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Most Expensive JavaScript Ever?

Soulskill posted more than 5 years ago | from the not-their-best-work dept.

Programming 405

ekran writes "A while ago Opera Software needed more servers. Not just a few servers either — they were planning Opera Mini's growth, implementing Opera Link, and My Opera was also growing quickly. Most of the major hardware vendors grabbed their specs and came back with offers and sample servers shipped all the way to Oslo for testing. One of the biggest vendors, however, did not do their homework. They shipped the server, but when the Opera sysadmins started up the web-admin interface, they were met with a JavaScript statement that managed to piss off the whole company including the CTO. The script, apparently, locked out the Opera web-browser."

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So who was it ?? (3, Interesting)

ls671 (1122017) | more than 5 years ago | (#28768471)

I browsed the comments on the Opera blog and I could not find any definitive answer although HP and Dell are mentioned as possible culprits.

So who was the culprit company ??

Now that it is on /., I am sure that a member of the Slashdot intelligence community could come up with the answer. I offer a reward that will be paid in SMP currency, not in NOK. Sorry about that but I do not have any NOK at my disposal.

currencies:
NOK = Norwegian krone
SMP = Slashdot Mod Points

Re:So who was it ?? (1)

galorin (837773) | more than 5 years ago | (#28768529)

Good luck with that.

Re:So who was it ?? not (5, Informative)

Chi-RAV (541181) | more than 5 years ago | (#28768637)

it's not HP as the link to what they actually buy shows they bought HP blades (http://www.digi.no/504306/her-kjores-egentlig-opera-mini&bid=6)

my money is going on Dell.

Re:So who was it ?? not (3, Insightful)

afidel (530433) | more than 5 years ago | (#28769045)

HP's not much better though:
var detect = navigator.userAgent.toLowerCase();
var ie = detect.match(/msie ([\d\.]+)/);
var moz = detect.match(/rv:([\d\.]+)/);
var fire = detect.match(/firefox\/([\d\.]+)/);
if(
( ie!=null && ie[1] >= "6.0" ) ||
( fire!=null && fire[1] >= "1.0.2" ) ||
( moz!=null && moz[1] >= "1.6" )
) {
// supported browser; do nothing
} else {
alert( "Integrated Lights-Out 2 supports Microsoft Internet Explorer version 6.0 or greater, Firefox version 1.0.2 or greater, and Mozilla version 1.6 or greater. Some functionality may not work and pages may not format correctly on other browser platforms. This browser platform reports it is \""+navigator.userAgent+"\""); }


Of course that's just a warning, not just dumping them to the error page. It IS annoying that we do such stupid browser detection tricks instead of coding to standards. In an ideal world that statement would be something like:
If browser.supports(HTML4) do {} else alert ( "upgrade to a modern browser" );

Re:So who was it ?? not (1)

notrandomly (1242142) | more than 5 years ago | (#28769117)

Actually, those pictures are old. That they had HPs before making the purchase doesn't mean that they chose them again.

Re:So who was it ?? not (4, Informative)

metalhed77 (250273) | more than 5 years ago | (#28769145)

Ah yes, Dell Remote Access Controllers have a shitty as hell web interface that only seems to work in IE. I think it's supposed to work in firefox but it never has for me.

Re:So who was it ?? (4, Funny)

gEvil (beta) (945888) | more than 5 years ago | (#28768655)

What's the current SMP/NOK exchange rate?

Re:So who was it ?? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28769099)

About minus infinite if that's the money used to buy ThePirateBay.

Re:So who was it ?? (3, Funny)

L4t3r4lu5 (1216702) | more than 5 years ago | (#28769165)

And more importantly, how many Libraries of Congress can we fill if we buy 5.25" floppy disks full of The Internet?

Re:So who was it ?? (1)

ByOhTek (1181381) | more than 5 years ago | (#28768803)

Good thing you had that key at the end. I thought I would be payed in time on your server farm, not some silly mod points.

I'm not answering you now :-P

For those new here... (4, Funny)

mcgrew (92797) | more than 5 years ago | (#28768809)

currencies:
NOK = Norwegian krone
SMP = Slashdot Mod Points

The uncyclopedia will explain:

Economy
The currency of Slashdot is the Karma Point (which recently replaced the archaic reputation point used under the barter system). In 2001, the Karma Point was cursed by an evil witch who got modded flamebait. Expert moneyologists agree that the curse is a serious matter, however its nature and effects are as yet unknown, although preliminary reports suggest a correlation between high Karma concentration and the Slashdot Effect.

Slashdot's primary export is journalistic integrity, and Slashdot has grown almost as rich as Oscar Wilde due to skyrocketing prices because of the global shortage, as well as the Federation of Planets adopting integrity as its staple food. Some analysts and economists have speculated that Slashdot does not in fact have any journalistic integrity of its own, and that all exports are either counterfeit or borrowed from the World Bank in exchange for several life-debts. If these accusations turn out to be true, then Slashdot could owe the Wookies that own the Bank several billion lives in payment.

