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US Supercomputer Lead Sparks Russian Govt's Competitive Drive

timothy posted more than 5 years ago | from the ever-since-that-damn-satellite dept.

Supercomputing 74

CWmike writes "Russia's launch of Sputnik in 1957 triggered a crisis of confidence in the US that helped drive the creation of a space program. Now, Russia is comparing the US's achievements in supercomputing with theirs, and they don't like what they see. In a speech on Tuesday, Russia's President, Dmitry Medvedev, criticized his country's IT industry almost to the point of sarcasm for failing to develop supercomputing technology, and urged a dramatic change in Russia's use of high-performance computing. Medvedev, at the opening address of a Security Council Meeting on Supercomputers in Moscow, told attendees that 476 out of the 500 supercomputers on the Top500 list were manufactured in the United States. 'Therefore, in general, our situation is very difficult,' he said."

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In soviet russia... (1, Redundant)

Haffner (1349071) | more than 5 years ago | (#28870689)

In Soviet Russia, you make supercomputers into Playstation 3!

Re:In soviet russia... (0, Redundant)

Teresita (982888) | more than 5 years ago | (#28870785)

In Soviet Russia, Blue Screen kill YOU.

Re:In soviet russia... (0, Redundant)

QX-Mat (460729) | more than 5 years ago | (#28870821)

In Soviet Russia, super computer created from YOU!

Re:In soviet russia... (1)

bigman2003 (671309) | more than 5 years ago | (#28872095)

The obvious answer to this story is...start another botnet.

If botnets were added to the supercomputer ranking, where would they be? And how many are Russian?

Re:In soviet russia... (1)

autoevolution (1519077) | more than 5 years ago | (#28872869)

Interesting, but I don't think there are any botnets that are capable of distributed computing.

Re:In soviet russia... (1)

Tubal-Cain (1289912) | more than 5 years ago | (#28876983)

Any botnet + folding@home

Re:In soviet russia... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28881417)

Then you don't know how botnets work. The vast majority of them (all?) will download any file they're told and then execute it.

Remarkable Idea (2, Insightful)

deathcow (455995) | more than 5 years ago | (#28870737)

Send some dudes to America with some cash and buy some nice computing equipment. Do you have some serious computing to do? Or do you have a serious need to build new computers?

Re:Remarkable Idea (2, Insightful)

Eddy Luten (1166889) | more than 5 years ago | (#28870815)

It would be more frugal for Russia to send these guys to Taiwan or China instead since all of the technology is being developed and manufactured there.

Re:Remarkable Idea (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28870999)

There were some restrictions on importing high-performance computers to Russia. But, most of best Russian brains are in the west anyway, I think so. The education is much more important problem than a supercomputing. Human brain is still worth more than a brute-force computer.

Re:Remarkable Idea (1)

cusco (717999) | more than 5 years ago | (#28876401)

Back in the Bad Old Days, when US computer manufacturers were prohibited from selling high-performance equipment to the Soviet Union, IBM set up an assembly factory in Tacna, Peru, under a shell company. They sold "spare parts" to the shell company, which then assembled them into AS/400s and System 38s and shipped them to Moscow.

So much trivia, so little time to pass it all along . . .

Re:Remarkable Idea (1)

wjousts (1529427) | more than 5 years ago | (#28871301)

Send some dudes to America with some cash and buy some nice computing equipment. Do you have some serious computing to do? Or do you have a serious need to build new computers?

I think the later. It's more a question of national pride than a pressing need to do some super computing. That and a fear of falling too far behind in technology.

Re:Remarkable Idea (1)

j-stroy (640921) | more than 5 years ago | (#28873051)

Which is worse, falling behind in technology, or failing to effectively integrate technologies?

The brilliance of russian thrift and efficiency (no doubt brought about by scarcity) is unmatched by the west's treadmill of newer and better, which is disruptive to integration and has lead to many technological dead ends and restarts. Not to mention inability to reproduce past results.

