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Dye Used In Blue M&Ms Can Lessen Spinal Injury

kdawson posted more than 5 years ago | from the lands-where-the-jumblies-live dept.

Medicine 324

SydShamino writes "Researchers at the University of Rochester Medical Center have found that the dye used in blue M&Ms and other foods can, when given intravenously to a lab rat shortly after a spinal injury, minimize secondary damage caused by the body when it kills off nearby healthy cells. The dye is called BBG or Brilliant Blue G. Given that 85% of spinal injury patients are currently untreated (and some doctors don't trust the treatment given to the other 15%), a relatively safe treatment like this could help preserve some function for thousands of patients. The best part is that in lab rats the subjects given the treatment turn blue." The researchers are "pulling together an application to be lodged with the FDA to stage the first clinical trials of BBG on human patients."

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Sound Methods? (5, Funny)

eldavojohn (898314) | more than 5 years ago | (#28856337)

"... so every year we have a bring-your-child-to-work day where we inject some M&M dye into the lab rats and let the kids play with them. And Gunderson's kid has this nasty tendency to just baseball them into the wall and, well, we noticed the blue colored mice were recovering much better from the wall impact injuries ..."

Seriously though is there like a lab out there giving rats spinal injuries and jacking them full of chemicals? Cause if there is, I've got my resume handy!

Re:Sound Methods? (2, Informative)

Brian Gordon (987471) | more than 5 years ago | (#28856635)

That's probably better than actual conditions for lab rats.

How do you think they determine what dose kills you? They inject 200 rats with an overdose of, say, acetaminophen, and wait for horrifyingly painful liver failure. I guess it's better than testing it on humans though.

Re:Sound Methods? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28856877)

They inject 200 rats with an overdose of, say, acetaminophen, and wait for horrifyingly painful liver failure. I guess it's better than testing it on humans though.

Why? Are rats less deserving of our sympathies than "intelligent" humans? Wouldn't it be /more/ humane to test on those creatures that can give informed consent?

Re:Sound Methods? (1)

Hadlock (143607) | more than 5 years ago | (#28856985)

Yeah and if less than 100 rate die then it passes the LD50 Lethal Dosage 50% test [wikipedia.org] . And then it can go on to be further tested for usage by the general public. This is the first thing PETA and animal rights activists point to when talking about testing cosmetics on animals, etc., "how much of this can we inject into a rabbit before 50% die, then run that through an FDA equasion to properly dilute it, package it and sell it for topical use only". I'm not a PETA fanatic, I just had to write a report about it in biology in 9th grade.

Re:Sound Methods? (5, Insightful)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 5 years ago | (#28857059)

The funny thing is, if you want to poison a rat for scientific reasons, or (as in this case) break a rat's spine for scientific reasons, there are all sorts of rules to be followed, standards to be upheld, forms to be filed, etc.

If you just have rats in your house/warehouse/store/(or heck, even your lab, as long as they aren't lab rats) you can put out backbreaking traps, glue traps that cause slow death by dehydration, warfarin baits, whatever you want and nobody will say a thing. No standards, just the maintanence guy hittin' em with a shovel if they are twitching too much for the garbage.

Same thing in other areas: You don't need to deal with an IRB to raise feedlot pigs. And, for human testing, you (ostensibly at any rate) need informed consent, and various safeguards, IRB oversight, etc. If you need to spray your nerve toxin/probable human carcinogen on your crops, you just hire some undocumented mexican for $3.50 an hour, and throw him away if he breaks...

I'm not arguing that science needs less scrutiny(unethical conduct is always bad, and "trust us, its for the greater good" doesn't have an especially noble history; but I do think that science draws flack well out of proportion to its relative ethical risk, for reasons I don't fully understand. Numerous fields of human endeavor kill, maim, or cripple far more animals and humans, to far less benefit, than science, and somehow get away with less scrutiny and opposition. Why is science the target?

Re:Sound Methods? (3, Insightful)

JPLemme (106723) | more than 5 years ago | (#28857097)

You guess it's better than testing it on humans?

