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World's Oldest Tattoo Written In Soot

samzenpus posted about 5 years ago | from the Hauslabjoch-ink dept.

Medicine 68

ewenc writes "A series of tattoos belonging to Otzi the 5300 year-old Tyrolean Iceman are made of soot, reports New Scientist. Mountain climbers discovered Otzi's mummified body in the Austrian-Italian alps in 1991. What's left of his skin was littered with simple cross and line markings. Electron microscopy and spectroscopy now show that Otzi's tats are made of double-bonded carbon indicative of soot, as well as silicate crystals that probably came from rocks surrounding a fire pit."

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68 comments

But what about.... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#28710821)

....the OLDEST post!!

Re:But what about.... (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#28710837)

What is the first post ever on slashdot? Can someone point to it or repost it?

Re:But what about.... (1)

Niris (1443675) | about 5 years ago | (#28710883)

Re:But what about.... (1)

iggymanz (596061) | about 5 years ago | (#28712007)

here's the first archived post, http://slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=98/01/01/012000&tid=95 [slashdot.org]

slashdot was started in Sept 1997 though. Site called "chips and dips" preceded it, that started in July of 1997

rats... (1)

macshit (157376) | about 5 years ago | (#28714251)

I was expecting it to be titled "first post!"...

Re:But what about.... (1)

codeButcher (223668) | about 5 years ago | (#28714119)

It's probably a dupe. Or else it will be slashdotted by everyone going to view it.

Re:But what about.... (4, Informative)

kromozone (817261) | about 5 years ago | (#28711085)

All comments from before 1999/01/01 have been deleted. The first post on 1999/01/01, still in the archive is; Anonymous Coward on Friday January 01 1999, @05:15PM (#2049871) I agree, that really boiled my blood. I saw the new layout this morning, I thought it was pretty damn cool looking.

Re:But what about.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#28711327)

Anthropolgists will wonder what he was replying to for ages...

Re:But what about.... (3, Funny)

ZeroExistenZ (721849) | about 5 years ago | (#28714781)

@05:15PM (#2049871) I agree, that really boiled my blood. I saw the new layout this morning, I thought it was pretty damn cool looking.

Anthropolgists will wonder what he was replying to for ages...

One would assume initially he's being unsettled by the new layout as he elaborates further on it, appearantly referencing to the first sentence.

But after closer analysis (reading it twice), the elaboration is a contradiction if he's speaking in a figurative speech. ("that boiled my blood; I thought it was damn cool looking.") unless, back in 1999, the boiling of blood would be a favourative state of being that is "cool".

To me, it seems the boiling of his blood is thus to be taken literally and the article could be about a DIY-project which could result in blood being boiled due to possible high pressure, dating back to prerecorded history.

I think it's safe to assume that the first poster on slashdot forgot to build his own pressure-suit making his blood boil and so agreeing with a poster who made the notion to take this into account. A pressure-suit of his time would be important to be though of attempting a simular endeavour which is communicated in the collaborative context, while expressing out his appreciation for the new environment which started the historical record for slashdot.

I propose the honouring of "Anonymous Coward" and to make a historical figure out of him. (record shows, in 1999, female presence was neglectable and the often found '18/F' notion was not, as priorly assumed, an indication of age and sex. So the assumpsion "Anonymous Coward" was a male has a 99% probability.)

Re:But what about.... (1)

carolfromoz (1552209) | about 5 years ago | (#28714927)

Female presence was "neglectable"?
Are we still being neglected?
Carol (token female presence)

Re:But what about.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#28715061)

Female presence was "neglectable"?

On slashdot? In 1999? yes...
This makes me think of this one quote "A *real* girl?" Internet vs Real world [youtube.com]

Re:But what about.... (1)

carolfromoz (1552209) | about 5 years ago | (#28715315)

My point is the word should have been "negligible".
Yes we female techies form a negligible presence - but we never like to be neglected. ;)
Carol

Re:But what about.... (1)

ZeroExistenZ (721849) | about 5 years ago | (#28715827)

My point is the word should have been "negligible".
Yes we female techies form a negligible presence - but we never like to be neglected. ;)

I knew it was something I was doing wrong....