An example is their space launch systems that run like clockwork, while ARES designs call for a 6 ton rubber damper be added. Lunacy. All the russian coders I have had the privilege of working with produced amazing results... now maybe the lame ones just stayed at home, but I think there is a resiliency there that we could all learn from.

If we stopped creating new technologies, and just fully integrated what we have already, I would bet that overall progress would be greater, since so many technologies have moved ahead without being fully understood or cross connected. Now with regard to super computers, we have all those cycles, but can we really harness them effectively other than for specific models?

Re:Remarkable Idea (1)

Kartu (1490911) | more than 5 years ago | (#28878893)

Lunacy? Do Russians have anything remotelly comparable to ARES please? USSR have created something comparable to von Braun's Saturn V (which did run like clockwork, unlike what Soviet project has produced) only in mid 80-th.

I sure hope they can create that need (1, Interesting)

Wrexs0ul (515885) | more than 5 years ago | (#28872513)

I hate an arms-race as much as the next guy, but imagine if all the showmanship from whose nukepeen was bigger in the cold war could go towards supercomputing or fuel efficiency as the primary goal instead of a spin-off.

No cold war fear, just politicians whipping out their huge... processors... as part of a rallying call.

So, drop the gauntlet Medvedev, or e-trousers as the case may be.

-Matt

Re:Remarkable Idea (1)

dunkelfalke (91624) | more than 5 years ago | (#28873209)

USSR used to be a major aircraft manufacturer, be it military or civil (Tu-104 was the first reliable jet airliner, Tu-204 was the second fly by wire airliner and so on). Nowadays the Russian aircraft industry has fallen behind Brazilia which hurts both the wallet and the national pride.

So it is both - a need for serious computing and serious need to build new computers.

Crisis (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28870757)

Looks like Dmitry wants to play Crisis

They can buy them from China just like the US does (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28870761)

With most of the work done in developing motherboards, stamping silicon, and exporting the machines done in China, Russia can buy their computers from the same source as the US.

Plus, with the advances in malware, why own a computercomputer when you can pwn it?

I thought (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28870827)

I thought Russia led in distributed node supercomputers (aka botnets). Shows what I know.

Supercomputers for the sake of supercomputers? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28870831)

So what? Suddenly we have to start building supercomputers in Russia?
Lack of supercomputers means nobody needs them. That's an indication that Russia is falling behind in technology in general. You can't fix this just by building some supercomputers.
Something more fundamental must be done: fight corruption, establish rule of law, create infrustructure. Then the high-tech industry will emerge by itself. No need for the government to build supercomputers.

Re:Supercomputers for the sake of supercomputers? (3, Funny)

Major Blud (789630) | more than 5 years ago | (#28871179)

Yeah, and this is not long after Putin told Michael Dell that they are not "invalids" and didn't need help.

Russian computers (1)

ArsonSmith (13997) | more than 5 years ago | (#28870835)

Imagine a beawulf cluster of these?

Re:Russian computers (1)

ArsonSmith (13997) | more than 5 years ago | (#28870867)

Dmitry Medvedev: "In Soviet Russia you make Beowulf Cluster."

Re:Russian computers (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28871187)

In Soviet Russia, Beawulf cluster imagines YOU.

Supercomputers dont compare to the human mind. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28870857)

The SR-71 blackbird was arguably the finest airplane ever built. Nothing before or since has ever matched it.

It was designed with nothing but a slide rule and paper.

Don't think these expensive toys are an adequate substitute for the human mind. Or for well trained engineers and mathemeticians.

Human minds don't compare to THAT human mind. (2, Interesting)

jeffb (2.718) (1189693) | more than 5 years ago | (#28871155)

The SR-71 blackbird was arguably the finest airplane ever built. Nothing before or since has ever matched it.

It was designed with nothing but a slide rule and paper.

Don't think these expensive toys are an adequate substitute for the human mind. Or for well trained engineers and mathemeticians.

