Beta

×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Google Latitude Arrives For the iPhone — As a Web App

Soulskill posted about 5 years ago | from the on-again-off-again dept.

Google 195

An anonymous reader writes "After months of waiting, the Google Latitude social maps service finally arrived for the iPhone ... but thanks to an Apple rejection of the natively developed app, it's a web app. Says Google on their blog, 'We worked closely with Apple to bring Latitude to the iPhone in a way Apple thought would be best for iPhone users. After we developed a Latitude application for the iPhone, Apple requested we release Latitude as a web application in order to avoid confusion with Maps on the iPhone.' But it gets worse for iPhone users: 'Unfortunately, since there is no mechanism for applications to run in the background on iPhone (which applies to browser-based web apps as well), we're not able to provide continuous background location updates in the same way that we can for Latitude users on Android, BlackBerry, Symbian and Windows Mobile.' Latitude has been sprouting new features lately and is an interesting take on social networking, but it looks like Apple is determined to ensure its users only get a seriously crippled implementation compared to the Android and WinMo versions. PC World put it less politely than Google did, saying, 'Google's new Latitude Web app for iPhone is so hamstrung that Apple customers may be wishing they had a BlackBerry or Android handset instead.'"

cancel ×

195 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

First (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#28827671)

Bleh, Apple should loosen their requirements.

Re:First (1, Funny)

wampus (1932) | about 5 years ago | (#28827681)

Nah, fanbois will be on to tell you why worse is better soon.

Re:First (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#28827725)

Exactly! Google Latitude is just an inferior (and potentially confusing) version of the maps app. Sure the maps app might actually use Google Maps but it's the Apple extensions that really put the shine on it. It's absolutely right that this be limited to a web-app. Furthermore, who would want to allow an application to continuously run in the background? It opens up all sorts of angles of attack, it's dangerous, resource intensive, and Apple is right to disallow it. Apple know what's best for it's customers. They shound't, and they won't allow the likes of Google to undermine their customers' experience with the iPhone using shoddy, poorly designed applications.

Re:First (1)

evilad (87480) | about 5 years ago | (#28828123)

6/10. Lost me at "shound't".

Re:First (-1, Troll)

DiSKiLLeR (17651) | about 5 years ago | (#28828595)

Exactly! Google Latitude is just an inferior (and potentially confusing) version of the maps app. Sure the maps app might actually use Google Maps but it's the Apple extensions that really put the shine on it. It's absolutely right that this be limited to a web-app. Furthermore, who would want to allow an application to continuously run in the background? It opens up all sorts of angles of attack, it's dangerous, resource intensive, and Apple is right to disallow it. Apple know what's best for it's customers. They shound't, and they won't allow the likes of Google to undermine their customers' experience with the iPhone using shoddy, poorly designed applications.

You, sir, are the biggest idiot I have ever met online.

Re:First (4, Funny)

ScrewMaster (602015) | about 5 years ago | (#28828773)

Apple know what's best for it's customers. They shound't, and they won't allow the likes of Google to undermine their customers' experience with the iPhone using shoddy, poorly designed applications.

You, sir, are the biggest idiot I have ever met online.

Satire [wikipedia.org] .

Re:First (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#28828797)

Have you met yourself yet? Also, WHOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOSH.

Re:First (1)

wampus (1932) | about 5 years ago | (#28827883)

Whoops, there's one now.

Link to source... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#28827679)

here [nimp.org]

Re:Link to source... (1, Offtopic)

lord_rob the only on (859100) | about 5 years ago | (#28827719)

Don't click !!! GNAA Troll !!!!

Re:Link to source... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#28827841)

Meh, it's not a troll.

The Gay Negroes have a point with trolling though. This site sucks. Someone needs to hang kdawson and feed his remains to wild dogs and buzzards. Same with timothy and soulskill.

Why wait for Apple? (1, Interesting)

Ed Avis (5917) | about 5 years ago | (#28827707)

Google should just put the app on their website along with instructions on how to jailbreak your iPhone and install it.

Re:Why wait for Apple? (5, Funny)

jez9999 (618189) | about 5 years ago | (#28827873)

Yup. Can't see any legal ramifications there.

Re:Why wait for Apple? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#28828031)

You are absolutely correct. There are absolutely no legal ramifications there. Feels great to live in a FREE country :)

Re:Why wait for Apple? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#28828611)

BWAHAHAHA! Thanks, I needed the laugh.

Look into the crystal ball (1, Interesting)

BadAnalogyGuy (945258) | about 5 years ago | (#28827723)

Anyone who thinks Apple is going to sit on their laurels while Android eats its lunch simply doesn't know Steve Jobs. First, compare the quality of user experience between the iPhone and all of its rivals. The iPhone is so far ahead of anything currently on the market that Apple has the luxury of rejecting apps that would otherwise be useful for their customers.

But despite this insurmountable lead in the UI, Apple is still developing their next version of the iPhone. There can be no doubt that they are going to take the best ideas of the current iPhone, the current competition, and the huge set of iPhone apps. So we can look forward to applications which run in the background like Latitude. We can expect to find better copy/paste support. All signs point to an even better keyboard experience. And more than anything, the connectivity between iPhones will be much better.

The competition will, as always, be one step behind. Following the leader is a losing game. Google is doing a great job in trying to change the rules with Android, but unlike Apple, OEMs using Android simply don't understand the user as well as Apple does.

Re:Look into the crystal ball (0, Troll)

Yetihehe (971185) | about 5 years ago | (#28827839)

The competition will, as always, be one step behind. Following the leader is a losing game. Google is doing a great job in trying to change the rules with Android, but unlike Apple, OEMs using Android simply don't understand the user as well as Apple does.

Yeah, because users don't really like recording video or sending mms. Or running IM in background. I know for all current smartphone users having only screen keyboard is the best possible thing, but I'll never buy an iPhone, just because it's keyboard is good only for lolcats. Even on numeric keypad inputting one long number without error (required in some teleaudio systems or when registering one program through phone) is hard, I've tried 3 times unsuccessfully until one coworker read numbers from screen and I was occupied only with entering them, otherwise there is too many errors. Text keyboard is even smaller. Nokia 6822 (my current phone) has probably the best idea for qwerty keyboard.

Re:Look into the crystal ball (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#28828289)

- My iPhone 3GS records video just fine.
- Any time you want to schedule a typing contest, pick a place and referee, and I'll show you better speed and accuracy on an iPhone than you can show me on on any phone with a physical keyboard.
- If I wanted to drain my batteries by running a bunch of crap in the background, I'd carry my laptop around.