Slashdot's primary import is n00bz, which upon arrival into the country are sent to meat factories to be processed into spam, an all-purpose household paste, good for use as a duct tape, glue, glue solvent, dodgeball, koala, roofing material or low-end computer. The manufacture of spam from n00bz is done through a process called pwnage.

Re:So who was it ?? (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28768813)

I browsed the comments on the Opera blog and I could not find any definitive answer although HP and Dell are mentioned as possible culprits.

Funny story. I have a large Dell LTO tape array, and it has a web-based management tool. Part of the management web pages generate on-the-fly images in XBM [74.125.47.132] format. IE had a security flaw in the parsing of XBM images, and since XBM images are so rare, Microsoft simply disabled XBM images entirely.

So, I am forced to use firefox to manage the tape array.

Re:So who was it ?? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28769183)

That must be terrible, being forced to use a non-broken browser. I'm so sorry!

Re:So who was it ?? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28768879)

"This single statement, apparently written by some sub-contractor they had outsourced admin interface programming to, cost them millions of NOK in lost sales."

Which is almost $37.55 in real money.

Re:So who was it ?? (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28769351)

Americans making currency jokes about an oil exporting country.
That's why love this site.

Re:So who was it ?? (1)

mmkkbb (816035) | more than 5 years ago | (#28769017)

What is the NOK (norwegian krone)/NOK (Nokia shares) exchange ratio?

Re:So who was it ?? (1)

morgan_greywolf (835522) | more than 5 years ago | (#28769337)

What is the NOK (norwegian krone)/NOK (Nokia shares) exchange ratio?

About NOK 80 [google.com] , but it seems to be falling right now.

Re:So who was it ?? (4, Informative)

jefu (53450) | more than 5 years ago | (#28769143)

A bit of exploration gives one possibility. This page, on Dell DRACs [dell.com] , which have a web interface, shows that the web interface supports really only IE and firefox, and those only on 32 bit machines.

More servers (4, Funny)

badfish99 (826052) | more than 5 years ago | (#28768543)

A while ago Opera Software needed more servers
I think they still do.

ok so the company lost money... (-1, Troll)

sulfide (1382739) | more than 5 years ago | (#28768555)

But since they are insignificant in the browser market I'd probably do the same thing. This is a lame piece of news, companies blow larger deals on much sillier situations than this. It's just Opera trying to drum up some users.

Re:ok so the company lost money... (4, Insightful)

noundi (1044080) | more than 5 years ago | (#28768677)

Don't be a jackass. Their market share has nothing to do with the article. I don't care about Opera but the story is still funny as hell and worth repeating. I just wish that kind of stuff happened to me at work. :(

Re:ok so the company lost money... (0)

Spewns (1599743) | more than 5 years ago | (#28768687)

Or it's just an Opera person posting a humorous story on his fucking blog. Christ.

Re:ok so the company lost money... (5, Insightful)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 5 years ago | (#28768691)

Why? I can see not bothering to test much on Opera, or putting a "We only support browsers X and Y." statement in the manual, or even not bothering about any issues that crop up if you use Opera to access the admin interface; but why would you deliberately add a check that breaks Opera?

Re:ok so the company lost money... (1)

Broken scope (973885) | more than 5 years ago | (#28768751)

Tying up a loose end so you don't have to test for compatibility?

Re:ok so the company lost money... (1)

FlyingBishop (1293238) | more than 5 years ago | (#28768909)

You don't have to test at all if no one buys your software. That's how you really tie up loose ends.

Re:ok so the company lost money... (1)

Broken scope (973885) | more than 5 years ago | (#28769229)

Sorry, I tried to convey sarcasm via text. Once again, it failed.

Re:ok so the company lost money... (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28768895)

But it's worse than that. The unnamed company specifically sent these test servers to Opera. I can sorta understand a bone-headed company deciding it would not bother supporting a minority browser like Opera... but it is then silly to bid on a contract with that minority player, and it takes colossal idiocy to ship a server that doesn't even work with that company's software.

Re:ok so the company lost money... (5, Insightful)

afidel (530433) | more than 5 years ago | (#28769119)

You are assuming WAY too much. Some subcontractor wrote software to a specification that said support browsers x and y with functionality a,b,c,..q and pass these tests. To make sure some clever tester didn't find some obscure bug with Opera that would keep him from getting paid he just errored the browser out. This passed functionality testing and was approved. Later this now approved and standard code was delivered with the imbedded management card of a server that just happened to be shipped to Opera. The two events have nothing to do with each other and it unbelievably unlikely that for an account the size of Opera that someone would have done regression testing on their software to make sure it works with Opera's product.