Aw, c'mon. There are good reasons that the "stolen alien technology" meme has such staying power, and the SR-71 is one of the biggest. It was ridiculously far ahead of anything else we'd produced. Sure, it was the product of "the human mind", or at least A human mind, but I don't think lumping Kelly Johnson or Nikola Tesla or Leonardo da Vinci in with "the rest of humanity" is especially useful.

Whatever your level of skill and insight, though, supercomputing can act as a force multiplier for your brain. If you're claiming that real engineers only need a slide rule and paper, or that supercomputing will somehow get in the way of their natural gifts, well, I'm going to have to disagree.

Oh, and I probably shouldn't be mentioning this, but I've heard rumors that the military actually didn't stop developing newer and faster aircraft technologies after the Blackbird. But don't tell anyone.

Re:Human minds don't compare to THAT human mind. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28871411)

Supercomputing does act like a force multiplier, which is my point.

Im not making stupid statements like "real programmers program in binary".

My point is that the results that matter are produced by well trained minds and thinkers.

You might compare it to algorithmic problem solving. You can take a thousand years with a linear algorothm and a supercomputer.

Or you can do it with an optimized algorithm and a crappy 8088 processor and get the result in five minutes. A well trained mind is the best algorithm you can employ, and it will always produce the best results, regardless of the tools available to it.

You can give a supercomputer to a substandard engineer, but remember that they're just multipliers....and 0 * 10,000,000 is still zero.

Re:Supercomputers dont compare to the human mind. (0)

hcdejong (561314) | more than 5 years ago | (#28872225)

The SR-71 blackbird was arguably the finest airplane ever built. Nothing before or since has ever matched it.

It was designed with nothing but a slide rule and paper.

Nonsense. It was the fastest non-rocket airplane ever, and that was a remarkable achievement, but it came at a price. It was a one-trick pony, built so close to the limits of the technology of that era that basically, every flight needed to be treated like e.g. a space flight or a speed record. It needed astronaut-level pilots. It had spectacular failure modes that needed constant attention if you wanted to avoid them (compressor stall) and was fantastically expensive to run and maintain.

These days, an F-22 could do the same job (undetectable and/or untouchable reconnaisance) better, plus unlike the SR-71 it can defend itself, attack ground targets etc. Unlike the SR-71, this aircraft is in series production and can be flown by any competent pilot.

That's what computers can do, in the hands of well trained engineers and mathemeticians.

Re:Supercomputers dont compare to the human mind. (1)

smithmc (451373) | more than 5 years ago | (#28888521)

The SR-71 blackbird was arguably the finest airplane ever built. Nothing before or since has ever matched it.

Nonsense. The SR-71 was really good at doing one thing - flying very high and very fast, in a straight line. How many Gs could it pull? Could it do a Cobra, or a J-turn? In terms of overall aerodynamic maneuvering, the F-15 or -16 or -22, or Su-27 or -35, are vastly superior to the SR-71. (Not that it isn't a massively cool plane, mind you, but "the finest plane ever built" carries with it lots of questions about criteria and standards.)

what 1920s? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28870869)

From Medvedev's website:

"If we are talking seriously, a huge number of entrepreneurs, not to mention officials, do not know what supercomputers are: for them it is an exotic type of those machines that were created in the 1920s to catch up and overtake America."

1920s? What does he mean? Those machines Zhukov used for mathematical modeling, when he prepared for Khalkhin Gol?

Appropriate Quote (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28870905)

"Mr. President, if I may speak freely, the Russkie talks big, but frankly, we think he's short of know how. I mean, you just can't expect a bunch of ignorant peons to understand a machine like some of our boys. And that's not meant as an insult, Mr. Ambassador, I mean, you take your average Russkie, we all know how much guts he's got. Hell, lookit look at all them them Nazis killed off and they still wouldn't quit."
                                                  - General "Buck" Turgidson

Re:Appropriate Quote (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28875435)

Someone please mod this guy troll.

