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Pirate Bay's Anonymity Service Enters Beta Testing

samzenpus posted more than 5 years ago | from the counting-grains-of-sand dept.

Privacy 137

schliz writes "Developers of The Pirate Bay have launched their new Virtual Private Network (VPN) service to some 180,000 pre-registered beta testers. An e-mail to beta testers read. 'IPREDator does not store any personal details about its clients. IPREDator does not store any traffic habits you might have. IPREDator is the key to a free internet in the renaissance of censorship!' The new service was launched to protect file sharers in response to the Swedish Intellectual Property Rights Enforcement Directive (IPRED) that went into effect in April."

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Finally got a first post... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28797389)

...and I have nothing intelligent to say. Though I guess that's the norm.

Re:Finally got a first post... (-1, Offtopic)

cbs4385 (929248) | more than 5 years ago | (#28797961)

Offtopic yes, but Troll? Really?

Does not store any personal details about clients (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28797411)

This has been the main problem with the beta as no one has been able to login to the vpn.

I don't think anyone thought this thing through.

Re:Does not store any personal details about clien (1, Interesting)

Gay for Linux (942545) | more than 5 years ago | (#28797541)

I don't understand your point. It doesn't need to store personal details, it only needs to confirm that your login and id are valid.

After that, as long as it doesn't record the IP addresses you're visiting, it's effectively anonymous and thus valid.

Yes, Pirate Bay could secretly store that information, but I somehow doubt they would.

Re:Does not store any personal details about clien (5, Interesting)

inotocracy (762166) | more than 5 years ago | (#28798803)

Yes, Pirate Bay could secretly store that information, but I somehow doubt they would.

Yeah, because no one would think that the soon to be new CEO, who happens to be good friends with the RIAA [cnet.com] , would ever do such a thing as log traffic or identifiable information. Right? ..right?

Re:Does not store any personal details about clien (2, Insightful)

rev_g33k_101 (886348) | more than 5 years ago | (#28799937)

from TFA

"Developers of The Pirate Bay have launched their new Virtual Private Network (VPN) service to some 180,000 pre-registered beta testers"

The developers, not the current owners of the name.

Re:Does not store any personal details about clien (2, Insightful)

Gay for Linux (942545) | more than 5 years ago | (#28800073)

Right, I don't think the developers would log traffic or identifiable information. These are people who started a whole political party based around anonymity. Take the tin hat off. (And as the other poster said, you are confusing developers with the new owners of the domain.)

Meh - black servers have been around for years. (5, Informative)

Ralph Spoilsport (673134) | more than 5 years ago | (#28797421)

Invitation only. Goes back to BBS days in the 80s. Pirate Bay are just making black servers "grey".

Black Servers won't go away, because they are impossible to find and stop.

RS

Re:Meh - black servers have been around for years. (3, Interesting)

BlueKitties (1541613) | more than 5 years ago | (#28797443)

Aren't those types of networks also referred to as "Darknets?" I recall hearing something about them a long time ago, but I haven't read much into them. Is it akin to using a botnet to host a server/communication system? Anyone with the sexy details?

Re:Meh - black servers have been around for years. (5, Informative)

Nursie (632944) | more than 5 years ago | (#28797509)

Black server - server using encrypted comms that is not publicly know
Darknet - layer on top of internet that uses encryption, multiple hop routing and other techniques to disguise nodes activity from each other

That's my understanding of it anyhow. I2P and freenet are the only darknets I know about. I wouldn't go near 'em, personally.

Re:Meh - black servers have been around for years. (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28797831)

I actually wrote my own at one point that tunneled itself steganographically using decent crypto disguised inside webcam sessions. Unfortunately, the throughput was abyssal, and of course--it was pretty difficult to get 'real' network behavior.

I wouldn't say the point of a darknet is to hide a node's activity from one another--so much as it is to conceal their presence from anything not in the darknet. Tor helps hide a nodes activity from another node (sort of), but isn't a darknet. Freenet--you can search for, but generally speaking you can't find other nodes in freenet trivially. I'd call it a greynet.