Re:ok so the company lost money... (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28769275)

You are assuming WAY too much. Some subcontractor wrote software to a specification that said

Exactly correct, your post is right on.

Of course, nobody at Opera bothered to find and fix the problems that prevented the sub-contractor from supporting it in the first place.

While I do find this quite hilariously ironic, I find it even more ironic that Opera's incompatibilities came back to bite... Opera itself.

Re:ok so the company lost money... (1, Funny)

Mystra_x64 (1108487) | more than 5 years ago | (#28769357)

Trolls are so obvious lately. Back then they were more green and weren't that fat. Sigh...

Re:ok so the company lost money... (1)

YourExperiment (1081089) | more than 5 years ago | (#28768971)

So that you never get users attempting to use an unsupported browser, and subsequently gaining a bad opinion of your software when it fails to run smoothly.

Not that I'm condoning any company refusing to support one of the major standards-compliant browsers - but if they're going to, this is probably the safest way to do it.

Re:ok so the company lost money... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28769039)

Is it possible that the admin interface in question uses oncontextmenu? Opera is the only browser that doesn't support it and a lot of browser based interfaces use it.

Google for "opera oncontextmenu" for more information.

Re:ok so the company lost money... (5, Insightful)

ihavnoid (749312) | more than 5 years ago | (#28769169)

It is common to deliberately add a check that breaks the whole stuff when some 'unexpected' condition happens. You know, assertions.

Which one is better? Not working at all, or seems like working but a not-so-commonly-used-some-sort-of-admin-command somehow gets screwed and the web browser fires a do-not-touch-this-unless-you-want-complete-meltdown-command because there was some minor difference on the javscript engine parsing some parameters? Yeah, can be extremely rare, but if it isn't tested, nobody can be sure.

Obviously, the best thing to do would be to test all possible conditions. However, if you can't, then there can be three choices:

1) Leave it to the users, Nah, I'm not gonna test it.
2) Launch a big warning message and blame the users if something goes wrong, or
3) Make it never work when some unknown condition is reached.

Number 1 is perfectly reasonable when the worst consequence isn't so bad. For example, a web forum interface, or things like Facebook. Maybe number 2 would be better in most cases. But, if an untested scenario may cause huge, irrecoverable damage, number 3 may be the best choice. (You should remember that the product in question was the server management console, which can bring the whole datacenter down when things go wrong.)

My opinion is that, deliberately excluding Opera was a quite reasonable idea. Trying to sell a product that deliberately excludes Opera (web browser) to Opera (the company) was the stupid idea.

Opera IS the "superior warrior" though... apk (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28768721)

"since they are insignificant in the browser market I'd probably do the same thing. This is a lame piece of news, companies blow larger deals on much sillier situations than this. It's just Opera trying to drum up some users." - by sulfide (1382739) on Tuesday July 21, @08:53AM (#28768555)

Not knocking FireFox/Mozilla really, they do a nice product & I've worked with their teams fixing bugs on various sites etc. et al, but... they're NO OPERA, in terms of performance, memory footprint, speed overall consistently, & security vulnerabilities patching (as well as meeting standards, but, here? FF seems to do more pages 'correctly', but, that's a matter of useragent string as a fix usually (report as IE, hassles go away many times), + webpage devs building MOSTLY around IE &/or FireFox instead)...

Considering Opera's OVERALL faster (when all factors are tested, Opera USUALLY comes out "on top" of the competition, for more speed & efficiency in various tests of browser speed (such as this one -> http://www.howtocreate.co.uk/browserSpeed.html [howtocreate.co.uk] + others such as -> http://nontroppo.org/timer/kestrel_tests/ [nontroppo.org] & more (available upon request, just ask, I will put them out))?

It keeps Opera's competition on their toes, so-to-speak - they "steal" ideas from Opera, rampantly, & yes FireFox has surpassed Opera in javascript parsing + processing speeds lately, but, that same "gain" turned up a loss in the next url below (1st one):

AND, that Opera is overall the most secure (i.e.-> consistently bearing less known & unpatched security vulnerabilities, for YEARS now no less, this HAS been the case) than BOTH of its main competitors in FireFox (yes, even v.3.51 lately, has "holes again", per this url from here @ /. no less) -> New Firefox Vulnerability Revealed http://tech.slashdot.org/story/09/07/19/169206/New-Firefox-Vulnerability-Revealed [slashdot.org] & Microsoft Internet Explorer -> http://secunia.com/advisories/product/21625/ [secunia.com] vs. Opera -> http://secunia.com/advisories/product/10615/ [secunia.com]

That anyone, with ANY SENSE, that is, knows which webbrowser not only performs the best, pound for pound, but also which one keeps you safest online (& has features natively "built-in" that other webbrowsers have to use addons for, or imitate, to achieve the same levels of excellence in 1 package)...