Russia caught up with the US in 1984 (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28870941)

From chernenko@kremvax.UUCP Sun Apr 1 15:02:52 1984
Relay-Version: version B 2.10.1 6/24/83 (MC840302); site mcvax.UUCP
Posting-Version: version B 2.10.1 4/1/84 (SU840401); site kremvax.UUCP
Path: mcvax!moskvax!kremvax!chernenko
From: chernenko@kremvax.UUCP
Newsgroups: net.general,eunet.general,net.politics,eunet.politics
Subject: USSR on Usenet
Message-ID:
Date: Sun, 1-Apr-84 15:02:52 GMT
Article-I.D.: kremvax.0001
Posted: Sun Apr 1 15:02:52 1984
Date-Received: Mon, 1-Apr-84 12:26:02 GMT
Organization: MIIA, Moscow
Lines: 41

Well, today, 840401, this is at last the Socialist Union of Soviet
Republics joining the Usenet network and saying hallo to everybody.

One reason for us to join this network has been to have a means of
having an open discussion forum with the American and European people
and making clear to them our strong efforts towards attaining peaceful
coexistence between the people of the Soviet Union and those of the
United States and Europe.

We have been informed that on this network many people have given strong
anti-Russian opinions, but we believe they have been misguided by their
leaders, especially the American administration, who is seeking for war
and domination of the world.
By well informing those people from our side we hope to have a possibility
to make clear to them our intentions and ideas.

Some of those in the Western world, who believe in the truth of what we
say have made possible our entry on this network; to them we are very
grateful. We hereby invite you to freely give your comments and opinions.

Here are the data for our backbone site:

Name: moskvax
Organization: Moscow Institute for International Affairs
Contact: K. Chernenko
Phone: +7 095 840401
Postal-Address: Moscow, Soviet Union
Electronic-Address: mcvax!moskvax!kremvax!chernenko
News: mcvax kremvax kgbvax
Mail: mcvax kremvax kgbvax

And now, let's open a flask of Vodka and have a drink on our entry on
this network. So:

                        NA ZDAROVJE!

--
        K. Chernenko, Moscow, USSR ...{decvax,philabs}!mcvax!moskvax!kremvax!chernenko

Re:Russia caught up with the US in 1984 (1)

hughk (248126) | more than 5 years ago | (#28873453)

This was a spoof post, but hilarious at the time. Yes, the Russians has some VAXes but mostly Robotron copies of PDP-11s and VAXes - but nobody would have dared make such a post.

Supercomps vs Botnets (4, Insightful)

Rockoon (1252108) | more than 5 years ago | (#28871001)

I thought Russia was focusing on botnets. Most of these have a lot more processing power than the fastest supercomputers.

Re:Supercomps vs Botnets (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28871571)

I thought Russia was focusing on botnets. Most of these have a lot more processing power than the fastest supercomputers.

The expensive part of supercomputing is not the processors, it's having enough throughput on the backend to feed those CPUs.

Re:Supercomps vs Botnets (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28879425)

And a supercomputer doesn't need any throughput, right? ...

(Rockoon was right on the money, the ac is a jerk, what a surprise)

Re:Supercomps vs Botnets (1)

benjfowler (239527) | more than 5 years ago | (#28880209)

Easy. Spam, fast-flux dick pill hosting, and DDoS workloads are what are technically known as "embarrassingly parallel" workloads.

Re:Supercomps vs Botnets (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28883285)

1 800-inch penis > 100 8-inch penises.

Re:Supercomps vs Botnets (1)

smithmc (451373) | more than 5 years ago | (#28888733)

1 800-inch penis > 100 8-inch penises.

Not if you've got 100 women to pork in a limited amount of time, whose vaginas are only 8 inches deep.

Ah, wait, what? (1)

girlintraining (1395911) | more than 5 years ago | (#28871035)

476 out of the 500 supercomputers on the Top500 list were manufactured in the United States.

Yeah right! I don't think a single PC has been manufactured, assembled, and shipped from this country in which every component was dug out of the ground, refined, processed, manufactured, packaged, assembled, and distributed, from this country-- Not in a long time. That said, if Russia's so damned worried about our CPU designers, why not recruit a few? I know of at least one that quit the x86 development team from Intel muttering something about "not dealing with a unit of time smaller than a season" after having some nanosecond glitches in a core he was designing... He sounds like a guy who could use a stiff drink. I'm sure you can deliver, Russia.