What's wrong with freenet?

It works beautifully for its intended purpose, even if there's a sad amount of...malcontent littered throughout it. Despite the nastyness that you store on your own hard drive (which you couldn't read anyway unless you want searching for it), it's not like you or anyone else could ever prove it was on your system--if they could, the very trial itself would necessitate proving a means to crack commonly used cryptographic protocols--keeping that secret (if it's possible) would be worth more to anyone than convicting you ever would be.

Amusing: Captcha = "crimes"

Re:Meh - black servers have been around for years. (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28798117)

Despite the nastyness that you store on your own hard drive (which you couldn't read anyway unless you want searching for it), it's not like you or anyone else could ever prove it was on your system-

I dunno. If I were a Fed, I'd break Freenet like this:

Fed: "We have a bunch of nodes on the darknet that contain Bad Things."
Judge: "How do you know what your nodes contain?"
Fed: "We surfed for Bad Things on Fed1, wrote the offending keys of the Very Worst Things into a textfile, and then ran a script on Fed2 that downloaded a whole bunch of the Very Worst Things. Fed2 is running a modified client that doesn't save chunks that are being passed through it to other machines. Therefore, the only stuff in its datastore is stuff that got there from our own requests. Then we walked away from Fed2's keyboard and let it stew for a few hours."
Judge: "...so Fed2's datastore is basically read-only at this point."
Fed: "Right. When a request for a chunk comes in, and Fed2 doesn't have it, we just pass the request on to the next node. When a chunk comes through from some other node, our modified client passes it on without storing it locally."
Judge: "But when a request comes in for which Fed2 *does* have a chunk..."
Fed: "...we add the requestor's IP address to the list of IP addresses for which we have probable cause to believe are requesting - or facilitating - the transmission of Bad Things. By the way, here's the list."
Judge: "Signed. Go get 'em."

Re:Meh - black servers have been around for years. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28798487)

(AC you replied to)

I like the way you think--but is it really sufficient to demonstrate the presence on your system? I guess it'd prove the presence of the ciphertext of the "bad thing"--but at that point it'd be completely unreadable to the "owner" who's replicated it as part of protocol.

I guess you're right that it might reveal a list of nodes requesting badness though... It seems kinda sleazy to claim somebody is in possession of anything for which you can't find the key though. "Did you know that your hard drive holds the entirety of the LOTR trilogy when we use the OTP we've discovered after confiscating it?"

Re:Meh - black servers have been around for years. (5, Insightful)

m.ducharme (1082683) | more than 5 years ago | (#28798601)

Despite the nastyness that you store on your own hard drive (which you couldn't read anyway unless you want searching for it), it's not like you or anyone else could ever prove it was on your system-

I dunno. If I were a Fed, I'd break Freenet like this:

Fed: "We have a bunch of nodes on the darknet that contain Bad Things."

Judge: "What's a node?"

Fed: "We surfed for Bad Things on Fed1, wrote the offending keys of the Very Worst Things into a textfile, and then ran a script on Fed2 that downloaded a whole bunch of the Very Worst Things. Fed2 is running a modified client that doesn't save chunks that are being passed through it to other machines. Therefore, the only stuff in its datastore is stuff that got there from our own requests. Then we walked away from Fed2's keyboard and let it stew for a few hours."

Judge: ......

Fed: "Right. When a request for a chunk comes in, and Fed2 doesn't have it, we just pass the request on to the next node. When a chunk comes through from some other node, our modified client passes it on without storing it locally."

Judge: *blank stare*

Fed: "...we add the requestor's IP address to the list of IP addresses for which we have probable cause to believe are requesting - or facilitating - the transmission of Bad Things. By the way, here's the list."

Judge: "Signed. Go get 'em."

I think the above changes might more accurately reflect reality.

Re:Meh - black servers have been around for years. (1)

simcop2387 (703011) | more than 5 years ago | (#28799531)

the thing about that is, that EVERY other node on freenet is also acting as a relay for those chunks, you actually don't have a reasonable expectation that the node you are getting requests from is the actual node that wanted it.