APK

P.S.=> Lastly, considering Opera generally makes passing the "ACID tests" (for browser std.s compliance) a snap usually, & they are usually the first OR amongst the first that pass it? Well... to quote Microsoft? "Where do YOU want to go, today?"... Opera! apk

What is funny is watching this go from +2 to +1 (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28768939)

See subject-line above, & realize this: NO MATTER WHAT YOU MOD my topic as? The facts in my last post just do not "go away", because they're fact... & "the truth shall set you free", especially from "fanboy fanatic down-modders", who don't realize 1 thing:

THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS "BAD PRESS"...

Mod it down, others get attracted to it, to see WHY it was modded so... & once they see what's inside of my post?

Well... you know!

APK

P.S.=> LOL, amazing... apk

LOL, somebody's blowing mod points like mad! apk (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28769067)

Let's see: So far, my post went from +2 INFORMATIVE, to +1 INFORMATIVE, down to 0 TROLL status?

LMAO: Guys, please - Give us a break...

(AND, keep blowing your mod points, because once somebody sees the inside of my post & the facts it extolls via valid backing postings from reputable sources?? Well, again: YOU KNOW - See my P.S. below, & whoever's "modding me down", all I can recommend is a really GOOD tune called "Policy of Truth" by Depeche Mode - listen to it, "drink it in, & digest it"...!)

APK

P.S.=> "And, the truth shall set you free..." FREE - of 'fanboy down modders' & FREE - of the trolls that like to do this to me, regularly lately here!

LMAO: Hey, personally? Well, I think they're HILARIOUS actually, because they can do so, namelessly, but when it comes down to facing my points directly, mano-a-mano?? They simply prove themselves to be what they are "The 'NOT MEN' Online" is all... TOO easy! apk

From +1 INFORMATIVE now down to 0 INFORMATIVE? lol (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28769155)

Amazing... see my subject-line, & the moderation scores on my initial posting bouncing like a rubber ball... lol!

From +2 INFORMATIVE

To +1 INFORMATIVE

To 0 TROLL

To +1 INFORMATIVE

To 0 INFORMATIVE...

LMAO! Amazing...

APK

P.S.=> Keep it up, blow those mod points downmodders, because sooner or later? YOU RUN OUT OF THEM, & that's when the REAL FUN begins + where I will just use facts (above & beyond what's in my initial post) to utterly destroy & discredit the "down modder", big-time (of course, that assuming the worms will come out of hiding, & they usually don't but... when they do? LMAO... well, you know (truth sets you free))... apk

Re:ok so the company lost money... (2, Insightful)

schon (31600) | more than 5 years ago | (#28768765)

since they are insignificant in the browser market I'd probably do the same thing.

Then you're a fucking moron.

If you were running a store with a physical presence, would you also ban customers who drove Toyotas, telling them "Toyota is insignificant, and therefore you are not allowed to shop at my store. Come back when you have a Ford or GM"?

Re:ok so the company lost money... (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 5 years ago | (#28768807)

If you were running a store with a physical presence, would you also ban customers who drove Toyotas, telling them "Toyota is insignificant, and therefore you are not allowed to shop at my store. Come back when you have a Ford or GM"?

If your store sells parts for Ford or GM vehicles but doesn't carry any for Toyota, and a Toyota needs special parking provisions, such a policy might appear reasonable at first glance.

Re:ok so the company lost money... (1)

Dunbal (464142) | more than 5 years ago | (#28769087)

But no one driving a Toyota would need spare parts anyway - especially not from Ford or GM...

Re:ok so the company lost money... (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28769219)

People driving a Toyota wouldn't even make it to the store. The damn thing would break down halfway there.

Re:ok so the company lost money... (2, Interesting)

TrippTDF (513419) | more than 5 years ago | (#28768833)

Actually, he has a very valid point. In your Toyota example, you are forgetting that in order to support Toyota, you have increased development costs and time in order to support a very, very small percentage of users, compounded by the fact that supported browsers are free and can be installed in a matter of minutes.

If I'm working on a project with a limited budget and you were going to tell me that enabling support for Opera was going to add even 5% to my total costs, I'd cut it in a heartbeat, because anyone that is using Opera can just switch over to another browser to perform the task at hand*.

The exception to this rule is my wife's office, which mandates Opera use... but it's only because they manage classical musicians and they like the name... it causes them all kinds of problems.

Re:ok so the company lost money... (1)

laron (102608) | more than 5 years ago | (#28768917)

OK, let's assume that you would want to rent out parking space to a local shop. It might make sense to ban brand X cars, if they would require extra wide and long spaces. But if you really want to sell your parking spaces to a brand X car shop, this strategy would be full of fail.