Re:Ah, wait, what? (1)

Cyberax (705495) | more than 5 years ago | (#28871245)

Russia has solid CPU designs which are used (unsurprisingly) in military hardware and other special applications. For example, these beauties: http://www.mcst.ru/22-23.htm [www.mcst.ru] are nearly indestructible. So there's expertise.

However, so far Russia lacks expertise required to create fabs.

Re:Ah, wait, what? (1)

nbauman (624611) | more than 5 years ago | (#28872531)

Loren Graham, the MIT professor who probably understood Soviet science better than any other American, described the "blackboard theory":

Anything you can do with a blackboard and chalk, the Soviets were great at.

But they can't do anything that requires them to actually make something.

Graham said that this was ironic for a movement founded on materialism.

He had an entertaining story about how he went to GUM and asked the saleslady in the electronics department if he could buy a personal computer.

She said, "Theoretically yes."

Re:Ah, wait, what? (1)

Cyberax (705495) | more than 5 years ago | (#28873055)

Yes, sounds about right.

Re:Ah, wait, what? (1)

hughk (248126) | more than 5 years ago | (#28873431)

Loren Graham, the MIT professor who probably understood Soviet science better than any other American, described the "blackboard theory": Anything you can do with a blackboard and chalk, the Soviets were great at. But they can't do anything that requires them to actually make something.

I arrived in Russia post Soviet times, in the mid nineties. My Russian colleagues would tell me about the issues with technology. Russians are extremely competent engineers but they are quite conservative. Also their tech was designed for the military. ICBMs may have been America's first market for the microchip, but it was consumer electronics that really drove it.

Re:Ah, wait, what? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28887533)

But they can't do anything that requires them to actually make something.

Graham said that this was ironic for a movement founded on materialism.

The second paragraph made me twitch in so painful ways. You can't call a massive country a movement so I assume you are talking about socialism. Though it is political and economical theory and neither of these are founded on materialism, certainly not more than capitalism.

The theory is largely inspired by communism and Marx who mostly said "People should own the tools they work with to ensure that everyone gets justified benefit from the work they do" and spoke very little about how this concept should be implemented and really didn't pay all that much attention to the role of religion or lack of it.

Only thing that I imagine your statement could be based on is the "Religions help people escape reality and make it easier to come up with excuses on not developing yourself and your society when it needs to be done.", "Religion is opium to the people" and so on... And I would hardly call it materialism because of that.

Anyways, what comes to the first chapter...

I recently spoke with a man who was an CS engineer in Soviet Russia (these days he owns a rather large software firm). He explained me why it sucked to be an engineer back then.

In short: As a young and ideological man he used to do his best in designing stuff that could be used by people and benefit someone - The thing that engineers want to do. However, due to the horrible management and bureaucracy, anything that he and his friends came up never got anywhere. No matter how they spent their days and how hard they worked, their work benefitted nobody. That killed the work motivation and after a while they just stopped even trying to do anything.

Re:Ah, wait, what? (1)

u38cg (607297) | more than 5 years ago | (#28879483)

A computer? Amercians can't even manufacture a pencil. [econlib.org]

Money talks IT walks (1)

camcorder (759720) | more than 5 years ago | (#28871123)

If Medvenev offended with IT industry in Russia, he should stop corruption in his country which led money earned from oil and gas to be spent for luxury cars and buildings. If you visit Moscow all you could see expensive cars flooding around but technology in government is years old and not used efficiently. If they have money to buy those cars, they can buy or even produce those CPUs as well.

He should know that all talents of Russia and brains are going to EU countries and US once they find an option to be employed there for last decase. Still they have enough manpower and knowledge to build those but not enough politicians to drive this move.