I agree with you that it's unfortunate that animals are sacrificed for medical research, and I hope and expect that the researchers are aware of their moral obligations to the animals under their care. But fixing spinal cord injuries so that people can walk again is worth the lives of millions of rats.

Re:Sound Methods? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28856695)

Lots of them. Spinal cord injury research is heavily funded, since so many poster children for planned parenthood get spinal cord injuries, necessitating expensive care, often on the public dime...

Re:Sound Methods? (1)

32771 (906153) | more than 5 years ago | (#28856703)

HA, that is funny!

"Nedergaard knew that BBG could thwart the function of P2X7, and its similarity to a blue food dye approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1982 gave her the confidence to test it intravenously." still leaves this possibility open I guess.

Re:Sound Methods? (2, Informative)

petehead (1041740) | more than 5 years ago | (#28856981)

The Wired article http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2009/07/bluerats/ [wired.com] notes that they dropped a 10 gram weight onto the backs of the mice while the mice were under anesthesia (it doesn't specify if the weight was made by ACME).

Re:Sound Methods? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28857129)

"... so every year we have a bring-your-child-to-work day where we inject some M&M dye into the lab rats and let the kids play with them. And Gunderson's kid has this nasty tendency to just baseball them into the wall and, well, we noticed the blue colored mice were recovering much better from the wall impact injuries ..."

Seriously though is there like a lab out there giving rats spinal injuries and jacking them full of chemicals? Cause if there is, I've got my resume handy!

Sure, I'm in grad school and one of friends spends much of his day doing micro-surgeries first breaking the spines of rats (T9 lumbar.. something-something) and then moves nerve tissue from one area to the other to regenerate it. This chemical seems viable for even his kind of study. Exciting!

there's more to science then just hurting animals (1)

Kenja (541830) | more than 5 years ago | (#28857197)

... sometimes you actually discover something and have to write a paper about it.

So eating M&M (0)

Z00L00K (682162) | more than 5 years ago | (#28856341)

Can be considered healty now?

At least if you have a spinal injury or possibly other type of nerve damage?

Or will you have to eat a truckload of M&M before there is any effect?

Re:So eating M&M (2, Interesting)

bigattichouse (527527) | more than 5 years ago | (#28856365)

Ok.. my father-in-law died from ALS (Lou Gherig's disease) - I wonder if this might be relevant in the nerve death suffered there.

Re:So eating M&M (2, Funny)

NFN_NLN (633283) | more than 5 years ago | (#28856469)

Can be considered healty now?

At least if you have a spinal injury or possibly other type of nerve damage?

Or will you have to eat a truckload of M&M before there is any effect?

Depends, if you can eat blue smarties INTRAVENOUSLY they might be helpful. I would work up to it by taking them in suppository form first.

Re:So eating M&M (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28856925)

I take it you mean non-USA smarties

Exchange? (1)

A little Frenchie (715758) | more than 5 years ago | (#28856355)

I give you my red one, you give me your blue one?

Blue Eyes? Blue Vision? (1)

deathcow (455995) | more than 5 years ago | (#28856369)

Notice that the eyes have completely changed color as well. I'm thinking I do not want my eyes filled with blue tint.

Re:Blue Eyes? Blue Vision? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28856443)

If you prefer life in a wheelchair to blue eyes, then okay.

Re:Blue Eyes? Blue Vision? (4, Insightful)

NFN_NLN (633283) | more than 5 years ago | (#28856515)

Notice that the eyes have completely changed color as well. I'm thinking I do not want my eyes filled with blue tint.

Yeah, given the choice between blue tinted eyes and spinal injury most people will chose spinal injury, I know I would.

Re:Blue Eyes? Blue Vision? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28856671)

I think the OP would agree, but as a fun exercise, go hold a blue filter up to your eyes sometime. Our eyes are least sensitive to the high energy end of the visual spectrum. Blue is dark. You would probably be rendered blind at nighttime, and severely color blind during the day.

Re:Blue Eyes? Blue Vision? (2, Insightful)

Trahloc (842734) | more than 5 years ago | (#28856965)

I wish someone would invent something that creates light ... like ... well ... a bulb of some sort ... maybe .. ahh... a light bulb? No too crazy, yes much better to be in a wheel chair pissing all over yourself than potentially have your night time vision affected for a short while. The lil rodents turned blue for only a short time, it wasn't permanent, even a year is a short while vs permanent spinal damage.