Re:Meh - black servers have been around for years. (2, Insightful)

MaskedSlacker (911878) | more than 5 years ago | (#28800597)

Since when has this ever stopped a judge from issuing a warrant?

Re:Meh - black servers have been around for years. (1)

cjb658 (1235986) | more than 5 years ago | (#28798295)

It works beautifully for its intended purpose, even if there's a sad amount of...malcontent littered throughout it. Despite the nastyness that you store on your own hard drive (which you couldn't read anyway unless you want searching for it), it's not like you or anyone else could ever prove it was on your system--if they could, the very trial itself would necessitate proving a means to crack commonly used cryptographic protocols--keeping that secret (if it's possible) would be worth more to anyone than convicting you ever would be.

Unfortunately, the MAFIAA doesn't need to prove anything to rack up massive legal costs against you, or threaten to sue you.

Re:Meh - black servers have been around for years. (1)

gilgongo (57446) | more than 5 years ago | (#28800289)

"Darknet" is the term for a general concept, coined by Microsoft researchers in 2002. [boingboing.net]

Re:Meh - black servers have been around for years. (0)

Znork (31774) | more than 5 years ago | (#28797719)

Darknet is a catch-all term used to describe covert networks.

More recently, it's begun to be used to describe friend-to-friend and small-world theory based distributed networks. In these networks the users connect only to their closest friends by sharing encryption keys with each other, but as those friends then connect to their own friends you eventually get a vast encompassing network that is untraceable, anonymous and yet globally searchable and reachable.

Quite similar to cell based covert organizations used by intelligence agencies and various insurgent groups. Close to impenetrable, yet able to communicate throughout the structure.

Personally I think the evolutionary pressure put on free communications by various governments the last few years have made the mass migration to these kinds of networks unavoidable. For better or worse. Pandering to a few special interests desire for monopoly and some industries fear mongering will ultimately and permanently cost governments the ability to monitor any communications at all.

Re:Meh - black servers have been around for years. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28797737)

Black Servers?

They're called African-American servers these days, you racist.

Re:Meh - black servers have been around for years. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28798017)

http://theregulator.net/wp-content/uploads/2008/12/thats_racist_animated.gif

Re:Meh - black servers have been around for years. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28798827)

Interesting, and do you arrange these "african-american" servers in a master/slave heirarchy?

Re:Meh - black servers have been around for years. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28797791)

*cough* http://anonet.org/ [anonet.org] *cough*.
Although it's self-contained, rather than a route to the "main" Internet.

Re:Meh - black servers have been around for years. (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28797829)

Post your damn initials in your signature spot. God almighty it's so pretentious when people put their initials in their posts.

AC

Initials (1)

jDeepbeep (913892) | more than 5 years ago | (#28798079)

Post your damn initials in your signature spot. God almighty it's so pretentious when people put their initials in their posts.

AC

Is that any way to talk to RMS? Oh wait, sorry. It just says RS.

Oxymoron? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28797441)

Wait a minute:

"Developers of The Pirate Bay have launched their new Virtual Private Network (VPN) service to some 180,000 pre-registered beta testers......"

Uh... Pre-registered testers for an anonymity service? Can I sign up using the same name I use when I post to Slashdot?

if you outlaw PREDators (0, Offtopic)

Em Emalb (452530) | more than 5 years ago | (#28797445)

Only outlaws will use PREDator.

Re:if you outlaw PREDators (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28797759)

So does that mean the only one using IPREDator will be The Outlaw Steve Jobs?

Re:if you outlaw PREDators (-1, Flamebait)

Vectronic (1221470) | more than 5 years ago | (#28801031)

Or, only pedophiles will use iPredator, seriously what fuckin genius thought this name up? Pretty much any way you look at it, is has a sort of negative connotation, Predator? Are you here to destroy websites? Fantasizing about being a Raptor, bursting through the gateways to consume some IP Ranges, RaWr...