Re:ok so the company lost money... (1)

L4t3r4lu5 (1216702) | more than 5 years ago | (#28769249)

Which is why most sensible car manufacturers make cars which fit within a reasonable spec, and those manufacturers who don't make cars for people who don't use parking spaces, and more than likely don't even drive themselves. You make your product compatible with the lowest common denominator, or you lose on a large proprtion of the market. Why do you think there's so much more driver, software, and hardware support for Microsoft in general?

Picture VW Polo next to Rolls Royce Phantom. Polo will fit nicely out the front of your local 7-11 / Tesco store; Good luck getting the Phantom in anything smaller than the Disabled spaces.

Re:ok so the company lost money... (1)

L4t3r4lu5 (1216702) | more than 5 years ago | (#28769267)

Mod me DOOOOOOWN I didn't read the comment properly.

Apologies!

Re:ok so the company lost money... (5, Insightful)

tsm_sf (545316) | more than 5 years ago | (#28769009)

Actually, he has a very valid point. In your Toyota example, you are forgetting that in order to support Toyota, you have increased development costs and time in order to support a very, very small percentage of users, compounded by the fact that supported browsers are free and can be installed in a matter of minutes.

If you hire a good developer your site should work for all browsers. It's not fucking rocket science.

Re:ok so the company lost money... (1, Insightful)

TrippTDF (513419) | more than 5 years ago | (#28769203)

you're being too simplistic... we don't know the context of the blocking of Opera. I'm sure every programmer out there would want to support it, but if you're 998 hours into a project and you have just discovered that the coding needed to make Opera work with the software is going to take at least another 25 hours, you do what this guy did... I'm not saying it's the best solution, but when you're trying to hit a deadline, you sometimes have to take shortcuts. From a business standpoint, it was probably the right thing to do, even though the coder hated having to do it. The team that built the software probably didn't even know the server was going to Opera anyway

Again, we don't have all the information, so there is no way to tell. While it's not rocket science, there are more factors involved than just the code.

Re:ok so the company lost money... (1)

wjousts (1529427) | more than 5 years ago | (#28769029)

The exception to this rule is my wife's office, which mandates Opera use... but it's only because they manage classical musicians and they like the name... it causes them all kinds of problems.

Dumbest reason to use a certain piece of software. ever!

Adoption because of the name (1)

BenEnglishAtHome (449670) | more than 5 years ago | (#28769297)

Dumbest reason ever? I agree. However, on the flip side...

How often do some FOSS advocates set out to prove that they have marketing savvy by pointing to the dumb, weird names of FOSS apps as a barrier to adoption by "normal" organizations?

We can't have it both ways. The name of a piece of software either does or does not influence people. I think it's clear that it does and if some office, somewhere made Opera the standard for that reason, then such an outcome should not be unexpected. Rare, perhaps, but not unexpected.

Re:ok so the company lost money... (2, Insightful)

blackraven14250 (902843) | more than 5 years ago | (#28768875)

Toyota has the #1 marketshare in the world at something like 15-18%. That's akin to Firefox in terms of share (20-something percent). Opera is lucky if they have 1% of the browser market. It's more like saying Ashok Leyland [wikipedia.org] doen't have a sizable marketshare, therefore we're excluding them from the market.

HP probably (3, Interesting)

YeeHaW_Jelte (451855) | more than 5 years ago | (#28768603)

Had the same thing on the webadmin interface for one of their ILO's. Or more precise, it wouldn't work on anything but IE. Hadn't seen that for quite a while.

Re:HP probably (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28768689)

This is the current ILO script: if( ( ie!=null && ie[1] >= "6.0" ) || ( fire!=null && fire[1] >= "1.0.2" ) || ( moz!=null && moz[1] >= "1.6" ) ) { // supported browser; do nothing } else { alert( "Integrated Lights-Out 2 supports Microsoft Internet Explorer version 6.0 or greater, Firefox version 1.0.2 or greater, and Mozilla version 1.6 or greater. Some functionality may not work and pages may not format correctly on other browser platforms. This browser platform reports it is \""+navigator.userAgent+"\""); }

Why "fire" and "moz", not "gecko"? (4, Interesting)

tepples (727027) | more than 5 years ago | (#28768857)

I've already found a defect in the revised sniffer. The variable names "fire" and "moz" appear to indicate that the code above this line would fail on Iceweasel, IceCat, SeaMonkey post-renaming, Fennec, K-Meleon, Epiphany, and other browsers using the same HTML/CSS/JavaScript engine as Firefox. Why is it testing for "fire" and "moz", not "gecko"? Having an alert() pop-up on (I'm guessing) every page is an improvement against immediate redirection to an error page, but it's still an annoyance.