Re:Blue Eyes? Blue Vision? (1)

himself (66589) | more than 5 years ago | (#28856993)

>
> Yeah, given the choice between blue tinted eyes and spinal injury most people will chose spinal injury, I know I would.
>
      I have (naturally) blue eyes, you insensitive clod!

Re:Blue Eyes? Blue Vision? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28857177)

The spice must flow!?

Re:Blue Eyes? Blue Vision? (1)

TinBromide (921574) | more than 5 years ago | (#28856547)

I dunno, ask this guy [scienceblogs.com] what being blue does to his vision. He used colloidal silver (i.e. silver dissolved in water) as a folk medical treatment for so long that it tinted him blue.

The guy reports no side effects beyond an urge to hold concerts based on performance art. [wikipedia.org] /humor...

Re:Blue Eyes? Blue Vision? (2, Funny)

maxwell demon (590494) | more than 5 years ago | (#28856685)

Did he possibly play blues?

Re:Blue Eyes? Blue Vision? (2, Funny)

jeffasselin (566598) | more than 5 years ago | (#28856593)

Do rats with blue eyes pray to earthworms?

I wouldn't mind being a Fremen myself...

Re:Blue Eyes? Blue Vision? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28856909)

No, they pray to Giant Gippsland Worms http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giant_Gippsland_Earthworm [wikipedia]

Re:Blue Eyes? Blue Vision? (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 5 years ago | (#28857189)

Given the frequency and severity of combat nerve damage, this stuff might have numerous "Long live the fighters!" applications...

Re:Blue Eyes? Blue Vision? (1)

mcgrew (92797) | more than 5 years ago | (#28856741)

A different take on the old song "don't it make my brown eyes blue?"

Maybe it's the spice melange? [wikipedia.org] Better than a yellow tint. If the whites of your eyes turn yellowish, you're in deep medical trouble.

Re:Blue Eyes? Blue Vision? (1)

CorporateSuit (1319461) | more than 5 years ago | (#28856783)

Not only are the blue mice absolutely adorable, but they've also taken a new appreciation of Emily Dickenson's poetry.

Hello? (1)

tnk1 (899206) | more than 5 years ago | (#28856991)

Notice that the eyes have completely changed color as well. I'm thinking I do not want my eyes filled with blue tint.

Umm, actually that would be AWESOME. You would have a cured spinal injury and you'd look like fuckin' Muadib!

Re:Blue Eyes? Blue Vision? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28857193)

It comes with being in SOLDIER, so man up and take your dose of Mako like a good boy!

The Matrix (1)

billy901 (1158761) | more than 5 years ago | (#28856373)

If you take the red dye nothing happens. You will never know. :O

Alrrrrrrrright! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28856375)

Time to buy more blue products.

And all this time... (4, Funny)

jbarr (2233) | more than 5 years ago | (#28856379)

...I've been focusing on the green ones!

Re:And all this time... (4, Funny)

TinBromide (921574) | more than 5 years ago | (#28856405)

But have you been injecting them intravenously?

Re:And all this time... (1)

RabidMoose (746680) | more than 5 years ago | (#28856987)

Well, he has been injecting them, but not intravenously.

Re:And all this time... (4, Funny)

SnarfQuest (469614) | more than 5 years ago | (#28857109)

I tried, but couldn't get them to squeeze out the little needle. Tried using a caulking gun, but that was just extremely painful.
Turned out as badly as when I tried snorting coke. The bubbles just about killed me.

Blue pill (3, Funny)

maxwell demon (590494) | more than 5 years ago | (#28856385)

Don't take the red pill. Take the blue pill. It's better for your spine.

Blue Rat Group (5, Funny)

HTH NE1 (675604) | more than 5 years ago | (#28856389)

The best part is that in lab rats the subjects given the treatment turn blue.

Do they also start taking part in voiceless percussion stage performances?