Supercomputers for the sake of supercomputers? (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28871131)

Suddenly we have to start building supercomputers in Russia?
Lack of supercomputers means nobody needs them. That's an indication that Russia is falling behind in technology in general. You can't fix this just by building some supercomputers.
Something more fundamental must be done: fight corruption, establish rule of law, create infrustructure. Then the high-tech industry will emerge by itself. I understand that this is not easy, definitely more difficult than building some supercomputers.

AFAIK best fab they've got is old AMD (1)

alexmin (938677) | more than 5 years ago | (#28871217)

I recall couple years ago Russia bought entire decommissioned Dresden AMD fab. Good luck competing using manufacturing processes of yesteryear.
It seems like the best product of their nanotech push so far are midget kremlin rulers with their delusion of grandeur.

And yes, I used to know something about semiconductor industry in ex-USSR

The Correct Quote (1)

AnonymousIslander (1603121) | more than 5 years ago | (#28871387)

"Therefore, comrade generals, our situation is very difficult," he said.

There, fixed that for ya Comrade Medvedev. Three cheers for cold-war style rhetoric!!

Stick to what you do well (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28871461)

It is difficult to break into existing industries and make a name for yourself. If Russia isn't already producing top supercomputers then they shouldn't necessarily try to as a matter of self-worth or nationalistic pride. India & China are trying to make inroads into the automobile markets, sure they are late in the game but they think their products have something unique to offer in the competitive marketplace. On the other hand, if I were a large world power with heavy computing needs, I wouldn't want to resort to purchasing necessary equipment manufactured by a former/current rival. Outside of a trust issue I have trouble understanding a need to homegrow supercomputers except out of pride.

Dear IBM Comrades: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28871513)

Thank you for your sale of Blue Gene/P [ibm.com] to Russia.

Yours In Novosibirsk.
K. Trout

but but but... they're not invalids... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28871563)

any idiot can put together computers...

Buy SGI (1)

sunderland56 (621843) | more than 5 years ago | (#28871573)

So, why didn't Russia buy SGI earlier this year? Instant membership to the supercomputer club.

Plus, the chance to screw up the SGI logo yet again.

Russian malware is the best in the world (1)

benjfowler (239527) | more than 5 years ago | (#28871729)

Who needs supercomputers when you've got million-node botnets?

Essential to Russia's Economic Growth & Divers (1)

javacowboy (222023) | more than 5 years ago | (#28871849)

For those of you that didn't RTFA, this is the bit that put Russia's problem into its proper perspective:

Although supercomputers are widely used in Western countries to, for instance, build aircraft, Medvedev said few aircraft in Russia have been built using supercomputers. Most of their design today is still being done on paper...

Contrary to popular misconception, Russia's economy doesn't just depend on oil and gas. It also depends on exporting weapons and other military equipment. For that country to maintain an advantage in the design, development, and manufacture of such military equipment, then they need to make more use of modern technology to do so.

Uh- Hello? (1)

Frightened_Turtle (592418) | more than 5 years ago | (#28872381)

Russia already has some of the largest and most powerful cluster computers in the world! All he needs to do is look to the Russian mafia and their collections of zombified computers that they control worldwide!

"In Russia, th3 p4wned kl0wd z0mb13s 0wnz3d U!"

Patriotism and Government, By Leo Tolstoy (1)

Max_W (812974) | more than 5 years ago | (#28872505)

I recently read this article http://dwardmac.pitzer.edu/anarchist_archives/bright/Tolstoy/patriotismandgovt.html [pitzer.edu] , Patriotism and Government, By Leo Tolstoy.

I read it in Russian, so I do not know about the quality of this translation.

It sounded very convincing. What it has to do with supercomputers? Try to read the text. The answer is there.

Confused over here.... (1)

Tetsujin (103070) | more than 5 years ago | (#28872645)

What are "Supercomputer Lead Sparks"? How are they affected by RoHS? ...I think my parser failed on the sentence after that point.