Re:Look into the crystal ball (1)

Yetihehe (971185) | about 5 years ago | (#28828465)

- Yeah, after two years, in it's third version... After every decent phone has it already. - Ok, 2009-08-14, Olsztyn, Poland. Referee: first one from street who will agree. - Yeah, some function does not exists on iphone = bunch of crap, no real apple follower would want it. Not every program must automatically drain batteries, typically background processes sleep most of the time and do something only when new data comes.

Re:Look into the crystal ball (4, Insightful)

Chyeld (713439) | about 5 years ago | (#28827843)

And this relates to Apple limiting their own customers from being able to do things that the other 'big' phones can do how? Sounds like the one a step behind is Apple. This IS about features that are being rolled out for other phones that Apple refuses to allow on the iPhone, the only one playing catchup is Apple here and from the article it's less catchup and more sit on your ass and take a nap.

Re:Look into the crystal ball (2, Insightful)

TooMuchToDo (882796) | about 5 years ago | (#28827847)

Right, which is why Apple can't run apps in the background. Someone at Apple was asleep at the switch with that decision.

Re:Look into the crystal ball (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#28828365)

Apple does run apps in the background, just not apps that suck battery power. If every app you download wants to continuously run in the background then you're phone only runs for 3 hours, everybody complains what a piece of crap the iPhone is due to its bad battery life (which is rather low as it is, without actually trying to use all the apps apple displays on every commercial). They allow the ipod to run in the background as well as the clock, but those are two very low power programs. One reason they don't want IM apps in the background (before their push service) was the constant need to have the 3g/wifi antenna running all the time to poll for messages. Beside the display, the connectivity sucks the most juice.

Re:Look into the crystal ball (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#28828399)

Doesn't the antenna have to run all the time to listen for, oh I don't know, SMS messages or phone calls? Perhaps I just don't understand the way these things work, but I thought they had to be in communication with the tower nearly all the time.

Re:Look into the crystal ball (1)

geekboy642 (799087) | about 5 years ago | (#28828635)

The antenna used to listen for incoming calls or texts takes just a tiny bit of current. Running an active TCP session for an IM client constantly would light up much more of the iPhone's hardware, and drain the battery that much faster.

Personally, I'd pay $100 more for an iPhone if somebody made it twice as thick and used all the extra space for a bigger fucking battery. If I even use the thing, the battery lasts about half of a day.

Re:Look into the crystal ball (1)

sabertiger (262179) | about 5 years ago | (#28829031)

There are battery extenders that double the battery life and size of the iphone for $100.
http://www.amazon.com/Mophie-Juice-Rechargeable-Battery-iPhone/dp/B001E42QBW [amazon.com]

Re:Look into the crystal ball (1)

adolf (21054) | about 5 years ago | (#28829715)

Oh, neat.

A "battery extender" that, in addition to being non-integral, gets its power stuffed through at least a couple of DC-DC converters within the phone itself, all while the internal battery charger leeches current and generates heat (ie: wastes even more energy).

Just what I want on a mobile device -- more complexity!

Thanks for the tip!

(Before the mods mark this down as "troll," please understand the following: I like the iPhone. I also like my iPod Touch. And if I didn't get a free Verizon phone from work, I'd probably carry an iPhone instead. But my iPod Touch has positively dismal battery life -- one of my favorite uses for it is to sit in the back yard streaming Pandora over WiFi into a set of battery-operated speakers, but it's only good for a couple of hours of this before the battery goes flat. It saddens me that it's actually more convenient to pull the car around and use its stereo, than to use my gee-whiz iPod. I can't imagine that the iPhone's battery life is much better at this task, with the phone also sucking down juice. I think it's inexcusable, these days, that so many manufacturers products don't have removable and/or expandable internal batteries. The fact that it's an Apple product doesn't somehow excuse them from this idiocy. But, hey -- at least they finally figured out how to do cut-and-paste with it.)

Re:Look into the crystal ball (3, Insightful)

dunkelfalke (91624) | about 5 years ago | (#28829237)

How do Windows Mobile and Android manage running background apps perfectly fine? Does Apple have some inferiour programmers who cannot implement a proper scheduler?

Re:Look into the crystal ball (2, Insightful)

adolf (21054) | about 5 years ago | (#28829811)

The iPhone is just a Darwin machine, which all of us here should know is based on FreeBSD. It, therefore, has a very good scheduler (one of FreeBSD's best features is that the system stays usable and responsive, seemingly no matter how high the load on the CPU is).

Apple's own software multitasks just fine, where it is useful to do so. They just don't let third-party apps run in the background.

My jailbroke iPod Touch (same hardware, more or less) works just fine as a multiuser Unix box, background apps and all. There's no compelling reason why I couldn't install Apache, Postfix, and BIND on it, and make a silly little Internet-facing WiFi-connected server (with a built-in UPS!) out of it, except for the fact that I'd rather do that on real hardware if I had a need to do so.

Re:Look into the crystal ball (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#28827877)

Methinks you haven't touched android recently. The Iphone 3gs is just now getting features that Android phones have had for a year. The UI is close to apples but fixed a lot of problems like it had cut & paste when apple couldn't figure it out. Being open-source and in the phone market where companies invest millions into development of a platform, and also with the backing of major developers that do understand customers, the android is poised to eat apples lunch by leapfrogging them. I'd also say google understands their customers pretty well and have a history of innovation.

Re:Look into the crystal ball (1)

Anonymous Psychopath (18031) | about 5 years ago | (#28828197)

Anyone who thinks Apple is going to sit on their laurels while Android eats its lunch simply doesn't know Steve Jobs. First, compare the quality of user experience between the iPhone and all of its rivals. The iPhone is so far ahead of anything currently on the market that Apple has the luxury of rejecting apps that would otherwise be useful for their customers.

This is certainly open to debate. The iPhone is a fantastic consumer device and I think is in a leadership position in that segment. However, as a business tool it doesn't hold up well compared to some of the more mature offerings available. Apple understands the consumer customer and marketplace very well but the enterprise market has them stumped (fanbois will say "uninterested"). I don't think Android is there yet, either, but I think I'm starting to understand what they're going towards and the next few years will certainly be interesting. Blackberry is dominate in this market segment for a reason; they don't make the best devices but they do make the best business tool.