Blue red (2, Informative)

greg1104 (461138) | more than 5 years ago | (#28856395)

Glad to see the blue M&Ms won't be going the way the red ones [wikipedia.org] did in 1976 [wikipedia.org] .

Re:Blue red (1)

Kell Bengal (711123) | more than 5 years ago | (#28856693)

I do love how they replaced the red colouring in M&Ms with cochineal http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cochineal_dye [wikipedia.org] - made from insect juice - to placate consumer concerns.

Re:Blue red (1)

Trahloc (842734) | more than 5 years ago | (#28857183)

All cultures eat bugs, we Americans just like having it hidden behind weird names that sound like any other chemical.

So it's true! (1)

Drakkenmensch (1255800) | more than 5 years ago | (#28856397)

M&Ms are good for your health... provided that you've just suffered a crippling spine injury.

Alright breeders, time to change it up! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28856403)

The only problem is... (1)

Monkeedude1212 (1560403) | more than 5 years ago | (#28856409)

There aren't enough dang Blue M&M's!

Seriously! Enough Red, Brown, and Yellow! I get like an entire bage of those!

after years of inadvertant preparation... (1)

FatRichie (1456467) | more than 5 years ago | (#28856413)

my spinal cord is now impervious to injury. also, my arteries are impervious to blood flow and my waist is impervious to pants.

They turned me into a SMURF !! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28856417)

A neut, too.

So, is it the blue, or the estrogen? (1)

tekrat (242117) | more than 5 years ago | (#28856429)

Isn't blue the sexy girl M&M that makes Red and Yellow act stupid all the time?

Re:So, is it the blue, or the estrogen? (1)

Monkeedude1212 (1560403) | more than 5 years ago | (#28856475)

That's Green actually. And the Orange one is all Jittery. I can't remember the Blue one's personality at all...

Re:So, is it the blue, or the estrogen? (1)

HTH NE1 (675604) | more than 5 years ago | (#28856523)

I can't remember the Blue one's personality at all...

Disaffected.

diamonds + insulin + blue dye + proteins = (1)

ground.zero.612 (1563557) | more than 5 years ago | (#28856451)

Akira?! I for one look forward to our blue-skinned gut-bar-arm having pyscho-kinetic energy wielding japanese manga overlords!

natgeo article with more pictures (2, Informative)

yincrash (854885) | more than 5 years ago | (#28856457)

nat geo [nationalgeographic.com] posted an article. basically, the blue dye helps prevent the initial swelling which compresses spinal cord tissue to the point of tissue death. less tissue death = better recovery.

Re:natgeo article with more pictures (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28856647)

Also from the NeoGeo... the dye's coloration effects go away after ~1 week, except in the spine...

Time limit (1)

El Gigante de Justic (994299) | more than 5 years ago | (#28856461)

The summary and CNN article don't mention it in detail, but other articles on this study have said that the first application of BBG has to come within 15 minutes of injury for it to have any benefit. If it does get approved at some point, you'd almost want carried by first responders instead of having to wait until you reach the emergency room.

Nuked Blue (1)

www.sorehands.com (142825) | more than 5 years ago | (#28856485)

Instead of being nuked blue when you smoke at LSC, you also get nuked blue when you get a spinal injury.

Cool.

Speaking strictly for myself.. (1)

dotmax (642602) | more than 5 years ago | (#28856493)

I would prefer to be called The Blue Max than ... matt.

It must be injected immediately after injury (1)

piojo (995934) | more than 5 years ago | (#28856505)

All the dye does, according to the article, is prevent the body from damaging itself further following a spinal cord injury. It must be injected before that additional damage can occur--I wonder if this will end up in every first-aid kit? That's the only way I see it helping.

How about yellow? (2, Informative)

DoktorSeven (628331) | more than 5 years ago | (#28856509)

Now can we really make M&Ms (and tons of other foods) better by getting rid of the awful yellow dye garbage (tartrazine)? It's been shown to affect tons of people negatively and some even link it to childhood obsessive-compulsive disorder and hyperactivity.

Seriously, we can do without yellow foods or find something much safer, can't we? Why do we continue to put use this as a food dye when there are so many issues with it?

