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Vacuum Leaks Lead To Another LHC Delay

Soulskill posted more than 5 years ago | from the doomsday-averted-once-more dept.

Science 224

suraj.sun tips this story at ZDNet about a new problem with the LHC. Quoting: "The restart of the Large Hadron Collider has been pushed back further, following the discovery of vacuum leaks in two sectors of the experiment. The world's largest particle collider is now unlikely to restart before mid-November, according to a CERN press statement. The project had been expected to start again in October. To repair the leaks, which are from the helium circuit into the insulating vacuum, sectors 8-1 and 2-3 will have to be warmed from 80K to room temperature. Adjacent sub-sectors will act as 'floats,' while the remainder of the surrounding sectors will be kept at 80K, CERN said in the statement. The repair work will not have an impact on the vacuum in the beam pipe. CERN has pushed back the restart a number of times, as repair work has continued. To begin with, scientists said the LHC experiment would restart in April 2009. In May, CERN [said] that the restarted experiment could run through the winter to make up some of the lost time."

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ZOMG, (5, Funny)

Icegryphon (715550) | more than 5 years ago | (#28781911)

This is like Duke Nukem Forever all over again.
History might not repeat itself but it sure does rhyme.

Re:ZOMG, (2, Funny)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 5 years ago | (#28781949)

You wish this was like Duke Nukem Forever. "Vacuum leak" is clearly just G-man coverup speak for "resonance cascade"...

Re:ZOMG, (1)

Intron (870560) | more than 5 years ago | (#28782083)

Or maybe "formation of miniature Black Holes"

Re:ZOMG, (1)

Jurily (900488) | more than 5 years ago | (#28781981)

This is like Duke Nukem Forever all over again.

The story or the development process?

Re:ZOMG, (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28782053)

Better that than the beginning of Half-life.

Re:ZOMG, (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28782335)

Anyone else getting flashbacks to Another World...?

Re:ZOMG, (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28782861)

Awesome game, thanks for reminding me.

Re:ZOMG, (1)

Vectronic (1221470) | more than 5 years ago | (#28782167)

Maybe history is repeating itself, if the first test they did caused some sort of temporal loop at the atomic level and that's what's been causing all the subsequent problems.

Re:ZOMG, (1)

The Archon V2.0 (782634) | more than 5 years ago | (#28782863)

Maybe history is repeating itself, if the first test they did caused some sort of temporal loop at the atomic level and that's what's been causing all the subsequent problems.

What, how many times? Dozens? Hundreds? You mean I've been working at the same job for over a century now, but only got about one year's worth of paychecks?! To hell with black holes destroying the Earth, that's nothing compared to this!

OK (3, Funny)

Shivetya (243324) | more than 5 years ago | (#28782193)

I want to know where they hid the working LHC at.

Re:ZOMG, (3, Insightful)

nametaken (610866) | more than 5 years ago | (#28782703)

"This is like Duke Nukem Forever all over again."

Hopefully Hubble. Plagued up front, hugely successful later on.

Nope. (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28783113)

Nope. It's like Ultra-High-Vacuum applications -- the one single real-world technical application even more frustrating than programming.

(Disclaimer: I am a scientist working on UHV applications, and I am a programmer :-) And I enjoy both. And I'm doing both for a living... Hm. Hang on a minute, I'm just realizing my masochistic tendency... :-p )

First post (0, Redundant)

Taibhsear (1286214) | more than 5 years ago | (#28781919)

After startup that is.
I'm beginning to think this thing is cursed.

Thank You, Mr. Air Pressure! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28781921)

Yea! A few more months of reprieve before we're all sucked into the black hole!

*sigh* (4, Interesting)

TooMuchToDo (882796) | more than 5 years ago | (#28781943)

As someone on the LHC/CMS experiment team, let me be the first to say "Argh."

At least... (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28782039)

...the delay will mean the world lives on for 2 more months ;=)
 
Ofcourse, A(H1N1)v will prevent the startup alltogether, as key personnel falls sick at the critical time ;)
 
Then again, the sudden reappearance of sunspots on the sun probably means the super nova will come before even that happens
Oh no, I forgot to take my pills !