I also want to point out that Apple had better be more than just one man's personality. Steve Jobs won't be around forever and if he's the only way they can introduce innovative products, they're gonna be screwed in a few years.

This post was typed on a Macbook Pro. It's possible to own and use Apple products without joining the cult. They make good products, but they have shitty policies about how those products are used.

Re:Look into the crystal ball (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#28828351)

iPhone UI looks and feels like a Palm OS 3.0 UI with multitouch and colour added. The lack of multitasking eerily adds to that feeling.

Re:Look into the crystal ball (1)

kimvette (919543) | about 5 years ago | (#28829025)

OEMs using Android simply don't understand the user as well as Apple does.

Really?

How many generations did it take for Apple to concede that Copy&Paste is a necessity on a PDA? THREE genertions of the iPhone?

They also don't value openness, hence jailbreak opening up the phone to give a TON more functionality, including bash, ssh, and so forth.

How long did it take Apple to admit that turn-by-turn GPS is a necessity? It has existed from day one on Windows Mobile, but did Apple allow turn-by-turn GPS? Oh no, of course not.

One drawback it has is no background apps - apps are suspended when calls come in. I don't know about you, but when I am driving I want the GPS to remain in the foreground, and I want voice-prompted turn-by-turn directions. I'll be buying TomTom for the iPhonewhen it makes its way to iTunes, but I will be hanging on to my Windows Mobile devices until Apple fixes that annoyance. The phone can

I finally bought an iPhone, and I love it, but I'm not blind to its glaring problems - which mostly stem from Apple's closed nature, which in turn is almost a form of arrogance.

Apple will allow for the app (1)

CrackedButter (646746) | about 5 years ago | (#28827733)

Apple always have something cooking, maybe an update for maps is around the corner taking in this functionality. I wouldn't discount it especially when they want to be at the forefront for mobile applications.

Apple needs to re-think some things (2, Insightful)

schnikies79 (788746) | about 5 years ago | (#28827747)

Happy iPhone user here.

Although I couldn't give less of a crap about this particular application (it's pretty worthless overall, in my opinion). They do need to open up the API a bit or they are going to be passed by.

Frankly, I think they will. Steve Jobs isn't one to be outdone by competition.

Re:Apple needs to re-think some things (2, Insightful)

moon3 (1530265) | about 5 years ago | (#28827987)

Steve Jobs had lots of misses too. I don't think Apple is invincible.

Re:Apple needs to re-think some things (5, Insightful)

jellomizer (103300) | about 5 years ago | (#28828061)

There is a real balance out there. The reason for the tight control is to prevent damaging software, which is a good thing. However Apple needs to lay off on apps that compete with the phones defaults. Sure their stuff is good but it doesn't always quite feet the need where a new app could.

I personally think their process should just check to insure the app doesn't kill the phone or slow it down way to much. And that it is age related. But besides that, let the honest companies make software without worry that they will get denied just because of some app approver with a God complex.

Re:Apple needs to re-think some things (1)

nick_davison (217681) | about 5 years ago | (#28828475)

MobileMe: $99/year/customer for Apple. The main selling point for a great many prospective users isn't any of the other junk they don't care about, it's being able to essentially LoJack their phones - something all the more critical as there aren't the usual insurance plans for the expensive piece of hardware that you have to pay $600 to replace.

Latitude: $0/year/customer for Apple. In many ways would provide the same service.

I'd suggest that, whilst you may see the app as pretty worthless, Apple sees it as worth, ooh, about $99/year/customer. Which, just possibly, might be why they're hamstringing their competition... uh... "reducing confusion".

Re:Apple needs to re-think some things (1)

FreudianNightmare (1106709) | about 5 years ago | (#28828539)

If there's one thing Apple are known for it's *not* opening up their kit to outside influences. Apples game plan is (and always has been) about rather more strict control of what happens when you use a bit of their kit then, for instance, MS. If you like the way Apple does things then that's all good. If you don't, its not. In any case, Apple and Google are doing different things. Google are trying to establish their mobile device operating system, Apple are trying to establish their physical device that happens to carry a unique operating system. As long as iPhone OS is unavailable on any other device, it cannot become the dominant mobile device operating system because, plain fact, most people don't spend that much cash on a phone. Now, in terms of revenue (the 'success' criteria for the businesses), I don't pretend to know which is going to work out better in the long run. But, in terms of cold, hard, world domination experience, I'm going to go with Google. After all, for all the success Apple have had over the years, they've never verbed their brand. (with all credit to Calvin and Hobbes for the term 'verbed').

Oh woe is me, Rob Malda (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#28827779)

Less Latitude features than a Blackberry. No background applications like an Android. Lame.

Is there a way to filter out anything "iPhone"? (5, Insightful)

erroneus (253617) | about 5 years ago | (#28827823)

Yet another iPhone discussion that includes "apple will not allow [X]"... They are starting to bore and depress me as they are rather futile. The Apple fans will always blindly support and back the Apple position. People who disagree with the Apple position will always see things as they do as well. Neither side will win the other over. And if it did, Apple would just kill the iPhone project completely.

I have to wonder if there is ever anything "apple fans" ever complain or disagree with Apple about? I'd like to hear from Apple fans to know if they are actually independent or completely sold into the Apple view. I remember some faint complaints about the change to OSX but those didn't last long. The "classic" mode also raised a bit of ire and frustration as I recall. But is Apple "simply perfect?" Can Apple do no wrong?

Re:Is there a way to filter out anything "iPhone"? (0, Offtopic)

Smidge207 (1278042) | about 5 years ago | (#28827891)

I have to wonder if there is ever anything "apple fans" ever complain or disagree with Apple about?

Here, here! And, just for kicks, take a look-see at this little vignette of 'customer service'...

It's a bit long-winded but I can't think of a better exemplar of what NOT to do to please the *gasp* paying customer:

There was this woman I knew. She was a child of the Sixties and a bit of a paradox. She had been a hippy and an Outlaw Biker bitch and she danced topless in gentlemen clubs in and around the Caribbean and Mexico. She was also my stepfather's daughter from a previous marriage. Nice, huh?

After my mother married her father, she was all set and ready to hate my guts because I dared to love her father (Her father was probably the most noble soul I've ever met). But after a weekend in the mountains, we were holding hands and nibbling each others ear. Well, for 25 years, we had a secret relationship because my mother hated her because of some twisted philosophy that my mother had picked up somewhere about there can only be one queen bee to every hive. My mother had already tried to savagely ruin the marriage of one of my brothers and had turned the other brother damn near into Norman Bates.