It's a real pain in the ass to analyze ingredient lists of every single thing I buy to make sure it doesn't have that in it, and it's in very non-obvious things as well (things that don't even look that yellow). Plus they don't draw attention to it like other food allergies, it's just hidden near the bottom of ingredient lists. And I'm sure I've accidentally had it at restaurants causing me to feel like crap and get headaches and feel sick afterwards.

Ban tartrazine.

Re:How about yellow? (1)

mcgrew (92797) | more than 5 years ago | (#28856857)

Seriously, we can do without yellow foods

No need, there are lots of naturally occuring yellow foods. Some tomatos, some potatos, squash, egg yolk, corn...

Re:How about yellow? (3, Funny)

vlm (69642) | more than 5 years ago | (#28857155)

No need, there are lots of naturally occuring yellow foods. Some tomatos, some potatos, squash, egg yolk, corn...

Yellow snow... no, wait, scratch that off the list.

Tough choice (1)

ItsColdOverHere (928704) | more than 5 years ago | (#28856517)

"Well sir, you have a choice; you can turn blue and maybe regain some function or you can stay paralysed and not look like an alien".

I'd need to be pretty damn convinced before I willingly had myself turned a light blue.

Re:Tough choice (1)

dotmax (642602) | more than 5 years ago | (#28856603)

i dunno... that bald chick on Farscape was pretty hott.

Re:Tough choice (1)

pushing-robot (1037830) | more than 5 years ago | (#28857033)

Judging by the rat, I think you'd look more like Chiana. Which would be awesome.

Random! (2, Funny)

EEBaum (520514) | more than 5 years ago | (#28856559)

I'm sure there are sound methods involved in this, but it sounds kinda like some lab techs have two dartboards, one labeled "thing to do to mouse" and another labeled "thing to inject into mouse to see if it gets better" and are playing a drinking game.

"Well, the Tide With Color-Safe Bleach injection didn't fix Squeaky's 'beetus. Your turn, Roy!"

Re:Random! (1)

PeterM from Berkeley (15510) | more than 5 years ago | (#28856733)

No, I don't think it's like that at all. Apparently "oxidized ATP" does the same thing as this blue dye, but suffers some drawbacks:
a) it must be injected into the damaged site directly
b) it has known dangerous side effects.

They were looking for a better alternative, and it seems this blue dye is one they found.

The blue dye they're using doesn't have any known drawbacks and they want to test it to find if there are any problems and if it's really effective.

--PM

Re:Random! (1)

Toonol (1057698) | more than 5 years ago | (#28856873)

Although it's a bit gruesome, it does speak to the benefits of thoroughly testing products on animals. There is something to be said for systematically generating nerve injuries, cancers, diabetes, and so forth in animals and studying the effect of... well, EVERYTHING on their systems. we have nowhere near enough knowledge to predict or model the behavior of chemicals on the chaotic systems of life; we need to still rely on serendipity, so we might as well be rigorous about it.

Mobsters, the new clinical trialists. (0, Troll)

7-Vodka (195504) | more than 5 years ago | (#28856565)

Researchers at the University of Rochester Medical Center found that when they injected the compound Brilliant Blue G (BBG) into rats suffering spinal cord injuries, the rodents were able to walk again, albeit with a limp.

Isn't it nice that they leave out the part where they break the backs of the animals first. Makes it sound almost like an animal hospital taking in injured creatures and saving them with the food dye.
Seems to me we should be contracting out mobsters as researchers. Because they also just 'happen' to find people who suffer spinal cord injuries.

Re:Mobsters, the new clinical trialists. (5, Informative)

VxMorpheusxV (817585) | more than 5 years ago | (#28856749)

That is the nature of research with animals. There is regulation (here in the U.S) that attempts to minimize pain when possible and guidelines that must be followed to acquire animals for research, but there has been substantial progress made through animal research. If you've got a viable alternative I'm sure it would be considered. Take a look at the wiki [wikipedia.org] page for more info.

Re:Mobsters, the new clinical trialists. (1)

maxwell demon (590494) | more than 5 years ago | (#28856799)

Do you have a better alternative?