Re:At least... (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28782589)

don't worry about the pills, they aren't working

Re:*sigh* (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28782097)

"Argh."

Pirates! I knew it!

Re:*sigh* (1)

JCSoRocks (1142053) | more than 5 years ago | (#28782689)

No wonder those scurvy dogs haven't gotten any work done! They're all busy drinking rum and running down wenches. ...or messing about on slashdot. Either way - get back to work you lazy pirates!

Re:*sigh* (1)

thenextstevejobs (1586847) | more than 5 years ago | (#28782115)

As someone on the LHC/CMS experiment team, let me be the first to say "Argh."

As someone with a cursory idea of how amazing some of the things we might learn are, I am champing at the bit myself. Best of luck to you.

I'm a linguist/programmer by training, but I recently read Brian Greene's "The Fabric of the Cosmos", have read Brief History, and most of Penrose's "The Road to Reality" (a book that covers a lot of the math found in Greene's book)

As a professional in the field, could you recommend more reading for a budding physics enthusiast like myself?

Re:*sigh* (-1, Flamebait)

GigsVT (208848) | more than 5 years ago | (#28782241)

Are all linguists know-it-all assholes, or just the ones I run into on the Internet?

Re:*sigh* (2, Insightful)

krakelohm (830589) | more than 5 years ago | (#28782459)

No its just you, I think you just attract the assholes like a big asshole magnet, might as well embrace it because I see no end to your asshole magnetism.

Re:*sigh* (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28782569)

Cue some other Anonymous coward with a goatse joke

Re:*sigh* (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28782671)

Interesting.

Does having an active intellectual life automatically make a person an asshole?

Or is it just the ones that are smarter than you?

Re:*sigh* (1)

somersault (912633) | more than 5 years ago | (#28782759)

I fail to see how someone who is humbly asking for sources of information on a topic which he would like to study in more depth can be classified a "know-it-all asshole", even in colloquial terms. Does anyone who enjoys the process of learning more than yourself constitute such a person?

Re:*sigh* (1)

GigsVT (208848) | more than 5 years ago | (#28782801)

Oh, yeah "thenextstevejobs" is the picture of humility.

Frank Close (1)

Roger W Moore (538166) | more than 5 years ago | (#28783137)

You could try some of the books by Frank Close. He's a British author and, while I've heard that some don't like his style, I appreciate it a lot more than Brian Greene - but then I work in the field so I might have a different point of view to a layperson.

Re:*sigh* (2, Funny)

GigsVT (208848) | more than 5 years ago | (#28782119)

You've already created a black hole though. It sucks in tax money which then promptly disappears, and nothing ever comes out of it.

Re:*sigh* (3, Funny)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 5 years ago | (#28782239)

You've already created a black hole though. It sucks in tax money which then promptly disappears, and nothing ever comes out of it.

Maybe LHC should merge with ISS then. At least the BH would orbit the Earth a while, giving us a little time to ... uh ... pray?
   

Re:*sigh* (3, Funny)

chaim79 (898507) | more than 5 years ago | (#28782465)

Actually that's not a bad idea, no problem of 'vacuum leaks' up there, and the black hole could suck up all the space junk in orbit! Great idea!

Now off to patent it... :)

Re:*sigh* (1)

mcgrew (92797) | more than 5 years ago | (#28782165)

Ye be a pirate, then? Are you trying to start an ARGHument?

Re:*sigh* (1)

nkcaump (1016816) | more than 5 years ago | (#28782203)

Have we learned nothing from BSG? All this has happened before and will happen again...

Re:*sigh* (-1, Troll)

mcgrew (92797) | more than 5 years ago | (#28782817)

BSG
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

BSG is a three-letter abbreviation that may refer to:

Baraminology Study Group
Battlestar Galactica
Battlestar Galactica (1978 TV series)
Battlestar Galactica (2004 TV series)
Beacon Street Girls, a book series
Bibliothèque Sainte-Geneviève, a library in Paris
Birtles Shorrock Goble, a band
Bournemouth School for Girls, Dorset, UK
British Society of Gastroenterology
British Society for Geomorphology
Brotherhood of Saint Gregory, a community of Anglican friars
Blue supergiant, a kind of star
Basigin (medicine), a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily
The British Sitcom Guide, currently turning into the British Comedy Guide
Betriebssportgemeinschaft, an organisational form of sports clubs in East Germany

Re:*sigh* (1)

bucky0 (229117) | more than 5 years ago | (#28782431)

As another person on the LHC/CMS team, let me say: "at least this gives us more time to break and refix things before first beam" .."Oh, you mean we need to change this code again? great."