Re:But what about.... (1)

BigBlueOx (1201587) | about 5 years ago | (#28716055)

We male techies are endeavoring to increase the number of women on Slashdot by taking all female techies seriously and respectfully. Your opinions are a vital and necessary part of the Slashdot commmunity.

BTW, whatcha wearin?

Re:But what about.... (1)

4D6963 (933028) | about 5 years ago | (#28714793)

The Wayback Machine could probably of some help there, if only it wasn't suffering from "Data Retrieval Failure".

Re:But what about.... (1)

4D6963 (933028) | about 5 years ago | (#28714811)

Actually I found that [archive.org] . The earliest comment is from "Jan 09 1998" and reads: "Well, I just tested this modified patch on my NT 4.0sp3 machine. It's still standing."

What do I win?

Re:But what about.... (2, Funny)

JustOK (667959) | about 5 years ago | (#28711949)

and the Iceman probably had frosty piss

Tattoos or mody scarring? (2, Interesting)

coplate (1187701) | about 5 years ago | (#28710825)

Maybe they we burned in with hot rock edges?

Re:Tattoos or mody scarring? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#28710915)

Basically the same thing.

Sounds like somebody tripped one day into the fire and cut themselves with a rock with soot on it. This was noted to cause a tattoo.

Re:Tattoos or mody scarring? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#28711259)

George Orwell spent some time writing about english coal miners, and he said that they all had blue tattoos on their heads and back. This was because every time they bumped into something the wounds would get filled with coal dust. The wounds would heal over and the dust would stay forming a tattoo.

I have a few lines on my fingertips because they got pretty cut up when I was learning to play guitar. This was at the same time I was working at a warehouse where it was impossible to keep my hands clean for more than a few minutes.

Re:Tattoos or mody scarring? (1)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | about 5 years ago | (#28714107)

They might have been using copper needles as well. :-)

And it was... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#28710901)

A tramp stamp.

Re:And it was... (2, Funny)

JustOK (667959) | about 5 years ago | (#28711935)

or a neander scrawl

wow (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#28710999)

they had white-trash 5300 years ago

Don't be biased (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#28711265)

This could just as easily have been an elite university fraternity hazing incident. I think Skull and Bones goes back about 5300 years or so.

Re:Don't be biased (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#28711319)

And just like back then they're still admitting Neanderthals today.

Otzi--early nanotech researcher? (1)

Billy the Mountain (225541) | about 5 years ago | (#28711027)

I wonder if there were any bucky balls or carbon nanotubes in that soot?

Re:Otzi--early nanotech researcher? (1)

Carnildo (712617) | about 5 years ago | (#28711083)

I wonder if there were any bucky balls or carbon nanotubes in that soot?

Undoubtedly. One of the main ways of making nanotubes is to generate a bunch of soot, then separate out the tubes.

So Ã-tzi (1)

DotMasta (1089813) | about 5 years ago | (#28711147)

was the first hardcore Tyrolean... i was wondering where my mean streak came from. Awesome!

Acupunture points. (1, Interesting)

squiggly12 (1298191) | about 5 years ago | (#28711149)

According to the article

Clothing would have obscured most of the designs, which are of crosses and bands of lines. Some are located near acupuncture points.

Some of the tattoos are near acupuncture areas. Not only were our ancestors playing bone flutes 35,000 years ago [slashdot.org] , but were also doing primitive medicine 5300 years ago. (Note homeopathic)

To me that is just amazing.

Re:Acupunture points. (1)

MrMista_B (891430) | about 5 years ago | (#28711375)

That's not amazing.

'Some of which are near' - put dozens of lines and crosses on the body, OF COURSE some of them are going to be 'near' acturepuncture points/areas (which ever one you mean).

Nothing to see here, move along.

Re:Acupunture points. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#28718145)

There is a concentration of tattoos over the body's joints that exhibited signs of arthritis.