So my stepsister and I decided to wait. My mother was not well. She was a lifelong alcoholic. She had been in and out of the hospital numerous times. All we thought we had to do was wait. 25 years later, my stepsister woke up one morning and said, "fuck it." She swallowed an entire bottle of Tylenol and drank most of a bottle of red wine. She was in a hideous painful coma for eight weeks before she died.

*That* was the good news. Now for the worst part: my mother died in her sleep six months later.

I don't think there's anything after this life. Even if there is a God, I don't think God could possibly be that cruel. But if I could interview my stepsister, I would ask her just the one obvious question: what the holy fucking hell were you thinking trying to screw your stepbrother at every possible moment? What does all of this have to do with customer service (or lack thereof)? Well, nothing, frankly, but if you read this far - and I charged a subscription fee to browse Slashdot - wouldn't you be pretty red-faced pissed right about now? I know *I* would.

=Smidge=

Re:Is there a way to filter out anything "iPhone"? (1)

wampus (1932) | about 5 years ago | (#28827919)

You just blew my mind, man.

Re:Is there a way to filter out anything "iPhone"? (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#28827911)

If you don't like the way your Motorola Razr organizes contacts, or displays menu items, what can you do? Answer: nothing

If you don't like the fact your LG lacks a photo sync feature, what can you do? Answer: nothing

If you don't like the fact that your Blackberry Storm is still quite a bit buggy and desperately needs a firmware update, what can you do? Answer: wait and hope

If you don't like the way the iPhone does X, what can you do? Answer: jailbreak. Takes about 3 minutes. You can unjailbreak at any time. You can still buy and use iTunes store apps. It's all still there for you, but now you can download apps, and springboard managers, and whatever the hell else you want for the phone.

Jesus, what is it with the Apple haters? 100% freedom is about 5 mouseclicks away for any iPhone user, yet somehow "the man" is holding all iPhone users down, and you haters are here to tell us all about it, over and over, ad nauseum every fucking day. Get bent.

Re:Is there a way to filter out anything "iPhone"? (3, Insightful)

amiga3D (567632) | about 5 years ago | (#28827971)

Apple does things their way. It works for them. It works for their users. The ones doing all the bitching are mostly just people that love to hate apple. I personally don't own an iPhone. I don't need a phone that's also a computer. I like seperate devices. But the people that I know that have an iPhone absolutely adore them. It's kind of disgusting. :)

Re:Is there a way to filter out anything "iPhone"? (1)

lorenzo.boccaccia (1263310) | about 5 years ago | (#28828201)

and, of course, if one absolutely need a latitude stile app in the background, they could just get a freaking android. nonsense in bitching about iphone being inferior to an android or the other way around - there is no lockin a là microsoft vs linux, every phone out there could call almost every other and that's all about it; extra features are extras and if you need something there are a gazzilion other model that may better suite customer needs.

or they're telling me that they bought a 2500 dollars/euros(running costs) phone *without* checking if the feature they needed was there? iphone has been there for three years and almost every day Apple reminded that they will never allow for background applications - so what's the actual point of all this hate? uninformed customers that did a bad purchasing choices? that's their fault, not Apple. why blame apple on that?

Re:Is there a way to filter out anything "iPhone"? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#28829849)

Semantics...
You probably own a microwave, car, and TV set that also contain computers.

Re:Is there a way to filter out anything "iPhone"? (5, Insightful)

99BottlesOfBeerInMyF (813746) | about 5 years ago | (#28827953)

Yet another iPhone discussion that includes "apple will not allow [X]"... They are starting to bore and depress me as they are rather futile. The Apple fans will always blindly support and back the Apple position... I have to wonder if there is ever anything "apple fans" ever complain or disagree with Apple about?

You're committing the no true scotsman fallacy here. You define Apple fans as people who will support anything Apple does and then question if Apple fans will ever complain or disagree. There are plenty of people who like a lot of what Apple does, but still are happy to complain about what Apple does that they don't like. If someone is complaining about Apple here, how do you know if they're an Apple fan on other topics?

Apple has restrictive and problematic policies that make it difficult or impossible for some applications to work properly. This is certainly a problem. At the same time, those same policies are preventing the iPhone experience form being overrun with a million really crappy applications that degrade the normal user's experience and present huge security and performance problems. Those people complaining that Apple is not competitive when you look at a laundry list of features other smartphones have are completely missing the point. That's not why Apple products become successful. Apple is good at creating a good user experience for normal people and providing only the subset of features they can do well and which contribute to making the overall experience better. Apple wants long battery life, apps sandboxed from one another for security, and apps quality and security checked through a single pipeline. So far a lot of normal users really like that. When they can do other things well enough they'll add those, but they aren't going to rush to add new things just because other phones have them, if Apple doesn't think it will be an overall benefit. If you don't like that, you're probably not their target market.

P.S. I don't have an iPhone and am not really their target market either. I can just appreciate the value of what they do for normal users.

Re:Is there a way to filter out anything "iPhone"? (2, Insightful)

maxume (22995) | about 5 years ago | (#28828005)

My impression was that the appstore is already a morass of crap anyway (the crap in the store might not present resource or security problems, but that doesn't mean it is useful).

I agree with your assessment that Apple tries to sell a good experience, but from what I can tell, the Appstore suffers from the same plight as pretty much every freeware review site, inclusiveness is favored over editorial opinion (they sort of have to do this is they are going to sell the phones in a state that is locked to their store, but there really wouldn't be any big ramifications to letting Google offer their own store).

Re:Is there a way to filter out anything "iPhone"? (1)

bytesex (112972) | about 5 years ago | (#28828341)

Another Apple user here (Macbook this time); I agree with your post and newsletter etc: I'm overall happy with my Mac, but I think Apple is doing certain things that invoke the wrath of us geeks because they are /too/ dumbed down (and cannot be smartened up). Something we used to acuse Microsoft of as well, ironically enough. Another 'feature' is the binary lock-in (which resonates with the subject at hand here); I always hold my breath when doing a software update. Not only do they require reboots too often (but that's just a sidenote), and I have no fear of Apple's apps working afterwards, but as for the installations of truecrypt, firefox, VLC, Virtualbox etc; it's usually shit-your-pants time. The third part of my beef with his Steve-ness is the fact that certain features of Mac OS are just stupid or immature. But on the whole I'm a happy Mac-user, who still likes to reserve the right to complain about those things that he considers downsides.