Re:*sigh* (1)

TooMuchToDo (882796) | more than 5 years ago | (#28782609)

We'll get there eventually =)

Re:*sigh* (1)

Roger W Moore (538166) | more than 5 years ago | (#28783185)

As a member of the LHC/ATLAS team let me say that you are in a good position if you have to break them first! ;-)

Re:*sigh* (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28782781)

Score: -42, Pirate.

and it's not even September, 19th yet...

Re:*sigh* (2, Funny)

drerwk (695572) | more than 5 years ago | (#28782853)

I understand this being /. most people think that argh is just a pirate term, since there are so many RIAA stories. In the context of Physics, which is what this post is about, argh is an SI unit of work done incorrectly.

Great (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28781965)

It's now what, a year behind the schedule they'd set after the explosion? CERN is looking worse and worse.

It's really too bad that the congressional Democrats killed the competing Superconducting Supercollider way back in 1994. It's not just a matter of national pride, really. The world simply can't afford to have only one of these machines. The delays have been a tremendous setback for the species as a whole. We are losing years in the progress of our knowledge of physics, the most important science of them all.

Re:Great (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28782047)

This is the USA that you're talking about, right? To the extent this physics knowledge is in the Bible, such efforts are unnecessary expenses. To the extent the knowledge is not in the Bible, such efforts are forbidden.

It's only a setback for lab technicians (3, Funny)

BadAnalogyGuy (945258) | more than 5 years ago | (#28782067)

Real physicists have already worked out the equations and have anticipated the results of the experiments at CERN.

Experimental lab techs are the ones who are having setbacks here.

Don't worry your little monkey brain too much. Humans are progressing just fine.

Re:Great (0)

cromar (1103585) | more than 5 years ago | (#28782095)

I'm as much for interesting research as the next guy, but I think the species will be fine even if we don't begin looking for the Higgs Boson or whatever they're doing over at the LHC for a few more months.

Worrisome (1, Troll)

BadAnalogyGuy (945258) | more than 5 years ago | (#28781967)

What's worrisome is that these same scientists who can't seem to build this thing without some fatal flaw are the same scientists telling us there's nothing to worry about when they create a black hole.

Re:Worrisome (5, Insightful)

thenextstevejobs (1586847) | more than 5 years ago | (#28782011)

What's worrisome is that these same scientists who can't seem to build this thing without some fatal flaw are the same scientists telling us there's nothing to worry about when they create a black hole.

Sorry if I'm missing intended humor in your post but that just doesn't make any sense.

These are construction flaws. The fact that the black holes they may be able to create are not a threat has nothing to do with any sort of special containment. It's simply that the size and level of energy is no where near enough to last even nanoseconds.

The ignorance about the dangers of particle accelerators is disconcerting.

By the way, if you want a good look at modern physics, read Brian Greene's "The Fabric of the Cosmos". Really good read.

Re:Worrisome (4, Interesting)

NonSequor (230139) | more than 5 years ago | (#28782401)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quantum_suicide [wikipedia.org]

I admit it's silly, but I can't shut up the thought in the back of my head that maybe the earth only continues to exist in branches where the start up of the LHC is delayed.

Re:Worrisome (1)

maxume (22995) | more than 5 years ago | (#28782977)

Well, if each quantum observation that you make creates a new universe, it makes at least as much sense to think of 'you' as existing in the various universe, exploring the consequences of each observation as it does to think of yourself as a precious unique flower.

I guess the information doesn't necessarily propagate (that we don't know how it could does not rule out the possibility that it could...) to other parts of the multiverse.

Anyway, like most existential questions, satisfaction is only a lifetime away.