The primitive invasive tattooing process could actually have an effect on the over active immune system response that causes arthritis, and alleviate joint inflammation. Skin infections and toxins in the hypodermis will certainly cause some immune response.

I find it easier to believe this works than many modern acupuncture or homoeopathic therapies.

Re:Acupunture points. (4, Insightful)

IICV (652597) | about 5 years ago | (#28711475)

According to Wikipedia, there's about 360 acupuncture [wikipedia.org] points. According to the article, the guy's skin was "littered with tattoos".

Birthday paradox, anyone?

Re:Acupunture points. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#28711543)

For those inclined to put ink to flesh, modern tattoo parlours offer dizzying arrays of dyes â" mercury-containing reds, manganese purples, even pigments that glow in the dark.

Getting inked wasn't always quite so complicated, however. A new analysis concludes that the world's oldest tattoos were etched in soot.

Belonging to Ã-tzi the 5300 year old Tyrolean iceman, the simple tattoos may have served a medicinal purpose, not a decorative one, says Maria Anna Pabst, a researcher at the Medical University of Graz, Austria, who trained optical and electron microscopes on biopsies of Otzi's preserved flesh. See a gallery of photoscans of Ã-tzi's body. Crosses and bands

Clothing would have obscured most of the designs, which are of crosses and bands of lines. Some are located near acupuncture points.

Alpine climbers discovered Ã-tzi near the Italian-Austrian border in 1991. Since then, scientists have analysed his clothing, diagnosed him with various ailments â" arthritis, back and stomach problems â" and even sequenced his mitochondrial genome.

To work out what Ã-tzi's tattoos were made of, Pabst's team applied light and electron microscopes to minutely thin sections of several tattoos as well as a non-tattooed flesh from his inner thigh. Soot ink

A close look at his tattooed skin revealed numerous fine particles, interspersed with elongated crystals. Chemical analysis indicated that the particles were made of double-bonded carbon atoms found in soot, while the crystals were made of silicate. His tattoo-free skin, on the other hand, showed no trace of soot particles. Ã-tzi's "ink" could have been scraped off silicate-containing rocks surrounding a fireplace, Pabst says.

"When you look at the body of the iceman â" I was there when the body was taken out â" you can't see anything that tells you how [the tattoos] were made," she says. Perhaps, Ã-tzi's brethren used thorns to pierce the skin deeply enough to inject a soot ink.

Journal reference: Journal of Archaeological Science (DOI: 10.1016/j.jas.2009.06.016)

I sure don't see anything that says "littered with tattoos". Do you?

Re:Acupunture points. (1)

cosmicaug (150534) | about 5 years ago | (#28725773)

I sure don't see anything that says "littered with tattoos". Do you?

Whatever. You are talking about 11 tattoos and over 300 acupuncture points (and, actually, different sources almost double that number of acupuncture points). It would be remarkable if all the tattoos were not near some acupuncture point.

Re:Acupunture points. (1)

Oscar_Wilde (170568) | about 5 years ago | (#28711989)

Some of the tattoos are near acupuncture areas. Not only were our ancestors playing bone flutes 35,000 years ago, but were also doing primitive medicine 5300 years ago. (Note homeopathic)

His body was "littered" with tattoos and some are near acupuncture points?

Colour me surprised!

Oh, and sticking needles into people can have an actual measurable effect. Therefore it's not homeopathic. Even the WHO agrees apparently.

Re:Acupunture points. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#28712621)

Oh, and sticking needles into people can have an actual measurable effect. Therefore it's not homeopathic. Even the WHO agrees apparently.

[citation needed]

Re:Acupunture points. (1)

Oscar_Wilde (170568) | about 5 years ago | (#28713129)

[citation needed]
 
You fail AC.
 
That factoid is cited on the very place you make fun of with your homorous [citation needed]. But nevermind, here's the link for you [wikipedia.org] since you weren't even willing to look at at least the Wikipedia page yourself.

Re:Acupunture points. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#28713377)

The effect is that they feel pain.

Re:Acupunture points. (1)

pnewhook (788591) | about 5 years ago | (#28717817)

Oh, and sticking needles into people can have an actual measurable effect. Therefore it's not homeopathic.

