682885)

You're impressed that they coated the circuit board with black epoxy? The only impressive thing about that is they use so little power that heat transfer isn't an issue.

Indeed. Get back to us when they have a Level 4 product - that's what all the big boys use.

Re:Nerdgasm (4, Funny)

TooMuchToDo (882796) | more than 5 years ago | (#28682929)

Is that where my USB key is embedded in a stick of dynamite for quick data wiping?

Re:Nerdgasm (1)

MarkvW (1037596) | more than 5 years ago | (#28683035)

Man! That reminds me of the scene from "This is Spinal Tap" where the musician is discussing why his amplifier is better because you can turn it up to level 11!

Re:Nerdgasm (1)

Smidge207 (1278042) | more than 5 years ago | (#28683179)

Indeed. Get back to us when they have a Level 4 product - that's what all the big boys use.

Level 4 is a theoretically achieved state where even looking at the device before entering the correct key randomizes the data to emulate a Rob Malda nullo Slashdot troll post.

=Smidge=

Re:Nerdgasm (1)

mrsteveman1 (1010381) | more than 5 years ago | (#28684011)

Only Chuck Norris can do that, you can only try.

Re:Nerdgasm (-1, Troll)

afabbro (33948) | more than 5 years ago | (#28684635)

There are 4 boxes to use in the defense of liberty: soap, ballot, jury, ammo. Use in that order. Starting now.

Lamest. Sig. Ever.

Mainly because you're trying to be cute.

Testicles. (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28682709)

That is all.

Spais (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28682711)

Here is your mission if you choose to accept it. This USB will self-destruct in twenty seconds.

Shilltatstic1 (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28682749)

Shill much?

Encryption is just as good as self destruction (3, Informative)

basementman (1475159) | more than 5 years ago | (#28682769)

What's the point of having it self destruct? Encrypt any old flash drive with True Crypt and you have accomplished the same thing at a much lower price. Want to destroy the data? Hit yourself on the head with a crowbar, making you forget the password. Problem solved.

Re:Encryption is just as good as self destruction (4, Funny)

ocularDeathRay (760450) | more than 5 years ago | (#28682815)

didn't you just read the slashdot front page news that they can hack your brain now? god... pay attention. This is an anti brain hacking device.

Re:Encryption is just as good as self destruction (1)

Paracelcus (151056) | more than 5 years ago | (#28683487)

Will my brain emit a puff of smoke if it self-destructs?

Re:Encryption is just as good as self destruction (1)

fishbowl (7759) | more than 5 years ago | (#28683895)

>didn't you just read the slashdot front page news that they can hack your brain now?

You're underestimating the amount of damage a crowbar can do.

Re:Encryption is just as good as self destruction (2, Interesting)

CannonballHead (842625) | more than 5 years ago | (#28682833)

Hit yourself on the head with a crowbar, making you forget the password. Problem solved.

Maybe the information-hiding-people don't want to potentially allow themselves to be subjected to information-gathering techniques (*ahem* torture) by knowing the password. It's easier to just have the data destroyed after a certain period of time. Once it's gone, you don't have to forget a password and you don't have any password to be persuaded to remember?

Re:Encryption is just as good as self destruction (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28683013)

Ever heard of a cryptographic erase? Basically, the point is that the password you have to remember only grants the drive access to the cryptographic key (stored on the device, but encrypted with the password). In a cryptographic erase, the old key is deleted and a new one saved (and encrypted, likely with the same password). Thus, all data is lost beyond what can be gathered from any amount of torture (except what could otherwise be gotten from asking what was on the drive, which self destruct wont help against either). The only way to get the data at that point is a brute force attack on cryptographic keys, which would take a goodly long time.

This of course wouldn't prevent people from thinking you knew the password that would unlock the data, so you might be tortured into providing it (which you couldn't), but like I said, they likely would use the same techniques to simply get the data out of you.

Re:Encryption is just as good as self destruction (1)

fishbowl (7759) | more than 5 years ago | (#28683929)

>Once it's gone, you don't have to forget a password and you don't have any password to be persuaded to remember?