Re:Worrisome (1)

Ed_Pinkley (881113) | more than 5 years ago | (#28783075)

I'm glad someone else brought this up. I was going in the direction of time travel: The End of Eternity [wikipedia.org]

Imagine if there are some people in the distant future (or outside of time as in the story) who know the earth/universe/human race will end if the LHC is completed. They could be messing with our progress in an attempt to prevent it.

I also admit it is silly and it is "only" in the back of my head.

Ed Pinkley

Re:Worrisome (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28782533)

Oh great, the linguist is here to give us a safety assessment.

Re:Worrisome (1)

CorporateSuit (1319461) | more than 5 years ago | (#28782999)

The ignorance about the dangers of particle accelerators is disconcerting.

Said the pot to the kettle.

The purpose of designing the LHC was to see what happens because they don't know what happens, and you are just as ignorant as the person you're chiding. No one is an expert on what happens when the very underlying principle of the experiment is that "no one is sure what will happen". It could make delicious, expensive icecream, for all we know. It could, in theory, destroy the world or a part of it. Given the evidence, I don't THINK it will destroy the world, but giving ridiculous odds against it (like winning the lottery 10 times in a row) is outright lying.

Re:Worrisome (2, Interesting)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 5 years ago | (#28782059)

What's worrisome is that these same scientists who can't seem to build this thing without some fatal flaw are the same scientists telling us there's nothing to worry about when they create a black hole.

The scientists blame the engineers. But let's see who gets "credit" for the Galactic Darwin Award.
     

Re:Worrisome (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28782543)

A "bad analogy guy" like yourself shouldn't worry over such matters. A black hole is like a cuddle blanket of snuggles to you and your ilk.

It will take 3 years to come back online (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28781969)

I predict the collider turns on in 2012.

Damn you Nature! (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28781971)

Why oh why must you abhor a vacuum???

Where's the news? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28781977)

Everybody knows that the LHC will be restarted... when, Dec. 23rd, 2012?

Re:Where's the news? (1)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 5 years ago | (#28782157)

Everybody knows that the LHC will be restarted... when, Dec. 23rd, 2012

Dammit, dontcha just hate it when the world ends? It sooo interferes with trolling.
       

Is that first thing we need ? (0)

HollyMolly-1122 (1480249) | more than 5 years ago | (#28782001)

Black hole - is that the top of the mankind capabilities they could "create" ? Is that first thing we need ? Why nobody was able to find any alien civilizations yet ? - That's because of there are black holes in place of them now.... Why not ? For every small problem with collider smart scientists say: ohh well, - we didn't account for that small issue. Keeping things this way, there could appear the moment when there is nobody left to say: ohh, - we didn't account for that small issue. 99% of population are delegating their future and safety to the remaining 1%. They also hope that this 1% knows all possible consequences. Isn't that scary ? If present science are so sure about all possible consequences of creating black holes using Large Hadron Collider or any collider that size, than why any expirements needed ? How people that are not "against science" can guarantee any HollyDolly mother, that she's childs are in safe place, if they are going to create something that they know nothing about ? Especially if this nothing has one way information flow. Information can enter black hole but can't escape. It could lead to unpredicted consequences in either case: in a small scale or big scale.

Re:Is that first thing we need ? (5, Informative)

samkass (174571) | more than 5 years ago | (#28782153)

Particle interactions with more energy than LHC can produce happen in the Earth's atmosphere every day. But outside of a carefully controlled environment with extensive sensor equipment, they can't be studied. The LHC is not about creating energies never before seen on Earth-- it won't do that. It's about doing so in an extremely controlled manner than can be measured and investigated.

Re:Is that first thing we need ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28782195)

Dilute! Dilute! OK!

Re:Is that first thing we need ? (2)

pwilli (1102893) | more than 5 years ago | (#28782333)

If you start a small firework rocket, you can't predict how far up it will fly and when exactly it will blow up in a shiny and entertaining explosion. But you know the limits of that rocket, e.g. it won't fly up more than 200 feet, the light of the explosion won't last longer than 10 seconds and it won't get hotter than 150 degrees celsius in the center of the explosion (numbers completely made up by me).