Re:Is there a way to filter out anything "iPhone"? (1)

commodoresloat (172735) | about 5 years ago | (#28828443)

It's true, this is a known fallacy. A true Scotsman would have figured this out.

Re:Is there a way to filter out anything "iPhone"? (2, Insightful)

Wyatt Earp (1029) | about 5 years ago | (#28828239)

Apple fan since '91 here, and yea, I have some complaints.

No MMS on the iPhone. Video I don't give a rip about, but the lack of MMS is annoying.
The USB keyboards have always been too damned small.
The USB mice have always sucked from Apple, the ADB mice rocked though.
Moving power to the side of the MacBooks/Powerbooks also sucked.

Documentation has lacked for a decade or so too.

Re:Is there a way to filter out anything "iPhone"? (1)

ArAgost (853804) | about 5 years ago | (#28829777)

No MMS on the iPhone. Video I don't give a rip about, but the lack of MMS is annoying.

Well, MMS support has been available for more than a month now, you can be annoyed only towards yourself for not upgrading the firmware.

Re:Is there a way to filter out anything "iPhone"? (1)

Red Marker (1598743) | about 5 years ago | (#28828517)

Honestly, I, like most most Mac users who aren't fanatics, steer clear of discussions like this. I have no need to evangelize, and Apple doesn't need me to defend it, so there's little for me to say. That leaves forums like this at the mercy of Apple lovers and haters, who don't place much value in reasoned discussion.

Obviously Apple can do wrong. For me, I don't think the iPhone is worth an AT&T contract. I can't imagine wanting an AppleTV. Besides the big three of Mac OS X, iTunes and Safari, their (non-professional) software is really spotty. iPhoto is bloated and painful, iWork is mostly useless (albeit less aggravating than Microsoft Office), and to pick on a minor example that really really irks me, Grapher is an appalling, atrocious wart on Mac OS X, and the best current example of how even Apple can distribute pathetic software now and then. (They had a much better graphing calculator [nucalc.com] that they ditched when they bought this crap to include with OS X 10.4.) More broadly, they've had plenty of commercial failures, safety recalls, security flaws, etc, just like any other successful tech company.

What makes Apple different is that they are the only computer maker that can charge a premium for their products. Critics hate that there's nothing in their hardware (iPhone, MacBook, whatever) that isn't in cheaper products. Fans love the OS, reliability, and aesthetic. But those are really the same argument: Apple adds some value, partially tangible and partially intangible, to their products, and they charge more for them. My MacBook is amazingly physically sturdy, and I don't want to spend time maintaining the OS on my computer or learning how things work. A good GUI works how a user naively assumes it should, and Apple does a good job there. And yes, ugliness bothers me, so they earn a few more points there. You may feel differently about the value of those differences, but unlike companies that depend on volume of sales to make up for narrow profit margins, they don't need to sell everyone a computer, so they don't care if you can build your own computer and compile your own Linux distribution on it. Most of their customers don't have the time or inclination to spend doing that.

I don't understand the animosity between the camps. I don't care what computer you use, or what you think about mine. There's gotta be more interesting stuff to talk about.

Re:Is there a way to filter out anything "iPhone"? (1)

Moldiver (1343577) | about 5 years ago | (#28829615)

What exactly is mostly useless at iWork? I'm quite fond on the package and often leave InDesign behind because Pages is nicer to work with and gives good enough results.

Re:Is there a way to filter out anything "iPhone"? (1)

m.ducharme (1082683) | about 5 years ago | (#28829489)

On the off chance that you're asking an honest question, I'll give you an honest answer. I am an Apple fan, I own an iPod Touch, a Macbook, a G5 iMac, and a G4 iBook. I guess I qualify. Thinks I don't like about Apple products? iTunes, for one. Since iPhoto got upgraded in Leopard, iTunes is the shittiest piece of software that Apple has let out of Cupertino. I hate it. The only reason I haven't switched away from it is that I haven't found anything better for the Mac to manage a music collection. I also am wary of the fact that iTunes has grown from a shitty music manager to a central control system for multiple devices. That makes me nervous. There are a few other things, but those are the biggies. Oh, and iProduct pisses me off no end.

I still buy Apple products because they do interfaces brilliantly. The OS itself is beautiful to use, doesn't crash on me, paying for an update of an OS usually is beneficial to me and not just a cash grab (just put Leopard on the G5, it actually runs faster than Tiger). The hardware looks beautiful, and is generally high-quality as well, particularly the computers.

In short, there are things about Apple products that I hate, but there are more things that I love, and those things that I love are more important to me. If too many of those things change for the worse, I'll stop buying Apple products.

Re:Is there a way to filter out anything "iPhone"? (1)

konohitowa (220547) | about 5 years ago | (#28829633)

The Apple fans will always blindly support and back the Apple position. The Apple haters will always blindly attack the Apple position.

There, FTFY. You had a minor consistency error.

Re:Is there a way to filter out anything "iPhone"? (1)

Moridineas (213502) | about 5 years ago | (#28829869)

Yet another iPhone discussion that includes "apple will not allow [X]"... They are starting to bore and depress me as they are rather futile. The Apple fans will always blindly support and back the Apple position

Do you really see a lot of people who are "blindly support[ing]" Apple here? I've read through a lot of the comments and I don't see much (if any at all) of that...

Agreed that this is a geek-emotion battle and neither side is ever going to convince the other with arguments.

I have to wonder if there is ever anything "apple fans" ever complain or disagree with Apple about? I'd like to hear from Apple fans to know if they are actually independent or completely sold into the Apple view.

I'm going to put the onus on you -- where are these Apple fans who claim that apple can do no wrong and is perfect in every way?

Latitude web app better than most "native" ones (3, Interesting)

bangpound (1106805) | about 5 years ago | (#28827867)

Google Latitude is an immature service. It's not as interesting or useful as Brightkite or even Loopt. However, the web app is brilliant. The responsiveness of the app is not very different from the iPhone Maps app. The directions tool is in some ways better. The fact that it's not a "real" app isn't important to me. In fact, it shows that most of the apps out there are unnecessary... they could be web apps instead.

If you don't like it let Apple know (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#28827895)

Tell apple that you don't like their decision and they are making the iPhone worse than any Android, BlackBerry, Symbian and Windows Mobile phone. Here is apple.com feedback, let them know how you feel. http://www.apple.com/feedback/iphone.html [apple.com]

this should be the tipping point. (1, Interesting)

DragonTHC (208439) | about 5 years ago | (#28827907)

Apple will be sued for their app store discrimination.