And you don't have any value to your captors, so they can just kill you for sport (or to set an example for the next person in line for interrogation.)

Re:Encryption is just as good as self destruction (4, Funny)

Cyberax (705495) | more than 5 years ago | (#28682871)

Encryption can easily be beaten by thermorectal cryptoanalysis (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rubber-hose_cryptanalysis).

Re:Encryption is just as good as self destruction (4, Insightful)

gapagos (1264716) | more than 5 years ago | (#28682965)

didn't xkcd [xkcd.com] teach you anything about encryption?

Re:Encryption is just as good as self destruction (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28684089)

What's the point of having it self destruct? Encrypt any old flash drive with True Crypt and you have accomplished the same thing at a much lower price. Want to destroy the data? Hit yourself on the head with a crowbar, making you forget the password. Problem solved.

I've had flash drives (encrypted with TrueCrypt no less) stolen from me. While I took comfort in the fact that the data was secure, I was upset for having it lost, and the thief gaining an expensive flash drive. At least with this, if someone stole it I could take pleasure knowing that they managed to steal a brick.

Re:Encryption is just as good as self destruction (1)

GigaHurtsMyRobot (1143329) | more than 5 years ago | (#28684493)

Normal flash drives are cheap... This one isn't. I think you have your story backwards.

Re:Encryption is just as good as self destruction (5, Insightful)

Hurricane78 (562437) | more than 5 years ago | (#28684247)

So you think that will make the evil ones stop torturing the password out of you? They'll use that same crowbar to make you remember it! ^^

(Interlude: WTF. I have my adblocker disabled for the first time in months, and the first thing I see, is an Ironkey banner. Truly a slashvertisement.)

The point is, that the keyfile on your USB key is encrypted with your password. So if you destroy the keyfile, which would open your encrypted safe, your password gets useless. You could scream it to the whole world. It wouldn't matter. Nobody could open that thing now. Not even you.

And that is why you never let someone know that you want access to his system. ^^
Just use a keylogger, or a trojan horse, and be good. Become a cleaning person in that place. Or gain some trust otherwise.
If you need it: There are some internal CIA agent training manuals on the net, that can teach you this. Or if you can speak Russias, I recommend some Russian forums. ^^

Re:Encryption is just as good as self destruction (4, Informative)

mlts (1038732) | more than 5 years ago | (#28684597)

The advantage of having it drop access to the data after a certain amount of tries is the same reason people use cryptographic tokens -- brute forcing a passphrase becomes a non issue.

There is another feature of the IronKey that isn't mentioned -- encryption on a machine, say at a student computer lab, but without requiring administrative rights to access the data. A lot of schools disallow admin access, and this is required to mount virtual volumes (TrueCrypt, BestCrypt, PGP, etc.) Having software to allow access to the drive that never needs to leave user space is a good thing in these cases.

IronKey does have a market. Especially for students at larger universities where there are people who lurk in the 24 hour computer labs just looking for a USB flash drive to steal. With a stolen USB flash drive, they can either sell the done homework, or if someone has a paper for a popular class that isn't turned in, actually take the word processing document and call it theirs. The downside is that the distinctive metal case does lure thieves, but the user has to figure out a balance. To the user, is the data on the drive worth the price premium, especially if the data can be used by a thief or extortionist? This applies to faculty too. I'm sure there are those who would be more than happy to sell any test or quiz data that was gleaned from a USB flash drive swiped from a faculty lab.

Another use for these USB flash drives is delivering to a customer something extremely confidental (such as TrueCrypt keyfiles or one time pads) that will be used for future communication of large volumes of data. For example, the customer gets the passphase from a rep, while a secure courier drops off the IronKey. This way, the data never crosses the Internet.

Rip-off (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28682771)

why would i pay $199 for that when i could buy a cheap USB drive and a hammer to break it with for less than $10?