Are you implying homeopathic medicine has no effect on people? i.e. same as a placebo?

Re:Acupunture points. (2, Informative)

Oscar_Wilde (170568) | about 5 years ago | (#28724465)

Are you implying homeopathic medicine has no effect on people? i.e. same as a placebo?

Yes of course.

Are you suggesting that a solution diluted until there are no measurable levels of any active ingredient has any effect beyond that of plain water?

If so you'd better be writing this up because you'll get Nobel Prizes for chemistry, physics and medicine. Not to mention $1,000,000 from the James Randi Education Foundation.

This is the point in the discussion where someone will either mention their great aunt's best friend who was "cured of cancer" or start warning us of a vast medical conspiracy to keep homoeopathy a secret. Bonus points go to anyone who tells us all the repeatable controlled studies into the matter are flawed for some vague reason.

Re:Acupunture points. (1)

pnewhook (788591) | about 5 years ago | (#28725319)

Are you suggesting that a solution diluted until there are no measurable levels of any active ingredient has any effect beyond that of plain water?

Dogs can detect molecules on the order of a couple parts per million, far below our level of detection. They can also smell cancer, and can tell the difference between different kinds of internal cancer just by smelling the skin. They have also been shown to be able to predict seizures, and hypoglycemic attacks.

Most of what dogs can do we dont know how they do it because we cant detect what they can. Just because we cannot detect low levels, doesn't mean they are not there nor have any effect.

Re:Acupunture points. (1)

Oscar_Wilde (170568) | about 5 years ago | (#28725575)

Dogs can detect molecules on the order of a couple parts per million, far below our level of detection. They can also smell cancer, and can tell the difference between different kinds of internal cancer just by smelling the skin.

And your point would be? If I dilute alcohol to the limits very of detection will it still get me drunk? And what of the homoeopathic solutions which have been diluted to the point that they don't contain a single molecule of the original active ingredient?

The burden of proof is on you. There's no body of evidence to suggest homeoeopathy has any effectiveness beyond the placebo effect. NOW is when you provide the evidence and claim your Nobel prize for discrediting a fairly important scientific principle (i.e. that you need a cause for a chemical effect).

They have also been shown to be able to predict seizures, and hypoglycemic attacks.

And this matters because? There are physical precursors to seizures so it's entirely possible that a dog might be able to detect them. That's neat but how is it relevant to homoeopathy where any active ingredient has been made absent?

Most of what dogs can do we dont know how they do it because we cant detect what they can.

Er, what? We know how dogs detect those things. The chemical receptors in their noses aren't that difficult to study. There's no need to make it out as some kind of spooky trick they have.

Just because we cannot detect low levels, doesn't mean they are not there nor have any effect.

We've got lots of evidence for lowering levels reducing effects and none for lowering levels increasing effects. The burden of proof is on you. Step up and actually show it and you'll be in every chemistry textbook printed in the next thousand years.

Perhaps it's my turn to be a dick: [citation needed].

Re:Acupunture points. (1)

pnewhook (788591) | about 5 years ago | (#28728145)

And your point would be? If I dilute alcohol to the limits very of detection will it still get me drunk?

And if you disable a virus and put a very tiny amount in a vaccine, will that make you sick> No. But will it help train your immune system against it? Yes.

And what of the homoeopathic solutions which have been diluted to the point that they don't contain a single molecule of the original active ingredient?

If it is so diluted that it no longer contains the original material, then I agree that is likely crap. However a low dilution may work.

Er, what? We know how dogs detect those things. The chemical receptors in their noses aren't that difficult to study.

Look it up. They don't know how dogs can detect seizures before they occur, and they dont fully understand how they can smell on the order of one part per million.

Re:Acupunture points. (1)

Oscar_Wilde (170568) | about 5 years ago | (#28735819)

And if you disable a virus and put a very tiny amount in a vaccine, will that make you sick> No. But will it help train your immune system against it? Yes.
Wow, where to start? First of all the amount isn't tiny. It's larger than what would often be required to infect you with the live virus. Repeatedly diluting this amount would make it less effective not more yet this is how homeopathy is supposed to work. Secondly there's a well understood process involved which doesn't rely on water having a "memory" or any of the other pseudo science homeopathy practitioners like to espouse. And thirdly there's a mountain of evidence for it working that fits or understanding of biology. Where's the evidence of homeopathy working?