This should be the point at which everyone realizes that If a google app gets rejected, there's no point investing time and money into an iphone app.

Business isn't going to make a product which can't be sold.

Just like mainstream movie production companies won't make a film that can't be shown in theaters. It's about money and Apple is trying to play favorites.

Re:this should be the tipping point. (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#28827967)

"This should be the point at which everyone realizes that If a google app gets rejected, there's no point investing time and money into an iphone app.

Business isn't going to make a product which can't be sold."

"As of July 14, 2009, there are over 65,000 third-party applications officially available for the iPhone and iPod Touch on the App Store" [wikipedia.org]

That reminds me... (0, Offtopic)

wampus (1932) | about 5 years ago | (#28827933)

Google just checked in [xda-developers.com] a bunch of code for the next Android release.

Wow, with full multitouch support... (0)

schon (31600) | about 5 years ago | (#28828161)

And Cyanogen says it has "full multitouch support throughout".

Considering Google left multitouch out to avoid a fight with Apple, this is an *awfully* big co-incidence.. Is this Google saying "game on" to Apple as retaliation for rejection of the native Latitude app?

As a very happy Android owner, the thought brings a smile to my face. :)

Re:Wow, with full multitouch support... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#28828297)

And Cyanogen says it has "full multitouch support throughout".

Considering Google left multitouch out to avoid a fight with Apple, this is an *awfully* big co-incidence.. Is this Google saying "game on" to Apple as retaliation for rejection of the native Latitude app?

As a very happy Android owner, the thought brings a smile to my face. :)

No. Google left out multi-touch support because the first generation hardware didn't support it. Yes, there were hacks, but they were total crap. The HTC Hero is the first Android device with actual hardware (and software) multi-touch support. The code gets released about the same time that the related hardware gets released... how mind-blowing!

Flamebate-tastic (1, Insightful)

crmarvin42 (652893) | about 5 years ago | (#28827963)

but it looks like Apple is determined to ensure its users only get a seriously crippled implementation compared to the Android and WinMo versions.

I think a more accurate replacement for this line would be, "but it looks like Apple is unwilling to make exceptions to their developer agreement for Google. Unfortunately, this means a crippled implementation compared to the Android and WinMo versions."

This summary makes it seem as though Apple conciously went out of their way to cripple the app, instead simply being inflexible in it's design restrictions. Everyone and their cat has an opinion on Apples "1 app at a time" policy, and that's fine. Bash that if you want to, theres plent of anger and frustration over that to go around. However, intentionally misrepresenting the issue here is counter productive, and prone to start a flamewar at best.

Re:Flamebate-tastic (1)

Aladrin (926209) | about 5 years ago | (#28828789)

"This summary makes it seem as though Apple conciously went out of their way to cripple the app,"

Actually, they did. Didn't you read the part of the summary where Apple insisted that it not be a native app and had to be a web-app instead? They -are- going out of their way to cripple it.

Re:Flamebate-tastic (1)

crmarvin42 (652893) | about 5 years ago | (#28829173)

Actually they didn't.

The told Google that their app would not be approvable for inclusion in the App Store because it requires the ability to run in the background. They suggested that the best way to get the app on the iPhone would be to load it as a web app for this reason.

Google could have decided to modify the app so that it was approvable, but decided against that. Since Apple didn't write they app, they can't "intentionally cripple" it, they can only veto the apps inclusion in the app store if they decide it violates one of their rules.

Google and web apps (4, Insightful)

YourExperiment (1081089) | about 5 years ago | (#28827993)

This must be a tiny bit embarrassing for Google. They're staking their reputation on Chrome OS, an OS based on the principle that native apps have had their day, and that everything we want to do can be done perfectly well through web apps.

Yet everyone's describing Google's web app as "crippled" on the iPhone, solely because Apple wouldn't allow them to release the native version of it. Why did they even deem it necessary to write a native version in the first place?

Incidentally, is there something in the Slashdot terms and conditions which means the site has to get worse every day? I can't even interact with the comment box with my mouse any more, it just ignores all clicks as if there's another HTML element overlaying it. This is truly pathetic.

Re:Google and web apps (1)

Fallen Seraph (808728) | about 5 years ago | (#28828543)

Did you even RTFA? It's one thing for web apps to be fully functional on a desktop or a notebook, it's quite another on a handset. The specific issue as hand is that it's crippled because it can't run in the background, due to the iPhone's shitty implementation of multi-tasking, whereas as a native app they were hoping it could. If, however, it were the Pre, for example, this would be a non-issue, because Pre users can just keep a background browser open continuously if they want, and open other browsers at the same time, or other apps without having to close it.

Re:Google and web apps (1)

YourExperiment (1081089) | about 5 years ago | (#28828653)

Did you even RTFA?

Yes.

It's one thing for web apps to be fully functional on a desktop or a notebook, it's quite another on a handset.

No it isn't, it's precisely the same thing.

it's crippled because it can't run in the background, due to the iPhone's shitty implementation of multi-tasking, whereas as a native app they were hoping it could

Why would they be hoping that? I think they'd be aware of the fact that neither web apps nor native apps can run on the background on an iPhone.

Re:Google and web apps (1)

kimvette (919543) | about 5 years ago | (#28829125)

Wrong.On a convergence device like the iPhone where you are forced to buy an unlimited data service, you are practically guaranteed to have connectivity to the cloud. That is not so on a standalone desktop or notebook. iPhone is down? Just drive a mile or two away and get perfect high-speed connection. Your cable or DSL is down? Make an appointment with your ISP and wait days to weeks for a resolution.

Re:Google and web apps (1)

WGFCrafty (1062506) | about 5 years ago | (#28829455)

So can newer Blackberry users. On my Curve 8900, Alt-Back pulls up a bar just like Window's Alt-Tab does. I currently have Yahoo Messenger, AIM and Google Talk all simultaneously running in the background.

Now, I can't open multiple browsers while browsing the internet on it, but I guess this functionality you refer to is more similar to multiple tabs then multiple browsers.

That makes sense... (1)

Gaerek (1088311) | about 5 years ago | (#28827995)

'Google's new Latitude Web app for iPhone is so hamstrung that Apple customers may be wishing they had a BlackBerry or Android handset instead.' Yes, because one crippled app is going to make me wish I had a Blackberry or Android...