Re:Mobsters, the new clinical trialists. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28856815)

You would prefer, perhaps, that we broke human spines to test efficacy of experimental medications?

And don't be fooled into thinking there are labs causing these injuries on research animals just to inject random chemicals and see what happens. This study was researching a known active agent that was predicted to be helpful in spinal chord injury, and the study confirmed the hypothesis.

Welcome to science.

Re:Mobsters, the new clinical trialists. (1)

Ardaen (1099611) | more than 5 years ago | (#28856911)

Isn't it nice that they leave out the part where they break the backs of the animals first.

Isn't it nice how you make it sound so straightforward, like hurting animals is unjustifiable.
Vegan are you? Live in a mouse or rat infested home? Use any over the counter or presecription medications?

Sadly the line is not clear or easy to draw.

Re:Mobsters, the new clinical trialists. (1)

32771 (906153) | more than 5 years ago | (#28856933)

Depends on the newssource:

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2009/07/photogalleries/blue-rats-food-dye-heals-pictures/ [nationalgeographic.com]

explains:

"Fifteen minutes after researchers intentionally paralyzed this rat by dropping a weight on its back..."

I know - poor thing, and so much cuter when blue.

Re:Mobsters, the new clinical trialists. (2, Funny)

Chris Burke (6130) | more than 5 years ago | (#28857123)

Seems to me we should be contracting out mobsters as researchers. Because they also just 'happen' to find people who suffer spinal cord injuries.

That's a good idea. They'd probably do it for free, too, because if there's one thing mobsters hate, it's a rat.

No Thanks: I Prefer (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28856599)

medical marijuana. However, the hospital-industrial complex would prefer the higher revenues from dye
prescriptions.

Yours In Socialism,
Kilgore Trout

Better than red dye, apparently (1)

mcgrew (92797) | more than 5 years ago | (#28856639)

The red dye is made from bugs! [wikipedia.org]

I couldn't find what this blue dye is made out of in wikipedia. [wikipedia.org] It doesn't mention M&Ms but does mention it's used in chemistry for determining protein concentration in a solution, and there's a link to a BBC article about reducing the effects of spinal injury. I wish someone who is knowledgeable about this would update the wiki.

So what do the other colors do? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28856645)

It would be unfair if only one color was a useful medical treatment.

85% are untreated!!??? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28856651)

I guess I'm a little confused. So I'm up on my roof, cleaning my gutters or hanging Christmas lights; I fall off and break my spine in half. The ambulance takes me to the hospital and the doctor says what, "Just walk it off, you'll be fine." What am I missing here?

I would think all those people walking around with broken spines would like at least SOME treatment.

What no Blue Man jokes? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28856681)

you're slipping guys.

Gimme some M&Ms!!! (1)

erroneus (253617) | more than 5 years ago | (#28856699)

Now available in prescription strength!

HOLY SHIT! So Carlin was really on to something... (1)

denzacar (181829) | more than 5 years ago | (#28856715)

Not exactly immortality [youtube.com] though...

It's not just for M&Ms anymore... (1)

my_left_nut (1161359) | more than 5 years ago | (#28856747)

Back in the 70s, I always thought Frank Rizzo was a little "out there" when he had all of the Philly police vehicles painted bright blue like this [fortunecity.com] one.

Now, with this new finding, over 35 years later, it all starts to make sense.

The actual research article (1)

damn_registrars (1103043) | more than 5 years ago | (#28856767)

The actual research article [pnas.org] mentioned in the CNN blurb is in the most recent (as in today) issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Good thing it wasn't Brown (1)

Alzheimers (467217) | more than 5 years ago | (#28856823)

or else David Lee Roth [snopes.com] would definitely refuse this treatment!

He'd probably trash the OR, too.

Why M&M? (4, Insightful)

Relic of the Future (118669) | more than 5 years ago | (#28856827)

Why are M&Ms getting attached to this story? This dye is used in all kinds of foods, not just M&Ms.

Maybe M&M/Mars, thanks to all the free and undeserved publicity, would be willing to help fund the necessary study, since no drug company seems interested in doing so (after all, there's no profit in selling a commodity food coloring.)