If it is so diluted that it no longer contains the original material, then I agree that is likely crap. However a low dilution may work.
And the evidence of a low dilution working would be? Do you believe homeopathy's claim that repeated dilution makes a solution more potent? Where is the evidence of homeopathy working?

Look it up. They don't know how dogs can detect seizures before they occur, and they dont fully understand how they can smell on the order of one part per million.

I did some googling and can't find anything that suggests there's any mystery to dogs' sense of smell that doesn't apply to all animals. Their chemoreceptors are apparently like most mammals just denser and their olfactory bulb is forty times larger than in humans. The information I can find makes smelling things in such low concentrations perfectly plausible and not subject to some as yet undetected process. What's the great mystery you're talking about? Smell is understood and has a physical basis and it really doesn't matter if we don't know how they predict seizures because there are physiological causes for them that dogs can plausibly detect. It can't be pretended that it's some kind of spooky effect that runs counter to established science. What was the physical basis for thinking homeopathy might work? Where is the evidence of homeopathy working?

Re:Acupunture points. (1)

cosmicaug (150534) | about 5 years ago | (#28725681)

Dogs can detect molecules on the order of a couple parts per million, far below our level of detection. They can also smell cancer, and can tell the difference between different kinds of internal cancer just by smelling the skin. They have also been shown to be able to predict seizures, and hypoglycemic attacks.

Since when is a couple of parts per million below our level of detection? Anyway, at the "concentrations" at which homeopaths consider potency to be greatest (in other words, the most dilute concentrations) it's not so much a matter of the solute existing at infinitesimal concentrations as much as there being not solute molecules left whatsoever.

Not even homeopaths dispute this. Instead of this they make some up bullshit, ad hoc stuff up about vibrations being left behind in the to form a memory of what used to be there.

And I really have no clue as to why you are bringing dogs into it. That's an altogether different discussion.

Just because we cannot detect low levels, doesn't mean they are not there nor have any effect.

That's pretty much an oxymoron since any effect constitutes something we can detect.

However you seem to be misunderstanding why there might not be something in there at all in some homeopathic preparations. It has nothing to do with whether we can detect it or not. It has to do with atomic theory, a concept which has been with us in its crudest forms for at least two millennia and which modern science has confirmed. You see, stuff is made up of discrete chunks. Let's say you've got a volume of water with 10000 arsenic cations (that's a kind of chunk). If you dilute it ten fold you will only have, on average, 1000 arsenic cations in that same volume of water. If you dilute it a million fold, you will have on average zero arsenic cations in that volume simply because there were a lot fewer than 1000000 arsenic cations to begin with.

How does this relate to homeopathic preparations? The most dilute homeopathic preparations out there (in other words, the ones which homeopaths consider the most potent --ever hear the joke about the patient who forgot to take his homeopathic medicine and died of an overdose?) are prepared at 200C (sometimes also written as 200 CK depending on which nutty dilution protocol is used: that of Hahneman or that of Korsakov). What this means is that the original substance is diluted one hundred fold and then the resulting solution is diluted one hundred fold again another 199 times. That means the dilution factor is 100^^200. This is a 1 with 400 zeroes after it. Not only is this number much greater than the number which is a homophone to the name of a popular search engine, it is also greater than the estimated number of atoms in the whole universe (which http://preview.tinyurl.com/nypp6p [tinyurl.com] Wikipedia estimates to be a lot fewer than a googol).

What this means is that if you put the same number of solute molecules as there exists atoms in the universe into a container and performed a 200C dilution you would end up with no solute molecules by the time that you were done with your serial dilutions.