Or were they going after iPod, like somehow the name is what people actually like... "what rhymes with iPod... iPred?, wait it can't be *that* obvious, IP-Red, no wait, IPRED...ATOR... fuck yeah!, I R Predatorz.."

Oh fuckit, just mod me down...

This is scary... (4, Insightful)

Eastender (910391) | more than 5 years ago | (#28797471)

... so many people being given assurance of "complete privacy", wonder how many will believe it almost blindly, indulge in piracy (or whatever the civilized world calls it), get caught and get into unnecessary trouble. And what are the bets that the demographics of these 180,000 people is among some of the better placed and prosperous human beings on this planet? About getting into trouble part, I do hope I am wrong though...

Well duh (4, Insightful)

dazedNconfuzed (154242) | more than 5 years ago | (#28797613)

And what are the bets that the demographics of these 180,000 people is among some of the better placed and prosperous human beings on this planet?

Well, considering that they HAVE a computer, are most likely using it (at least during TPB activities) for leisure instead of survival, understand enough of broadband network technology to realize encryption is useful for their activity, understand VPNs, understand encryption, appreciate anonymity, and apply all of it to the indicated activity, I dare say that they're in all likelihood doing much better than the half of the world's population trying to get by on less than $2/day. ... is there a problem with that? Why do you call them out as "some of the better placed and prosperous human beings on this planet"?

Re:Well duh (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28798373)

is there a problem with that?

yes I have a problem with that

Re:Well duh (1)

Runaway1956 (1322357) | more than 5 years ago | (#28798605)

I think that the GP was trying to point out that when the authorities do make major busts, there is almost always someone who is powerful and influential involved. Mayors, governors, chiefs of police, members of parliament, congressmen, etc.

He may or may not be aware that possession of a personally owned computer puts him into the wealthiest 10% of the world's population, by definition.

Re:This is scary... (1)

Runaway1956 (1322357) | more than 5 years ago | (#28798449)

Agreed. There are a number of applications designed to anoynymize your traffic before and/or as it leaves your own machine. I trust that a lot more than I trust anyone to protect my anonymity. The lackwitted "h4x0r" who broke into Palin's email trusted the "anonymous proxy" that he went through, and THAT bastard cooperated with the Feds. WTF was he keeping logs for, anyway? Without logs, the Feds couldn't have got a thing!! Stealthnet, Freenet, TOR, I2P and the rest of the darkweb apps may be slow, but the government isn't going to trace you without a LOT of coordinated effort. Trust The Pirate Bay? Phhhht. Those guys have balls, and have already stood up to a lot of pressure, but if they don't HAVE my IP address, they can never give it away.

Re:This is scary... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28798497)

That's why I'm behind 7 proxies

Re:This is scary... (1)

Fnord666 (889225) | more than 5 years ago | (#28799311)

And what are the bets that the demographics of these 180,000 people is among some of the better placed and prosperous human beings on this planet?

And your point is?

A little pseudocode is in order... (1)

Techmeology (1426095) | more than 5 years ago | (#28797473)

bool IsDoingSomethingIllegal(IpAddress dest)
{
if (dest == TBP_ADDRESS){ //make a law against using services like TPB's VPN
return true;
}
else {
return false;
}
}

Or in other words, if the government isn't happy, they just make using TPB's VPN illegal (I'm sure they could come up with an anti-terrorism excuse).

Re:A little pseudocode is in order... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28797503)

Overcomplicate much? How about "return dest == TBP_ADDRESS;"

Re:A little pseudocode is in order... (0, Redundant)

Freetardo Jones (1574733) | more than 5 years ago | (#28797589)

Because he's one of those morons who when checking a bool do something stupid like this:

bool isTrue = false;
if (bool == true)

Re:A little pseudocode is in order... (0, Redundant)

Freetardo Jones (1574733) | more than 5 years ago | (#28797623)

Oops that was meant to be:

if (isTrue == true)

Re:A little pseudocode is in order... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28798271)

Oops that was meant to be:

if (isTrue == true)

That's unnecessary code, but it serves it's purpose by increasing readability over:

if (isTrue)

Not everything has to be as short as possible in the code lines themselves. Especially if you're writing code that will be translated/read by someone else.