Re:Why M&M? (1)

DerekLyons (302214) | more than 5 years ago | (#28857001)

Ah yes, despite evidence the research and trials are actually taking place - it's impossible for them to actually be taking place because no drug company will fund it.
 
Take your tinfoil hat bullshit elsewhere.

Re:Why M&M? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28857191)

Beats me, perhaps they're alluding to the red M&M's that they temporarily stopped production on in the 70s?

Who would think (1)

hamburgler007 (1420537) | more than 5 years ago | (#28856845)

that blue M&M's would be this centuries aspirin?

Also used as a fabric dye (1)

damn_registrars (1103043) | more than 5 years ago | (#28856879)

From the research article [pnas.org] :

BBG is lower due to the high binding affinity of BBG for proteins, as is characteristic for all Coomasie dyes (14). Never- theless, BBG outside the lesion was minimal, indicating that BBG primarily entered the lesion via the disrupted bloodspinal cord barrier.

Our mutual friend wikipedia [wikipedia.org] tells us that Coomassie blue started as a fabric dye in Africa.

Thanks a lot (1)

greymond (539980) | more than 5 years ago | (#28857027)

Now I have another reason to keep stuffing my face and getting fatter - jerks! :P

Big Blue *bleep* (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28857035)

Now I too, can be blue and walk around naked like Dr. Manhattan.

Who would take the red coloured one? (1)

goobermaster (1263770) | more than 5 years ago | (#28857065)

Lets compare red to blue coloured things:

In Health:
Fire is less healthy when inserted into your body than water (+1 blue)

In money:
20 Euro blue note buys more at Quiznos than 10 Euro red note (+1 blue)

In the Matrix:
Red pill allows you to live in a decrepit city underground, implanted with large amounts of metal in your head and constantly hunted by squid robots itching to place dendrites through your ribcage and/or face.
Blue Pill allows you to live in a nice modern city with noticeable lack of said squid robots. And now it helps you avoid and/or lessen the impact of spinal injuries. (+11!!one1 blue)

Winner? Blue!

Forget the medical advancement... (1)

asdf7890 (1518587) | more than 5 years ago | (#28857067)

Forget the medical advancement. Where can I get me a cool blue/white rat?!

How?! (1)

Fuzzums (250400) | more than 5 years ago | (#28857083)

How the *#%)( do you inject a blue M&M. And is that with or without peanut?

Misery Loves Company (1)

mindbrane (1548037) | more than 5 years ago | (#28857089)

Finally the blue man [msn.com] won't be singing the bluez all alone

In related news... (1)

omnivagus (1005211) | more than 5 years ago | (#28857143)

In related news, the sexual partners of male lab rats injected with Yellow #5 reported far less damage to vaginal tissue following copulation...

Seriously, I can't believe the shit we put into our food! What other crazy effects do dyes like this have that we don't know about?

This is going to be a can of worms (4, Insightful)

overshoot (39700) | more than 5 years ago | (#28857201)

Apparently this is one of those things like clotbusters after a CVI or MI where time counts -- only more so: waiting an hour or two can make the difference between walking and not walking.

Which means that restricting it to use in trauma centers is going to end up with a lot of nonurban victims left paralyzed for life. Trouble is, administering it outside of a trauma center is going to cause a lot of problems with licensure etc. Which causes me, as a nonurban first responder, to simultaneously stress out and reach for the popcorn.

tro7L (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28857227)

effort to addrees development models your spare time

Blue! Hahaha (1)

GargamelSpaceman (992546) | more than 5 years ago | (#28857229)

Here dude, this will get you HIGH!!!

Next day -

Holy shit dude. You're blue!

This is better than that sleeping drunk girl whose friends write all over her.

They need FDA approval? (0, Troll)

Ironica (124657) | more than 5 years ago | (#28857247)

Gosh, you'd think something that's FDA-approved to be present in visible quantities in foods marketed heavily to children wouldn't need *additional* FDA approval for these clinical trials... you mean, blue dye might not be entirely safe? Who woulda thunk?

I prefer my chocolate to be chocolate-covered, thank you. Artificial chemicals are best left to things like debilitating spinal injuries or cancer treatment.

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