So basically, paraphrasing you, to say that "just because a homeopathic preparation is diluted beyond Avogadro's limit doesn't mean that it does not have any effect" is like saying that "just because distilled water doesn't have any salt in it it doesn't mean that it is not going to taste salty". It's true that I could convince you that some http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oscillococcinum [wikipedia.org] Oscillococcinum will help you with your flu just as it is true that I may convince you that distilled water is, in fact, salty. However, this fact is not due to any inherent curative properties of http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oscillococcinum [wikipedia.org] Oscillococcinum just as distilled water tasting salty, if you are sufficiently suggestible and and in an appropriately receptive state of mind, has nothing to do with distilled water possessing a property of saltiness.

He Later Proclaimed (5, Funny)

Master Moose (1243274) | about 5 years ago | (#28711245)

.. That he only intended getting three, but there was a language barrier between himself and the tattooist. he would have stopped more marks being made but he later fell asleep during the proceedure

Re:He Later Proclaimed (2, Informative)

worf_mo (193770) | about 5 years ago | (#28713683)

Seeing that you're not being rated highly enough, let's give people some background. :) Belgian girl's tattoo 'nightmare' [bbc.co.uk]

If he was a hobo.... (1)

Cur8or (1220818) | about 5 years ago | (#28711581)

it is still called a tramp stamp?

Upon further study... (4, Funny)

Oscar_Wilde (170568) | about 5 years ago | (#28711669)

What's left of his skin was littered with simple cross and line markings.
 
... upon closer inspection the scientists determined this to be Chinese writing which says "Forever Protector of Old Ladies" [hanzismatter.com] . Work to locate the man's Facebook profile and collection of popped collar shirts is continuing.

Now back to you in the studio, Dave.

Re:Upon further study... (1)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | about 5 years ago | (#28714399)

Well, could be worse [softpedia.com] ...

You're losing your touch, Slashdotters (-1, Troll)

jra (5600) | about 5 years ago | (#28711675)

*No one* has made any jokes about Otzi taking it up the ass...

Re:You're losing your touch, Slashdotters (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#28713277)

Explain plz? (Hint: It's not funny, so maybe you were going for insightful?)

My Mum has "soot" tattoos from her youth days (2, Informative)

sasha328 (203458) | about 5 years ago | (#28712715)

This is a practice that is probably still going on to these days.
My mum, who is from the Middle East and in her early 70s has had self-applied tattoos made out of soot since she was a teenager.
They're not like the tattoos one would be used to, but are just simple and crude symbols, one of them a cross. I am sure this is a practice still in many countries, especially 3rd world countries.

Re:My Mum has "soot" tattoos from her youth days (1)

PopeRatzo (965947) | about 5 years ago | (#28715663)

Of course this 5300 year old corpse's tattoos are made from soot. What else would they be made from? I'd say that most of all the tattoos ever done were made in soot. It's not only 3rd world countries that use soot. Many prison tattoos are done this way as well.

Re:My Mum has "soot" tattoos from her youth days (1)

mattstorer (832625) | about 5 years ago | (#28715773)

This is a practice that is probably still going on to these days.

I can say for certain it's definitely still going on these days in West Africa, and probably all over Africa. I was a Peace Corps Volunteer in The Gambia from 2006 through 2008, and many Gambians have these sorts of primitive tattoos, in the Wolof language called "nyaas," that are created by taking a razor blade and cutting a design in the skin. After, the charred, sooty remains of ground nuts (what we know as peanuts, which are a staple crop there) are ground into the cuts. The soot stops the bleeding, and the scar heals through and around the soot. If you don't mess with it while it's healing, it comes out looking pretty good - color me nuts, but I went through this procedure while I was there, as did a fair number of other PCVs. It's pretty cool.

Nyaas has several purposes, depending on where it's located on the body.

  • If it's on the face, it's usually for beautification. Women there tended to get small cuts below and to the sides of their eyes.
  • If it's on the arms or chest, it may be for beautification, but it could also be a form of "juju," or protective ward. There are many kinds of jujus - most are Koranic inscriptions written by marabous (a sort of Islamic tribal "witch doctor," although I don't really like using that term), bound into a protective leather pouch and worn on the body. Some jujus are concoctions that you drink. Anyway, so some nyass are protective jujus.
  • And lastly, some nyaas are used as remedies for such mental ailments as epilepsy, for example. These are usually placed on the back, above and between the shoulder blades.