What's up with Apple lately? (3, Insightful)

HangingChad (677530) | about 5 years ago | (#28828035)

... but thanks to an Apple rejection of the natively developed app, it's a web app.

Breaking iTunes compatibility on Linux and Blackberry and now they're crippling a Google app. What up? I'm sure there's a strategy here, I just can't see it.

I don't think trying to Balkanize their services and regulate iPhone users is going to ultimately be good for them or their user base. The iPhone user demographic may not have the same brand loyalty as the Apple faithful.

Beyond that I've always been impressed with Apple's execution...until recently. Instead of their usual suave and polish, always being ahead of the curve in packaging and style, lately they seem to be heavy handed and bumbling around a bit. Reactive instead of their usual proactive. Being reactive and heavy handed reminds me of Microsoft and even though I'm not a Mac fan myself I really appreciate what Apple did well.

I hope they right themselves and implement a service strategy with the same quality they've shown in other areas. If they start trying to make iPhones the AOL of cellular services, then Google and other providers are going to out-maneuver them with superior service offerings on a wider range of devices.

Maybe it's some flashback to the OS wars. Instead of a big market share and being the dominant player in the field, Apple is setting themselves up for a smaller but more loyal market share. Which could be either good or bad depending on how you feel about them tying their OS to their hardware.

background (3, Funny)

WillKemp (1338605) | about 5 years ago | (#28828091)

The iphone's OS has no mechanism for running applications in the background??? That's stunning! Is it based on Windows 3.1 or something?

Re:background (2, Informative)

larry bagina (561269) | about 5 years ago | (#28828259)

The iPhone OS supports background processes. The app store guidelines ban background apps, to preserve battery life.

Re:background (1)

topham (32406) | about 5 years ago | (#28828305)

Actually, the OS itself fully supports it.

Apple will not allow 3rd parties to write apps that can run in the background.
This is mostly due to battery life, and memory issues. Do some research on the typical issues people run into with background apps on other platforms and it starts to make a lot of sense. However, in this instance I think Apple is off their rocker. They should create an API to handle on-going location recording and posting.

Re:background (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#28828995)

The OS fully supports it. Apple doesn't allow it on anything that isn't part of the firmware. There's a jailbreak app that lets App Store apps run in the background by long-pressing Home. Yeah, it does hurt battery life. But there are some situations in which you need to have background apps, like this.

Android is much smarter about it - it has facilities for separating an app into 'user interface' bits and a small long-lived 'server' process, which lets the OS economize on battery life/memory more aggressively by killing the UI bits when they aren't being used but keeping the backgrounded part up.

And that goes to show... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#28828099)

that Apple doesn't like people competing against their products. They want to look better.

This is why I am a PC. :)

Re:And that goes to show... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#28828213)

Yeah, because Microsoft has never acted anti-competitively, or even been found guilty of doing so in a court of law. Oh, wait...

* Post withdrawn if parent poster uses Linux. And if sarcasm was intended it should have been designated.

Before you donk Apple for this restriction... (1)

woohootoo (904621) | about 5 years ago | (#28828207)

maybe you should consider that there might be a well-thought-out reason why they do it. Quite simply, if they let every third-party app have free access to the CPU, the battery would last about 10 minutes. The reason that lots of people are bitching about the battery life on the Pre: multitasking. There's a technical trade-off between CPU load and battery life. Considering that battery life for a mobile phone is an important consideration, I think Apple made the right decision to limit CPU access. Sure, you could build a bigger iPhone that had a replaceable battery and carry a bag of batteries around with you, but the compactness of the iPhone appeals to a lot of people. Aside from the technical considerations, the functionality of Latitude, which allows the whole world to know where you are, strikes me as creepy.

Re:Before you donk Apple for this restriction... (1)

dunkelfalke (91624) | about 5 years ago | (#28828549)

The battery of my WM phone generally lasts for three days. With full multitasking, a larger and higher resolution display than iPhone and lots of eBook reading on the device. And the best thing is, my device is only slightly larger due to the huge screen.

There are also other benefits of multitasking like using ICQ while listening to music while reading a book.

Speaking as a bit of an Apple fanboy (1)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | about 5 years ago | (#28828273)

HEY APPLE.

Worried about us users confusing Latitude with Maps? We're not that stupid.

Latitude is MUCH nicer. Thanks for putting us users first.

I find it odd... (4, Funny)

Jafafa Hots (580169) | about 5 years ago | (#28828361)

...that the ultimate narcissist application (everyone needs to know exactly where I am every second!)... ...doesn't work on the ultimate narcissists cell phone.

Did I miss something? (0, Flamebait)

Touvan (868256) | about 5 years ago | (#28828471)

Didn't Google claim last week that app stores were not the future, that web apps are? Then this week, they release a web app, because of Apple's decisions? Apple's not off the hook here, but this is perfectly in line with Google's stated vision for the future, and I don't know why they should get off the hook any more than Apple...

Re:Did I miss something? (1)

musicalwoods (1115347) | about 5 years ago | (#28829021)

Well, I also think that Google has shown that their vision for web apps extends into offline mode ala Google Gears and multitasking via tabs. In this particular instance, if the web app is not open on the iPhone, it cannot record your location. They thought if they could use it as a special app, it would be able to update your location while you are doing other things.

No iphone? (2, Interesting)

secureboot (920488) | about 5 years ago | (#28828493)

This is the first thing that's really made me want to get a non-iPhone. Latitude really introduces a lot of option for apps, and not being able to do this in the background really hamstrings the device. Hope Apple fixes this soon...

Re:No iphone? (3, Insightful)

broken_chaos (1188549) | about 5 years ago | (#28829047)

...Latitude is the 'service' where Google gets to track pretty much every move you make, right? I'm still at a loss why people are so enthusiastic over this.

AT&T is likely crippling the iPhone (5, Interesting)

Michael G. Kaplan (1517611) | about 5 years ago | (#28828501)

AT&T wants to sell their 'AT&T FamilyMap' plan to its users. Subscribers are charged $9.99 for the ability to locate up to 2 other people with AT&T phones $14.99 to locate up to 5 people. Google latitude will do this for free only better because users can locate as many people as they want and it can locate non-AT&T users.

I think that Apple would be happy to allow this but the problem is that wireless providers abuse their oligopoly status to cripple cell phone features so that users are forced to give the wireless carriers money for things that they otherwise would have been free and better.

For example Verizon forces smart phone manufacturers to rip out WiFi so users are forced to pay Verizon to access the internet. MP3 players are ripped out of cellphones and replaced by silly paid services such as VCast.