Re:Why "fire" and "moz", not "gecko"? (1)

ChunderDownunder (709234) | more than 5 years ago | (#28769137)

That implementation may be seen as a feature, by the web page maintainer and not a bug. i.e. various browsers may use the same gecko engine but the site owner only wants to support Firefox.

For an example of similar daftness, I tried ubuntu's rebranding of firefox 3.5, 'abrowser', only to find that few of my browser extensions loaded. When using the firefox branding they all worked - evidently even extensions check for the firefox string.

Microsoft's fault (0, Troll)

muyla (1429487) | more than 5 years ago | (#28768631)

I'm quite sure microsoft did it to make them switch to IE...

I'm more curious who did their QA (2, Insightful)

Loopy (41728) | more than 5 years ago | (#28768635)

And if it was outsourced.

let me take a guess (4, Interesting)

Zashi (992673) | more than 5 years ago | (#28768641)

Having tested web based software for IBM before, I'm going to take a stab in the dark and guess it was IBM. Anyone here ever use SCM (Storage Configuration Manager)? It's utter shite; slow, buggy, and unsupported on anything other than firefox and IE.

Remember kids, IBM Hardware = Good. IBM Software = Kill it with fire.

Re:let me take a guess (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28768679)

We're an IBM shop, and I'm accessing a gazillion of their product web interface through Firefox.

Re:let me take a guess (1)

hattig (47930) | more than 5 years ago | (#28768831)

and unsupported on anything other than firefox and IE.

WTG Einstein.

Re:let me take a guess (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28768863)

Wow, support for the worlds second most used browser. [wikipedia.org] I'm impressed.

IBM. So do you. (0, Offtopic)

tepples (727027) | more than 5 years ago | (#28768883)

Remember kids, IBM Hardware = Good.

Is Lenovo hardware good too? Do you think IBM choose a good buyer for its PC division?

IBM Software = Kill it with fire.

Would this include IBM BIOS, IBM BASIC, and IBM OS/2?

Re:let me take a guess (1)

brucmack (572780) | more than 5 years ago | (#28768961)

"Storage Configuration Manager" sounds like something from their hardware division.

From TFA, the actual code... (5, Informative)

mcgrew (92797) | more than 5 years ago | (#28768645)

if (is.opera)
{
window.location.href="config/error.htm";
}

Conspiracy theorists unite!

Warn and continue (1)

Joe U (443617) | more than 5 years ago | (#28769347)

I never understood the reasoning behind not just warning the user once and continuing.

I once played a game that had a check for processor speed using GHz and flat out refused to play on a fast processor running at a lower GHz.
I've also had software that was written for Windows 2000 and requires SP4. I expect it will start working properly in XP once XP SP4 is released because they were too stupid to check the OS version properly.

Like every other Opera user (5, Funny)

doas777 (1138627) | more than 5 years ago | (#28768647)

spoof the agent, just like everyone else who uses Opera

The offending javascript (0, Redundant)

Zumbs (1241138) | more than 5 years ago | (#28768661)

... from TFA:

if (is.opera) { window.location.href="config/error.htm"; }

And someone sent this on a server for Opera? I marvel at the stupidity of the developer for that niceness, as well as the hardware vendor for not testing their software before shipping.

It was probably something with windows server on i (1)

know1 (854868) | more than 5 years ago | (#28768667)

Heh

I'm going to go out on a limb, and say.... (5, Funny)

popo (107611) | more than 5 years ago | (#28768685)

Not that Opera doesn't have serious funding... but I'm going to go out on a limb and say that this javascript would be more expensive, most of the time
.
.

if (is.explorer)
{
window.location.href="config/error.htm";
}

At least someone knew what Opera was. (5, Funny)

Kupfernigk (1190345) | more than 5 years ago | (#28768693)

If you have an enemy, at least someone cares about you.

The British cartoonist Giles is said to have made himself practically sacking proof by one of his cartoons. The Duke of Edinburgh remarked that "The [Daily, owned by Beaverbrook] Express is a bloody awful newspaper."

Giles promptly did a cartoon of his employer being led off in chains by Yeoman Warders, watched by the Duke, with the caption

"Ah well", said Lord B, as they trotted him off to the Tower, "At least he reads it, or he wouldn't know it's a bloody awful newspaper."

If large corporations would only use common sense, (5, Insightful)

judolphin (1158895) | more than 5 years ago | (#28768713)

This nonsense would never happen.

I started as a web developer in the mid-90s. I know how hard it is to develop for multiple browsers and versions. When Netscape and Internet Explorer 4.0 came out, they quickly gained the majority of market share. Many colleagues did not want to keep their sites compatible with 3.x browsers because they felt it was a pain. I would always hear the sentence, "They only have a 5% market share."