Re:Rip-off (4, Insightful)

caerwyn (38056) | more than 5 years ago | (#28682939)

If you can break it with a hammer remotely, you should really be selling that capability- pretty sure someone would want to buy it.

Until then, the self destruct does work remotely.

Re:Rip-off (5, Funny)

Chabo (880571) | more than 5 years ago | (#28683913)

Here's my idea:

Sell a USB drive that's approximately 2 feet by 2 feet by 4 feet in size. The drive will consist of a radiation-shielded box. Inside, there's a flask filled with poison, and a hammer connected to a Geiger counter. There's also a cat with a heart monitor. If the flask breaks and the cat dies, then the drive will self-destruct.

Would you be willing to buy my product?

Re:Rip-off (5, Funny)

Starteck81 (917280) | more than 5 years ago | (#28682945)

I believe the self-destruct is triggered by unauthorized attempts to access. While your way is cheaper I suspect that rubber banding your usb drive to a hammer with a note that says "In case of theft please smash drive" is somewhat less effective due the lack of ethics most thieves posses.

Where's the market? (2, Interesting)

religious freak (1005821) | more than 5 years ago | (#28682777)

Funny, instead of paying extra, I'd just use a hammer, or a desk drawer, or if in a real pinch my two hands to break the thing apart. Unless you're James Bond, I don't see how most folks would need any more than this, and if they do need more, they already have it.

Re:Where's the market? (1)

hedwards (940851) | more than 5 years ago | (#28682853)

But that's who this is geared towards. The people that are carrying around data that is incredibly sensitive. Why these people are carrying it around on a thumb drive is a much bigger question, really, if you don't want it cracked, you shouldn't be carrying it on a portable easily lost/stolen medium.

Re:Where's the market? (4, Insightful)

LWATCDR (28044) | more than 5 years ago | (#28683029)

How would you transport a few gigabytes to a new location?
FTP?
External HD.
DVD?
And very large number of floppies?
I take my source code home with me on a USB drive. I currently encrypt it but I could see this being even better.

Re:Where's the market? (2, Informative)

pjt33 (739471) | more than 5 years ago | (#28683335)

Maybe there's some straightforward* way to hack your USB drivers so that the only devices they support are self-destructing drives, but if not then I'd prefer any computer with data sensitive enough to need this drive not to have the ability to mount any USB drive. You just need to look at the British civil service to see what happens when it's possible to dump your database to an unencrypted physical medium and then leave it on the train / lose it in the post.

For security-conscious home users it's great. For government / enterprise users you need methods of transfer which the sysadmin can lock down.

* Emphasised because I don't need to be told that if you use Linux you can obtain the source and break it to your heart's content.

You're on to something! (2, Funny)

SCPaPaJoe (767952) | more than 5 years ago | (#28683363)

I vote for the floppies. How about 5.25" 360k. 3 to 9 thousand of them!
How many people can read those nowadays?

Re:You're on to something! (1)

imamac (1083405) | more than 5 years ago | (#28683541)

I have a working Apple ][GS...

Re:You're on to something! (1)

bertoelcon (1557907) | more than 5 years ago | (#28684053)

I vote for a punch card system, after its been encrypted and the unlabeled cards shuffled.

Re:Where's the market? (1)

pete-classic (75983) | more than 5 years ago | (#28683423)

Surely you don't write gigs of code daily. VPN + SCM and you don't have to carry any code with you. (You might need an RSA ID at home, though.)

-Peter

Re:Where's the market? (1)

0100010001010011 (652467) | more than 5 years ago | (#28683525)

SVN and do an update anytime you get to a new location. It's how I work on code across 6 computers. Why didn't someone teach me about this subversion stuff earlier?

Re:Where's the market? (1)

shentino (1139071) | more than 5 years ago | (#28683851)

But I use git you insensitive clod!

Re:Where's the market? (2, Funny)

Abreu (173023) | more than 5 years ago | (#28683567)

How would you transport a few gigabytes to a new location?
FTP?
External HD.
DVD?
And very large number of floppies?
I take my source code home with me on a USB drive. I currently encrypt it but I could see this being even better.