Re:Confused over here.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28874043)

it certainly did, since parsing the first part as "lead sparks" (Pb) makes the latter part of the sentence grammatically incorrect

you dumb fuck

Hard takeoff AI (1)

religious freak (1005821) | more than 5 years ago | (#28872689)

Hmmm, reminds me when I was reading some singularity stuff, and they referenced a "hard" AI takeoff being driven by a rivalry between nations for hardware computing power to drive the birth of the first AI. I agree, it sounds really wacky (and there's a fairly high probability it is), but hell, this could be as important as fire, so I figure it's worth thinking about.

WTF do they want this computing power for, I wonder

Politician as Computer Science Expert (1)

DynaSoar (714234) | more than 5 years ago | (#28872837)

... yeah, right.

Even a moderate load of smarts is enough to figure that it's cheaper to let someone else do the R&D the build a copy. Just look at pretty much all aircraft they've built and compare with ours.

Either this guy is ignorant to the point of incompetence, or he's just playing wag-the-weenie national ego games. They built stuff very much like ours when we were enemies. They're allies now.

Re:Politician as Computer Science Expert (1)

smithmc (451373) | more than 5 years ago | (#28888803)

... yeah, right.

Even a moderate load of smarts is enough to figure that it's cheaper to let someone else do the R&D the build a copy. Just look at pretty much all aircraft they've built and compare with ours.

Uh... yeah. How did that turn out, again? I forget...

Security (1)

bloobamator (939353) | more than 5 years ago | (#28872907)

I noticed that the speech was given at a Security Council meeting, yet nowhere in TFA did they mention anything about security. President Medvedev talked about building better airplanes but it seems he glossed over the security concerns.

It's an incredibly huge security issue for them. If our supercomputers spank their supercomputers, then we can decrypt their traffic but they cannot decrypt ours. They might as well just blog their state secrets in clear text.

Always consider what they're not saying. That's the really important stuff.

Re:Security (1)

NotBornYesterday (1093817) | more than 5 years ago | (#28873575)

Hell, they can't even decrypt Skype. [slashdot.org]

they've been resting....since Tetris (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28873525)

...or so they'd have us believe...

Any Windows bot-net is a Soviet supercomputer LOL. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28873639)

They should patent the advanced Windows Bot- Net technology, they beat Mickeysoft by decades.

Colossus to Guardian (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28873885)

Colossus to Guardian
2x1 = 2
Guardian to Colossus
What?

Competitve drive? (1)

NecroPsyChroNauTron (1541583) | more than 5 years ago | (#28877595)

Does that install in the standard 5.25 bay?
Perhaps I'll get on myself when the prices come down and they stop "sparking".

Yet another time glorious government pushes "high (1)

Kartu (1490911) | more than 5 years ago | (#28878863)

First Putin's government pushed "GLONASS" system, an alternative to GPS. Oh, it still doesn't work and nobody expects it ever will.
Then, Putin's government pushes "Nanotechnologies" thingy, which brings as many results as "glonass" push and becomes one of the popular jokes.
They also push for "brand new" and "deadly as hell" "Bulava" rocket, which keeps exploding "because of sabotage" and because, "when so many factories are involved in producing it, it's absolutelly impossible to control it's quality" (not a joke, they've really said that)
Last, but, not least, russian government decides to dethrone USA as "supercomputers creator", by creating "supercomputers" using CPUs produced by US companies.


Very strong weeds smoke they...

Re:Yet another time glorious government pushes "hi (1)

benjfowler (239527) | more than 5 years ago | (#28880261)

Vote parent up. There's a pattern emerging here. It's what a lot of corporate types call an "inability to execute".

Could be that all these grandiose-but-ultimately-fruitless hare brained schemes are actually a symptom of a more serious underlying malady: a very low self-esteem in the Russian political establishment. This manifests itself in bullying countries in their near abroad, and 19th-century style political posturing when that they REALLY need to do, is knuckle down and do the unglamourous grunt work of building the foundations of future prosperity. Like properly guaranteeing the rule of law for everybody, and not just selectively enforcing the law when it suits the "power vertical"; real political pluralism, independent judiciary, and a thorough and wide ranging crackdown on corruption.

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