The scientists know that the black hole and anything else that may come from LHC won't destroy the world. They also have clear expectations about what they will see, based on what they know about science. But they can't predict 100% what exactly will happen and what new particles will be created, just like a fireworks producer won't be able to tell you how exactly the explosion of the firework will look, just stuff like "it will look like a red heart".

Shooting that firework rocket may point out weekness in design or understanding of explosives involved, just like the LHC may point out flaws in the understanding of physics.

Re:Is that first thing we need ? (0)

HollyMolly-1122 (1480249) | more than 5 years ago | (#28782563)

There was an information previous year, that one uf Universities studied documentation of Collider and found it is largely based on documents that are themselves based on assumptions.

Large Hadron Collider Understanding The Dangers (1)

HollyMolly-1122 (1480249) | more than 5 years ago | (#28782811)

Large Hadron Collider: Understanding The Dangers (Part 3) The end note there: This "safety review" is a political PR document, not real science. http://deepthought.newsvine.com/_news/2008/09/05/1831610-large-hadron-collider-understanding-the-dangers-part-3 [newsvine.com]

Re:Is that first thing we need ? (4, Insightful)

mcgrew (92797) | more than 5 years ago | (#28782555)

Why nobody was able to find any alien civilizations yet ?

That's because of a number of factors.

  1. There may in fact not be any; it's possible that life (and the conditions that cause it) is so rare in the universe that only one in a hundred galaxies has produced it
  2. It's too far away to talk to. No other civilizations farther than a little more than 100 light years away would have been able to pick up any EMF we transmitted
  3. The signals we/they transmit are likely too weak to detect
  4. It's possible that we haven't discovered their form of communication, while they haven't discovered ours
  5. They may have seen our violent history (or their own) and are afraid to communicate with us. If I was them, I'd be scared, too.
  6. They may not even realize we are alive (their form of life is likely to be more bozarre than we can imagine)
  7. Our own hubris - many (most?) people don't realize that other species on our planet do in fact think, feel, and communicate. It's only recently that science has discovered that other species do in fact communicate
  8. They may be so advanced that we're just not interesting to them

If present science are so sure about all possible consequences of creating black holes using Large Hadron Collider or any collider that size, than why any expirements needed ?

Because for a hypothesis to become a theory, it must be tested. That's how science works.

How people that are not "against science" can guarantee any HollyDolly mother, that she's childs are in safe place

There is no such thing as absolute safety. Your "1%" chance enormously overestimates the chances of a black hole swallowing the earth. We're not talking about a pea sized black hole (which would have a mass as great as a mountain), but an infinitessimal mass measuring the same as a few atoms, at most.

Information can enter black hole but can't escape.

See, the problem is calling these tiny singularities "black holes". Wikipedia's definition of "black holes" excludes these things. There is a vast difference between a gnat and an elephant, even though both are animals. There's no magic about black holes swallowing light; in space an object must have enough mass to collapse on itself to create a black hole, if I remember correctly it's about the mass of a thousand suns.

You have far more dangerous things to worry about, driving your kids to the store for instance.

Further reading about black holes. [wikipedia.org] Further reading about the LHC. [wikipedia.org] Further reading about Micro black holes [wikipedia.org]

Re:Is that first thing we need ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28782847)

9. They may be so advanced that they hold a common-sense policy of "absolutely no interaction" with primitive civilizations. In fact, they may be studying us at this very moment, from an entirely different galaxy, using technology we have no chance of detecting, or even comprehending at this point in our evolution.

Vacuum Leaks... (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28782019)

... soon they won't be able to stop them. It will be a hazardous vacuum spill, endangering all the surroundings of the LHC!!

Re:Vacuum Leaks... (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28782287)

wow...that sucks. :)

Re:Vacuum Leaks... (1)

gilbert644 (1515625) | more than 5 years ago | (#28782659)

nah, it blows!

Re:Vacuum Leaks... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28782787)

Surely you mean that blows? ;)

Re:Vacuum Leaks... (1)

BlueKitties (1541613) | more than 5 years ago | (#28782597)

I think the vacuum is caused by a BLACK HOLE. Excuse me while I go blog.

Re:Vacuum Leaks... (5, Funny)

CopaceticOpus (965603) | more than 5 years ago | (#28782737)

Vaccuum leaks are one of those under-appreciated dangers, along with dry spills, hot freezes, and explosions of calm.