To me this was and still is a ridiculous attitude. You're OK randomly raising your middle finger to 1 in 20 potential customers visiting your site? What if that 1 in 20 is the wrong person? Obviously, in this case, they definitely raised their middle finger to the wrong people.

But this gets even worse, because Opera is not obsolete and is fairly standards-compliant. To top it off, the vendor specifically broke the web site for the browser they were too lazy to design for, rather than doing something that makes sense -- like investing time and money to reach a small but tech-savvy segment of the population.

All told -- shamefully -- it makes me feel a little Schadenfreude that it bit them in the rear.

You think the code is bad? Take a look at page 5! (4, Interesting)

RingDev (879105) | more than 5 years ago | (#28768819)

http://www.digi.no/504306/her-kjores-egentlig-opera-mini&bid=5 [www.digi.no]

Notice anything odd about the large 48v DC power cables? Like the '+' and '-'... on the wrong lines...

Forget a javascript issue, that there is a pretty huge installation issue.

-Rick

Re:You think the code is bad? Take a look at page (1)

gEvil (beta) (945888) | more than 5 years ago | (#28768947)

Well, at least the installer was consistent. But yeah, ouch!

Re:You think the code is bad? Take a look at page (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28768965)

can only guess on wheter the colors or the labeling is wrong

Re:You think the code is bad? Take a look at page (1)

Dunbal (464142) | more than 5 years ago | (#28769027)

Maybe that's why the page is in this weird language...

Re:You think the code is bad? Take a look at page (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28769235)

Weird language, that would explain a lot of /.

Re:You think the code is bad? Take a look at page (5, Informative)

ZorinLynx (31751) | more than 5 years ago | (#28769041)

48V DC is an odd beast, with odd standards going back to the early days of the Bell System.

In a 48V DC system, the positive side is grounded. This is to prevent corrosion on phone lines in the ground that happens more readily if the system is negative ground.

Since positive is ground, the "live" wire is negative, or -48VDC. Since this is the wire you don't want to lick, or allow to touch the chassis when powered, it is colored red in many deployments. The black wire is ground, you can lick* it all you want.

* -48V DC won't really sting you much if you just touch it unless your hands are wet or you touch it with a wet part of you like your tongue.

Well I learned something new today (4, Insightful)

RingDev (879105) | more than 5 years ago | (#28769107)

Thanks for that, now I feel kinda like an idiot. At least I am now a smarter idiot than I was half an hour ago.

-Rick

Re:Well I learned something new today (1)

gEvil (beta) (945888) | more than 5 years ago | (#28769167)

Don't worry, you're not alone. I suppose there's a reason we're not electricians. : p

Re:If large corporations would only use common sen (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28768881)

I'm not sure who to feel Schadenfreude towards. The company that sold a server with pre-installed web-admin software that locked out the company's own browser, or the Web browser company that needs their servers to be pre-installed with web-admin software...

Old browser == old PC == miser (1, Insightful)

tepples (727027) | more than 5 years ago | (#28769071)

[Old versions of popular browsers] "only have a 5% market share."

To me this was and still is a ridiculous attitude. You're OK randomly raising your middle finger to 1 in 20 potential customers visiting your site?

They probably did a business decision that people in the last 5 percent to upgrade their web browsers buy less. You see, older browser versions tend to run better on obsolete PCs, and people who don't replace an obsolete PC are probably misers [wikipedia.org] : people who stretch their dollar so far that they are less likely to demand your luxury product. Case in point: PCs running IE 6 or Firefox 2 are likely to be at least eight years old.

Re: 5% (2, Interesting)

Lonewolf666 (259450) | more than 5 years ago | (#28769265)

In general, not supporting a 5% market segment because it would cost too much development effort may be a reasonable decision.

In this case, the real WTF was submitting the product in a bid for the vendor of said 5% market segment. And simply throwing an error if Opera is detected. That's like opening a business in a black neighborhood and putting up a sign that says "Niggers not allowed" ;-)

Re:If large corporations would only use common sen (1)

plague3106 (71849) | more than 5 years ago | (#28769301)

Please... there's nothing wrong with NOT investing time / money which you will never see back. Sending a server like that directly to Opera when trying to win a bid is stupid... but for the most part that 1 in 20 is inconsequential.

I want to know who the vendor was! (1)

erroneus (253617) | more than 5 years ago | (#28768725)

I've been a Dell user for a long time but I have never used one that shipped with a web interface. But the specs probably called for some pretty special stuff and it may not have been loaded with Windows at all. So I just have to know. Who was it? Was it my Dell? I could sort of believe it if it was Dell... sometimes the people there leave me scratching my head wondering what they were thinking and if they listened to me at all. But my preference for Dell is due in large part to my experience with HP whose support and sales are very unmoving and inflexible. (I am sure others have had different experiences and that's fine, and I believe you too... it's just not my experience. No need to discuss.)