I am partial to the classic solution: Microfilm in a hollow tooth

Re:Where's the market? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28683815)

How would you transport a few gigabytes to a new location?

I've undergone cybernetic surgery to have a data storage system implanted in my head.

How else could anyone securely transfer data too sensitive for the internet?

Brain (1)

PleaseFearMe (1549865) | more than 5 years ago | (#28684067)

Memorize the freaking 0's and 1's. If the brain gets lost or is stolen, it self-destructs by itself. 100% organic, too!

Re:Where's the market? (1)

mlts (1038732) | more than 5 years ago | (#28684651)

This falls under the "never underestimate the bandwidth of a station wagon full of tapes hurtling down the highway" category. With a lot of WAN Internet connections, it is a lot faster to carry a flash drive with your 8GB of data on it, than to download it from remote, especially if someone is often using different machines (student computer lab, for example.)

Re:Where's the market? (1)

CannonballHead (842625) | more than 5 years ago | (#28682863)

Maybe if they lost it and thus can't reach it with a hammer? :)

Re:Where's the market? (1)

LWATCDR (28044) | more than 5 years ago | (#28683067)

Actually a hammer may not be good enough. There are some very strict rules for medical records and financial data that this could be useful for.

The Market (4, Insightful)

NotQuiteReal (608241) | more than 5 years ago | (#28683073)

Like most things, if you have to ask "who needs this?", the answer is not you.

Personally, there are a great number of wildly popular products for which I am not in the market.

Re:The Market (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28684479)

Slashdot, apparently. Ironkey has been an advertiser on /. for some time, and this product is a revision on an otherwise old product of theirs that also self-destructs.

Re:Where's the market? (1)

DragonWriter (970822) | more than 5 years ago | (#28683091)

Unless you're James Bond, I don't see how most folks would need any more than this

There are all kinds of legal environments, outside of national security, where you need better certainty of destruction of data than "it looked broken to me" (e.g., HIPAA).

and if they do need more, they already have it.

Maybe, maybe not. Places that are subject to rules that would require additional security sometimes simply don't do particular things that might be useful from an operational convenience perspective since the tools don't exist that let them work under the rules, and others bend (or break) the rules because they aren't willing to sacrifice the operational convenience. Anything that lets them meet requirements in the applicable mandates while promoting operational convenience is a big plus for them.

Additionally, the balance between operational convenience and available protective technology is usually a consideration in adopting new (e.g.) privacy regulations.

Old feature (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28682779)

I thought all of their thumb drives would 'self destruct'?

24's Cloe O'Brian (1, Informative)

SolarStorm (991940) | more than 5 years ago | (#28682819)

would have this cracked in no time (at least withing the timeframe of one episode) From what I have see her do, no encryption is safe for more than 41 minutes

Re:24's Cloe O'Brian (1)

DigiShaman (671371) | more than 5 years ago | (#28683649)

You were actually expecting realism from a show that's about drama and suspense? I'm *shocked* I tell you!!!

What a bad idea (1)

Reason58 (775044) | more than 5 years ago | (#28682835)

Flash drives are a big no-no in the federal government and military. If something is so sensitive that it needs this kind of encryption wrapped in dynamite, then it should not be walking around on a USB drive. Dumb dumb dumb.

Re:What a bad idea (3, Informative)

NecroPuppy (222648) | more than 5 years ago | (#28683183)

Correct.

In many branches, they are currently banned, largely because of the viral vector issue.

Re:What a bad idea (1)

saintsfan (1171797) | more than 5 years ago | (#28683257)

I partially agree with you, although some people on the go may demand a compromise between usb storage convenience and security. More to your point though- this tool, solution, toy, -pick your reason- is not perfect. I am not an expert at anything, but I've learned over time that as long as there is a unique challenge and the barriers aren't too high, enthusiastic hackers around the world will take it on. The more services, conveniences what-have-yous built into this stick https://www.ironkey.com/compare [ironkey.com] , https://www.ironkey.com/ikdocs/datasheets/s200/IronKey_S200_Enterprise_Server.pdf [ironkey.com] ; the more touted it is for being secure by the company "the world's most secure flash drive; the only level 3 FIPS 140-2 flash drive"; the more security professionals say they use it and how cool it is https://www.ironkey.com/sdkform [ironkey.com] ; the more likely someone will find a vulnerability with it, one of its dependencies, or one of its features and break it. period.