Re:A little pseudocode is in order... (2, Insightful)

Freetardo Jones (1574733) | more than 5 years ago | (#28798749)

That's unnecessary code, but it serves it's purpose by increasing readability over:

It doesn't serve any purpose. If you can't understand the statement:

if (isTrue)

Then you're worse than an amateur coder.

Re:A little pseudocode is in order... (1)

DoubleDownOnEleven (690607) | more than 5 years ago | (#28798371)

Some languages require this.
Asking
if( someObject )

will return true if someObject is defined, regardless of whether someObject = true/false, so you have to compare it to a value.

Re:A little pseudocode is in order... (1)

T Murphy (1054674) | more than 5 years ago | (#28797725)

If TPB can figure out secure bittorrent over Twitter, the government will have the general public up in arms if they try to outlaw it.

Re:A little pseudocode is in order... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28797903)

...brilliant!

Re:A little pseudocode is in order... (1)

Propaganda13 (312548) | more than 5 years ago | (#28798253)

I don't use Twitter. Could you send the torrents encrypted as image files over Twitter or is Twitter changing those images before it sends them? http://tech.slashdot.org/story/09/07/15/1314253/New-Service-Converts-Torrents-Into-PNG-Images [slashdot.org]

I assume PNG probably isn't a valid format for Twitter images anyways.

Re:A little pseudocode is in order... (1)

harl (84412) | more than 5 years ago | (#28798875)

VPNs have been in use forever, at least in computer terms. Every remote user in the business work uses a VPN. Likely on a daily basis. To make the claim that someone using one is doing something illegal is nonsensical.

Virtual Pirate Network (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28797529)

Shoun't that be Virtual Pirate Network?

Re:Virtual Pirate Network (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28800551)

It is! It is!

but you can still be caught out ... follow the money!
Just how is your subscription paid fo?

Free? (0)

Brian Gordon (987471) | more than 5 years ago | (#28797535)

Doesn't running a proxy for hundreds of thousands of users downloading large files over bittorrent cost a lot of money? It'll have to be a paid service. A fully anonymous paid service that doesn't keep any records. Hm.

Re:Free? (2, Informative)

Nuno Sa (1095047) | more than 5 years ago | (#28797595)

RTFA, please. Who said it's free?

Re:Free? (1)

Freetardo Jones (1574733) | more than 5 years ago | (#28797649)

It'll have to be a paid service.

No shit? They said it was going to be a paid service when it was first announced. From the title of the original Slashdot article from March: Pirate Bay To Offer VPN For $7 a Month [slashdot.org] . From where did you get the idea that this was ever going to be a free service?

Re:Free? (2, Informative)

SteelRat (11640) | more than 5 years ago | (#28797691)

RTFA, guy. It's not free.

Also It's been done [slashdot.org] before and well [wikipedia.org] . The code has been open for a long time now. I'm just surprised it hasn't happened sooner.

The code used to be archived by some of the industry cool kids for quite a while, but I'm not readily finding it in the allowed attention span of this comment.

Re:Free? (1)

ChinggisK (1133009) | more than 5 years ago | (#28797841)

Read the rest of his post, guy. His point isn't that it's not free, but that any service that accepts money from you is gonna have to keep some kind of records of those payments; therefore it's not fully anonymous.

Re:Free? (3, Interesting)

Freetardo Jones (1574733) | more than 5 years ago | (#28797945)

gonna have to keep some kind of records of those payments; therefore it's not fully anonymous.

Yes, the record that have to keep would amount to this: "x user paid his monthly fee". There is no need to retain any other information.