Of the big two, HP and Dell, which one of them is "more beholden" to Microsoft? It's hard for me to tell since I have Dell leanings and haven't dealt with HP for a few years. Both offer Linux on servers. Both offer Linux on desktops and laptops. Both are pretty beholden to Microsoft and have to walk lightly when it comes to offending them. I really haven't a clue who it could be...

Re:I want to know who the vendor was! (1)

afidel (530433) | more than 5 years ago | (#28769327)

HP supports every OS under the sun, from their own OS's to Linux to Solaris. About the only major OS's they don't support are OS X and AIX and those because they can't. Heck HP even employs quite a few key people in the Linux community which AFAIK Dell does not do. Windows boxes account for some significant percentage of HP's revenues, but it's not even a majority of their hardware profit let alone overall profit. Dell on the other hand would die without their windows sales.

Headline (2, Insightful)

iVasto (829426) | more than 5 years ago | (#28768737)

The headline is misinformative. Based upon the headline I would have expected to read about a company hiring a bunch of developers for a lot of money to code something cool in javascript. Perhaps a more appropriate headline is "Javascript locked out Opera, Opera locked out the company."

Global Warming blamed for Ted Kennedy's cancer (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28768769)

http://www.breitbart.com/article.php?id=CNG.d672f9d7f0f64fefdf0b21e696b41e21.7a1&show_article=1 [breitbart.com]

Funny, the "study" claims that commercial fishing isn't a significant factor in the shrinking of the average fish size, yet it was just last night that I was watching an Animal Planet show that claimed the opposite! I am tired of these contrived "studies" with predetermined outcomes. No, you may NOT use Church of Gaia dogma to revoke my God-given rights as defined by the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution. Neither the federal government nor some international shadow government like the UN has any business trampling on states' rights.

Re:Global Warming blamed for Ted Kennedy's cancer (0, Offtopic)

Dunbal (464142) | more than 5 years ago | (#28768919)

as defined by the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution. Neither the federal government nor some international shadow government like the UN has any business trampling on states' rights.

So the bit in the Constitution that says: "This Constitution, and the Laws of the United States which shall be made in Pursuance thereof; and all Treaties made, or which shall be made, under the Authority of the United States, shall be the supreme Law of the Land; and the Judges in every State shall be bound thereby" should be removed, then?

Re:Global Warming blamed for Ted Kennedy's cancer (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28769005)

Yes, if said laws or treaties trample on the very specifically enumerated limited powers of the federal government. Any power not explicitly granted to the federal government by the Constitution belongs to the states. I'm afraid you are confused. The founders' clear intent was that the federal government be an agent of the states, not the reverse situation in which we find ourselves today.

Re:Global Warming blamed for Ted Kennedy's cancer (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28769381)

But the Constitution was subsequently amended to include a Bill of Rights, reserving to the people and the states those powers not explicitly delegated to the national government.

Re:Global Warming blamed for Ted Kennedy's cancer (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28769061)

Kind of funny... people who believe in evolution are trying to prevent it from happening.

Heh. (4, Insightful)

popeyethesailor (325796) | more than 5 years ago | (#28768805)

Classic case of a company not knowing what their product is used for.

Opera != Work Browser.
Opera == Bestest P0rn Browser ! Swift image resizing, superior mouse gestures, and remaining responsive even after a gazillion tabs are opened.

It's like turning up with your purpose-built race car at the city center, and whining about speed humps.

kinda funny, but... (1)

motang (1266566) | more than 5 years ago | (#28768933)

It's kinda funny, but it also shows the ignorance of some people who used to (and maybe still do) think there is only one web browser out there and it's IE. Good thing times are changing!

Ah, memories of days past.... (5, Funny)

dals_rule (1076803) | more than 5 years ago | (#28769003)

Many years ago, we were bidding on a US Postal Service contract to supply computer equipment to all of their offices. We had several pallets of bid material on the loading dock, ready to go. Fortunately, one of the program managers made a last minute check and discovered (in time!) that nobody had bothered to tell the shipping department to ignore the standard, "Ship all contract proposals FedEx, overnight", procedure in this case.....

Re:Ah, memories of days past.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28769097)

I don't get it.

Re:Ah, memories of days past.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28769181)

Then you sir (or maam), are an idiot.

Re:Ah, memories of days past.... (1)

ledow (319597) | more than 5 years ago | (#28769253)

Bidding on US Postal service contracts.

Shipping the stuff to them by FedEx.

Am I the only one... (2, Insightful)

jenn_13 (1123793) | more than 5 years ago | (#28769091)

... who was expecting this to involve the new recovery.gov?

proof... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28769127)

Wow, so this proves someone actually does use Opera!

It was Dell. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28769277)

It was Dell.

donkey cock (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28769375)

donkey cock!
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