Re:What a bad idea (2, Interesting)

NecroPuppy (222648) | more than 5 years ago | (#28683695)

We don't have a compromise where I work.

USB key drives are banned. There is even software loaded onto the machines, by default, that detects if you've inserted a key drive (and can tell the difference from a USB hard drive) and reports you to the IS guys.

If you do this, you get yelled at, your computer gets scanned and scrubbed, and it can even affect your clearance.

Re:What a bad idea (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28684125)

There is even software loaded onto the machines, by default, that detects if you've inserted a key drive (and can tell the difference from a USB hard drive) and reports you to the IS guys.

Can it tell the difference between a USB drive and one that has had it's HID changed to something innocuous, like a keyboard that records the scroll lock status to transmit data?

I'm that paranoid. It's relatively trivial to change the HID of many USB devices to something other than they are.

Re:What a bad idea (1)

merreborn (853723) | more than 5 years ago | (#28684653)

USB key drives are banned. There is even software loaded onto the machines, by default, that detects if you've inserted a key drive (and can tell the difference from a USB hard drive) and reports you to the IS guys.

Why is this important?

Aren't a USB harddrive, USB key drive, and iPod all just as good for bringing in/taking home bad stuff?

Re:What a bad idea (2, Interesting)

ChaoticCoyote (195677) | more than 5 years ago | (#28683907)

Flash drives are a big no-no in the federal government and military. If something is so sensitive that it needs this kind of encryption wrapped in dynamite, then it should not be walking around on a USB drive. Dumb dumb dumb.

True... but not everyone who requires security is a government spook. For most of us non-spooks, this thing has merit.

What!?! (1)

Starteck81 (917280) | more than 5 years ago | (#28682847)

No retina scan authentication? LAME

Re:What!?! (1)

auric_dude (610172) | more than 5 years ago | (#28683141)

No, I think you will find it relies upon a self anal reader.

Re:What!?! (1)

canonymous (1445409) | more than 5 years ago | (#28683155)

That just puts you at risk of losing an eye as well as a USB drive.

Re:What!?! (1)

kamochan (883582) | more than 5 years ago | (#28683289)

A much better option is a palm vein scanner. It needs a live hand for a 3-d image of warm veins.

Re:What!?! (1)

Abreu (173023) | more than 5 years ago | (#28683591)

a torniqueted, recently severed hand wouldn't work?

Re:What!?! (1)

camperdave (969942) | more than 5 years ago | (#28683677)

Bah! Just pump warm water through the thing. Same diff.

Smoke (5, Funny)

wjousts (1529427) | more than 5 years ago | (#28682955)

This better emit a puff of smoke when it self-destructs or I'm not buying it. It doesn't matter if the smoke is only for show.

Re:Smoke (1)

madcat2c (1292296) | more than 5 years ago | (#28683129)

Magic Blue Smoke at that.

Re:Smoke (1)

JoeCool1986 (1320479) | more than 5 years ago | (#28683421)

Actually, only the "contains fully-featured genie" edition has that feature.

Re:Smoke (1)

Hurricane78 (562437) | more than 5 years ago | (#28684289)

Bonus points when you can either
A) kill an attacker because it also is a nerve gas
B) use it as an antidote against a truth serum
C) kill yourself when in risk of being captured
D) all of the above.

.
.
.

Sadly, in reality, a good attack would mean, that you did not even notice that your system is compromised, and never would.