Re:Free? (1)

scubamage (727538) | more than 5 years ago | (#28798047)

There are a number of illicit services which have to accept payment and don't keep records. Now, if there is a subscription then I would be suspect. However if its non-recurring payment, I could believe that they don't have any records. For instance, "seed banks" do the same thing for many entheogenic plants. You make a payment, they ship your product, and the records of the transaction are deleted and shredded. However, that would mean a *lot* of hands on work for a few people to perform since I doubt most seed banks will ever see 180,000 customers. I'm sure it could easily be automated though. But as I said, the whole idea of a subscription seems harder to believe, unless the subscription is tied solely to a username/password, and not to billing details. Even so, its not hard to skirt the potential identifiablity by using prepaid gift cards.

Re:Free? (2, Informative)

Mister Whirly (964219) | more than 5 years ago | (#28798131)

Keeping account information is far different that keeping activity logs. Completely anonymous, no. Where you have been and what you may have downloaded, yes. So unless they make having an account on the VPN illegal, it is "anonymous enough".

Re:Free? (1)

ground.zero.612 (1563557) | more than 5 years ago | (#28799277)

Why are they mutually exclusive? Maybe I'm missing an epic troll here, but I'm thinking you don't understand the word anonymous, nor any of the concepts/methods involved in creating that status on the net. The service isn't really the VPN, it's the not keeping (or anonymizing -speel) transaction records for your VPN connection. Having a bill for a service doesn't mean the service provider keeps a log of my usage.

Re:Free? (1)

daveime (1253762) | more than 5 years ago | (#28799459)

These *are* pirates we are talking about ... of course they'll be using stolen credit card numbers ... duh

Re:Free? (1)

cjb658 (1235986) | more than 5 years ago | (#28798321)

It's 5 euros per month: http://www.ipredator.se/ [ipredator.se]

Old News (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28797577)

It's entered Beta? Hardly news, I got my invite on the 1st of July, it contained a unique HTTPS URL which was the only way to access the login page. I signed up (and paid up), connected the VPN after following the simple steps to create a Windows VPN connection. My IP then geo-located to somewhere in Sweden. It's nice, cheap and easy solution, assuming it does indeed remain anonymous. Speeds are pretty much wirespeed on my 5MB ADSL in the UK.

Re:Old News (3, Funny)

Em Emalb (452530) | more than 5 years ago | (#28797979)

Damnit, now Sweden is gonna be a haven of terrorism.

Good job, TPB!

Re:Old News (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28799649)

It's entered Beta? Hardly news, I got my invite on the 1st of July, it contained a unique HTTPS URL which was the only way to access the login page. I signed up (and paid up), connected the VPN after following the simple steps to create a Windows VPN connection. My IP then geo-located to somewhere in Sweden. It's nice, cheap and easy solution, assuming it does indeed remain anonymous. Speeds are pretty much wirespeed on my 5MB ADSL in the UK.

Windows VPN connection .... windows (?) not freeswan VPN from BSD or Linux? so you are running on Windows and yet think you have possibility of privacy? windows == virus == keyloggers != privacy!!!!!

Keep in mind... (5, Informative)

jshackles (957031) | more than 5 years ago | (#28797579)

that here in the USA, using a service like this (and subsequently being caught) can stiffen any penalties or jail time your may receive because you're actively obstructing justice.

Re:Keep in mind... (2, Insightful)

Dan667 (564390) | more than 5 years ago | (#28797643)

Certainly groups like the RIAA are going to play that up while they secretly freak out they are not longer losing control, but have completely lost it to services like this.

Re:Keep in mind... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28797779)

s/freak out/freak the fuck out/

Re:Keep in mind... (5, Insightful)

CopaceticOpus (965603) | more than 5 years ago | (#28797721)

I fear you're probably right. But it is messed up that "taking steps to avoid sharing your personal information with your ISP" can be construed as "actively obstructing justice."

A person who does nothing illegal might want to use this service simply because they value privacy.

Re:Keep in mind... (1)

ModernGeek (601932) | more than 5 years ago | (#28797873)

You can also use a gun for target practice, but if you use one during the comission of a crime, the penalties are stiffer.