Good news (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28782827)

I'm glad that the restart of the Large Hardon Collider has been delayed.

I don't care who you are. A large hardon collider has got to hurt.

Bit off more than they could chew (0, Flamebait)

Tanman (90298) | more than 5 years ago | (#28782099)

This is why movies have producers. It's to keep the artists in check. Someone should have kept the brains in check when they designed this thing. Instead of being smaller and useful, it's just a gigantic waste of money -- the Waterworld of the scientific community.

Once it 'works' . . . my guess is something will go wrong with the measuring instruments. There's no reason to think that the base functionality is the only thing flawed. It'll be great to finally have particles fire around the track, collide, and have bad data.

Re:Bit off more than they could chew (1)

alexhs (877055) | more than 5 years ago | (#28782221)

Once it 'works' . . . my guess is something will go wrong with the measuring instruments. There's no reason to think that the base functionality is the only thing flawed. It'll be great to finally have particles fire around the track, collide, and have bad data.

Cutting-edge science uses cutting-edge technology.
Of course it breaks !
But in a few decades these technologies might be ready for industrial uses.

Re:Bit off more than they could chew (1)

cowscows (103644) | more than 5 years ago | (#28782497)

This is a giant multi-national project with funding from multiple governments. I'm sure there was plenty of politics and bureaucrats involved, not just a bunch of over-ambitious engineers trying to build the most complicated things they could dream up.

Re:Bit off more than they could chew (1)

mcgrew (92797) | more than 5 years ago | (#28782603)

Instead of being smaller and useful, it's just a gigantic waste of money

We already did smaller [wikipedia.org] . The LHC, when it comes on line, will be far more useful.

Re:Bit off more than they could chew (4, Insightful)

Kjella (173770) | more than 5 years ago | (#28782709)

This is why movies have producers. It's to keep the artists in check. Someone should have kept the brains in check when they designed this thing. Instead of being smaller and useful, it's just a gigantic waste of money -- the Waterworld of the scientific community.

Yes, and we should dismantle Hubble and replace it with an army of hobbyist astronomers with a 100$ telescope. They won't find anything new except maybe a few near-earth asteroids, certainly no exoplanets and all the other interesting stuff happening. Same with LHC, if you wanted any particle accelerator I think we had an electron one in high school science class. We could play with it forever but I doubt we'd ever get any more results on the standard model and the higgs particle. Experimental science of this kind is all about building the most sensitive equipment you can - it's complex, expensive, obsoleted by the next generation but it's the only way to do science and not guesswork.

I have said this before... (0, Redundant)

Colourspace (563895) | more than 5 years ago | (#28782107)

.... but the time for the LHC to come online is getting scarily closer to 2012 each time one of these hiccups happens. And did anyone else wonder how lead could leak out of a vacuum?

Re:I have said this before... (1)

Colourspace (563895) | more than 5 years ago | (#28783049)

Couple of things - this wasn't redundant when I wrote it - by the time I had come back to the main thread two other people had mentioned it. I *did* actually check first - I hate being redundant. Secondly, if you read the moderation recommendations, you are supposed to use mod points in general to mod up. If I see something redundant, I don't waste mod points on it, I simply don't mark it up. Simple really. Think about it next time.

The simple way (1)

Feint (135854) | more than 5 years ago | (#28782113)

C'mon guys - it's just a leak.. didn't someone put some budget aside for duct tape?

Vacuum leaks are bad (4, Funny)

OglinTatas (710589) | more than 5 years ago | (#28782123)

I had a vacuum leak once and in less than 5 seconds my house, instead of just smelling like dog hair smelled like stale month old dog hair in a vacuum bag. I also learned to empty the bag more often.

Re:Vacuum leaks are bad (1)

maxume (22995) | more than 5 years ago | (#28782467)

I also had a vacuum leak. It made my car idle too fast.

I didn't get it repaired until the EGR valve failed and the engine temp would go up when the vehicle wasn't moving (I guess the valve failed open).