Better spy flash drive (1)

FunPika (1551249) | more than 5 years ago | (#28683125)

Would be one that said "this flash drive well self-destruct in 5 seconds" the 2nd time you removed it from a computer (1st time to write the sensitive info to it, 2nd time for recipient to read it). :D

AES-256 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28683153)

It uses AES-256, which has already been broken. Not that it's actually possible to use the attack to recover data, but in the future, AES-256 will only get more broken.

Oops... (1)

Monkeedude1212 (1560403) | more than 5 years ago | (#28683165)

I misstyped my password and my USB key melted. Now I lost the company thousands of dollars worth of spreadsheets, Ruined a perfectly good USB port on my computer, and now it smells kinda funny...

Re:Oops... (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28684211)

Call IT support and tell them that you were not doing anything in particular when the computer did it by itself.

Then tell everyone else that IT support failed to fix the problem costing the company thousands of dollars of spreadsheets.

Ironkey also supports Linux! (4, Informative)

AMuse (121806) | more than 5 years ago | (#28683277)

I'm using an Ironkey at work (have been for about 2 years now) and the thing has been rock solid. However, the main reason I selected it is that it's the only key that I've had the opportunity to trial which is both FIPS 140-2l2 compliant *AND* supports Linux.

I use it with WinXP and MacOSX daily and yes, they do ship with "alpha" Linux drivers. Not full support like Win* but enough to read and write the encrypted data, which is all I really use.

Although the company claims that you can now "initialize" a key on MacOS, all the versions I've used required an initial bootstrapping under Windows before being cross-platform usable.

Re:Ironkey also supports Linux! (1)

AberBeta (851747) | more than 5 years ago | (#28683505)

I got a review piece of hardware from InfoSec and tried it out in Linux.
You can mount it once the key has been set-up, but you can't set it up under Linux with the software provided.
So this key *requires* Windows before it can be used under Linux, which is pretty bloody stupid.

Since I don't have any copies of that software, it pretty much doubles the cost of the drive.

Re:Ironkey also supports Linux! (2, Informative)

AMuse (121806) | more than 5 years ago | (#28683709)

It practically doubles the cost of the drive if you're a standalone user with no job involving computers; for me, it was very easy to go over to my officemates' desk and initialize it on his Windows machine.

Also, I did a pretty good amount of work using the IronKey inside a VM. Using VMWare Fusion in MacOSX Leopard and a Windows XP VMWare image, I was able to mount the key inside the Windows image and do an initialization successfully. One thing I did notice was that when doing so, it would always unmount my ipod from the VM, which was a bit odd.

Re: Nobody gives a shit! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28683715)

all is said

unvi (2, Informative)

kaoshin (110328) | more than 5 years ago | (#28683371)

I understand thinkgeek and slashdot are sister companies, so this post is more of an ad, but is the only thing different here the revision or level of certification, or is there something else newsworthy on this from a tech standpoint? Ironkey has been on thinkgeek for like a year, and the self destruct and other features have all been in this product for a long time.

Re:unvi (1)

adona1 (1078711) | more than 5 years ago | (#28684203)

That was my first thought when I saw this story on my RSS feed. Maybe this is a small update to the product, but still, unless it also gives electric shocks or sexual favours, hardly worth a /. story.

Wow (1)

webheaded (997188) | more than 5 years ago | (#28683405)

This is such old news that it's ridiculous. Furthermore, this is a ridiculously overpriced toy that breaks itself. No thanks...if I have data that someone wants to hack by opening up my thumb drive, then I shouldn't be carrying it on a thumb drive in the first place. Everything else this is just ridiculous and expensive overkill.

Sell-out (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28683531)

So is Slashdot accepting paid posts now? At the bottom of this story my RSS reader displayed an ad for... wait for it... IronKey!

let me guess the code (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28683601)

Self destruct code: Code zero zero zero destruct zero

Mission Impossible (2, Funny)

Neanderthal Ninny (1153369) | more than 5 years ago | (#28683615)

The new version of the Mission Impossible self-destructing tape player.
However, how many spoofs has been made to this "self-destruction" capability so I wonder what if your USB key self-destructs accidentally in your pants pocket will it fry your gonads.