Re:Keep in mind... (2, Insightful)

Bigby (659157) | more than 5 years ago | (#28797965)

Is the penalty really stiffer if you kill someone using a gun instead of a knife? Or you rip out their heart with your bare hands?

Re:Keep in mind... (1)

Shatrat (855151) | more than 5 years ago | (#28798007)

If you then proceed to eat it, you may be able to avoid jail completely and go to a mental institution whilst writing a book which makes you a millionaire!
The downside is, you have to eat a human heart.

Re:Keep in mind... (5, Funny)

Captain Splendid (673276) | more than 5 years ago | (#28798191)

The downside is, you have to eat a human heart.

You say downside, I say Tuesday.

-Mola Ram

Re:Keep in mind... (1)

thisnamestoolong (1584383) | more than 5 years ago | (#28798403)

Congratulations, Captain Splendid, you just won the Internets. I wish I had some mod points for that one.

Re:Keep in mind... (2, Insightful)

zmollusc (763634) | more than 5 years ago | (#28797973)

Well, in theory you can use a gun for target practice, but if you have a gun at all you must be a crazy would-be mass murderer. Hence all guns (except those protecting Important People) are confiscated and guns are never used to commit crimes ever again.

Re:Keep in mind... (2, Insightful)

CopaceticOpus (965603) | more than 5 years ago | (#28797981)

That's because using a gun endangers lives. This would be more akin to drawing the blinds while making illegal copies of Hollywood movies in your basement.

The real scary bit is when they decide that anyone with drawn blinds is acting suspiciously and needs to be searched. Just wait, I guarantee you someone will propose that anyone using this anonymity service should be investigated.

Re:Keep in mind... (1)

daveime (1253762) | more than 5 years ago | (#28799481)

If you have nothing to hide, then there's no need to close your blinds.

Sound familiar ?

Re:Keep in mind... (1)

cjb658 (1235986) | more than 5 years ago | (#28798355)

You can also use a gun for target practice, but if you use one during the comission of a crime, the penalties are stiffer.

You heard it from slashdot: downloading pirated content with a VPN is the same as shooting someone.

Re:Keep in mind... (1)

pilgrim23 (716938) | more than 5 years ago | (#28798221)

Privacy is illegal these days. Soon to be in the "Land of the Free" Just step out on to your porch. Be sure to wave (in all directions, ya never know which camera is active...)

Re:Keep in mind... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28798581)

Why do you think you need privacy, citizen?

*This message brought to you by the Internet Resource Optimization and Networking Information Center*

Re:Keep in mind... (1)

Tuoqui (1091447) | more than 5 years ago | (#28798887)

Well... We have the right to ask what does the ISP need with our personal information? All they need is a place to send the bill and the IP Address of the source and destination in packets you send on the network.

Re:Keep in mind... (1)

TubeSteak (669689) | more than 5 years ago | (#28799183)

I fear you're probably right. But it is messed up that "taking steps to avoid sharing your personal information with your ISP" can be construed as "actively obstructing justice."

Not quite. There's no way that using this while going about legal activities is a crime.
The only way this could possibly be "actively obstructing justice" would be if you used it during the commission of a crime.

Re:Keep in mind... (1)

pixelpusher220 (529617) | more than 5 years ago | (#28797951)

as a serious question....are you saying that using encryption in your communications would increase your penalties?

Is this codified law somewhere? Since the future of all electronic communications is going to be encrypted I would think this presents a pretty serious problem (or from a law standpoint a powerful club).

Using encrypted wireless communications on your router is not by nature going to increase your penalties, why should encrypting the rest of your communications do so?

Re:Keep in mind... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28798127)

that here in the USA, using a service like this (and subsequently being caught) can stiffen any penalties or jail time your may receive because you're actively obstructing justice.

It has nothing to do with actively obstructing justice, it is *all* to do with fundamental rights.

First Amendment.
Freedom of expression (a good number of American court cases have forced sources to come out, this can help stop that).
Freedom of association (you chat with a family member that is suspicious in DHS' eyes, you become a person of interest, guilty before innocent).