Banning Latitude is almost certainly just another mundane example of carrier oligopoly abuse. The federal government needs to legislate to stop cell phone carriers from crippling phones.

Re:AT&T is likely crippling the iPhone (2, Insightful)

Phroggy (441) | about 5 years ago | (#28829223)

Banning Latitude is almost certainly just another mundane example of carrier oligopoly abuse. The federal government needs to legislate to stop cell phone carriers from crippling phones.

Wrong solution!

The federal government needs break up the oligopoly to allow real competition to thrive. In a competitive market, we can have the features we want without the government having to decide what features those should be, which always causes problems. Verizon can strip wifi out of your phone because they know you're not going to switch to another carrier that supports phones with wifi. There are plenty of reasons why it wouldn't be easy for you to switch - and THAT'S the root of the problem.

Re:AT&T is likely crippling the iPhone (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#28829391)

I love it; anything remotely wrong with the iPhone is AT&T's fault. Anything remotely wrong with the iTunes system is the RIAA or the MPAA's fault. It's a great defense. Apple does everything in the users' interests.

Re:AT&T is likely crippling the iPhone (1)

99BottlesOfBeerInMyF (813746) | about 5 years ago | (#28829585)

I love it; anything remotely wrong with the iPhone is AT&T's fault. Anything remotely wrong with the iTunes system is the RIAA or the MPAA's fault. It's a great defense. Apple does everything in the users' interests.

Obviously you're a snarky troll, but you make an interesting point (even if you didn't mean to). You see Apple does what is in Apple's best interests, but in the case of iTunes Apple's best interests are to do whatever it takes to make iPods easy for people to use so they'll buy more. This makes them one of the strongest and most effective consumer advocates fighting against their partners in the RIAA and MPAA. Apple is largely responsible for the removal of DRM from online music stores because it is what benefitted Apple. The same is true for the iPhone. Many of the things the iPhone does are compromises, concessions Apple managed to get from AT&T that would not be allowed in other phones AT&T sold and supported. Now with the iPhone a resounding success Apple has even more leverage to push against AT&T and other providers in the next round of bargaining and while Apple's goal is to make money and do what is good for Apple, the consumer's interests happen to align with Apple's right now.

Re:AT&T is likely crippling the iPhone (1)

lordofthechia (598872) | about 5 years ago | (#28829661)

This is one of the reasons I jumped ship from Verizon. I got tired of having to go *through* the VCast music store (clicking something along the lines of "Buy Music") to play my music (every single frikkin time).

Also the fact that to use my own mp3 as a ringtone you had to:
1. Record a Voice Message clip directly to the SD card
2. Remove the SD Card form the phone
3. Plug SD Card to your PC
4. Copy mp3 onto the SD Card
5. Re-name mp3 to the same name as the Voice Clip
6. Put SD Card back into phone
7. Select the (numerically) named mp3 file as your ringtone

They later removed the ability to use Voice Messages are ringtones....

Lastly, they made it a *pain* to sync up the phone to a PC.

I switched to another carrier and was delighted to have a phone that was actually mine to use!

Who cares? These types of apps should concern ppl (1)

blahbooboo (839709) | about 5 years ago | (#28828665)

I am not someone who normally posts this sort of anti-google message as I actually LOVE google's applications, functionality, and the real threat they pose to Micro$oft! But even I am starting to get concerned about how willing people are to give away all privacy for a few "colored beads."

I love all the Google apps, but this is getting rediculous. Now they will have my email, cell phone number, and ability to track my movement. Data mine both to compare my email use and apps use against my movements. Be able to figure out who my friends are and what they are doing... etc

I guess I am just not their core audience which is probably teenagers? I have played with a few of these services and after some use realized I have no interest in seeing where my friends are moving nor transmitting my location continuously even to a select group of friends.

Yes, I know. They have "privacy" settings etc. But at some point one has to think of the bigger picture and say "enough is enough." There is absolutely no legal safeguards on this data. Who cares? Well how about that little trip to Planned Parenthood? Or your trip to a doctor to take care of that mysterious "rash."

Re:Who cares? These types of apps should concern p (1)

PrimaryConsult (1546585) | about 5 years ago | (#28829643)

Latitude is very useful for arranging meetups. Instead of "lets meet at the corner of X and Y", I can wander stores in the general vicinity of X and Y, and know to move closer to the established location as their dot(s) gets closer to the meeting spot. Since you can easily turn off it off with both the app and (in some cases) the physical gps device itself, you still have privacy when you want it.

Not an iPhone Thing.....No Lattitude! (1)

ReverendDC (1547301) | about 5 years ago | (#28828839)

Thus is ridonkulous. A program that tracks your exact location, transmits this info wirelessly, and stores it on the web....and does it in the background?!?!?!?! I have a Blackjack II and an iPhone - this garbage won't go on either phone ever. I have a problem with Apple rejecting it - freedom to have yourself tracked with "government privacy protection" stemming from an institution that can't decide if an IP address can identify you - but I will never put this garbage on my phone. Instead of knocking on the iPhone or Microsoft all of the time, turn your attention to Google for once. We allow them to track our emails and "scan" them. Docs, maps, geo-locating, chat "scans." Now Lattitude. How much will we allow Google to know about us before we become alarmed?

Monopoly? (4, Insightful)

LBArrettAnderson (655246) | about 5 years ago | (#28828897)

"Apple requested we release Latitude as a web application in order to avoid confusion with Maps on the iPhone."

How does Apple get away with that as an excuse when Microsoft gets sued billions of dollars for simply including a web browser or media player with Windows? At least in Windows you can install a different browser!

Re:Monopoly? (0, Flamebait)

nedlohs (1335013) | about 5 years ago | (#28829137)

Because one was found to be a monopoly by a court of law and the other was not.

Re:Monopoly? (2, Insightful)

LBArrettAnderson (655246) | about 5 years ago | (#28829593)

Yes, that's what I was asking. Microsoft didn't get sued for Windows being a monopoly, but because within Windows, WMP and IE were dominating. Within the iPhone's OS, not only is the built in maps program dominating, but it's very difficult (and against the contract) to install anything else.

Re:Monopoly? (0, Troll)

nedlohs (1335013) | about 5 years ago | (#28829823)

Windows itself was found to be a monopoly in the OS market having over 90% of the market, iPhones make up 10% of the "smart" phone market.

Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?
or Connect with...

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>