Enterprise Mac Alternatives? (1)

GreenPickles (2275) | more than 5 years ago | (#28683721)

I really like the IronKey Enterprise features -- remote destruction, management console, etc. It sounds like mac support is in it's infancy. Are there any enterprise level mac alternatives to IronKey?

Circuitry? (1)

dandart (1274360) | more than 5 years ago | (#28683793)

So it blows out the circuitry, but what about the flash? Someone could just recover that.

Re:Circuitry? (1)

shentino (1139071) | more than 5 years ago | (#28683901)

It's still encrypted.

Re:Circuitry? (1)

dandart (1274360) | more than 5 years ago | (#28684075)

So, just one that's encrypted is good enough then. If people really want something, they WILL get the data.

Thermite (2, Insightful)

Dr_Barnowl (709838) | more than 5 years ago | (#28683871)

I keep wanting to build a flash drive with a thermite filler and some kind of rip-strip fuse that you could just yank on hard to set it off.

No offence to IronKey, but how do you know that it's really, really, destroyed your data beyond recovery? Maybe it just locks out the disk controller. A small heap of smouldering slag is much more definitive.

Now, if you could combine the thermite with their remote wipe protocols......

This is nothing new. (1)

joshtheitguy (1205998) | more than 5 years ago | (#28683981)

I've been administering and deploying these "self-destructing" IronKeys for over a year now. Yeesh... talk about a really fucking slow news day.

Re:This is nothing new. (2, Funny)

Joe U (443617) | more than 5 years ago | (#28684213)

I've been administering and deploying "self-destructing" USB drives for several years!

After about a year, the drive stops working and all the data is gone. It's always the one the boss was using and it's always some important file that he didn't have a copy of somewhere else, so it is very consistant in that one regard.

A hacker challenge (4, Insightful)

RobertLTux (260313) | more than 5 years ago | (#28683995)

what iron key should do is go to DEFCON with a bunch of these drives and then run a contest

If you can crack the drive you get some obscenely large amount of money
how to run the contest fairly

have the contents of the drive detail how to get to an offshore account with the prize money

So Ironkey how much you want to bet this key is "secure"

Strictly speaking, it doesn't self-destruct (3, Interesting)

e9th (652576) | more than 5 years ago | (#28684009)

From IronKey's blurb:

- Secure key management -encryption keys are born on the device in the Cryptochip and bound to the device
- Hard-wired encryption key self-destruct defenses and electromagnetic shielding of the Cryptochip

which I interpret as saying that only the key is wiped, while the actual data remains on the drive. If you've somehow managed to snarf the key before it was wiped, or if you're really cool and can break AES-256, you're good to go.

WOOPS! (1)

binaryseraph (955557) | more than 5 years ago | (#28684071)

"no- wait ctrl-Z, ctrl-Z!!!- damnit!"

TSA Approval? (1)

Perf (14203) | more than 5 years ago | (#28684157)

Ummm, what will the TSA say about self destructing thumbdrives?

Refer to my signature (1)

carp3_noct3m (1185697) | more than 5 years ago | (#28684199)

Old news is old. My company uses these and I have found them very useful, less because of how secure they are (even though they really are pretty good) but more for the "wow the customer" factor when some big wig sees me pull it out and I get to throw some ridiculous acronyms and make myself sound like james bond to him. Yeah, it's worth it. Now they need to catch up in the space department (space as in size, not space as in pew pew, chewbacca went that way)

Its a joke (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28684223)

Melts in your pocket, not in your hand.

self destruct (1)

confused one (671304) | more than 5 years ago | (#28684245)

if it doesn't burn like a magnesium flare and leave nothing behind but ash, then I'm not happy : )

So (1)

Jamamala (983884) | more than 5 years ago | (#28684545)

This thing can nuke itself from orbit?

Impressive.

Teacher (1)

JumpDrive (1437895) | more than 5 years ago | (#28684619)

My USB burned my homework.
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