Fourth Amendment
Freedom from unreasonable search and seizure. (Trying to say that monitoring peacetime communications [email/IM] *isn't* unreasonable search?)

These are parts of the American Constitution, and if Americans won't stand up for their own rights against their own government and the Swedes are doing something to help restore those Constitutional rights.. any American that is worried about the loss of their Constitutional rights should sign up for this service, and ask their elected representatives to forward bills fighting what this technology helps supersede. Only the sheeple believe that this is about fighting terrorism and obstructing justice, I think it's about wresting back control of fundamental rights, guaranteed by the US Constitution.

Lay rezeestaunse? (1)

davidsyes (765062) | more than 5 years ago | (#28797591)

Viva la Fra.... Oh, wait, wrong episode...

Re:Lay rezeestaunse? (1)

Elektroschock (659467) | more than 5 years ago | (#28797741)

The worst upcoming nightmare is transatlantic and it is called ACTA [wikipedia.org] .

What Pirate Bay? (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28797631)

I dunno what you're talking about -- there is no "pirate bay", no more "black servers" or "darknets"; now, everyone be quiet!

The Pirate Bay captains... (1)

macraig (621737) | more than 5 years ago | (#28797667)

... have finally found a way to pay that 3.6 million dollar judgement from the trial, eh? Unlike TPB, this has a subscription fee to use it.

Re:The Pirate Bay captains... (1)

X-Power (1009277) | more than 5 years ago | (#28797901)

They sold the pirate bay website for twice the amount of their fines. So they are fine financially.

Supporting VPNs is supporting illegal activity (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28797687)

They should be outlawed for similar reasons to possession of child pornography.

I don't know. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28797765)

If you are of the opinion that TPB sold out or gave in to the **AA, what's to stop them from doing the same thing with this venture? How do you even know that no logs are kept? All you have to go on is their word, and I'm pretty sure they said that they were never going to cave in to the **AA. Just don't be shocked if there is a strong legal push or a large sum of money changes hands and suddenly the logs mysteriously appear.

IPRED, the acronym. (1)

migla (1099771) | more than 5 years ago | (#28798337)

I never actually thought about what IPRED stands for. Now I see the acronym refers to words in english...

I all ready knew the swedish elite takes its directions regarding copyright law from the big ol' US of A, but jesus, couldn't you at least bother to translate the names of laws they've ordered into swedish !?!

Re:IPRED, the acronym. (1)

migla (1099771) | more than 5 years ago | (#28798363)

Ok. Here's me looking foolish. IPRED is an eu directive, hence the name not being in swedish.

Out of interest... (1)

Nathrael (1251426) | more than 5 years ago | (#28798367)

...will this service belong to the old or the new TPB owners?

US credit card? Forget it (2, Informative)

Evildonald (983517) | more than 5 years ago | (#28798439)

Except their only payment portal doesn't accept payment using US credit cards. The portal told me themselves when they rejected 3 of my cards and a Paypal temporary credit card.

Re:US credit card? Forget it (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28798973)

That just shows they are smarter financially than most.

Re:US credit card? Forget it (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28799271)

they are juust hypocritical, greedy arrogant kids. nothing better than that

Re:US credit card? Forget it (1)

Sir_Lewk (967686) | more than 5 years ago | (#28800571)

Wht in the world would you want to use your credit card for a service like this?

Wireless version in my neighborhood (4, Funny)

noidentity (188756) | more than 5 years ago | (#28798655)

In my neighborhood they even have a wireless version of this VPN. It's called "linksys" for some reason, but it allows anonymous access, and it's even free.

Yet another dissapointment from the TPB guys... (1)

mots (1192769) | more than 5 years ago | (#28798763)

Turns out this is just a repainted version of Relakks... (see http://www.golem.de/0907/68539.html [golem.de] (german))

Re:Yet another dissapointment from the TPB guys... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28800233)

Why on earth is that a disappointment? Relakks is a great service at a very reasonable price. I've been using it for ages to, among other reasons, get around the traffic shaping implemented by my ISP.
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