Re:Vacuum leaks are bad (0, Troll)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 5 years ago | (#28782591)

So, in other words, they forgot to take out the trash? How typically geeky. Wasting billions on shiny stuff but failing to hire some immigrant to do their trash.

Re:Vacuum leaks are bad (1)

BlueKitties (1541613) | more than 5 years ago | (#28782621)

My wife had a vacuum leak and it ruined her dress.

Zing!

If this keeps up... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28782133)

we won't be able to use the LHC before the end of the world in 2012...

Over or Under June 2010 - taking bets (1)

us7892 (655683) | more than 5 years ago | (#28782177)

I'll take the "over" bet on this one. It will not restart successfully until after June 1, 2010.

Re:Over or Under June 2010 - taking bets (1)

tnk1 (899206) | more than 5 years ago | (#28782351)

Actually, we already know when it will restart:

December 21, 2012.

A vacuum leak causing delays? (2, Funny)

drachenfyre (550754) | more than 5 years ago | (#28782261)

That sucks.

Re:A vacuum leak causing delays? (1)

MadKeithV (102058) | more than 5 years ago | (#28782409)

Maybe it blows. It all depends on which way you look at it.

The delay is not big for such an experiment... (3, Insightful)

master_p (608214) | more than 5 years ago | (#28782263)

For an experiment of such magnitude, a delay of a few years is not very important...it's way more important to make the experiment in a good way, above anything else.

puzzled by the headcrabs ref? (1)

gandhi_2 (1108023) | more than 5 years ago | (#28782309)

so was i. [wikipedia.org]

Re:puzzled by the headcrabs ref? (2, Informative)

PaintyThePirate (682047) | more than 5 years ago | (#28782809)

More importantly, Gordon Freeman is apparently an engineer at CERN.

No worries though, he has a crowbar [reddit.com] now.

Reminds me of that God joke... (3, Funny)

lymond01 (314120) | more than 5 years ago | (#28782319)

To paraphrase, this guy is in the middle of a flooding city. He repeatedly refuses attempts of others to rescue him, claiming God will save him. He drowns, winds up in Heaven, and asks God why he didn't save him. "I sent you a two boats and a helicopter..."

So I can see God now using his mighty and flagellant tendrils to tinker with the LHC's inner workings and yet we still press on, thwarting his every attempt to save the planet Earth and the life he created. I'm certain this will all end with a, "Okay, power it up!", followed by a surprisingly brief sucking sound as the world is drawn into a black hole of its own making.

I can just see the look on his face...

Re:Reminds me of that God joke... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28782845)

God: "Petrus, have you seen Earth? I sent them a message that I'd be on vacation for some months and they should postpone the startup of LHC till I've got time to oversee the experiment."
Petrus: "It was there just a moment ago... wait, there seems to be someone at the door!"
God: "God dammit, not again!"

Two Words (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28782445)

Duct Tape!!!

Well, that sucks. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28782599)

(repairs, how appropriate....)

Aliens (1)

nevvamind (988833) | more than 5 years ago | (#28782673)

They're not vacuum leaks, they're gateways to another universe. Plug'em soon before Aliens start oozing out !

December 21, 2012 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28782887)

Coincidentally, LHC activation is delayed until the last day of the Mayan calendar. [wikipedia.org]

Large Hadron Collider: Understanding The Dangers (0)

HollyMolly-1122 (1480249) | more than 5 years ago | (#28782911)

Large Hadron Collider: Understanding The Dangers (Part 3) The end note there: This "safety review" is a political PR document, not real science. http://deepthought.newsvine.com/_news/2008/09/05/1831610-large-hadron-collider-understanding-the-dangers-part-3 [newsvine.com]

Re:Large Hadron Collider: Understanding The Danger (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28783063)

So, some guy calling himself "deep_thought" read a document about LHC and thinks that it is not real science, but a political PR document.

So how exactly is his opinion any more valuable or valid than that of others or the scientists who don't hide behind a nickname?

New Expected Start Date (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28782947)

December 21st, 2012

So that means... (1)

Neurowiz (18899) | more than 5 years ago | (#28783191)

the invasion from the Hive will be delayed a few more months. Good! We can look for the Tunnel-Makers' signal a while longer... (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Einstein%27s_Bridge_(book))

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