So yeah, still being done, you just gotta know where to look.

Re:My Mum has "soot" tattoos from her youth days (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#28716273)

color me nuts

Har har.

Re:My Mum has "soot" tattoos from her youth days (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#28716545)

My mum, who is from the Middle East

 
How long before she blows herself up in a crowded market? You people are a disgrace.

Iceman Photo Scan (3, Informative)

worf_mo (193770) | about 5 years ago | (#28713611)

You can find some high quality images at http://iceman.eurac.edu/ [eurac.edu] . You can see the whole body of Oetzi down to millimetric detail. You can also compare images taken with white light to images taken with a special UV light.

As a little side note: I live only about 30 km from the Oetzi museum where the mummy is kept. But whenever I went by the museum, people were lined up in an incredibly long queue in front of the entrance, so I haven't actually seen "the real thing" yet.

Re:Iceman Photo Scan (1)

PopeRatzo (965947) | about 5 years ago | (#28715727)

You can find some high quality images at http://iceman.eurac.edu/ [eurac.edu]

Wouldn't it have been funny if they found the iceman, thawed him out and he was striking the goatse pose?

I don't know what made me think of that, except I have an automatic hesitation to click any link in a Slashdot comment from the days before the domain was automatically posted after the link. After clicking enough misdirected links and having to wash my eyes out with Lysol will do that to you.

Accidently tattooed myself (2, Interesting)

DollyTheSheep (576243) | about 5 years ago | (#28713907)

While I admire artistic tattoos, I probably won't get one for myself. The idea of something on my skin that is forever, but is perhaps not looking good or cool forever repels me.

But when I was a kid, I accidentally tattooed myself, atleast with one dot of ink :-) It was in arts education in school. We did calligraphy with old fashioned dip pens. I had the habit then to gnaw on all my writing utensils like pencils, pens etc. So I did that with my dip pen too. Something fell on the floor, I bent down to get it and ...ouch... I had the tip of the nib in my thigh. It's still a small greenish dot after 30 years.

Re:Accidently tattooed myself (1, Funny)

PopeRatzo (965947) | about 5 years ago | (#28715757)

when I was a kid, I accidentally tattooed myself

I understand.

I once accidentally tattooed the faces of all the members of Flock of Seagulls across my back.

It's Oetzi, not Otzi. (1)

Sique (173459) | about 5 years ago | (#28715477)

The nickname of the mummy is Oetzi, because it was found at the upper end of the Oetztal (Oetz valley). I know that many Americans ignore german umlauts and write an o instead of an ö (native speakers use 'oe', if no umlauts are possible), but in this case it's not even an umlaut. The little town which gives the valley its name is called Oetz with an oe, not an ö.

Re:It's Oetzi, not Otzi. (1)

Shatrat (855151) | about 5 years ago | (#28717223)

Sounds like someone who knew some german but didn't know Oetztal wasn't spelled that way translated it 'back' to an umlaut and then someone else dropped the umlaut.
I've seen this happen to Goethe a few times.

Tic, Tac, Toe? (1)

yogibaer (757010) | about 5 years ago | (#28716153)

Around the Campfire and no paper available?

Criminal or Slave (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#28716399)

The images of the the wrist appeared to look like ligiture marks. Maybe representing that he was a slave or criminal, "bound" at one time in his life.

On a lighter note, maybe the "Barcode" images were for breeding management or inventory control by his owner or captors.

Egyptians marked their slaves with dots and dashes around the wrists (men) and ankles (women) to prove ownership.

No surprise there (1)

0x537461746943 (781157) | about 5 years ago | (#28717849)

I (37) still have a *tattoo* that my aunt gave me when she put cigarette ashes on a cut that I got when I was 6. Thanks a lot :/.

Next question (1)

Linux_ho (205887) | about 5 years ago | (#28724859)

Did he use vi or Emacs?
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